We Rule the Night
Two girls use forbidden magic to fly and fight–for their country and for themselves–in this riveting debut that’s part Shadow and Bone, part Code Name Verity.Seventeen-year-old Revna is a factory worker, manufacturing war machines for the Union of the North. When she’s caught using illegal magic, she fears being branded a traitor and imprisoned. Meanwhile, on the front lines, Linné defied her father, a Union general, and disguised herself as a boy to join the army. They’re both offered a reprieve from punishment if they use their magic in a special women’s military flight unit and undertake terrifying, deadly missions under cover of darkness. Revna and Linné can hardly stand to be in the same cockpit, but if they can’t fly together, and if they can’t find a way to fly well, the enemy’s superior firepower will destroy them–if they don’t destroy each other first.We Rule the Night is a powerful story about sacrifice, complicated friendships, and survival despite impossible odds.

We Rule the Night Details

TitleWe Rule the Night
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 2nd, 2019
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316417273
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Young Adult Fantasy

We Rule the Night Review

  • may ➹
    January 1, 1970
    if this isn’t gay, it’s fake
  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    it seems like we're going ✈ broke this year with all these great releases
  • Vicky Who Reads
    January 1, 1970
    4 starsWe Rule the Night completely caught me off guard with its immersive world and narrative of fierce women. I wasn’t sure how I’d react to the wartime fantasy setting, but I love how Bartlett used it to point out the flaws both in this world and our real world. This is a very understated book though, despite the action and adventure occurring. I honestly don’t think a lot of people will like it (the most common complaint will probably be “too slow”), but I really really enjoyed. This is one 4 starsWe Rule the Night completely caught me off guard with its immersive world and narrative of fierce women. I wasn’t sure how I’d react to the wartime fantasy setting, but I love how Bartlett used it to point out the flaws both in this world and our real world. This is a very understated book though, despite the action and adventure occurring. I honestly don’t think a lot of people will like it (the most common complaint will probably be “too slow”), but I really really enjoyed. This is one of those fantasies that are a bit more of a slowburn—like Rachel Hartman’s Tess of the Road. And I love that, although it’s not for everyone. However, it’s . . . Fantastic for fans of military/wartime fantasies—but centering around women!I think people who liked the concept of Joanna Hathaway’s Dark of the West will definitely like this (plane-like things! military! wartime!). Or if you thought Dark of the West was cool but didn’t feature enough women and female friendships (aka me) and want more of female interaction. Either of these would be indicative that you should definitely pick up We Rule the Night.Because not only is it a wartime fantasy with alliances and hierarchies and people fighting on live-metal machines (more on that later), but it also has that sort of more measured tone that a lot of fantasies take on. It’s severe, and I think people who like older-feeling fantasies will like this. It’s still got action elements to it, but it’s also got training and a lot of struggling to work together. It’s messy, in a good way.Huge bonus points for female friendships and the complexity of that!One of my favorite parts of We Rule the Night would probably be how the story examined Linné and Revna‘s hatred/friendship. Linné is prickly and hard to get along with and she definitely does not want to be in this female-only group of women fighting in the war, especially given her history of dressing up as a boy and serving in the military. However, this is the only way she can fight in the war, and she’ll have to stick with it if she wants to contribute. Revna, on the other hand, is just there to help her family and do what’s best for them. Both girls are part of the squadron, and both have to stay. But despite being paired to fly a living-metal plane together—one girl to fuel it with her spark, and the other to navigate the Weave—they struggle working together. I thought it was really nice to see this gradual friendship as the focus of the novel. There’s no romance (I mean, I wasn’t going to oppose a queer romance but it’s not a romance book) and it’s all about Linné and Revna’s relationship, which I really enjoyed. I do want to note that Linné is one of the sources of where some of the disability-associated harassment comes from initially (Revna has living metal prosthetics below the knee on one leg, and ankle and below on the other), but she definitely isn’t doing that in the end of the book and learns better. However,if you think this might be triggering/not good to read for you, it’s probably a good idea to skip out on We Rule the Night. I personally can’t speak on how Bartlett portrayed Revna’s disability, and I would love to see an #OwnVoices review from an amputee using prosthetics, if someone has a review! There wasn’t anything glaringly harmful to me and the message did not seem problematic, but I also know that I have a lot of blind spots, and I can’t definitively say whether or not this was good rep. Interesting, metal magic and an industrial world with its own set of stigmas.The living-metal magic that I referenced a few times was really really cool! People have a sort of magic in them and there’s different types of magic, like using a spark (hot or cold) and the Weave. In their country, the Weave is banned for the way it can get tangled, however the military has allowed the girls’ squadron to use it for the purpose of flying their living-metal planes. The planes aren’t normal planes, they’ve got also living metal animal-shaped machinery and other mechanical stuff. Very industrial feeling.It’s very interesting, and Bartlett introduces it in a way that’s not info-dumpy, and more integrated, which I enjoyed. Plus, reading about this specific country’s issues with the Weave versus the country their fighting (who embrace it) added another interesting element to the story. The purpose of the war was a bit foggy to me.This is one of my biggest complaints, although I’m not sure how relevant it actually is. I don’t know what they’re fighting for. I know Linné and Revna’s country is at war with another, but I either missed when reading or it didn’t really say clearly what the war was caused by and why they were still fighting and if they were trying to negotiate peace. Some of the larger politics were a little bit blurry.The ending was kind of abrupt, and I felt like parts were unresolved. Also, it wraps up a bit quickly, and it feels like We Rule the Night has sequel potential, although it doesn’t really end on a cliffhanger. I just felt like a lot of the storyline besides the friendship (the war, certain side characters and families) was generally unresolved? I’m not sure if I’d recommend it to people who want every last detail resolved, because you don’t really get that. I would totally love if this book had a sequel, though *cough COUGH*. However—I can’t really say if either of the last two points are really necessary. Because ultimately, this is a book about female friendship and how it defies the patriarchy, and it’s not really focusing on a giant fantasy world’s politics. I think We Rule the Night is more of a friendship story among a fantasy backdrop, which a lot of people might not get based off of first glance. It’s about Linné and Revna. Not about the world or the war, it’s about them against the backdrop of the war. Overall, We Rule the Night is a book I really enjoyed, even though I don’t think it’s for everyone. I would definitely recommend people who like - Female-friendship oriented stories, even in fantasy settings- People who like slower fantasies, à la Tess of the Road- People who like military/wartime fantasies, à la Dark of the West- People who want a feminist story about characters who persevereThank you so much to The NOVL for sending me an advance reader’s copy in exchange for an honest review!Blog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    releases: 2 April 2019two feuding girls attempt to survive a war, and also this cover is SHOCKINGLY beautiful.
  • Ayla Cato
    January 1, 1970
    What this book is NOT about:- Big scale plot- Saving the world- Romance- Special Snowflakes- Magic system you're used toWhat this book is about:- Friendship- Female empowerment- Reality, light and dark- Obstacles- Loss- The power of will- Different mindsets and personalities- Living with prosthetics- A dash of magic with a big impact, which I found very uniqueIf you're looking forward a the-world-revolves-around-me protagonist who must save the world and yada yada, then you'll be disappointed. T What this book is NOT about:- Big scale plot- Saving the world- Romance- Special Snowflakes- Magic system you're used toWhat this book is about:- Friendship- Female empowerment- Reality, light and dark- Obstacles- Loss- The power of will- Different mindsets and personalities- Living with prosthetics- A dash of magic with a big impact, which I found very uniqueIf you're looking forward a the-world-revolves-around-me protagonist who must save the world and yada yada, then you'll be disappointed. This is a slow burn book with a subtle climax. While the accomplishments our MCs make and the hardships they face might be great for them, they're miniscule on a world scale. In fact, they don't get any recognition for what they do. Still, that's not stopping them. They're realistic and strong and very different. They do what they can in their power, and I really appreciated to see characters fall into helpnessness they couldn't simply magic away. It's the dark reality, people. Now, that doesn't mean this book was dark all the time. There's some humor, a silly celebration, appreciation of friendship and feminity and life and its joys. This is the kind of book you'd want to read when you feel lonely. You survive with the characters, root for them, feel for them, and you feel like you've forever known them. I really liked both of the MCs, but Linné's perspective was the most interesting to read. She seemed like an awful person on the outside (everybody in the book hated her in the beginning), but being in her head, you know she only has good intentions. She simply doesn't know how to express them and ends up offending the other girls over and over again. This is explained, of course: Linné had spent years pretending to be a boy so she could serve her country. She was trained to follow orders and be the perfect soldier, and the women's regimen is not nearly as strict. This, as you'd expect, makes her skeptical. The lack of order grates on her, and so does the girls' 'girliness' and, in the begining, childishness.Over all, I mostly loved this book for the characters and the writing. As I understood from the author's bio, this her debut. Possibly? I'm still not sure, but I would never tell from the writing. It's quality and flows beautifully. The character's voices are distinct as well.5/5 stars from me. I can't promise you'd enjoy it, as character-focused stories aren't for everybody, but if you enjoy interesting characters and love to watch friendships develop--realistically!--give it a go.
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  • Allison C
    January 1, 1970
    I like the story but it can get really boring at times.
  • Toya
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in an afternoon, and when I finished, I was so conflicted with how I felt about the book. I wasn’t sure if just liked it or loved it. This was one of those books that I needed to digest what I read before I could even give it a rating. From start to finish, this story is chock full of non-stop action. The story opens with Revna and the other factory workers desperately trying to escape to the underground shelters as Tammin is under siege from enemy planes. The problem is that Re I read this book in an afternoon, and when I finished, I was so conflicted with how I felt about the book. I wasn’t sure if just liked it or loved it. This was one of those books that I needed to digest what I read before I could even give it a rating. From start to finish, this story is chock full of non-stop action. The story opens with Revna and the other factory workers desperately trying to escape to the underground shelters as Tammin is under siege from enemy planes. The problem is that Revna is in a wheelchair, and she must make a further trek than her coworkers since her family’s status as second-class citizens forbids them from entering the closer bomb shelters (the reason why is addressed). As time is running out, Revna decides to call on The Weave, magic that has been banned by the union, in order to save her own life and find her family. Unfortunately for her, a run in with a Union officer mid Weave jump betrays her secret magic use. Revna assumes that she will be thrown in prison alongside her father and labeled as traitor, but she is given a different opportunity instead. At this point, we switch gears and meet Linné who has been called in front of her superiors for impersonating a male in order to join the frontlines of war (Mulan anyone?). Linné comes from a well-known and respected military father who is under the impression that his daughter is doing well at her boarding school instead of fighting alongside her battalion on the frontlines. She is faced with the decision to either be sent back home to her father or to join a newly formed reigmen of women who will be trained to use The Weave to pilot war planes. Linné is one of the citizens who is adamantly against The Weave but signing up for this squad is the only way she will be able to fight for her country once again.Once Revna and Linné meet the other girls of their regimen, which is led by the famous Tamara Zima, they quickly learn what the military men really think of their team and mission. The men believe that Tamara is only leading this team and mission because her lover is a high ranking official, which is consistently brought up. To be fair, even the girls believe it at first as well. Immediately, Linné feels like she’s made a mistake and these girls are making mockery of what the military stands for. The girls want to alter their uniforms, wear their own fashionable shoes instead of the military grade boots issued to them, and refuse to be modest (Linné had to bind her breasts, shower when everyone was asleep, and hide her menstruation rags). This builds a HUGE rift between Linné and everyone else…especially Revna, who is the most gifted at controlling The Weave. This team had a long way to go if they were going to come together to help fight in the war, especially when all the men kept reminding them that they were not capable. I have to hand it to the author for creating a fantasy story, that aside from the actual magic, did not feel like fantasy. The blatant sexism that the girls face in this book pissed me off to absolutely no end. To make matters worse, Tamara has no sympathy on the girls because she herself is treated as an absolute joke by all of the commanding officers. The girls were purposefully given equipment that was expected to fail and never given the opportunity to succeed.I loved watching the girls’ band together against all odds; especially the extremely slow burn friendship that built between Revna and Linné. These girls would do whatever it takes to win the war, and they refuse to leave their own behind. I realized that I hadn’t even commented on much of the fantasy in the plot because I was so engrossed with the characters in this story. The magic is everything that I wanted in this remarkable debut. There are fire-breathing dragons that can decimate cities in seconds. The planes that the girls fly are comprised of living metal that adapts to the Weave user’s emotions. The fight scenes are incredibly descriptive and get your heart racing. Thank you to The NOVL for an advanced copy of this book. This did not influence my review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Kelly Coon
    January 1, 1970
    Fierce. Feminist. Fearless. I loved, loved, loved OUR REALM IS THE NIGHT. I want to BE a fighter pilot in this book. It recounts the tale of Revna, a traitor's daughter with prosthetic (living metal, omg) legs and Linee, the governor's daughter who dresses like a boy to get into the army. They couldn't be more different. Revna, afraid that she's a curse to her family, wants to keep her mother and sister safe, to provide for them because her father is gone, and Linee, closed off from her emotions Fierce. Feminist. Fearless. I loved, loved, loved OUR REALM IS THE NIGHT. I want to BE a fighter pilot in this book. It recounts the tale of Revna, a traitor's daughter with prosthetic (living metal, omg) legs and Linee, the governor's daughter who dresses like a boy to get into the army. They couldn't be more different. Revna, afraid that she's a curse to her family, wants to keep her mother and sister safe, to provide for them because her father is gone, and Linee, closed off from her emotions so she can protect her heart, wants to be loyal to the Union. When they're paired together as pilot and navigator, using the magic of the Weave to fly the haphazard planes given only to girls, they decide to own the skies anyway and fight for their place in history. The fight scenes were breathtaking. The fantasy was incredible. And more than once, the depth of these characters made me breathless with admiration for Bartlett's literary prowess. I cannot say enough about this story. Put it on your TBR. You will absolutely root for these two fierce females who battle the Elda and each other right down to the gripping end.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, holy hell, this book. Never in my life did I think that I'd read a book so bleak, and so maddening, and love it so damn much. I don't know know what kind of magic Clarie Eliza Bartlett wove to create this story, but it worked. Oh, it worked. Strap yourself in for some rambling, my friends, because that's all I know how to do at this point.Look, I'm all for likable characters. It's nice when the MC is sweet, or snarky, or any manner of traits that are easy to connect with. Linne is not that c Oh, holy hell, this book. Never in my life did I think that I'd read a book so bleak, and so maddening, and love it so damn much. I don't know know what kind of magic Clarie Eliza Bartlett wove to create this story, but it worked. Oh, it worked. Strap yourself in for some rambling, my friends, because that's all I know how to do at this point.Look, I'm all for likable characters. It's nice when the MC is sweet, or snarky, or any manner of traits that are easy to connect with. Linne is not that character. Linne is difficult. She's not just rough around the edges, she's a solid block of stone. And yet, I fell in love with her all the same. Linne felt realistic to me, because she was a multi-faceted human being. Someone who looks so hard on the outside, but is really just trying to protect everything inside of her that she's afraid to let out. As the story progressed, I saw her cracks. I saw her flaws. I loved her more for it. Then there was Revna. The exact opposite of Linne in the beginning, but with her own imperfections. A woman who had constantly been told she wasn't enough, but managed to push through anyway. A woman buried under self doubt and shame, but being pressed into a diamond without noticing it. The love I felt for Revna was instantaneous, unlike with Linne, but Bartlett didn't let Revna stay in her shell for long. These two girls were like fire and ice when they met. Completely different, and yet linked together in ways that they couldn't see.This isn't a happy story. Sure, there are portions of it that are lighthearted. There are moments of light in the darkness. However, this is a story about war. It's about women who are willing to risk everything for the good of their country, even when the men around them take away every shred of their credit. I won't lie, I cried while I read this book. Linne and Revna, plus all of the other women in their division, go through hell and back during the course of this story. What I loved more than anything though was that it didn't take away their individual personalities. Sure, they grew and adapted. Just like in real life though, they were still always very much themselves. My hard, stony Linne and my sweet, unsure Revna. Battered, but not completely broken.We Rule The Night is a lightning fast read. There isn't a moment to breathe really, from the second you read that first sentence. I know it's kind of cliche to say things like "ALL THE FEELINGS." but that basically sums up this book better than anything else I could say to you. This story is full of intense emotions. It's bleak, it's frustrating at times, but it's beautiful too. The women in this story are stronger than I could ever be, and I loved them for that. I can't thank Claire Eliza Bartlett enough for writing a book that doesn't try to make her female characters bad ass assassins, or smart-mouthed space pirates, but just takes women who are already amazing and makes them even more impressive as they grow. I felt like I knew these women intimately by the end, and that's why this book stole my heart. Read this. I'm sure that you'll love it too.
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  • Kalyn Josephson
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely LOVE the magic system in this book. Living metal (it’s so cool!), the Weave, hot and cold spark—they’re all parts of the same whole, which Claire does a fantastic job of working into the character’s daily lives. Everything about the world is wonderfully fleshed out, which is one of the many things I really liked about the book. After the great worldbuilding, I’d have to say my other favorite part was the characters. Revna is strong, brave, and determined. Linne is coarse and fierce I absolutely LOVE the magic system in this book. Living metal (it’s so cool!), the Weave, hot and cold spark—they’re all parts of the same whole, which Claire does a fantastic job of working into the character’s daily lives. Everything about the world is wonderfully fleshed out, which is one of the many things I really liked about the book. After the great worldbuilding, I’d have to say my other favorite part was the characters. Revna is strong, brave, and determined. Linne is coarse and fierce in all the ways I absolutely love. They both grow in a lot of ways throughout the story, and Claire really keeps you rooting for them all the way through, while maintaining a fluctuating tension between all the characters that’s really well done.The harrowing ending had me speeding through the last hundred pages nonstop. I had to know what was going to happen next, and the ending does not disappoint! Plus, that title <3 <3
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  • ♠️ TABI ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    Magic and planes???Also hello, hello, hellooooooooo pretty cover. My name's Tabi. Whatchu doing later?? xD
  • Tara (Spinatale Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m loving all of the books coming out lately that are inspired by lesser known parts of history! We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett is a YA fantasy that was inspired by the women who flew for the Soviet Union’s 588th Night Bomber regiment. This one was a pretty quick read that was full of brave women and interesting magic. While I wish the magic system had been described a bit better, the concept was so fascinating. I particularly liked the living metal and how the connection between pi I’m loving all of the books coming out lately that are inspired by lesser known parts of history! We Rule the Night by Claire Eliza Bartlett is a YA fantasy that was inspired by the women who flew for the Soviet Union’s 588th Night Bomber regiment. This one was a pretty quick read that was full of brave women and interesting magic. While I wish the magic system had been described a bit better, the concept was so fascinating. I particularly liked the living metal and how the connection between pilot and ship was formed.I also loved both of the main characters, they were so distinct and vibrant. Linné really grew throughout the story, her character development was great. And Revna was so determined, strong, and resilient. Plus the disability rep! I also liked how complex the friendship between them was and how it developed over time.While certain parts of the plot lagged a bit, I enjoyed We Rule the Night overall. It kept me intrigued and was a very quick read. I'm pretty sure this will be a series and, now that the groundwork has been laid in this book, I think the story will really take off (I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist one flying pun)*Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • K.A. Doore
    January 1, 1970
    Two girls from entirely different backgrounds, with entirely different motives, and entirely different personalities must fly a plane together.What could possibly go wrong?While on the surface this is a story about two girls who hate each other but are forced to work together, just beneath that surface you'll find another story: one about girls working together, girls in all their many shapes & flavors & sizes being strong as only they can be; one about earned trust, blind faith, and exp Two girls from entirely different backgrounds, with entirely different motives, and entirely different personalities must fly a plane together.What could possibly go wrong?While on the surface this is a story about two girls who hate each other but are forced to work together, just beneath that surface you'll find another story: one about girls working together, girls in all their many shapes & flavors & sizes being strong as only they can be; one about earned trust, blind faith, and expedient lies; one about hard choices and harder compromises; and one about family, both lost and found.The writing was exquisite, the world fully fleshed and bitingly cold, and every character felt like they meant something to someone. Like they had a life beyond the pages.Plus, I mean you've got living! metal! airplanes!! that react to emotion and have their own wants and desires, a really nifty & original magic system, shape shifters, real & complex emotions, and a proper bar brawl. What more could you possibly want??
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    There were so many things that I loved about this book. I HATE that I can’t share all my thoughts because then I’d give too much away and I definitely don’t want to spoil this book for you. This book wrecked me. I was distressed and had so many emotions and I was not prepared, especially for that ending. I really hope that a second book comes from this because I need more of this story. We Rule the Night releases April 2, 2019. This is one that I HIGHLY recommend. It’s got magic, war, intrigue, There were so many things that I loved about this book. I HATE that I can’t share all my thoughts because then I’d give too much away and I definitely don’t want to spoil this book for you. This book wrecked me. I was distressed and had so many emotions and I was not prepared, especially for that ending. I really hope that a second book comes from this because I need more of this story. We Rule the Night releases April 2, 2019. This is one that I HIGHLY recommend. It’s got magic, war, intrigue, and survival. Truly things one needs when hoping for a great fantasy. You definitely don’t want to miss this stunning debut.
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  • Kip
    January 1, 1970
    I'm sure many people will love this book for the magical elements, but for me, it was the realistic elements that absolutely hooked me. I loved the strong female leads, their messy friendship, and the details of life in a male-dominated military. Plot-wise, the story is fast-paced and full of action. Fans of YA fantasy will surely love this, and it should also appeal to fans of YA historicals like Gwen Katz' AMONG THE RED STARS (about the Night Witches in WWII).
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    This one's tough. I think the premise is strong and interesting - living metal that reacts to the emotions and spirits of those who use it. But I found a lot of the flying formations/happenings hard to imagine and the whole middle bit of the book is extremely slow. More could have been done with the Skarov secret information agents too. Overall the book had strong characters but kind of a weak plot.
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  • Cassandra **The Bibliophagist**
    January 1, 1970
    Check out my blog here: http://thebibliophagist.blogWhen I jumped into this book, I was a little put off at first. The beginning seemed a little slow but that was because the author was setting the world up, introducing us to the characters...setting the stage so to speak. The story quickly picks up though and for sure does not disappoint. And what a story it is, complete with incredibly strong female characters. Despite the blatant sexism and struggles they face, they stand tall and do what the Check out my blog here: http://thebibliophagist.blogWhen I jumped into this book, I was a little put off at first. The beginning seemed a little slow but that was because the author was setting the world up, introducing us to the characters...setting the stage so to speak. The story quickly picks up though and for sure does not disappoint. And what a story it is, complete with incredibly strong female characters. Despite the blatant sexism and struggles they face, they stand tall and do what they must. I love that sexism is shown here in this book but it isn't a small subplot, it becomes something the characters must overcome time and time again. Something that was very real in that time period and the author did a wonderful job showing that. One manifestation of this was when Linne was told women are a distraction to men and that is why they are not permitted to serve on the front lines, men need to concentrate and they can't do that with women around. This is an excuse we still hear today regarding school dress codes. Women, or girls, are not permitted to wear short shorts, spaghetti strap tank tops, anything showing too much cleavage, etc. All of this is because they feel it is too distracting to the male students and school is a place to focus on learning. Anyway...not only is sexism a huge theme here but disabilities are as well. Revna has prosthetic legs and she shows, time and time again, that she is not defined by her disability. I really love that this book covers two huge topics but entwines them in an engaging and enjoyable tale.I will say that I was expecting more magic in this story but it simply wasn't there. Instead, we are given a war-time story where the machines aren't tanks but living metal machines powered by magic. The concept of living metal is something I've never encountered or thought about before but it is fantastic. I'd love to say more but I don't want to give away too much so you just have to read this story for yourself.The writing style was fun and I enjoyed the dual POV. We get to see the story from the perspectives of Revna and Linne. I really loved both of these characters, one more than the other at times. All of the names in this book sound Russian which makes sense since the story is based on Soviet women that flew outdated planes to the front lines of combat, bombing German forces. These women were known as the Night Witches because they would fly in during the cover of darkness and bombard enemy troops, the same way Linne, Revna, and the rest of their female companions did.Linne: Linne, she is incredibly strong, the perfect soldier. She follows her orders...well most of the time...and takes her place as a leader. She tries to help her fellow female soldiers despite their hatred of her. She only wants what is best for them, almost mom-like. We see from her internal thoughts that she wants to be known for being herself, not her father's daughter. She wants to aid in the war as anyone else. She is closed off and her sole purpose is to be a good soldier, she doesn't feel she connects with the other well.Revna: Revna...sweet Revna, she is the polar opposite of Linne. I love how she is strong in a different way. She never lets her prosthetics become her identity. She would rather walk than use a wheelchair but some forced her to sit in one regularly. She doesn't accept the help of others with basic things that she can manage. Revna hates when people assume she is not capable of something and I love that about her because it is so true. She is the only one in their regime willing to give Linne a chance, despite her foul attitude.Tannov: I liked him initially but that relationship quickly soured. He does anything he is ordered too and is not above sexism himself. He just leaves a bad taste in my mouth, I'm not fond of him.I really loved Revna and Linne, they might be polar opposites but they are both strong in their own way, overcoming odds even men never have. They come from different backgrounds but find they face many of the same challenges and the biggest one being proving themselves time and time again to the men above their station.The world here is beautiful but war-torn. The imagery was well written, giving enough information without going into unnecessary details. I could visualize the mountain as Revna and Linne climbed it, I could smell the smoke of the burning towns. The author brings us back in time to a period of war and sadness but gives us just a little bit of magic and a lot of perseverance.I think another one of my favorite aspects of this book was that everyone was always drinking tea. I love tea, I'm actually drinking some now as I type this...tea break. Ok, I'm back. This story was so well written that when the characters found themselves in danger, I could feel the urgency and their sense of fear. I was essentially put right in the war beside them. It does take a while for the action to really start and for the pace to pick up, but it is worth it in my opinion. If you can read through the gossip and arguing while training, you will not be disappointed. Living metal that retains emotions...what a unique concept. If you are looking for a novel that explores deeper messages dealing with sexism and disabilities, one that pulls at your emotions or takes you on a war journey with hints of magic...this is a good book for you.
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  • Kristi Housman Confessions of a YA Reader
    January 1, 1970
    We Rule The Night started off a bit slow for me, but the story really picked up.  I expected a bit more magic and less war training, but it was so good. Revna works in a factory.  Her father was arrested for making her prosthetic legs.  It was considered treason to take leftover metal.  The Union had a lot of rules and one of the main ones was that using magic was illegal.  Revna used the weave and was caught one day.  Instead of being arrested, she was brought to be a flier in a new part of The We Rule The Night started off a bit slow for me, but the story really picked up.  I expected a bit more magic and less war training, but it was so good. Revna works in a factory.  Her father was arrested for making her prosthetic legs.  It was considered treason to take leftover metal.  The Union had a lot of rules and one of the main ones was that using magic was illegal.  Revna used the weave and was caught one day.  Instead of being arrested, she was brought to be a flier in a new part of The Union that is all women.Linne's father is a Union general.  She pretended to be a boy to fight in their war.  She was finally caught and was also sent to the new group to train.  In this unit, magic is allowed.  It's actually needed.  These girls are going to fly new planes.  They need three people for each plane.  Linne uses spark to help the planes run.  Revna uses the weave to fly the plane.  And then there is an engineer that gets everything set up.   Linne is a rule follower.  She doesn't have fun or have friends.  No one wants to pair up with her.  Revna is well liked, but her legs cause concern with some of the girls.  So Linne and Revna are paired up with Magdalena.  The girls argue a lot, but their team works. They do start to question some of their orders, especially ones they know should be wrong.Two soldiers Linne was friends with, Tannov and Dostorov, become Skarov.   They get information and try to find anyone that is committing treason.  In the Union, you can't lie.  But when things don't go as planned, Linne is asked to go against everything she believes and tell a big lie to save the only girl who she can consider a friend.What I loved most about this book is that it was about strong females and their relationships.  There wasn't romance.  These girls busted their butts every day to be taken as seriously as the men.  As you can imagine, that doesn't happen.  I loved their spirit and how they never gave up no matter what.  Thank you to Meg for sending me this arc.  I really liked it and gave it 4 stars.  I am very much looking forward to the next one.Warnings for sexism, sexual assault (grabbing breasts), violence, and judgement based off a disability.
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  • Jennie Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely flew through WE RULE THE NIGHT. Yes, that’s obvious and not terribly creative wordplay, but nonetheless true. A fiercely consumable combination of action-packed and emotionally-charged scenes, there was never a good moment to take a break, so goodbye weekend adulting activities and hello to eating cereal for three consecutive meals because my sole priority was finding out what Revna and Linné did next. Forced to enter a world where she didn't excel after her previous successes were I absolutely flew through WE RULE THE NIGHT. Yes, that’s obvious and not terribly creative wordplay, but nonetheless true. A fiercely consumable combination of action-packed and emotionally-charged scenes, there was never a good moment to take a break, so goodbye weekend adulting activities and hello to eating cereal for three consecutive meals because my sole priority was finding out what Revna and Linné did next. Forced to enter a world where she didn't excel after her previous successes were nullified, Linné’s arc captured my attention and my heart. A young woman who'd hurdled herself over every obstacle to join the fight on the front lines, only to be sidelined because of her gender and then assigned to a secret flight unit composed of very un-soldier-like women, Linné didn’t quite know what to do with herself. Bitter, judgmental, standoffish, but still dedicated to the cause, Linné’s struggles to find her place inside and outside of the cockpit made her too vulnerable not to love, so when things got crazy, I was worried sick about her. She pushed everybody away, and while Revna faced similar uncertainties, she had the support of the rest of the unit (albeit somewhat tainted support because of how the others considered her living metal legs, at least in the beginning). But whether they liked it or not, they were united by a common goal, and watching how each young woman navigated their feelings of self-doubt and fear produced a lot of head nodding and empathy from me. I also appreciated the various ways Bartlett showed the pilot's courage and strength because there's so much more than just throwing a punch.As I’ve touched on the balance between character growth and action, now I get to rave about the magic. Because flying planes YES. The use and construction of the planes, comprised of living metal (THE ACTUAL AWESOMEST BUT I WON’T SAY ANY MORE) and operated by a pair of pilots with two different magical tasks, made my imagination explode. At times, perhaps slightly challenging to envision, but who cares because it was such an extraordinary concept. I do wish a particular storyline had more explanation and depth, especially as it proved critical to the world-building, and the end left me with mixed feelings. Mostly good, but also some wanting. As in, I want another book. The comps are totally bang-on, so if you’re a fan of Code Name Verity or Shadow and Bone, you’ll love WE RULE THE NIGHT!Big thanks to Hachette Book Group Canada for an ARC!
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    * Thank you to HBG Canada for an advanced reader copy, in exchange for my honest opinion *This novel was very different than I expected, and had a much stronger feminism representation than I thought it would - BUT that aspect was written very well. Female empowerment was a strong element of the story, and both Linne and Revna are strong believers in this notion. As their all-female military unit prepares to fly in the war for the first time, betrayal, secrets, and conflict occur, but nothing wi * Thank you to HBG Canada for an advanced reader copy, in exchange for my honest opinion *This novel was very different than I expected, and had a much stronger feminism representation than I thought it would - BUT that aspect was written very well. Female empowerment was a strong element of the story, and both Linne and Revna are strong believers in this notion. As their all-female military unit prepares to fly in the war for the first time, betrayal, secrets, and conflict occur, but nothing will stop these ladies from doing their part.I liked the variety of characters that readers got to know, the differing perspectives were engaging. Revna is determined to prove herself worthy of being in the unit - especially to keep her family safe, while Linne wants to demonstrate that she can be more than just a pretty face in society. The arguments and lies are bold, but the tentative friendship is worth it. There is also a unique magical element in this fantasy world. I found it a bit confusing at first, but it improved as the story continued. It played a vital role in the plot, and it is exciting to see the story unfold. I did find it a bit hard to connect to the characters at the beginning, but I am sure many readers will be excited for this release!
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  • Jessie_Book
    January 1, 1970
    This was not the book that I thought it was going to be. I was expecting a hate to love story with two girls and them coming together to be badasses. What I got was a whole bunch of girls going through military training and being catty towards each other. All they did was argue and talk about each other behind their backs. But don't worry the men were just as bad. I don't think that there was a single guy in this book that did say something horrible about women or just straight up hate them. I d This was not the book that I thought it was going to be. I was expecting a hate to love story with two girls and them coming together to be badasses. What I got was a whole bunch of girls going through military training and being catty towards each other. All they did was argue and talk about each other behind their backs. But don't worry the men were just as bad. I don't think that there was a single guy in this book that did say something horrible about women or just straight up hate them. I didn't completely hate this book, I actually greatly enjoyed some parts. The writing was fun and the flying scenes were interesting, but not enough to hold up the whole book. I quit about three fourths the way through because I was tired of reading about them training. Thats about all the characters did for this book train and gossip about each other.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    I can't lie, I was first drawn to We Rule the Night because of the absolute stunning cover with this fiery bird - reminiscent of what some of the girls call their planes. But what ended up keeping my attention was the friendships between the girls and the characters themselves. Told from both Revna and Linné's point of views, we are able to really dive into their thoughts - experience their nightmares, doubts, and fears. (I can't speak to the disabled rep, because I'm not an ownvoices reviewer f I can't lie, I was first drawn to We Rule the Night because of the absolute stunning cover with this fiery bird - reminiscent of what some of the girls call their planes. But what ended up keeping my attention was the friendships between the girls and the characters themselves. Told from both Revna and Linné's point of views, we are able to really dive into their thoughts - experience their nightmares, doubts, and fears. (I can't speak to the disabled rep, because I'm not an ownvoices reviewer for that aspect. Revna lost her foot and part of her leg in a car accident and throughout the book she has prosthetics and uses a wheelchair in certain situations).full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Rendz
    January 1, 1970
    4.5So this was great.But this cannot be the end.I do not accept.Ummm there needs to be a sequel. Like literally nothing was solved!But based solely on my experience with this book it was goooooood.
  • Sara (A Gingerly Review)
    January 1, 1970
    2 starsI struggled with this one. It took me a long time to get through it because there was so much information but not enough at the same time. I had high hopes but was disappointed.FRTC.Thank you to The Novl and Little Brown for the arc!!
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    I’m sure others will enjoy this one immensely, it just wasn’t for me.
  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    This was more of a 3.5 rating.It took me awhile to get into and understand the world of this book. I initially thought it was more of a straightforward WWII Soviet night witch flyers with an overlay of magic. Instead, Countries were made up but based on Soviets and Germans (the Elda), and interrogation and traitor practices seemed aligned. But it wasn’t just manipulation of magic, there were types of magic one can use manipulating the Weave, strands of magic cross crossing the world. Spark magic This was more of a 3.5 rating.It took me awhile to get into and understand the world of this book. I initially thought it was more of a straightforward WWII Soviet night witch flyers with an overlay of magic. Instead, Countries were made up but based on Soviets and Germans (the Elda), and interrogation and traitor practices seemed aligned. But it wasn’t just manipulation of magic, there were types of magic one can use manipulating the Weave, strands of magic cross crossing the world. Spark magic is metal imbued with Weave magic and metal is alive/has intentions. As in the planes require a pilot to hook in, a navigator that gets a needle in the arm sucking their Spark magic out of them to life the plane. It was complicated and also the plot meandered and could’ve been edited down to tell a more concise story. Didn’t love the ending and so many loose ends.
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  • Karyn Silverman
    January 1, 1970
    The comps on the arc are unexpectedly accurate (Code Name Verity meets the Grishaverse), and it’s really good. And no romance!
  • Lillian Clark
    January 1, 1970
    I count myself exceedingly lucky to have been able to read an early copy of this book. The writing is lush and evocative. The world-building is atmospheric and immersive. The main characters, Revna and Linne, are incredibly strong and complex, both in their own unique ways. And with its cast of capable female characters, this is a story I wish I could take back in time and give to my teenage self. Though the universe is fictional, these young women navigate deeply realistic hurtles and inequalit I count myself exceedingly lucky to have been able to read an early copy of this book. The writing is lush and evocative. The world-building is atmospheric and immersive. The main characters, Revna and Linne, are incredibly strong and complex, both in their own unique ways. And with its cast of capable female characters, this is a story I wish I could take back in time and give to my teenage self. Though the universe is fictional, these young women navigate deeply realistic hurtles and inequalities, with such grace and tenacity and, at times, well-earned anger, that I found myself cheering the characters on and raging on their behalf. And aside from the beautiful style, Bartlett writes with an unflinching honesty I was blown away by. Not only is this a fantastically entertaining and well-written story, it's an important one. Don't miss it!!
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  • Addie Thorley
    January 1, 1970
    I adored every second of this breathtaking book! The world building blew me away. Bartlett's gritty, war-torn world feels slightly reminiscent of WWII while still being completely fresh and original. The magic system is SO unique and inventive, between the spark and weave and (my favorite) living metal. And the CHARACTERS!! Gahhhh I loved Revna and Linne so much. Their stakes and motivation are so personal--you can't help but root for them. And as polar opposites, I especially loved how they dem I adored every second of this breathtaking book! The world building blew me away. Bartlett's gritty, war-torn world feels slightly reminiscent of WWII while still being completely fresh and original. The magic system is SO unique and inventive, between the spark and weave and (my favorite) living metal. And the CHARACTERS!! Gahhhh I loved Revna and Linne so much. Their stakes and motivation are so personal--you can't help but root for them. And as polar opposites, I especially loved how they demonstrated different types of strength. Not to mention they are surrounded by an incredible ensemble cast of fierce ladies. It was basically my feminist fantasy dream. Top all of this off with Bartlett's gorgeous, lyrical writing and you've got a debut novel not to be missed. I can't wait to see this book soar like the planes Linne and Revna fly. Add this to your TBR immediately!
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  • Samantha Hastings
    January 1, 1970
    I read it one day!!! Two strong, but very different female protagonists trying to survive a militaristic world at war. Both are sympathetic and both struggle with what in means to be loyal to the fellow female pilots but also to the Union. Unique, thought-provoking, with a fabulous flare of feminism and female empowerment. I’m eager to get my hands on the sequel.
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