The Shape of Water
It is 1962, and Elisa Esposito—mute her whole life, orphaned as a child—is struggling with her humdrum existence as a janitor working the graveyard shift at Baltimore’s Occam Aerospace Research Center. Were it not for Zelda, a protective coworker, and Giles, her loving neighbor, she doesn’t know how she’d make it through the day.Then, one fateful night, she sees something she was never meant to see, the Center’s most sensitive asset ever: an amphibious man, captured in the Amazon, to be studied for Cold War advancements. The creature is terrifying but also magnificent, capable of language and of understanding emotions…and Elisa can’t keep away. Using sign language, the two learn to communicate. Soon, affection turns into love, and the creature becomes Elisa’s sole reason to live.But outside forces are pressing in. Richard Strickland, the obsessed soldier who tracked the asset through the Amazon, wants nothing more than to dissect it before the Russians get a chance to steal it. Elisa has no choice but to risk everything to save her beloved. With the help of Zelda and Giles, Elisa hatches a plan to break out the creature. But Strickland is on to them. And the Russians are, indeed, coming.

The Shape of Water Details

TitleThe Shape of Water
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherFeiwel & Friends
ISBN-139781250165343
Rating
GenreFantasy, Romance, Fiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Horror, Audiobook, Science Fiction

The Shape of Water Review

  • Jolene Haack
    January 1, 1970
    Husband: You're already finished that?Me: Yup.Husband: Didn't you start it today?Me: Yesterday.Husband: Still! Was there fish sex?Me: Yeah. (gentle readers it was not graphic)Husband: SERIOUSLY?!?!Me: It's about social outcasts! About seeing someone as they are, in a way that no one else sees them!Husband: Yeah but still.Me: But he's a man!Husband: STILL.Me: He's a man, babe. Husband: ...............still
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  • Sophia Triad
    January 1, 1970
    “Man should be better than monsters.”“Ah, but who are the monsters?” I have always had a soft spot for misunderstood monsters who are unreasonably feared. The key work here is “unreasonably”. When their life or the life of their beloved is threatened of course they are allowed to become vicious.And it’s not just me. I am sure that most of you know that there is a huge number of fans that enjoy PNR books i.e. paranormal romance, monsters’ erotica, erotic horror, fantasy books for young adult a “Man should be better than monsters.”“Ah, but who are the monsters?” I have always had a soft spot for misunderstood monsters who are unreasonably feared. The key work here is “unreasonably”. When their life or the life of their beloved is threatened of course they are allowed to become vicious.And it’s not just me. I am sure that most of you know that there is a huge number of fans that enjoy PNR books i.e. paranormal romance, monsters’ erotica, erotic horror, fantasy books for young adult audience or adult audience etc. – especially the last decade. Books full of dearly loved monsters. People included me are attracted to anything different and extraordinary for a variety of reasons. Can I suggest the books by R. Lee Smith for you to try? I consider "Land of the beautiful dead", "Heat" and "Cottonwood" masterpieces in the erotic horror category. And of course there is also Clive Barker the author of "Cabal", "Abarat", "Sacrament" and so many other books who taught me firstly and before it becomes fashion trend exactly what erotic horror and erotic fantasy mean. Not that before the 90s there were no books about monsters. But you mainly felt sorry for them, not lust for them.I could definitely place this book in the above mentioned categories, however on the lighter side of monster romance fiction. There is no gore, not much rejection by the plain and common humans because there is no interaction with them and the love story and sex are more implied and less described.The book is lyrical and emotional. It is a manifesto against the hate and fear for anything different. A beautiful love story. It has a happy ending because it needs to have a happy ending. She reaches out to him. To herself. There is no difference. She understands now. She holds him, he holds her, they hold each other, and all is dark, all is light, all is ungliness, all is beauty, all is pain, all is grief, all is never, all is forever. It can be read easily. The chapters are short and the situations (locations, feelings, dialogues) are so well and detailed described that they reminded me movie scenes. Each chapter corresponds to a scene and it mainly has one main character or two main characters on the spotlight. I highly recommend it, even if you have not watched the Oscar-winning movie. Which obviously is a masterpiece! I am not a film reviewer but you can trust Stephen King’s words (who is a veteran on monsters) :I loved THE SHAPE OF WATER. What a great way to end the year!(From Stephen King's social media pages)I decided to read the book, before I watched the movie and I do not regret it!
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  • Huda Yahya
    January 1, 1970
    هذا العمل مخصص لمن يحبون لإبقاء على روح الحلم في الواقعلمن يعيشون مغمضين عيونهم نصف إغماضةللمنبوذين الذين اختاروا العزلة أو فرضت عليهموهو أيضا لكل شخص لم يتعلم بعد أن ينظر داخل أرواح الناس ويفتش عن خباياهمليتعلم كيف يكون الحب***كلنا قرأنا الحكايات القديمة المعروفةعن ازميرالدا و كوازيمودوأو الجميلة والوحشوبينما تنتهي الحكاية الأولى نهاية مأساويةويعود الوحش في الثانية ليصبح أميرا وسيماينتصر دي تورو للحلم***إليزا فتاة عادية.. بكماء أيضالا مبهرة الجمال كأميرات الحكايات الخرافيةولا تعيش مظلومة مقهورة هذا العمل مخصص لمن يحبون لإبقاء على روح الحلم في الواقعلمن يعيشون مغمضين عيونهم نصف إغماضةللمنبوذين الذين اختاروا العزلة أو فرضت عليهموهو أيضا لكل شخص لم يتعلم بعد أن ينظر داخل أرواح الناس ويفتش عن خباياهمليتعلم كيف يكون الحب***كلنا قرأنا الحكايات القديمة المعروفةعن ازميرالدا و كوازيمودوأو الجميلة والوحشوبينما تنتهي الحكاية الأولى نهاية مأساويةويعود الوحش في الثانية ليصبح أميرا وسيماينتصر دي تورو للحلم***إليزا فتاة عادية.. بكماء أيضالا مبهرة الجمال كأميرات الحكايات الخرافيةولا تعيش مظلومة مقهورة في خدمة زوجة ابيها أو تحت رحمة ساحرة شريرةإنها مجرد فتاة عادية تعيش حياة عادية روتينيةوحيدة وحدتنا جميعالكن ومن اللحظة الأولى هناك شيء أعمق ينبض بداخلهاشيء لا علاقة له بالحياة الأرضية الاعتياديةحياة أخرى تسمع أزيزها داخل البيضات التي تتناولها يومياداخل حوض الاستحمام الذي تغمض عينيها فيه متخيلة نفسها مكتملة مع نصفها الآخرتسمعه في صوت الموسيقى والأغنيات الشافية للروحوكما يحدث في عالم الأحلامأنت تصدقها .. لا تتعجب ان تحب إليزا المخلوق العجيب .. لا تتعجب وأنت تشاهدهما –أو تقرأهما هنا- وهما يمارسان الحب ويزهران نباتات خضراء ترتوي بماء الحكاية المتدفق***نقل جييرمو أحلامه إلى الشاشة ولكنه لم ينس أن يبقيها أحلامفهو لا يريد جلبها إلى الواقع لتصبح جزءا منهقدر ما يريد جلبك أنت إليهابشخصياته الناعمة وكأنها مرسومة على الماءموجودة وغير موجودةقص علينا قصتهخرافية ... عجائبية ... مذهلة...
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  • Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed by: Rabid ReadsTHE SHAPE OF WATER is a strange book. For a variety of reasons.1. Dual film/book release, which, to my knowledge, has never been done before.2. It’s only 312 pages long, but it has a cumulative 130 chapters (split into four sections). That’s an average of 2.4 pages per chapter. In the past, I’ve knocked an entire star off my overall rating of a book if a mere portion of it felt choppy and chaotic b/c short chapters. And before TSoW, I considered a ten page chapter to be s Reviewed by: Rabid ReadsTHE SHAPE OF WATER is a strange book. For a variety of reasons.1. Dual film/book release, which, to my knowledge, has never been done before.2. It’s only 312 pages long, but it has a cumulative 130 chapters (split into four sections). That’s an average of 2.4 pages per chapter. In the past, I’ve knocked an entire star off my overall rating of a book if a mere portion of it felt choppy and chaotic b/c short chapters. And before TSoW, I considered a ten page chapter to be short.3. All those tiny, tiny “chapters” are told from multiple POVs, which I almost always hate outside of 500+ page fantasy novels, preferably in a long-running series. BUT.Somehow del Toro and Kraus pack so much personality, so much meaningful information, so much feeling into those tiny, tiny chapters that the only reason I noticed their length is b/c when I buddy read a book, I usually comment in the group thread every five chapters.Getting through five chapters went a lot quicker than it usually does. As for the alternate POVs (six of them), it doesn’t work outside of epic fantasy, b/c you don’t have enough time to connect with your storytellers, but that wasn’t a problem here. The short, powerful chapters had an effect usually reserved for significantly longer books—I felt like I knew the characters, and knew them well, almost immediately.So there’s that. The story itself . . . It had ups and downs.Basically, the military captures a mythical fish-man-creature in South America and transports it to a research facility to poke, prod, and torture it (b/c ‘Merica). Then a woman on said facility’s custodial staff falls in love with the fish-man-creature and tries to rescue it before its dissected for research. Pretty simple, right? Government bad, underdog good. Love conquers all.Yes and no.B/c despite the apparent simplicity of the setup, there is nothing simple about this story.Elisa is an orphan with mysterious scars on her throat, the byproduct of a surgery she has no memory of or explanation for that left her unable to speak. Her loneliness is palpable. Strickland is a career military man clearly suffering from PTSD, yet he is a wholly unsympathetic character, b/c dude is a sadistic bastard. His training only serves to give him the experience and authority to break more shit than a civilian could. Lanie is a housewife whose newly gained independence is yanked away with the return of a husband she’d reconciled herself to losing.And the list goes on.All of this is made more intense by the 1960s setting. The evil man has more power. The orphan, the gay man, the black woman, and the white housewife have fewer options, are thoughtlessly victimized in ways that fifty years later seem incomprehensible.SO. Not only is TSoW a fantastical story of captured sea gods and thwarting the Man, it’s a complex social commentary—it’s remarkable how much was accomplished in just 312 pages.That being said, I did have a few minor issues, most of them spoilers, so don’t click the spoiler tag unless your prepared for the consequences:1. (view spoiler)[ HE ATE THE CAT!! *edvard munch face*And YES, I get that fish dude is a Wild Thing, but COME ON. It’s bad enough when a pet dies in a book, so if you have a character EAT another character’s pet, be prepared for the fallout. *shakes fist* (hide spoiler)]2. Worst sex scene I’ve ever read. It’s so bad that when I texted book bff about it, she not only immediately recognized my quote referencing it, she responded WITH THE NEXT LINE:(view spoiler)[If you think we’re exaggerating or oversimplifying or summarizing, you’re WRONG: (hide spoiler)]3. In the words of book bff: those fingers will haunt me forever.You: What fingers? O.oMe: Someone loses a couple of fingers in an altercation with fish-man-creature. They get reattached, but b/c reasons, we know there’s s possibility they won’t take.You: Eww.Me: You have no idea.BUT. A couple of lost digits, etc. are hardly reasons big enough to stop you from experiencing THE SHAPE OF WATER for yourself. I can honestly say, it’s been a unique experience, and it’s one I highly recommend. Now I’m going to watch the movie. I’ll let you know how it goes. *winks*
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  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    The book is awesome, as long as you remind yourself to stay in the moment. The fantasy. The UNreality. Because, if not, you will be thinking weird shit, like me. See, I'm a weird shit thinker. I'll let you know where my twisted mind went in just a second.First, about the book. It has multiple POV's and is about an amphibious man-like creature that the army found in the Amazon and immediately captured to study it in the lab. It sounds about right.As we learned in E.T., they want dissect the crap The book is awesome, as long as you remind yourself to stay in the moment. The fantasy. The UNreality. Because, if not, you will be thinking weird shit, like me. See, I'm a weird shit thinker. I'll let you know where my twisted mind went in just a second.First, about the book. It has multiple POV's and is about an amphibious man-like creature that the army found in the Amazon and immediately captured to study it in the lab. It sounds about right.As we learned in E.T., they want dissect the crap out of anything they don't understand.Luckily, the female mute janitor that cleans the den of horrors lab where he's kept is crazy and desperate pure-hearted enough to think she and the Swamp Thing are in love, so she decides to try and save it. And, have sex with it. Because, you know. That only makes sense.This is where the weird shit thinking comes in. I can't help but thinking that this creature may not exactly be the best choice for a sex partner. Why? Well, aside from the obvious..(ugly children)..Because it reminded me of that gorilla that learned sign language. Coco. You remember the story? That gorilla could communicate with the humans. And, the humans naturally loved Coco, and Coco loved the humans. Does this mean that Coco and the humans should have gotten down with hot monkey sex? No. Because that is gross, and weird, and wrong, and about a thousand ways to Sunday creepy. Yet, the extent of the communication between Swamp Thing and our heroine is actually less than Coco's communication and understanding with her human caretakers. The book gives us a couple of chapters with Swamp Thing's POV and I gotta tell ya, I wasn't impressed. Sure, his thoughts were sweet, pure, and simple. But, they were NOT sexy. And, not that particularly intelligent. Yes, it is sentient, but not even close to being like us. To me, this made the idea of Swampy Sexy Times very icky. See? My name's not even Doreen. Swamp Thing is a moron.But, if you could erase all of the mental images I just put into your head, you will love this book. Because it is intriguing and has a fun throw-back to the 1950's feel to it. It's totally worth reading.
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  • Tina Haigler
    January 1, 1970
    4 1/2 stars! This book was beautiful. I can't think of any other way to describe it. The story, the characters, the words themselves. It was all beautiful. The best way I can think of to describe the way this book made me feel is I'm a shoreline and the words in this book are the waves in the ocean, coming and going, each time leaving something, but also taking something with them when they leave.The book is split into four parts. Parts one and two are mostly storytelling, atmosphere building, a 4 1/2 stars! This book was beautiful. I can't think of any other way to describe it. The story, the characters, the words themselves. It was all beautiful. The best way I can think of to describe the way this book made me feel is I'm a shoreline and the words in this book are the waves in the ocean, coming and going, each time leaving something, but also taking something with them when they leave.The book is split into four parts. Parts one and two are mostly storytelling, atmosphere building, and character development. Parts three and four are where most of the action is. Getting through the first two parts is worth it, once the story picks up pace and the excitement starts. To be honest, the first half of the book is very interesting but it's not very exciting. You can tell from the length of the chapters if it is going to be storytelling or action. Anything over two pages is storytelling. I really enjoyed the pace of the action chapters and how quickly it switches points of view. It gave a sense of urgency to the story.The characters were amazing as well. Even the characters I didn't like were fascinating. There's the main protagonist, Elisa, an orphan who is mute, works as a janitor, and has a serious shoe fetish. Also her next door neighbor Giles, an elderly, homosexual artist, her best friend Zelda, a fellow janitor, Hoffstetler, a Russian scientist assigned to the creature, and the creature, of course, who was never given a name, was sometimes referred to as the asset. The main antagonist is Strickland, a military man, in charge of the creature. We also have POV chapters of his wife, Mrs. Strickland, but she is more of a connecting character, interacting with characters of the main story but never interacting with the main story itself.I didn't love Elisa but I didn't hate her. She kind of wallowed in her own pity and I'm never fond of that. She had a terrible upbringing though so I tried to be sympathetic. I did love Giles, Zelda, and the creature though. Zelda has that spunk that I love to see in characters and Giles was just a sweet old man. The creature was magnificent and I would've loved to learn more about him. Hoffstetler was more of a gray character. You never really knew if he would do the right thing or not. Strickland was one of my favorites to read. I have always been obsessed with psychology and how different minds work, so reading his POV was frightening and at the same time fascinating. As far as the wife, I was pretty neutral towards her but liked her more toward the end. I also liked knowing how interconnected the characters were even though they didn't realize it.Definitely an enjoyable, moving book. My only issue was I wish the action would've picked up before the second half of the book. It took a little too long to get to the suspense. Now I'm very excited to watch the movie. I hope they did the book justice.*Side note: I also listened to this on audiobook. The narrator was excellent and each person had a different voice. The accents were great and I could tell who was talking without looking at the book or hearing names. I highly recommend listening to this one if you enjoy audiobooks.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars.....After finally deciding to watch the movie (that I enjoyed MUCH more than I thought I would) just had to checkout what Guillermo del Toro did with the book....and so glad I did!....The setting is Cold War era America 1962, and unlike the flick, the novel begins with a human monster....Richard Strickland....assigned a dangerous mission in the sweltering jungles and rain forests of South America to locate and capture a legendary new life form, i.e. Gill-God...Man-Fish with supernatura 4.5 Stars.....After finally deciding to watch the movie (that I enjoyed MUCH more than I thought I would) just had to checkout what Guillermo del Toro did with the book....and so glad I did!....The setting is Cold War era America 1962, and unlike the flick, the novel begins with a human monster....Richard Strickland....assigned a dangerous mission in the sweltering jungles and rain forests of South America to locate and capture a legendary new life form, i.e. Gill-God...Man-Fish with supernatural powers.....Now, flash forward to Baltimore and Elisa Esposito....poor, lonely and trapped in a world of silence and isolation; she sleeps by day and travels by night to her graveyard shift janitorial job at a high security government laboratory. Her only two friends, a witty co-worker Zelda Fuller and a gay, aging artist neighbor Giles Gunderson complete the realm of her existence....until the asset appears and begins to monopolize her thoughts and dreams.....THE SHAPE OF WATER is a unique fairy tale love story that requires the reader to step out of the real world into one of fantasy and science fiction.....The movie is wonderfully atmospheric of the time with beautiful music. The novel (for me) was even better....creepier....with more storyline....the villain more evil....with del Toro's usual ewwww moments, BUT....I would have been a bit confused at the start had I not first seen the movie.....One final note...warning. There are a couple of shocking animal incidents. (one with a cat)
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  • Mohammed Arabey
    January 1, 1970
    A Brilliant Novelizations...For a Magical Movie..Of Hope and Acceptance and Love
  • Anniebananie
    January 1, 1970
    Ok lasst mich klarstellen: auch wenn ich laut goodreads fast einen Monat gebraucht habe um dieses Buch zu beenden stimmt das so nicht ganz. Denn eigentlich hab ich das Buch an 2 Nachmittagen beendet, nur lagen diese Nachmittage leider recht weit auseinander 🤷🏼♀Der Grund ist, dass das Buch meiner Meinung nach einfach nichts für nebenbei ist. Die Thematik und der Schreibstil erfordern einfach die volle Aufmerksamkeit und Konzentration des Lesers.Der Schreibstil ist zwar nicht einfach, aber so geni Ok lasst mich klarstellen: auch wenn ich laut goodreads fast einen Monat gebraucht habe um dieses Buch zu beenden stimmt das so nicht ganz. Denn eigentlich hab ich das Buch an 2 Nachmittagen beendet, nur lagen diese Nachmittage leider recht weit auseinander 🤷🏼‍♀️Der Grund ist, dass das Buch meiner Meinung nach einfach nichts für nebenbei ist. Die Thematik und der Schreibstil erfordern einfach die volle Aufmerksamkeit und Konzentration des Lesers.Der Schreibstil ist zwar nicht einfach, aber so genial und bildgewaltig und dabei auch einfach schonungslos und brutal.Auch die Story an sich ist so. Unser Bösewicht Richard Strickland zeigt einem die Abgründe der menschlichen Psyche auf und das Buch behandelt so viele wichtige Themen: u.a. Rassismus, Homophobie und die schlechte Stellung der Frauen in den 60er Jahren.Das Ende war auch zu meiner vollsten Zufriedenheit!Was lässt sich sonst zu diesem Buch sagen? Es ist einfach anders als alle Bücher, die ich bisher gelesen habe und will nun auf jeden Fall auch noch den Film sehen 🎥
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  • Robin (Bridge Four)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsBuddy read at This was a beautifully told story about so many individuals that just didn’t fit into the time or place they were born into and how each touched the others life. I thoroughly enjoyed this story. The prose is beautiful and it helped me connect to each of the characters in a different way. It makes me want to protect Elisa, our mute heroine that finds little ways to defy authority and be the woman she is. She is a good friend to those she cares for and so easy to love in he 4.5 StarsBuddy read at This was a beautifully told story about so many individuals that just didn’t fit into the time or place they were born into and how each touched the others life. I thoroughly enjoyed this story. The prose is beautiful and it helped me connect to each of the characters in a different way. It makes me want to protect Elisa, our mute heroine that finds little ways to defy authority and be the woman she is. She is a good friend to those she cares for and so easy to love in her loneliness There’s a mirror here in the bedroom, too, but she chooses not to look at it, just in case her hunch is true and she’s invisible. Then there is Giles a man later in years who was born into a time where his sexual preference is deemed deviant and it has cost him so much be he remains true to the man he is. I loved him and I really wanted to find a nice man to set him up with. Of everyone in the story he deserved a happy ending too. This is, in short, the magic of art. To concede the possibility of being captured in this way is to actively collaborate with the artist. By God, Giles thinks, it’s true: They are not so different from each other. Giles might still, under the right light, bathed in the right water, be beautiful, too. Lainie made me so grateful that I was not a woman in that time. She did her duty and married someone to keep house for and bare children. Someone, who would make all the decisions as she cleaned and toiled. But what happens when he leaves for 18 months and she made all the decisions and felt the control and freedom of running her own life. How is she supposed to go back to being just a Mrs. Strickland and not Elaine anymore? How do you go back to only crawling after learning to walk? Inside these boxes are seventeen months of a different life. One that had knocked her off the well-trod path she’d been on since she was a little girl: dating, marriage, children, homemaking. Pulling items from those boxes—it’s like ripping organs from that other version of herself, that woman of ambition and energy and promise. The whole thing is silly, she knows that. She’ll get to it. She will. Even the scientist that would normally be the bad guy in a book like this is someone I wished had a different life with more chances. He was a man caught between impossible choices but I liked how he saw not only our fish man but people in general. “The most intelligent of creatures,” he offers softly, “often make the fewest sounds.” And Strickland. Watching him decay into the worst version of himself a small step at a time was just horrifying. Knowing his thought processes and why he made certain choices too was as awful as it was insightful. I HATED HIM as soon as he said Fanciful fables don’t deserve to live. but then he got so much worse and by the end he felt like true evil.The Dovonian (fish guy) is fantastic. At first when I heard there was going to be some boom-chicka-bow-wow between him and Elisa I was a little leery of that. It’s all well and good in shapeshifter novels and PNR but I wasn’t convinced that it was going to work for me. Surprisingly I’m totally okay with fishman love. It was actually a bit beautiful how they communicated and after the ending it completely felt right for them to have that moment. I adored getting a few PoVs from the Devonian to really understand his thinking patterns and such. It humanized him as more than a creature and made the story that much more special.This is a fantastic story of hope, doing the right thing and being okay with being different. It showed how each of us might feel alone, but we are connected in so many little ways to so many people that you are never truly alone.Audio Note: This is one of my absolute favorite audio narrations of the year. Jenna Lamia was spectacular in her narrative performance. I loved her performance of this and will look for other books narrated by her.
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  • Bark
    January 1, 1970
    If you don’t know the story yet, The Shape of Water is about a Sea God that is captured by an evil man who considers himself a Jungle God. The Sea God is taken to a laboratory where he is held captive and subjected to torture by human monsters who want to destroy this thing they don’t understand. A mute janitor named Elisa shows him kindness and brings him eggs and music and they fall in love.If you’ve ever had a little secret crush on The Creature from the Black Lagoon this is the book that was If you don’t know the story yet, The Shape of Water is about a Sea God that is captured by an evil man who considers himself a Jungle God. The Sea God is taken to a laboratory where he is held captive and subjected to torture by human monsters who want to destroy this thing they don’t understand. A mute janitor named Elisa shows him kindness and brings him eggs and music and they fall in love.If you’ve ever had a little secret crush on The Creature from the Black Lagoon this is the book that was written for you. Even if you haven’t, it might be the book for you!There is brutality and ickiness but the sweet romance provides a nice contrast.This book is based on the movie of the same name and if you enjoyed the movie, I think you should read the book too. I was expecting an emotionless rehashing of the screenplay but that’s not at all what I got. The story is fleshed out most excellently as are all of the characters. The first ¼ reads like an action adventure novel that takes place in the jungle. We see bad guy Strickland in action and he does some horrible, depraved things that end up haunting him throughout the story. There is so much more here than what was shown in the film that you need to know, if you’re anything like me. Strickland’s wife even has a storyline that I found interesting. She is the typical perfect 50’s/60’s wife but she’s not thrilled with her lot in life and longs for more and actually takes the steps to do so causing Strickland to become more unhinged as the book progresses. I loved seeing that bastard get beaten down. We also get to know Zelda and Giles and the Russian scientist on a much deeper level as well.Now about that fish love, and I know that’s why you’re here, it works spectacularly in the book and it’s not at all “icky” (the ickiness only came from Strickland and his rotting fingers and garbage thoughts). The romance develops too quickly in the movie for my tastes (I’m never a fan of insta-love even if the male is a Sea God) but here there’s time for it to develop at a natural pace as they communicate through sign language and his physical color changes that he controls to show his emotions and calm situations for anyone paying close enough attention - and Elisa is. We get to know Elisa and are allowed in on all of her intimate thoughts. We even get a bit of the Sea God’s perspective which I LOVED. He’s primitive and gentle in his thoughts and has another way of looking at life that felt genuine to who he was before being ripped from the calmness and savage beauty of the jungle. This is a unique and strange love story and I really and truly am glad I took some time to read it. 4 ½ Stars
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  • Malacorda
    January 1, 1970
    ...and the oscar goes to... Questa lettura presta inesorabilmente il fianco ad un bilancio (per quanto provvisorio) delle peggiori letture del 2018. Se ho assegnato due stelline alla Romano, a Zeichen e – per motivi opposti – alla Meyer, qui proprio non posso andare oltre la stellina singola: ed è così che il libro vince il premio per il peggior libro dell'anno, perché sarà difficile trovare di peggio. Mai titolo fu più azzeccato: questo libro mi è scivolato via proprio come acqua tra le dita. A ...and the oscar goes to... Questa lettura presta inesorabilmente il fianco ad un bilancio (per quanto provvisorio) delle peggiori letture del 2018. Se ho assegnato due stelline alla Romano, a Zeichen e – per motivi opposti – alla Meyer, qui proprio non posso andare oltre la stellina singola: ed è così che il libro vince il premio per il peggior libro dell'anno, perché sarà difficile trovare di peggio. Mai titolo fu più azzeccato: questo libro mi è scivolato via proprio come acqua tra le dita. A metà strada tra la favoletta, la sceneggiatura hollywoodiana e l'operetta stile Andrea Vitali, perfettamente nel solco di cose come "E.T." o "Splash, una sirena a Manhattan" o il più recente "Avatar": il pattern e il cast sono sempre gli stessi, i personaggi-stereotipo ci sono proprio tutti, non ne manca uno. Anzi no, per completare il quadro mi mancherebbe un nazista dell'Illinois. Anche tenendo doverosamente conto di queste premesse, la lettura è appena appena potabile. La narrazione ha un ritmo cadenzato che sulle prime mi è risultato piacevole, ma per la maggior parte del tempo mi ha spazientito. Terribilmente noiosi i tentativi di approfondimento psicologico e patetici i tentativi di approccio filosofico. Interessanti alcuni piccoli dettagli e accorgimenti della costruzione narrativa (tra i quali l'attento uso dei colori nella parte descrittiva), ma nel complesso non mi ha dato emozioni e non mi ha coinvolto. A più riprese sono stata lì lì per abbandonarlo, ho terminato solo sull'onda del sentimento "fatto trenta, facciamo trentuno": e tutto sommato è stata la scelta giusta, perché arrivata al termine del libro, dopo una tale infilata di banalità e stereotipi, il finale mi ha colto con un briciolino di sorpresa e ha restituito un pizzico di significato a tutto il mappazzone che precede.
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/04/28/...Described as one half of a “bold two-tiered release”, The Shape of Water is the companion novel to the Guillermo del Toro film of the same name. But what exactly does this mean? Curiosity piqued, I decided to do some digging around, and found out that the idea for a story about a mute woman falling in love with an imprisoned river monster actually came to author Daniel Kraus when he was a teenager. In the years that follow 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/04/28/...Described as one half of a “bold two-tiered release”, The Shape of Water is the companion novel to the Guillermo del Toro film of the same name. But what exactly does this mean? Curiosity piqued, I decided to do some digging around, and found out that the idea for a story about a mute woman falling in love with an imprisoned river monster actually came to author Daniel Kraus when he was a teenager. In the years that followed, he continued to incubate the concept, until a meeting with del Toro became the spark that motivated Kraus to finally write the novel. The director also expressed interest in turning the idea into a movie, and so, both projects went forward at the same time while the two creators kept in touch. Eventually though, Kraus decided he wanted to finish his book without knowing any more about the film, so at that point both author and director agreed to each proceed with their own individual interpretation of the story.As a result, while there are many similarities between the movie and novel, there are quite a few differences as well. The key elements, however, are the same: the setting is 1962 Baltimore, at the height of the Cold War; the protagonist is Elisa Esposito, a woman who has been mute her whole life; and the conflict begins when Elisa, working as a night janitor at the Occam Aerospace Research Center, meets and falls in love with the laboratory’s top secret asset—an amphibious man captured from the Amazon.From the moment Elisa first laid eyes on him, she was enraptured by his terrifying beauty. He was worshipped as a god where he came from, but now he is a prisoner and an experiment to be studied for Cold War advancements. Day after day, he is tormented by Richard Strickland, the soldier who spent nearly two years hunting rumors of a “fish man” through the South American rainforest before he finally caught up with his prey. At the research center, Elisa is the only person who shows the creature any kind of compassion, secretly teaching him sign language so the two of them can communicate. Later, when Strickland’s plans to dissect the amphibious man come to light, Elisa and her friends risk everything to save her beloved with the help of an impassioned scientist who is also an undercover Russian spy.I opted to watch the movie before tackling this book—a decision I’m glad I made, because I think it helped me understand and appreciate the story more fully once I experienced both mediums in this order. There are differences between them, but not really so much that calling this one a novelization would be wholly inaccurate, since after all, both film and book follow the same basic plotline and events. And yet, what I got here also turned out to be much more than what I watched on screen. One major difference comes to light right off the bat, with the book opening on Strickland’s POV as he makes his trek through the Amazon jungle trying to capture the river creature. The novel definitely gives us a more well-rounded picture of the story’s villain—not enough to get us to truly sympathize with him perhaps, but these early chapters do go a long way in explaining why he might be so messed up. The second major difference in the book version is the subplot involving Strickland’s wife Lanie, whose character was almost a non-entity in the film. In contrast, she is a powerful presence in the novel, her sections adding a great deal of depth to the story by expanding the narrative beyond the events taking place at Occam.Other than that, the characters and their roles are generally very similar between both versions. Readers do get to enjoy a few extra perks in prose form, however, namely being able to get into the heads of the characters, thus gaining more insight into their thoughts and emotions. Supporting personalities like Zelda, Giles, and Mr. Hoffstetler were all better developed, and once or twice, we even get brief glimpses into the mind of the amphibian man himself. Since neither he nor Elisa could speak in the film, audiences were limited with regards to the interpretion of what the characters were thinking or feeling, but this was obviously not an issue in the book where readers were actually able to experience the story from their perspectives.The writing was also beautiful, and there were definitely a few scenes in this tale where only the written format could do them justice. Unfortunately, those were not the love scenes, which, as some other reviewers have already pointed out, were dismally bad. To be fair though, I was never too keen on the romance to begin with; Elisa’s character always struck me as too guileless and practically childlike, while the narrative kept driving home the point that the creature was at his core an animal. With these images in mind, thinking about the two of them together simply became a little too disturbing and off-putting.Still, narratively speaking, overall The Shape of Water was a fascinating and worthwhile journey. Although I was unable to enjoy the romance on an emotional level, I nonetheless felt a connection with many of the characters, and the premise itself appealed to my sense of wonder and imagination. I would highly recommend this book if you enjoy character-driven stories with a touch of the uncanny and fantastical, or if you are interested in the subgenre many have come to describe as fairy tales for the modern age.Audiobook Comments: I was quite impressed with the narration by Jenna Lamia, whose lilting voice made for a good fit with this novel. She brought the tale to life with her pitch-perfect tones, accents, and inflections, adding another layer of personality to the characters. It made for a very rich and enjoyable listening experience.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Buddy read with the wonderful weekly UF Wednesday group over at BB&B. To love,In its many forms and shapes. The dedication of this book sums up so perfectly just what this book is about. It’s about being different, struggling in the box the world tries to force you into because it can’t understand and accept your difference and finally breaking free to fight for those you love. I absolutely loved the beautiful writing, the amazing characters, their depth of feelings whether it was from Buddy read with the wonderful weekly UF Wednesday group over at BB&B. To love,In its many forms and shapes. The dedication of this book sums up so perfectly just what this book is about. It’s about being different, struggling in the box the world tries to force you into because it can’t understand and accept your difference and finally breaking free to fight for those you love. I absolutely loved the beautiful writing, the amazing characters, their depth of feelings whether it was from the villain’s POV (and what a despicable monster he is) or the few heroes and how everything showed just how immoral some humans can be but also how heroic, how good others are. I can’t recommend this book enough. READ IT.
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  • Dana Al-Basha دانة الباشا
    January 1, 1970
    What a weird, magical, romantic movie! The colors (green and red) reminded me a lot of the french movie Amélie, but it's much less innocent. I thought that Eliza Esposito would be a Mexican who met the monster as a kid, and he marked her to know her later, and by the end she will be like him an Amphibian, and her voice would return to her... that didn't happen though, I guess my imagination is even wilder than the movie.
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  • Sara Saif
    January 1, 1970
    I was beyond excited for this. Ever since I saw the trailer. I haven’t seen the film which only made me more curious for it. Pan’s Labrynth and Pacific Rim are two of my all-time favorite films. I love them with all my heart and I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve seen them. This looked to be similar and it was, the Guillermo Del Toro visual aesthetic was leaping off the page, the imagery was vivid in my mind, its sharpness boosted by the trailer. Strangely though, you don’t see the acto I was beyond excited for this. Ever since I saw the trailer. I haven’t seen the film which only made me more curious for it. Pan’s Labrynth and Pacific Rim are two of my all-time favorite films. I love them with all my heart and I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve seen them. This looked to be similar and it was, the Guillermo Del Toro visual aesthetic was leaping off the page, the imagery was vivid in my mind, its sharpness boosted by the trailer. Strangely though, you don’t see the actors as the characters, your mind creates its own impression of the character.There’s always a mild reservation whilst reading novelizations of films or video games. They sometimes tend to be bland, the latter more so than the former. I’ve read Assassin’s Creed which was so bad I went nuts and Pacific Rim which was quite alright. And I don’t think this book was bland and toneless in that way, regarding prose. I liked the book not only because I was intensely curious and eager to find out more but also because I enjoyed the flow of words.But after reading it all, I feel it was bland, in the sense that the whole story while appealing to watch I’m sure, on paper seems so uneventful. The visual appeal is off the charts, it really is. That was what stoked me and kept me enthralled throughout, the imagery. But the story itself is limited. The focus is on the emotional side of things, the book is extremely character-driven and there is a great amount of detail about each of them. That cut the potential and room for more fantasy stuff.I wanted to know more about Deus Brânquia, the amphibious man, how the government found out about him, how he came into being, how did his kind die out, how was Elisa (view spoiler)[one herself (hide spoiler)], more about the fantastical side of things of which there wasn’t much at all. This is where I feel the story lost its spell, more than halfway through I realized that we weren’t getting any answers about any of these things. It’s a tale of a mute woman and a centuries old creature’s extraordinary love. This is the box the story is confined in, which again, I’m incredibly certain is a treat to watch but this lack of broadness killed it for me near the end. The spell broke.However, and I could tell, that the book does a much better job at explaining the personalities and motivations of the people in the story. It fleshes them out in a way that the film wouldn’t have been able to and it was intriguing because of that too. Two or three chapters are from the creature’s perspective as well which was absolutely great.I was not disappointed by The Shape of Water. But as a reader who always leans towards and yearns to know more about the supernatural side of things, I came close.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    congratulations on the oscars! 👏🏼🎉💧🏆
  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Poetic, beautiful, far more emotional than the movie. Some scenes were different than the movie but still, this is one of the few times where both book and movie have amazed me equally!
  • Jaya
    January 1, 1970
    My second movie-to-book-adaptation. Very satisfactory read (both). Why am I surprised that both (movies) were made by the same guy!I vote for more such movie-to-book things! There are so many that I would love to read as a story. If all the powers that be is/are listening i.e.
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  • Lieblingsleseplatz
    January 1, 1970
    Elisa ist stumm und putzt in einem geheimen US–Militärlabor. Dort entdeckt sie ein Wasserwesen, das dort gefangen gehalten wird. Nun ist es ja in den 60ern so, dass kaum jemand einer Frau Gehör schenkt – schon gar keiner stummen Frau… aber der Wassermann schon. Er „hört“ auf Elisas Kommunikationsversuche und lernt von ihr die Gebärdensprache. Eine zunächst zarte Freundschaft entwickelt sich. Doch schon bald muss sich Elisa entscheiden, was sie bereit ist für diese Freundschaft aufs Spiel zu setz Elisa ist stumm und putzt in einem geheimen US–Militärlabor. Dort entdeckt sie ein Wasserwesen, das dort gefangen gehalten wird. Nun ist es ja in den 60ern so, dass kaum jemand einer Frau Gehör schenkt – schon gar keiner stummen Frau… aber der Wassermann schon. Er „hört“ auf Elisas Kommunikationsversuche und lernt von ihr die Gebärdensprache. Eine zunächst zarte Freundschaft entwickelt sich. Doch schon bald muss sich Elisa entscheiden, was sie bereit ist für diese Freundschaft aufs Spiel zu setzten. Denn dem Wassermann droht das Seziermesser …„Wenn du so oder so durch das Wasser waten musst, ist es egal, ob es warm oder kalt ist.“ (Pierre Teilhard de Chardin)Das Wesen – halb Mensch, halb Amphibie wird ganz wunderbar gezeichnet, auch der Bösewicht Strickland ist mehr als nur böse. Der Leser wird an die Hand genommen und bekommt tiefe Einblicke in die menschlichen Hintergründe jedes Charakters.Ganz spannend: Guillermo del Toro und Daniel Kraus haben zwar zusammen den Plot entwickelt, dann hat aber del Toro das Drehbuch und Kraus das Buch unabhängig voneinander geschrieben. Das merkt man an vielen Abweichungen wie ich schon hörte. Den Film habe ich nämlich bis jetzt noch nicht gesehen. Das Setting ist ganz fantastisch. Kulisse und auch die zeitlichen Gegebenheiten sind absolut detailreich und bildgewaltig beschrieben. Rassismus, Frauenfeindlichkeit, Homophobie sind geschickt eingebaut und auch in der heutigen Zeit gar nicht so abwegig… Der Stil ist nicht einfach. Ich gebe zu, ich hab mich echt zwingen müssen nicht aufzugeben. Aber es lohnt sich. Kein Buch zum nebenher wegdösen. Wer allerdings mit Konzentration und Ausdauer an das Buch heran geht, der wird mit einem mehr als überraschenden Finale belohnt!
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  • Rusty Grey
    January 1, 1970
    Frankly . I wouldn't have read this book if it wasn't based on the movie . I haven't yet watched it . But it has won the Oscar for best picture and is directed by one of my favorite directors . The Shape Of Water is a romance drama story with fantastical elements set in the backdrop of the Cold War . If this was only a book , I wouldn't even have given it a chance. Elisa Esposito , a mute woman , works as a cleaning woman in a secret government facility . There she meets a humanoid amphibian cr Frankly . I wouldn't have read this book if it wasn't based on the movie . I haven't yet watched it . But it has won the Oscar for best picture and is directed by one of my favorite directors . The Shape Of Water is a romance drama story with fantastical elements set in the backdrop of the Cold War . If this was only a book , I wouldn't even have given it a chance. Elisa Esposito , a mute woman , works as a cleaning woman in a secret government facility . There she meets a humanoid amphibian creature in captivation and falls in love with him . And the rest of the plot is entirely predictable . No way anyone could have made me read this novel . But still , for Mr. Guillermo del Toro's vision and the infusion of fairy tale and monster tale , I give 3 stars to this book . Though I have a feeling that this novel will be dry , and little underwhelming , compared to its silver screen sibling which I am going to see right now . And I have to say this : Mr. Jimmy Kimmel took a crack on the movie saying that this year will be remembered as the year in which men screwed so bad that women started dating fish . That is funny . But I still consider 2005 as the worst year . For both men and women . When teenager girls started dating 100 year old vampires .
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  • Pippa DaCosta
    January 1, 1970
    Not gonna lie, I just wanna read this for the fish sex and the cat eating.
  • Juli
    January 1, 1970
    An expedition from the Occam Aerospace Research Center treks into the Amazon to find the legendary Gill God, an aquatic creature rumored to live there. They capture it and bring it back to Baltimore. Elisa is mute and works as a janitor at the facility. While her muteness cuts her off from some facets of society or makes people treat her differently, she finds ways to express herself like wearing colorful shoes she loves to work. Nobody else does janitorial work in high heels, but it makes Elisa An expedition from the Occam Aerospace Research Center treks into the Amazon to find the legendary Gill God, an aquatic creature rumored to live there. They capture it and bring it back to Baltimore. Elisa is mute and works as a janitor at the facility. While her muteness cuts her off from some facets of society or makes people treat her differently, she finds ways to express herself like wearing colorful shoes she loves to work. Nobody else does janitorial work in high heels, but it makes Elisa happy. When she befriends the man-fish creature they have trapped in a holding tank at Occam, she feels she understands his feelings of being trapped, the emotions he must feel about being "other'' and misunderstood. She knows that the creature will die if kept in captivity, so she hatches a plan to rescue him. The Creature From the Black Lagoon is my favorite monster movie. When the film version of this story won academy awards, I knew I had to read the book....and then watch the film. I have a firm rule....always read the book first. So I did -- even though with this particular story the film and book were released at the same time. The film concept came first.....the book after. A special situation....but I still followed my rule. I read the book. And I now have the sealed Blu Ray Disc on my desk to watch later today. :) I'm glad I read this story. While it is about the capture of a creature from the wild, it's also a complex commentary on how society treats those who are different. Other characters in the book also feel that "otherness''....Elisa is mute. Giles is gay. Strickland has PTSD. His wife yearns for more in an era where women are supposed to be content being wives and mothers. Zelda is black and trapped in a bad marriage. Dr. Hoffstetler has a deep desire for knowledge and scientific discovery but is victimized by the politics and greed of others. It isn't just the "monster'' that's trapped. Elisa ends up having emotional ties to the fish creature. While that is a bit disconcerting if looking at things in a realistic manner....this story isn't realistic. It's fantasy. So the story line and ending work perfectly. This story left me feeling very thoughtful about life, my place in it and my own sense of "otherness.'' Sometimes you just have to find inner freedom within individuality. But I do sympathize with the creature in the tank.....I'm sure we all feel a bit chained at times. Beautiful story! I can't wait to watch the movie!
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  • « Court (Take the Read) »
    January 1, 1970
    Third person, Multi-POV, HAE. Standalone. Try to imagine it. Eons of loneliness, and then one day, your ellipses peaks toward that of another planet and there is a gasp of nearness. Wouldn't you try to make the most of it? Wouldn't you, too, combust and flare and explode if you had to? It's been a long time since I've experienced a book like this. The fantasy aspect drew me in, but the souls of the people telling the story kept me reading. It's intelligent, sometimes horrifying, and eventually a Third person, Multi-POV, HAE. Standalone. Try to imagine it. Eons of loneliness, and then one day, your ellipses peaks toward that of another planet and there is a gasp of nearness. Wouldn't you try to make the most of it? Wouldn't you, too, combust and flare and explode if you had to? It's been a long time since I've experienced a book like this. The fantasy aspect drew me in, but the souls of the people telling the story kept me reading. It's intelligent, sometimes horrifying, and eventually a reckoning of each character realizing that in order to achieve everything you're meant to, you should shelter and save something greater than you.There are quite a few characters narrating this book, but really there are two warring personalities that stand out the most: Elisa and Strickland.Strickland was a tough character to read. We open in 1962, with him just leaving Korea during the war and tasked with hunting and capturing a mythical creature in the Amazon. His inner dialogue is haunting -- a man, broken by the wilds of war and jungle. He's ruthless, cruel and above all craves for his assignment with the Gill-god to be over.Elisa is the mute girl, 14 years spent at Occam Lab in Baltimore, MD. Her only friends, Zelda from work and Giles, another tenant in her building atop an old theater, learning sign language to communicate with her. She's innocent, but strong, and when she discovers the hidden subject in F-1, she acknowledges immediately that this beautiful creature shouldn't be locked in a lab. She knows that she's been the thing in the water before. She's been the voiceless one from whom men have taken without ever asking what she wanted. She can be kinder than that. She can balance the scales of life. She can do what no man ever tries to do with her: communicate. Dr. Hofstetter is an undercover agent for the Russians, tasked with gathering intel on American scientific studies, and tasked with overseeing the study of the creature. He, too, realizes that something so mystical shouldn't be bound and tortured by Strickland, but can't make a move without his leader's say so. In some ways, he suddenly feels, this creature in F-1 is an angel that, having deigned to grace our world, had been promptly shot down, pinned to a corkboard, and mislabeled as a devil. And he was a part of it. His soul might never recover. So many contributing insights into these character's opinions about what should happen with the Deus Branquia - the Amazonian name for the creature - but only one that truly matters to the Gill-god: Elisa's. Throughout weeks of visits and interaction, they form an unshakable bond. Love born of two species who aren't very unalike. There's suspense, a daring escape, self actualization, but above all, sacrifice in order to do the right thing. "The most intelligent of creatures often make the fewest sounds." I couldn't put this one down. Anyone who's a fan of del Toro's previous works like Pan's Labyrinth will enjoy this a lot.'Til next time cuties ;)
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  • Arwen56
    January 1, 1970
    Solita favoletta che prevede il “cattivissimo” (sempre uguale a se stesso e irriducibile nel percorrere la strada sbagliata), la “bella” (ama tutti gli essere diversi, deboli o altrimenti indifesi), la “bestia” (ha qualche difettuccio, ma nell’insieme possiede l’animo più nobile dell’universo) e, naturalmente, i comprimari di diverso genere che aiutano gli eroi nel loro epico cammino.Il finale avrei dovuto immaginarmelo, dato che la mia maestra di prima elementare me l’ha insegnato: i pesci sono Solita favoletta che prevede il “cattivissimo” (sempre uguale a se stesso e irriducibile nel percorrere la strada sbagliata), la “bella” (ama tutti gli essere diversi, deboli o altrimenti indifesi), la “bestia” (ha qualche difettuccio, ma nell’insieme possiede l’animo più nobile dell’universo) e, naturalmente, i comprimari di diverso genere che aiutano gli eroi nel loro epico cammino.Il finale avrei dovuto immaginarmelo, dato che la mia maestra di prima elementare me l’ha insegnato: i pesci sono muti! Scrittura tremenda, neanche a dirsi. Praticamente perfetto per ricavarne un film, come di fatto è successo. Non credo che andrò a vederlo: mi è bastato il trailer.
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  • ✨ Kaira ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Plot - 5Writing style - 3.75Characters - 4Romance - 3.75In which a beautiful 33-year-old mute fell in love with an amphibian man. • plot - I still haven't watch the movie though I can assure you, I will but forgive me, my friends but I don't think I can digest the scene with a cat involvement. So, I guess I'll just skip that part. First off, The Shape of Water strikes me as a pure romance novel at first but boy was I wrong, it has a mixed of action. Truth be told, I was kinda disappointed. Haha. Plot - 5Writing style - 3.75Characters - 4Romance - 3.75In which a beautiful 33-year-old mute fell in love with an amphibian man. • plot - I still haven't watch the movie though I can assure you, I will but forgive me, my friends but I don't think I can digest the scene with a cat involvement. So, I guess I'll just skip that part. First off, The Shape of Water strikes me as a pure romance novel at first but boy was I wrong, it has a mixed of action. Truth be told, I was kinda disappointed. Haha. Anyways, despite that, it was not a major hindrance for me to applaude this novel. The climax sure was amazing. I mean, that's what you call climax, folks! I almost can't read it properly due to how nervous I was. I was like, I have no times for your feelings or whatsoever, just tell me what the antagonist's next move is. One of the things that caught my attention was how the author didn't solely focused on the two main leads. Almost all the prominent characters had their own chapters which to be honest, was both intriguing and somehow boring. But hey, at least there was character development. Like loads of them. • writing style - read it in one sitting but I have to say, there are soooo many chapters that bore the hell out of me. Mainly because of pov of some characters that I hardly care about. Anyways, still, it was still beautifully-written. In short, it's more like it's not you but me. • characters - I love the mute protagonist's strong friendships with her old homosexual neighbor and colored co-worker. The last few chapters were utterly emotional and beautiful. It's been a while since I hate an antagonist like in this one. Man, he was the most sexist slash racist horny motherfucker I've ever read. Many times while reader, I stopped reading for a bit to calm my anger. My blood was surely boiling, I'll tell you that. He was like that antagonist from Tarzan. Forgot his name, sorry. One of the few things I wished was that the author wrote more chapters with the amphibian man for us to get to know his character better. To be honest, I failed to see any character development on him. As if he was just this trophy to all teh characters. • romance - like I said, the amphibian man doesn't really connect well with me though I have to say, I find the scenes between him and the female protaginist okay. The two did slept together but it was not really described so no worries, my sweet innocent Goodreads friends.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I won’t soon forget this incredible book. From everything I had read about it, I thought it would stray from the movie more significantly, but the ways it did were the ways in which I needed more from the story. The chapters from the creatures perspective had me gasping for breath; Kraus’ writing style shines in Strickland as well as the creature itself. I am in love.
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  • Sabrina
    January 1, 1970
    4.25 Sterne ⭐😄Das Buch (und auch der Film) sind ein wahres Erlebnis und haben beide eine ganz eigene Athmosphäre. Ich hatte das Gefühl, in eine komplett andere Welt einzutauchen 👌Mein absolutes Highlight waren die liebevoll gestalteten Nebencharaktere Giles und Zelda, die Elisa immer zur Seite standen ❤ 4.25 Sterne ⭐️😄Das Buch (und auch der Film) sind ein wahres Erlebnis und haben beide eine ganz eigene Athmosphäre. Ich hatte das Gefühl, in eine komplett andere Welt einzutauchen 👌Mein absolutes Highlight waren die liebevoll gestalteten Nebencharaktere Giles und Zelda, die Elisa immer zur Seite standen ❤️
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  • Aja James
    January 1, 1970
    So, this is a bit of a cheat - I was going to buy the book, then realized it was $20+, and decided to watch the movie instead. Really liked the movie. Lots of subtext, made you think. Great artistic ambiance. The "hug" scene was especially rivetting. Definitely deserved the Oscars.
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  • Murf the Surf
    January 1, 1970
    Movie made into a book...What a wonderful tale and not really much to tell other than it is in conformity to the movie. The creature is discovered then extracted from the Brazilian rain Forrest. The creature is held for observation by the U.S. gov't. This period of the tale is supposedly during the cold war times, where Russian spies are out to get secrets and navigate espionage. A young mute woman falls in love with the creature from the black lagoon and fairy tale blossoms into a improbable lo Movie made into a book...What a wonderful tale and not really much to tell other than it is in conformity to the movie. The creature is discovered then extracted from the Brazilian rain Forrest. The creature is held for observation by the U.S. gov't. This period of the tale is supposedly during the cold war times, where Russian spies are out to get secrets and navigate espionage. A young mute woman falls in love with the creature from the black lagoon and fairy tale blossoms into a improbable love story. I felt as though the sex scene was a bit much, but was full of finesse and good taste. The last third of the book deals with his , it's escape. I don't want to tell you the rest in case you've not seen the movie. Peace, Murf
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