Lies Sleeping (Peter Grant, #7)
Join Peter Grant, detective and apprentice wizard, for a brand new case . . .Martin Chorley, aka the Faceless Man, wanted for multiple counts of murder, fraud, and crimes against humanity, has been unmasked and is on the run. Peter Grant, Detective Constable and apprentice wizard, now plays a key role in an unprecedented joint operation to bring Chorley to justice.But even as the unwieldy might of the Metropolitan Police bears down on its foe, Peter uncovers clues that Chorley, far from being finished, is executing the final stages of a long term plan. A plan that has its roots in London’s two thousand bloody years of history, and could literally bring the city to its knees.To save his beloved city Peter’s going to need help from his former best friend and colleague–Lesley May–who brutally betrayed him and everything he thought she believed in. And, far worse, he might even have to come to terms with the malevolent supernatural killer and agent of chaos known as Mr Punch . . .

Lies Sleeping (Peter Grant, #7) Details

TitleLies Sleeping (Peter Grant, #7)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 15th, 2018
PublisherGollancz
ISBN-139781473207813
Rating
GenreFantasy, Urban Fantasy, Fiction, Mystery

Lies Sleeping (Peter Grant, #7) Review

  • Milda Page Runner
    January 1, 1970
    Oooh, the cover and release date! :DCan't wait!
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free ARC of this book via NetGalley. Thank you, Net Galley, I love this series. I can't wait until the audio book is out because all the characters are voiced by Kobna Holdbrook-Smith even when I'm reading the ARC. Action, magic, creepiness, and police procedural all wrapped up into one, and I'm only in the middle of the first chapter. I have still pre-ordered the audio book, though, because the writing really comes alive when Kobna Holdbrook-Smith reads it.Update: Lots more history I received a free ARC of this book via NetGalley. Thank you, Net Galley, I love this series. I can't wait until the audio book is out because all the characters are voiced by Kobna Holdbrook-Smith even when I'm reading the ARC. Action, magic, creepiness, and police procedural all wrapped up into one, and I'm only in the middle of the first chapter. I have still pre-ordered the audio book, though, because the writing really comes alive when Kobna Holdbrook-Smith reads it.Update: Lots more history in this one, and I love it. And that last page, Ben Aaronovitch!
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  • Marielle Authier
    January 1, 1970
    Expected publication: June 2018 by GollanczChange to Expected publication: November 6th 2018 by Gollancz
  • Cyn Armistead
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished Lies Sleeping after reading the entire series straight through, so this review is about the series as much as about the ultimate entry in it.Wow! I've been immersed in the marvelous world Aaronovitch created for us, and it's a shock coming back. His world lives right next door to ours, changed just a bit so that magic is in use next to cell phones and deities walk and work amongst the "normal" folk. His descriptions of London and its surrounds are amazingly rich. The slang and Br I just finished Lies Sleeping after reading the entire series straight through, so this review is about the series as much as about the ultimate entry in it.Wow! I've been immersed in the marvelous world Aaronovitch created for us, and it's a shock coming back. His world lives right next door to ours, changed just a bit so that magic is in use next to cell phones and deities walk and work amongst the "normal" folk. His descriptions of London and its surrounds are amazingly rich. The slang and British references are occasionally mysterious to this American reader, but I got enough from context to push right on.I think Lies Sleeping might be intended as the last book in the series because it wrapped up pretty much all of the plot threads that have been building from Rivers of London to Lies Sleeping. If that's the case, I'll miss Peter and the rest of the characters. I can hope that Aaronovitch will give us more in the future, though. I will certainly be watching to see what he does next!#LiesSleeping #NetGalley
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved this latest installment in the excellent Rivers of London series. Lies Sleeping goes deeper into the history of London than any of the books have done so far, giving readers rewarding answers into some of the biggest mysteries plaguing Peter and company.
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  • Siobhan
    January 1, 1970
    Such high hopes for Peter Grant number seven. Bring it on!
  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series so much! Wanna live in it!
  • Joe Jones
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect blend of an urban fantasy with a police procedural plus a dash of London history. How could I not love the latest entry in this long running series?
  • Kathy Martin
    January 1, 1970
    This seventh book in the Rivers of London series feels like an episode that brings a number of plot threads to a conclusion. Having read only the first of the series before this one, it took a little while to catch on to what was happening as the Faceless Man, sometimes known as Martin Chorley, is bringing his long term plan for something to come to fruition.Peter has risen in rank to Detective Constable and has also greatly increased his skill at magic. He hasn't lost his irreverent viewpoint a This seventh book in the Rivers of London series feels like an episode that brings a number of plot threads to a conclusion. Having read only the first of the series before this one, it took a little while to catch on to what was happening as the Faceless Man, sometimes known as Martin Chorley, is bringing his long term plan for something to come to fruition.Peter has risen in rank to Detective Constable and has also greatly increased his skill at magic. He hasn't lost his irreverent viewpoint and his ability to make snarky comments. The fellow officer he was crushing on in book 1 has turned to evil and a character he met there - one of London's rivers - has become his girlfriend.This plot is filled with the police investigating to try to find out what Chorley's long-term plot is and to thwart it if at all possible. Peter seems to have a knack for causing confusion among his enemies and gets his chance to do so more than once in this story. I liked all the magical characters. I liked Peter's personality. I do plan to catch up on the books I missed because this world is engaging and imaginative. I'm even getting better at all the British slang which almost required a trip to Google to find out what some of it meant. People who have been following along with this series won't want to miss this exciting episode. New readers, in my experience, will also enjoy the story.
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  • Lorena
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free ARC of this book via NetGalley. I adore this series. The depictions of all the layers of London - modern and historical, real and mythological - are perfection. The intricate humor of the writing is on a level with P.G. Wodehouse and E.F. Benson, and regularly had me laughing aloud as I read. This volume wraps up a major arc in the series, but I can't wait to read more of Peter Grant's adventures!
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  • Hobart
    January 1, 1970
    This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- I've got to say, I'd much rather be talking about this book in detail with someone else who had read the series than talking about it in spoiler-free form, so much of what I feel strongest about with this book cannot be discussed. Aaronovitch has outdone himself this time -- it's the best book of the series thus far, and that's no mean feat.It's easy -- far too easy -- when thinking about this series to think of the lighter aspects -- the This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- I've got to say, I'd much rather be talking about this book in detail with someone else who had read the series than talking about it in spoiler-free form, so much of what I feel strongest about with this book cannot be discussed. Aaronovitch has outdone himself this time -- it's the best book of the series thus far, and that's no mean feat.It's easy -- far too easy -- when thinking about this series to think of the lighter aspects -- the humor, the heart, Peter's growing pains, the snark, the pop culture references, and whatnot. That's typically where my mind goes, anyway. But time after time, when picking up the latest novel, or even rereading one, I'm struck by how carefully written, how detailed everything is, how layered the text is -- and I feel bad for underestimating Aaronovitch. Not that I have anything against breezy, jokey prose -- but there are differences. Nor am I saying these books are drudgery -- at all -- the stories are fun, the voice is strong, and the narration will make you grin (at the very least, probably laugh a few times, too). In Lies Sleeping part of that care, part of the thoroughness of this novel is how there is a tie -- character, event, call-back, allusion -- to every novel, novella, comic arc involved in the Rivers of London up to this point -- if you haven't read everything, it won't detract from your understanding of the novel -- but if you have read them all, if you catch the references -- it makes it just that much richer.So what is this novel about? Well, after years of chasing The Faceless Man (and The Faceless Man II), Peter Grant (now a Detective Constable) and Nightengale have his identity, have several leads to follow to track him down -- or at least his supporters and accessories (willingly or not). Better yet -- the Metropolitan Police Force have given them the manpower they need to truly track him down and interfere with his funding and activities.During this operation, Peter, Guleed and Nightengale become convinced that Martin Chorley (and, of course, former PC Lesley May) are preparing for something major. They're not sure what it is, but the kind of magic involved suggests that the results would be calamitous. How do you prepare for that? How do you counter the unexpected, but dangerous? There are two paths you follow: thorough, careful, borderline-tedious policework; and bold, creative, innovative thinking. The two of those employed together lead to some great results -- and if Peter Grant isn't the embodiment of both, he's . . . okay, he's not perfect at the former, but he can pretend frequently (and has colleagues who can pick up the slack).Not only do we get time with all our old friends and foes -- we meet some new characters -- including a River unlike anyone that Father or Mama Thames as yet introduced to. Mr. Punch is more involved in this story than he has been since Midnight Riot, but in a way we haven't seen before. Most of the character things I want to talk about fit under the "spoiler" category, so I'll just say that I enjoyed and/or loved the character development and growth demonstrated in every returning character. There's more action/combat kind of scenes in this book than we're used to. I couldn't be happier -- Peter's grown enough in his abilities and control to not need Nightengale to bail him out of everything. Nightengale and Peter working together in a fast-paced battle scene is something I've been waiting to read for 7 years. It was worth the wait.As I said before, Lies Sleeping is the best and most ambitious of the series -- the richness of the writing, the audacity of the action, the widening scope of the novel, the Phineas and Ferb reference, the epic battle scenes, the growth in Peter, Bev, and Guleed (and maybe even Lesley), the ending rivals Broken Homes' -- all add up to a fantastic read. Yeah, I'm a fanboy when it comes to this series, and Lies Sleeping made me a happy fanboy. I have no idea how Aaronovitch moves on from this point with these books, but I cannot wait to find out.Disclaimer: I received this eARC from Berkley Publishing Group via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both for this.
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  • Perry
    January 1, 1970
    Hmm. I still thoroughly, thoroughly enjoyed this, but I'm not in quite the same ecstasies of glee as I was after finishing the last three. Possibly a reread will help, but I found the plot less coherent and well-paced than I'm used to from Aaronovitch--too many dangling bits and unexplained pieces and total coincidences. And I'm fairly unsatisfied by one particularly large spoiler. This is also the first time I've felt like not reading the comics might actually be negatively affecting my compreh Hmm. I still thoroughly, thoroughly enjoyed this, but I'm not in quite the same ecstasies of glee as I was after finishing the last three. Possibly a reread will help, but I found the plot less coherent and well-paced than I'm used to from Aaronovitch--too many dangling bits and unexplained pieces and total coincidences. And I'm fairly unsatisfied by one particularly large spoiler. This is also the first time I've felt like not reading the comics might actually be negatively affecting my comprehension, and I'm not wild about that.But I did have a great time reading it, and, as always, I laughed a whole lot and loved every single character. Besides, there's a Night Watch reference, and we all know that's what I really care about.
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  • Soup
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent (but hopefully not final) addition to the Rivers of London series. Aaronovitch borrows from his superb storytelling toolkit from his Doctor Who days to do what few folks can successfully do – both refer back to long-ago plot points and conclude a multi-year story arc while still retaining reader interest in both the book their reading and the books they hope are still to come. It’s impossible to say much more without revealing spoilers but, rest assured, fans of the series are likel An excellent (but hopefully not final) addition to the Rivers of London series. Aaronovitch borrows from his superb storytelling toolkit from his Doctor Who days to do what few folks can successfully do – both refer back to long-ago plot points and conclude a multi-year story arc while still retaining reader interest in both the book their reading and the books they hope are still to come. It’s impossible to say much more without revealing spoilers but, rest assured, fans of the series are likely to be pleased. ARC via NetGalley – Thanks, NetGalley!
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    This is a review of an ARC from NetGalleyThe latest in the Peter Grant series about a London detective who hunts London's more spectral wrong-doers. Peter and the rest of the gang at the Folly - the special branch of the Metropolitan Police tasked with tracking down the paranormal - may finally be able to nab Martin Chorley, the Faceless Man, wanted for multiple counts of murder. Chorley is also the one who lured Peter's former comrade Lesley May away from Met and into a life of crime. If you're This is a review of an ARC from NetGalleyThe latest in the Peter Grant series about a London detective who hunts London's more spectral wrong-doers. Peter and the rest of the gang at the Folly - the special branch of the Metropolitan Police tasked with tracking down the paranormal - may finally be able to nab Martin Chorley, the Faceless Man, wanted for multiple counts of murder. Chorley is also the one who lured Peter's former comrade Lesley May away from Met and into a life of crime. If you're a fan of this series you'll enjoy this. It ties up multiple ongoing mysteries (Molly's origins!) brings back a familiar foe and sets up new plots. I wouldn't jump into this as a first one, but it's a great continuation.
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  • Glennis
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the showdown on the Faceless Man. The Met has geared up and given the Folly all it needs to bring him in. If you haven’t read any of the comics that go along with the series, there are several nods to the various stories but nothing that will completely leave you scratching your head. Everything that has gone on before in the series gets mentioned almost in passing as if to remind the reader what has happened before. There will be more books in the series, but I think this one shuts This book is the showdown on the Faceless Man. The Met has geared up and given the Folly all it needs to bring him in. If you haven’t read any of the comics that go along with the series, there are several nods to the various stories but nothing that will completely leave you scratching your head. Everything that has gone on before in the series gets mentioned almost in passing as if to remind the reader what has happened before. There will be more books in the series, but I think this one shuts down the first story arc in this setting. I don’t want to really give anything away with the plot but everything is moving as fast as it can in the book and yet there are times of a bit of quiet that almost lets everyone catch their breath as they wait to see what the Faceless Man will do next. Digital review copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    9.21.2018: Read through once, review to follow after second reading
  • Becca
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe the best one yet, honestly. Or maybe I just feel that way since I finished it last night and loved it. I have one star knocked off for the ending, but it's not a bad ending.
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