Manfried the Man
In this hilarious graphic novel, the roles of cats and humans are reversed, putting humanoid felines in charge of tiny, dimwitted little man-pets.Manfried is a stray taken in by Steve Catson, a slacker with a dead-end job and nonexistent love life. Soon Manfried becomes the Garfield to Steve’s Jon Arbuckle: lazy, selfish, and sometimes maddening in his weird human behavior. Yet the pair depends on each other to get through life’s troubles. When Manfried runs away, Steve musters his meager resources to find his best man-friend and bring him home safe. Ultimately, both Steve and Manfried realize they’re capable of so much more than they thought.

Manfried the Man Details

TitleManfried the Man
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2018
PublisherQuirk Books
ISBN-139781683690153
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Humor, Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics, Fantasy

Manfried the Man Review

  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    this is a graphic novel in which the world of Man and the world of Cat do a freaky friday switcheroo and things get weird.there are parts of this book that are five stars, no question, but as a whole, it's prolly a 3.5. the concept is a winner, if you are someone who a) loves cats and b) finds tiny naked men behaving like cats hilarious. or creepy. or just uncreepy enough to be hilarious. the jokey details of the illustrations are perfect, from the man food to the after-foodto the perfectly catl this is a graphic novel in which the world of Man and the world of Cat do a freaky friday switcheroo and things get weird.there are parts of this book that are five stars, no question, but as a whole, it's prolly a 3.5. the concept is a winner, if you are someone who a) loves cats and b) finds tiny naked men behaving like cats hilarious. or creepy. or just uncreepy enough to be hilarious. the jokey details of the illustrations are perfect, from the man food to the after-foodto the perfectly catlike behaviors and mannerismsthe posturesand situationseven the background details are a joyi love the spin on the crazy cat lady house:and i also love that the man-equivalent of a meow is the word “hey,” and that it gets used in so many different situationsas a “lemme in!”as a “feed me!”as a “hello there”and as a “back off, pal!”and with all that to recommend it, you would think this book would be a slam-dunk. the problem is that while every little thing the pet man does is perfection, steve the cat’s plotline is really dull. he’s not bringing any “hahah, oh that’s so human” gags, and he’s not even a character we can root for; he’s kind of a dick - petty, lying, irresponsible, messy, childish, pathetic - he doesn’t embody any funny or interesting human qualities, he’s not inviting human readers to giggle at our eccentricities, he’s just a big douchey cat who’s not even particularly cute. and yes - he becomes more likable by the end, but he’s not holding up his half of the story and it takes too much time away from the man, who is - again - supercute and cuddly.oh, and when you have a lot of little men, you have adorable manpilesthere’s another volume of this coming out in 2019 - i just hope that their stories don’t diverge this time, because - and i never thought i would say this - that cat’s no fun without his man.and remember - no matter what pet you get, get it from a shelter, okay?
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  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    I think my brain is way too literal to be able to appreciate this properly.There were a couple of panels that made me giggle or do the little, "Awww," but for the most part, I got distracted by the half-swap between man and cat. Lines were blurred as each kept some of their species' traits but took on some of the traits of the others'.Why weren't cats wearing clothing? And the ones who did wear clothing wore shirts only. Why? Why did they have normal people jobs like call center work? They used I think my brain is way too literal to be able to appreciate this properly.There were a couple of panels that made me giggle or do the little, "Awww," but for the most part, I got distracted by the half-swap between man and cat. Lines were blurred as each kept some of their species' traits but took on some of the traits of the others'.Why weren't cats wearing clothing? And the ones who did wear clothing wore shirts only. Why? Why did they have normal people jobs like call center work? They used computers like people. They did all the people things except for when they were doing cat things like ordering fishbowls with fish inside as their adult beverages.Who do man pets have stripes? Are those stripes hair? Why do some man pets have full facial hair and others only have mustaches? And why are some bald? So they really are little men, not cats in the shape of men? But then they try to catch birds to eat when out in the wilderness and they wash like cats. But they sit at little tables and use forks and knives at dinner.It was confusing for me.I'm sure this is delightful and hilarious. Sadly, I couldn't connect.
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  • Chihoe Ho
    January 1, 1970
    It took a little while getting used seeing cats as humans and men as pets. I'm actually surprised it took so long for someone to put this onto paper and turn it into a comic so thank you Caitlin Major and Kelly Bastow for the enjoyable read and adorable illustrations that work very well for this f(el)ine comic!Certain quirks, truths, and stereotypes of men and cats are turned upside down... like, instead of meowing or purring, the men HEEEEEYs at everyone and everything. Or chips being the catni It took a little while getting used seeing cats as humans and men as pets. I'm actually surprised it took so long for someone to put this onto paper and turn it into a comic so thank you Caitlin Major and Kelly Bastow for the enjoyable read and adorable illustrations that work very well for this f(el)ine comic!Certain quirks, truths, and stereotypes of men and cats are turned upside down... like, instead of meowing or purring, the men HEEEEEYs at everyone and everything. Or chips being the catnips of our men-pets. The comic adventures of Manfried the Man and Steve Catson will definitely tickle the fancy of cat-lovers, and could possibly be the start of a fan-favourite franchise.
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  • Megan (ReadingRover)
    January 1, 1970
    The concept of this graphic novel is fantastic! Basically it’s a world where cats and humans have reversed roles. Cats work, drive and have pet human men! The men are naked, domesticated, little pets who are fully dependent on their cat owners. They’re fed tiny Hungry Man meals, taken to special Man hospitals and strays are sent to Man shelters.In this story Steve the Cat is down on his luck and pretty depressed. He’s irresponsible in general. He watches his friends Man and almost loses him. The The concept of this graphic novel is fantastic! Basically it’s a world where cats and humans have reversed roles. Cats work, drive and have pet human men! The men are naked, domesticated, little pets who are fully dependent on their cat owners. They’re fed tiny Hungry Man meals, taken to special Man hospitals and strays are sent to Man shelters.In this story Steve the Cat is down on his luck and pretty depressed. He’s irresponsible in general. He watches his friends Man and almost loses him. Then he loses his job and loses his own Man. The story itself is a bit anticlimactic but the mannerisms and actions of the Cats and Men are what make the book. Overall it’s a fun read. 3.5 stars
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  • Ferial Fattahi
    January 1, 1970
    It was a great read!
  • Miriam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Won in the Goodreads Giveaways - looks a fun and interesting read!
  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: I recieved an Advanced Reading Copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Based on the book’s description and the introduction, I had expected the book to be humorous and cute. I was wrong. Instead, it was painful and awkward to read.First I’ll start off by saying the illustrations were good, for the most part. However, was it REALLY necessary to illustrate genitals on the men? In real life cat genitals are not so blatantly visible like that, so it just detrac Disclosure: I recieved an Advanced Reading Copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Based on the book’s description and the introduction, I had expected the book to be humorous and cute. I was wrong. Instead, it was painful and awkward to read.First I’ll start off by saying the illustrations were good, for the most part. However, was it REALLY necessary to illustrate genitals on the men? In real life cat genitals are not so blatantly visible like that, so it just detracts from the rest of the work.Another thing I’d like to point out is that this graphic novel could be appropriate for youth or young-adult audiences, if not for the illustrated genitals. At the end of the day, it’s the parents’ responsibility to decide what is appropriate for their kid to read. However, although tastefully done, I would be inclined to label it adult because of the nudity. Now on to the actual story.Even though the book is called, “ Manfried the Man,” it should really be called “Steve the Irresponsible.”Despite the title, and the parallel storylines (perspectives from Manfried and Steve), the book really focuses on Steve.Steve is that one friend everyone has who just can’t get it together, and won’t take responsibility for his actions. Being around him can be painfully awkward and/or infuriating at times, and reading this book was exactly like that. This book was advertised as cute and funny, but in actuality, it was just sad and depressing. Yeah, there’s a happy ending, but it’s actually the worst part of the whole story because Steve never actually grows as a character. Throughout the entire book Steve has one opportunity after another to actually learn something, and become a responsible adult, but all the things that happen are just examples of serendipity, and him taking advantage of the kindess of others:- Instead of being thankful to his old boss for giving him (likely illegal) access to call center phone lists for his personal use, and trying to get his job back like his old boss suggested he might actually have the opportunity to get, he just ghosts her- Instead of thanking the man shelter for allowing him to use their survey as an opportunity to find his man, he just sulks around because no one found his man- Instead of being thankful for all the support he’s getting online, he just grumbles because he’s not getting any response about his man being found- Instead of being kind to the old cat-lady who has been taking care of so many strays, he still acts like she’s some kind of creepy pariah- He never properly thanked Henrietta for supporting him despite how poorly he treated her- He never took responsibility for nearly poisoning his friend’s kid- He never actually put forth any effort to get a job, one just magically fell into his lap thanks to his irresponsible actions garnering him massive media attention Despite all he went through, Steve doesn’t actually learn anything or grow as a person. At the end of the book, he’s basically right back where he started. The only difference is he’s lucked out on few things, so he’s still not really putting forth any effort. Manfried, on the other hand ,is the best part of this story (and the only reason it gets two stars instead of one). Manfried starts out as a fat, lazy, demanding, and selfish house-man. When he gets lost, though, he begins to change and grow. He learns how to socialize with other men, gets a little fit, no longer demands as much, and learns to share. Manfried should be the true main character of this story, like the title suggests. If it was solely about Manfried, and not Steve, I think this book would have been exponentially better. Think “Garfield Minus Garfield,” but instead “Manfried Minus Steve.” If that was the case, the story would have actually been cute and funny, and not the disappointment it turned out to be.
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  • Elaine HowlinBooks
    January 1, 1970
    I think any cat lover would appreciate this book but for me, it could have been better.There was too much focus on Steve (the cat) instead of Manfried (the man) where I think the most potential for humour lies. It would have worked better as a series of anecdotes as opposed to one complete story as well. The story ends up being a bit mundane since it focuses on Steve, his unhappiness with life and reliance on his pet man for companionship. It's just all too normal though there are a few humorou I think any cat lover would appreciate this book but for me, it could have been better.There was too much focus on Steve (the cat) instead of Manfried (the man) where I think the most potential for humour lies. It would have worked better as a series of anecdotes as opposed to one complete story as well. The story ends up being a bit mundane since it focuses on Steve, his unhappiness with life and reliance on his pet man for companionship. It's just all too normal though there are a few humorous moments with Manfried such as his tinned man food of burgers, his tiny kitchen table for eating at and toy cars for playing with. They're just too rare to make the book as a whole entertaining.
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  • Ashlee Null
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite sure what I just read but I think I enjoyed it?
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Better in small doses, maybe? (Check out the tumblr.)(Full disclosure: I received a free ARC for review through Goodreads.)We’re trying to get volunteers to take part in the annual man count so we can keep track of all the stray men in the neighborhood.If he’s only been missing a day he’s probably just holed up somewhere nearby. Men like to find small spaces and hide out.Not all men though. Some men like the open space.No not all men, obviously.Steve Catson is kind of a fuck up. His apartment is Better in small doses, maybe? (Check out the tumblr.)(Full disclosure: I received a free ARC for review through Goodreads.)We’re trying to get volunteers to take part in the annual man count so we can keep track of all the stray men in the neighborhood.If he’s only been missing a day he’s probably just holed up somewhere nearby. Men like to find small spaces and hide out.Not all men though. Some men like the open space.No not all men, obviously.Steve Catson is kind of a fuck up. His apartment is a shithole, he hates his job at a call center, and he doesn't have m/any real friends. He's at that age when his peers are growing up, marrying, and having kittens of their own - but Steve is chronically single, socially awkward, and quite possibly depressed. The only bright spot in Steve's life is his pet man, a chubby little ginger number not-so-creatively named Manfried. So when Manfried goes missing - thanks to Steve's own carelessness, no less - Steve is beside himself with grief, panic, and self-loathing. Yet in his search for his beloved man, Steve might find even more than he could have hoped for.I really dug the absurdist vibe of Manfried the Man, but I think the idea would have been better served by a series of self-contained strips as opposed to a singular narrative. I love those "if humans acted like dogs/cats" videos that occasionally make the rounds, and Manfried is very much in this vein. However, I didn't find the storyline terribly interesting, and Steve is just plain irritating. I empathized with him initially - I too struggle with anxiety and depression, and sometimes feel like I'm just not doing right by my furry friends - but by story's end I wanted to throttle the guy. Blaming your man's escape on someone else, pffft. If I'd done that I'd be begging random strangers for a tongue lashing to feed the guilt. Anyway, Manfried has its cute moments (#NotAllMen ftw; naked little men running around with their naked little twigs and berries), but overall I found it kind of meh. I do wish the whole "cones of shame for men" thing would catch on, though. http://www.easyvegan.info/2018/05/01/...
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  • Shawn
    January 1, 1970
    My husband brought an ARC of this home, and I immediately fell into reading it because it was such a cute play on cat-obsessed people, with a man-obsessed cat. I thought it was clever and well thought out. There is an actual story, replete with plot, and even though it started to drag ever so slightly, it sustained enough interest to make it feel like a worthwhile read. Quick read. Much quicker than the three months it appears to have taken me. I got distracted by so many other books (as I am wo My husband brought an ARC of this home, and I immediately fell into reading it because it was such a cute play on cat-obsessed people, with a man-obsessed cat. I thought it was clever and well thought out. There is an actual story, replete with plot, and even though it started to drag ever so slightly, it sustained enough interest to make it feel like a worthwhile read. Quick read. Much quicker than the three months it appears to have taken me. I got distracted by so many other books (as I am wont to do), that this one got pushed further and further (literally) to the bottom of my bedside table. Glad to have finally pulled it back out and finished it. Cute, often funny, creative little tale.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    My friend let me borrow his advance copy and I zoomed through it and loved it. It won’t be for everyone, but it is for me, and I fully intend to buy a billion copies for myself and my friends when it comes out. Manfried’s and the other men’s mannerisms and expressions are so accurate, and Kelly Bastow’s art is just perfect for this story. I was impressed by the depth of emotion; the story far surpasses the obvious visual gags possible in a world where human-sized cats have cat-sized men as pets. My friend let me borrow his advance copy and I zoomed through it and loved it. It won’t be for everyone, but it is for me, and I fully intend to buy a billion copies for myself and my friends when it comes out. Manfried’s and the other men’s mannerisms and expressions are so accurate, and Kelly Bastow’s art is just perfect for this story. I was impressed by the depth of emotion; the story far surpasses the obvious visual gags possible in a world where human-sized cats have cat-sized men as pets. In short, if you are a weirdo and a cat lover (like me), you will probably love Manfried the Man.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    In the world of this story, cats rule. They often keep a man (or a few men) as pets. Manfried the Man is particularly treasured by his owner, Steve, though Steve also worries about being branded a crazy man-cat. Manfried escapes through an open window and panic ensues for Steve, who embarks on a frantic search for his man . . . and discovers a lot about himself along the way. It's a delightful concept, but I did find myself a bit unsettled by all the tiny nude men behaving like cats. They're fan In the world of this story, cats rule. They often keep a man (or a few men) as pets. Manfried the Man is particularly treasured by his owner, Steve, though Steve also worries about being branded a crazy man-cat. Manfried escapes through an open window and panic ensues for Steve, who embarks on a frantic search for his man . . . and discovers a lot about himself along the way. It's a delightful concept, but I did find myself a bit unsettled by all the tiny nude men behaving like cats. They're fantastically drawn and *very* cat-like, but definitely a bit disturbing.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    This was fun. It’s a GN with a man as the pet of a cat. Role reversal at its best.
  • Kendal
    January 1, 1970
    It’s a pretty boilerplate story wrapped around a single gag but... it’s a pretty good gag.
  • Lisa K
    January 1, 1970
    Steve Catson is in danger of becoming a sad pet-man crazed fellow with a grubby apartment and no job. When his pet, Manfried, goes missing everything changes. I love that the chief vocalization for the men is "hey." A sweet story about pets and getting it together.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2018/01/2...Quirk Books proved to be an apt publisher for this quirky graphic novel about cats and humans having their roles reversed. Steve Catson is a slacker who has a dead-end job but loves his man, Manfried. When his chubby ginger disappears out a carelessly left open window, Steve is distraught. He needs to own up to his failings and find his man, and in so doing he is able to help the local Man Shelter and find a new ca This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2018/01/2...Quirk Books proved to be an apt publisher for this quirky graphic novel about cats and humans having their roles reversed. Steve Catson is a slacker who has a dead-end job but loves his man, Manfried. When his chubby ginger disappears out a carelessly left open window, Steve is distraught. He needs to own up to his failings and find his man, and in so doing he is able to help the local Man Shelter and find a new career path.The artwork is clean, simple and attractive; typically with a six panel layout per page. The cats who portray the pet-owners walk on their hind legs and live just as you would expect humans would. It’s the little men, that will make you pause and laugh, as it’s quite odd to see naked men acting like cats. While the artist draws that cats in various colors as you’d expect to see, it’s the men (never women) drawn with different body types, ages, and nationalities that make the panels distinctive. And instead of a meow, the men always say “hey” to one another or to their cats to get their attention.The book proved to be a more nuanced than I originally thought it might be. The front cover let’s you know this is a graphic novel, not a collection of strips , as many might expect. While stand alone strips with this role reversal would certainly be funny, this longer narrative lets you move past the juxtaposition of the roles, and you really start to connect with the characters. The story makes you root for Steve to grow up and get Manfried back. I definitely would welcome more stories about these two. Thanks to NetGalley for this clever book!
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  • Emmy
    January 1, 1970
    I had seen excerpts from the webcomic on my Facebook news feed from time to time, so I thought this might be an interesting book to check out. The premise is simple enough: Steve Catson is a anthropomorphic cat with a tiny pet human named Manfried. The original comics show Manfried doing "cat things" like running across Steve's keyboard, chasing laser pointers, or shouting at other men outside the window. It was weird (especially since Manfried is anatomically very masculine, if you know what I I had seen excerpts from the webcomic on my Facebook news feed from time to time, so I thought this might be an interesting book to check out. The premise is simple enough: Steve Catson is a anthropomorphic cat with a tiny pet human named Manfried. The original comics show Manfried doing "cat things" like running across Steve's keyboard, chasing laser pointers, or shouting at other men outside the window. It was weird (especially since Manfried is anatomically very masculine, if you know what I mean), but the comics were generally good for a laugh.The book, however, was very different. If Manfried is like reading Garfield comics, but Garfield and John have switched places, then this was like reading a Garfield comic, but John is depressed, obsessed with his pets, and incredibly irresponsible. The novel explores important themes and topics, but when one is expecting the bizarre, lighthearted fare presented in the webcomic, it quickly grows old. In short, I was disappointed.I think this falls into a weird limbo. Casual readers might feel uncomfortable picking up a book with little naked men all over the cover (I know I was very glad to have an ebook version!), while seasoned fans of the series will quickly find that while the characters are all there, the story is very different, and not nearly as fun. The ending even felt rushed and unbelievable. By the time I got to the final chapter, I had mentally checked out.In short, not a horrible book, but would not recommend bothering with it.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    This book is hilarious. If you’re a cat person you’ll love it.
  • KimberlyRose
    January 1, 1970
    Review of ARC, received at Ontario Library Association Super Conference.If I remove the major concept of this story, and picture it with the cats as cats and the humans as humans, it's still a solid, if unoriginal, story. Caitlin Major's schtick--the role reversal of human and cat--takes the story to a catchy level. Her written dialogue is natural, likeable. But it's Kelly Bastow's cute artwork that seals the deal. The men's (who are the cats, remember) baby penises are just the right tiny splas Review of ARC, received at Ontario Library Association Super Conference.If I remove the major concept of this story, and picture it with the cats as cats and the humans as humans, it's still a solid, if unoriginal, story. Caitlin Major's schtick--the role reversal of human and cat--takes the story to a catchy level. Her written dialogue is natural, likeable. But it's Kelly Bastow's cute artwork that seals the deal. The men's (who are the cats, remember) baby penises are just the right tiny splash of sensationalism; the expressions and movements are all emotional, believable, and engaging; and the panel choices move the plot along clearly and steadily. What isn't schtick might not be very fresh but there's some strong, simple character growth nonetheless. Steve, our cat (that is, our man) is not living his bliss, and it shows. He's unmotivated, blame-y, unhappy, living sloppily and wastefully. The universe sends him several forced wake-up calls--that annoyed me in the sense that it all just fell together for him. But he chooses to respond positively, and moderately--Steve is extremely ordinary, which is a character type I respect in story-telling: we're not all intense go-getters.I wouldn't actively look for the planned second book, but if I were bored and it was in front of my face, okay. The quirky role reversal is fun, but I was ready for it to be done by the last few pages. So, timely ended, and end it should.
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  • Kelly Lynn Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    In this world, cats are man sized and men are cat sized. Cats keep men as pets. And it is the most hilarious thing I've read in a long time.This isn't just a funny book, though--it's also a touching tale about the connections we form with our pets, and chasing dreams vs. getting stuck in a cog-in-the-wheel kind of job.The art is cute, and they really managed to make the men pets adorable. I read an ARC, so everything was printed in black and white, but I bet the full-color version looks great.De In this world, cats are man sized and men are cat sized. Cats keep men as pets. And it is the most hilarious thing I've read in a long time.This isn't just a funny book, though--it's also a touching tale about the connections we form with our pets, and chasing dreams vs. getting stuck in a cog-in-the-wheel kind of job.The art is cute, and they really managed to make the men pets adorable. I read an ARC, so everything was printed in black and white, but I bet the full-color version looks great.Definitely check it out!
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  • Elia
    January 1, 1970
    This is adorable!It's basically the story of an underachieving 20-something who has a crappy job and is a little too in love with his pet... except the underachiever is a giant cat and the pet is a little chubby ginger balding man. I do have one glaring question though - all the pet men are... well.... MEN. There are no WOMEN man-pets, yet a big part of the story revolves around there being a bunch of strays on the streets... so how are they getting all these men if there are no women? Mmmmm.. P This is adorable!It's basically the story of an underachieving 20-something who has a crappy job and is a little too in love with his pet... except the underachiever is a giant cat and the pet is a little chubby ginger balding man. I do have one glaring question though - all the pet men are... well.... MEN. There are no WOMEN man-pets, yet a big part of the story revolves around there being a bunch of strays on the streets... so how are they getting all these men if there are no women? Mmmmm.. PLOT HOLE! LOL!
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    I like weird stuff, believe me. But this book kind of pushes my threshold. In this bizarre graphic novel, we are introduced to a world where cats are human sized and human men are kept as House pets. The only thing they can say is “hey.” The book is as bizarre as this sounds. I applaud the author on her creativity as well as her art style. I did not however enjoy the plot and felt the “joke” got old rather quickly.
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  • Chrys
    January 1, 1970
    A really fun idea that was nicely done, although it did feel a touch dark at times. There were some confusing bits, would have been better if all or none of the traits had transposed. And also a disturbing lack of female cats. But overall quite good gun.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    Why are there no female pets? How do they breed if they're all literally men?Yes, I overthink things sometimes and get hung up on minutiae, but world-building is important and details matter.It's cute, though, if a bit melancholy.
  • Jesica DeHart
    January 1, 1970
    Oh please don’t stop, this new series is instantly purrrfect. I am not even a cat person but see the overlapping hairy humor to be outrageously on the mark. I can related as I live with three of my very own Man Pets!!!
  • Ashly Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    This was so strange, but I kinda really loved it. RTC
  • Blanka Rota
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Reading Copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I think this is really a book for cat lovers who I'm not, but I have some questions like why all the mancats are male?, why all the catpeople and the peoplecat walk in four legs, the catpeople have genders? and why whyyy all the mancat are male, other wise I think if you are a cat person you will enjoy it, it not only jokes and mancats doing funny stuff, it talk about the social pressure of having k I received an Advanced Reading Copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I think this is really a book for cat lovers who I'm not, but I have some questions like why all the mancats are male?, why all the catpeople and the peoplecat walk in four legs, the catpeople have genders? and why whyyy all the mancat are male, other wise I think if you are a cat person you will enjoy it, it not only jokes and mancats doing funny stuff, it talk about the social pressure of having kids, how depression and cleaning your house is connected and not to ever give up and you make all your wish come true, or something like that.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I have adored this comic from its first public iteration and I am thrilled it was expanded into such a delightful and fun book. Truly a fantastic and well-executed concept. I love Manfried. Art is perfect, colors are great. Story is engaging and relatable. High recommend especially for any cat lover.
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  • rosamund
    January 1, 1970
    Very cute little comic in which giant anthropomorphic cats have tiny cat-like pet men. There are a lot of great gags about keeping tiny men as pets, and if you're a cat-lover there's a lot to relate to in the story. I picked this up in the comic book shop to cheer myself up today, and it really worked.
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