This Is How You Lose the Time War
Among the ashes of a dying world, an agent of the Commandant finds a letter. It reads: Burn before reading.And thus begins an unlikely correspondence between two rival agents hellbent on securing the best possible future for their warring factions. Now, what began as a taunt, a battlefield boast, grows into something more.Except discovery of their bond would be death for each of them. There’s still a war going on, after all. And someone has to win that war. That’s how war works. Right?

This Is How You Lose the Time War Details

TitleThis Is How You Lose the Time War
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 16th, 2019
PublisherSaga Press
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Time Travel, Fiction, LGBT, Romance

This Is How You Lose the Time War Review

  • Chaima ✨ شيماء
    January 1, 1970
    “You asked me to tell truths. I have. What do I want? Understanding. Exchange. Victory. A game—hiding and discovery. You’re a swift opponent, Blue. You play long odds. You run the table. If we’re to be at war, we might as well entertain one another.” This Is How You Lose the Time War is the kind of novel that dips in and out of minds, catches the sharp sun of memory and gleams, leaves its scent on its readers, like perfume transferred between lovers. As soon as you start to put more words in, h “You asked me to tell truths. I have. What do I want? Understanding. Exchange. Victory. A game—hiding and discovery. You’re a swift opponent, Blue. You play long odds. You run the table. If we’re to be at war, we might as well entertain one another.” This Is How You Lose the Time War is the kind of novel that dips in and out of minds, catches the sharp sun of memory and gleams, leaves its scent on its readers, like perfume transferred between lovers. As soon as you start to put more words in, however, you stagger and come to bewilderment—like reaching for something and misjudging the distance, feeling your fingers close over nothing but air. My head is still heavy with some fierce thing no matter how many times I sought to identify, name, I couldn’t. I had to read this novel in small doses, swallowing its blows a little at a time and I reckon I’ll need several rereads to figure out all that I can’t say in words right now.Even now, I find it hard to describe the action of the novel, but—without spoiling anything—I can tell you that the first strand running through this loosely-braided narrative came in the form of a letter. The first of its kind was only pretend, an instant of self-indulgence, something like laying laughter over the dark, but it begun a circling of time for Red, the past cutting into the present like a whetted blade. The second letter was an abyss daring her to fall inside, and Red had a sense that she and Blue were all digging themselves deeper than ever before. By the third letter, Red felt that they were cutting their own throats by this: Two time traveling spies from rival factions divided between attack and diplomacy who, finding their way—making their way—through world after time-war-ravaged world, made contact and found love—and something that frightened them, too—across a void too profound to bridge with anything other than words.The two women were more real to each other than reflections in a mirror and their scarred and hacked edges had borne witness to too many battles waged against time (and each other). They were like fish eyeing the hook, with too many forces ready to make siege weapons of their letters. In the sheer, shimmering improbability of the moment, however, they could almost pretend this love affair wasn’t a fool’s errand. And we’ll run again, the two of us, upthread and down, firefighter and fire starter, two predators only sated by each other’s words. This Is How You Lose the Time War is not a light read by any stretch. It's a book of sustained beauty and lyricism that also works as a fractured mosaic of a novel—told in swift, brutal strokes, all wound into vertiginous loops of prose.It is difficult, at first, to get a firm grip on the slippery setting of This Is How You Lose the Time War. I felt like a girl hurled unwary into a tale she didn’t understand, with folk all around waiting for her to take up a part she didn’t know. The dim shapes of words remained just beyond understanding, and I had a strong sense of vertigo, like I was free-falling through a huge, dark chasm. There was a dream-like quality to the experience, as if those moments were divorced from the waking world by the strangeness of it all. But even with confusion painted on my face, the story made sense to me in a wordless way that could only be described as magic. Every word was worth savoring, and my own breath seemed to pipe in harmony.Which is why I think the novel would be irreducible by any easy categorization: This Is How You Lose the Time War is a time travel adventure, a sci-fi romp, poetry masquerading as prose, and a love story. It’s an intricate dance, and one that the authors render with agility, grace and ease. That they could pull it off at all—let alone so winningly—is something of a marvel itself, and I was left genuinely impressed.While This Is How You Lose the Time War is not written in verse, poetry lives in its pages. The authors are in thrilling command of their narrative gifts, and their language soars as they write of beauty, longing, survival, and freedom.That said, those gifts can double as obstacles. As dizzying and immersive as the setting and premise are, This Is How You Lose the Time War is novel that is both exhilarating and exhausting—sometimes simultaneously. Even as I snatched hungrily at the next page, there were moments when the lyricism felt labored—the sentences so bedecked with metaphors and analogies that reading becomes akin to treading water in sodden clothes, barely keeping your nose and mouth above the surface—and I found myself craving a little restraint. Inside the long economy of a novel, too much prose—no matter how exquisite—can occasionally hamper the otherwise compelling flow, and, I think readers who can’t muster tame patience for tackling a few extra pages of mellifluous language might not find as much resonance.I’m confident, however, that those able to relax into the chaos will be richly rewarded as the strands eventually beautifully entwine together. Dearest, deepest Blue— At the end as at the start, and through all the in-betweens, I love you. Red BLOG | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | TUMBLR
    more
  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Damn excellent SF novella. I won't have any problems nominating this for next year's Hugo. It's poetical, yo. Not only poetical, but delighfully unforced in its romance... even as the time war rages between heavy tech and heavy biopunk up and down multiple timelines in a game of Go! that stretches to near-infinity.Wait. Did I say romance? Yep. Hard SF romance, so light and deft in its hardcore science it becomes a whirlwind of ambiance designed only to paint glorious pictures and denude us in pl Damn excellent SF novella. I won't have any problems nominating this for next year's Hugo. It's poetical, yo. Not only poetical, but delighfully unforced in its romance... even as the time war rages between heavy tech and heavy biopunk up and down multiple timelines in a game of Go! that stretches to near-infinity.Wait. Did I say romance? Yep. Hard SF romance, so light and deft in its hardcore science it becomes a whirlwind of ambiance designed only to paint glorious pictures and denude us in playful taste, hunger, and excitement.The novella is mostly written in epistolary format, which I love, and it evokes so much crazy longing between these two enemies that it is pretty obvious that they have completely fallen for each other by the third exchange. :) Even if they're plotting their opposite's death by strange and subtle threads and means up and down the timelines. :)Gloriously so, the tastes of history are obscure and rich. The format of the letters, even more so. Written in plants, seeds, only readable through taste or stings. Scorched space battlements and desolate beaches, dinosaurs and playful birds. Did I say this was poetry? Poetry as prose? The hunger is palpable, the romance, desperate. Sure, they're post-human women, but the shape doesn't matter when they take whatever shapes they like. The feeling is everything. So how does it turn out? Is it a tragedy? I will not say. But I feel lighter than air after reading this. It deserves a careful read. An engrossing read. A consuming read. :)
    more
  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsThis Is How You Lose the Time War is a novella about a love that transcends time, space and humanity. It's beautiful and lyrical and heartbreaking; it's all of these things and I loved its ending so much that I don't feel like I can do this story justice with a review. Just know that, while this is an epistolary f/f enemies-to-lovers story set during a time-travel war, calling it that feels almost reductive.It follows two entities, "Red" and "Blue", both presenting as women but who don' 4.5 starsThis Is How You Lose the Time War is a novella about a love that transcends time, space and humanity. It's beautiful and lyrical and heartbreaking; it's all of these things and I loved its ending so much that I don't feel like I can do this story justice with a review. Just know that, while this is an epistolary f/f enemies-to-lovers story set during a time-travel war, calling it that feels almost reductive.It follows two entities, "Red" and "Blue", both presenting as women but who don't strictly adhere to our definition of what a human is, and there's a time war. If you're the kind of person who needs to know the reasons and the workings of everything, this won't work for you; it's often vague, but as I didn't feel like much more context was needed, I didn't have a problem with that.The writing in here will be polarizing. At times, I hated it: it was pretentious, and it made me feel like the authors were trying to show off how many pretty sentences they were able to string together without saying that much at all. But in other places it was beautiful and powerful, and the foreshadowing was woven into this story effortlessly - which only makes sense in something about braiding time.And you know what else makes sense? That a story about Red and Blue writing to each other would be 90% Purple prose.In one of my updates, I said that I wondered whether this started out as a short story. If you've ever read some short fiction on online magazines, you probably recognize the metaphor-heavy style and the vagueness of the worldbuilding, and I mean, if I'm going to read something that short, I want something really pretty that will make me feel and won't need that much background to do so. I wouldn't have minded if the authors had toned all of this here a bit down, however.
    more
  • rin 눈_눈 WATCH GOOD OMENS
    January 1, 1970
    i wish i liked it more but it's a little too poetic for me i guess? im not into this type of prose much
  • unknown
    January 1, 1970
    A time travel romance with teeth sharp enough to tear out your still-beating heart.
  • ☙ percy ❧
    January 1, 1970
    first attracted to this because my dr who ass saw the words Time War and fucking gravitated to it like a moth to a flameand i thought it was some sort of literary metaphor but NOPE there's ACTUAL TIME TRAVEL and also SAPPHIC WOMEN in it, and (i think) an enemies to lovers trope??? literally yeet this straight into my letter box pleez
    more
  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    I’ll tell you right upfront, this book is not for everyone. Hard sci-fi readers may be disappointed because even though this book is dependant on time travel, it is more about love and told very poetically. The story begins at the end of a battle. Our two main characters are the top agents for each side: Red from the technology enhanced future versus Blue from the environmental future (these descriptions are subject to my own interpretation as the truth was slightly vague in the story).A message I’ll tell you right upfront, this book is not for everyone. Hard sci-fi readers may be disappointed because even though this book is dependant on time travel, it is more about love and told very poetically. The story begins at the end of a battle. Our two main characters are the top agents for each side: Red from the technology enhanced future versus Blue from the environmental future (these descriptions are subject to my own interpretation as the truth was slightly vague in the story).A message is left by one for the other. It seems to start as a taunt but the messages continue and as they do, things change between Red and Blue. From a sci-fi standpoint, I was fascinated by the strange futures Red and Blue were from although both were described very sparingly. From a romance standpoint, I thought it was very well done. I don’t usually like romance as they are rushed, sloppy and all about the sex. None of those things apply here.From a time travel standpoint, it reminded me of The End of Eternity with the ability to go to specific points in time to tweak things in a certain direction but the war gave this a duelling banjo feel - one side would tweak to their advantage then the other side would tweak to their advantage. When people were from and how they time travelled was never discussed.I can’t say that I’m not a little disappointed with learning so little about the very strange futures Red and Blue come from and also how the war started. Truth be told, now that I’m thinking about it, I really wasn’t told all that much about anything. Wow. The author did a great job sucking me into a story while giving me precious little of what I love (SF and time travel details) and lots of what I don’t love (poetic romance). That’s good writing
    more
  • wanderer (Para)
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received from the publisher (Saga Press) on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Whoa. Just...whoa. Another candidate for "best of 2019" for me. It's like someone distilled almost everything I like into one book - exquisite prose, a high dose of weirdness, a queer relationship, a more literary feel, experimental structure - and the end result is breathtaking. Brilliant in a way I'm not sure a review can illustrate. It has to be read to be believed. I feel almost invincible in our battl ARC received from the publisher (Saga Press) on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Whoa. Just...whoa. Another candidate for "best of 2019" for me. It's like someone distilled almost everything I like into one book - exquisite prose, a high dose of weirdness, a queer relationship, a more literary feel, experimental structure - and the end result is breathtaking. Brilliant in a way I'm not sure a review can illustrate. It has to be read to be believed. I feel almost invincible in our battles’ wake: a kind of Achilles, fleet footed and light of touch. Only in this nonexistent place our letters weave do I feel weak. How I love to have no armor here. Footnote for fans of the romance genre: for the sake of proper expectations, this is a love story but is  not romance  genre-wise - if anyone rec'd it as such...🤦The plot is so simple it's almost not worth describing: two rival agents from the opposite sides of the time war start exchanging letters in secret. A tale as old as time (heh). You can probably guess the broad strokes of where it goes from there and you'd probably be correct, too. But I don't think reducing it like this does it justice. Not even close. It's two lives circling around each other but never quite touching. It's loneliness and longing and finding solace in each other, the war be damned. Technology and nature. It's heady and strange, a book to be savoured rather than devoured.The prose is ridiculously good. Absolutely on the stained glass side - poetic, reminiscent of Samatar's The Winged Histories and practically begging to be read out loud. I could drown in it; I don't know how to give it higher praise than that. Another thing that reminds me of The Winged Histories is that the war itself, which would be front and centre in most books, is merely a background detail, context for the characters and their interactions (the true main focus) but largely glossed over. The alternation between letters and chapters describing where they find them adds to the disconnect. To be clear, it's nowhere near a bad thing - just different. Unconventional.And it's weird in terms of setting, too. Profoundly, gloriously weird. It's a world where poetry is the answer to math riddles, where letters are written in seeds and water and poison and hidden behind eyes, where everything including time is fluid and seemingly anything goes. After all, all is fair in love and war. And that's the beauty of it. Relax, enjoy the wild ride.I wouldn't recommend it to anyone, as it's highly experimental fare, but those of us who fall for the stuff will fall hard. It's absolutely my catnip and I can already see it winning all the awards.Enjoyment: 5/5Execution: 5/5Recommended to: literary fantasy fans, prose fans, those looking for f/f representation, anyone who enjoyed The Gray House / The Winged Histories / The Only Harmless Great Thing / City of Saints and Madmen Not recommended to: those who like their stories straightforward and need to understand what's going on immediatelyMore reviews on my blog, To Other Worlds.
    more
  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    ALL THE STARS!!I'm not sure if I'm reeling from that ending or how the entire book wove and threaded and braided its way into my heart and soul, and how I fell hard for Red and Blue and their long games.It all begins with ruthless agent of the Agency Red finds a letter that reads, "Burn before reading." In it, she finds a taunt, a challenge—her greatest foe has revealed herself. And off she goes in a cat and cat game of win-lose-win, sneaky subterfuge and long and short games of chance and espio ALL THE STARS!!I'm not sure if I'm reeling from that ending or how the entire book wove and threaded and braided its way into my heart and soul, and how I fell hard for Red and Blue and their long games.It all begins with ruthless agent of the Agency Red finds a letter that reads, "Burn before reading." In it, she finds a taunt, a challenge—her greatest foe has revealed herself. And off she goes in a cat and cat game of win-lose-win, sneaky subterfuge and long and short games of chance and espionage with her enemy, Blue, agent of the Garden.But slowly, throughout the years and strands of time and different worlds, their relationship turns into something else. Is it love? Or are they both playing each other to get their side to win? But their time together is running out. Something is following them.Fuck I loved this. It kept twisting and turning so deliciously, with little seeds planted and grown throughout until the grand reveal at the end.And their letters! They started with so much humor and taunting and that competition blossomed into something more—or is it??—and even their relationship was filled with so many twisty-turny ahas that you never really quite know if their feelings are sincere or just another play to get their side to win.The letters were definitely my favorite part, and this is my absolute favorite quote of the entire book because it captures their initial feelings so well. Ha-a Blueser. Your mission objective's in another castle.Hugs and kisses,RedPS The keyboard's coated in slow-acting contact poison. You'll be dead in an hour."So think of this as Spy Vs Spy meets Romeo and Juliet, with two time-crossed spies meeting on a battlefield and engaging in a secret correspondence romance despite being diametrically opposed foes. Also, maybe it's just me but I felt heavy allusions to Red vs Blue, which is hilarious and should be watched by everyone who played video games in the early 2000s (specifically old Halo). Or maybe it's the plot of The Lake House, but with science fiction, Advanced Robotics vs Advanced Gardening, and spies, and without the bad haircuts and Keanu Reeves.Anywho, if you enjoy time travel, sapphic romance, spy shit, lyrical writing, slow burn romance and madcap capers throughout time, this is a must read.Also, I must get a copy of the comedy-version of Romeo and Juliet. Anyone wanna hook me up?I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.Hey, I have a blog, and this review has ~pictures~ The Suspected Bibliophile
    more
  • caitlin ✶
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. ya’ll better not sleep on this adult sci-fi SAPPHIC romance, or else despite this book’s length, the world building, character development and relationship development never felt rushed or crammed in. Though the writing and world building was hard to get into at first, countless sentences and phrases in this are works of art. The only real complaint I have is that I didn’t really connect with Red’s character. Either way, I recommend!
    more
  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    Okay. So. Hmm. I loved the love story aspect of it and generally got the gist of what was going on, but there was some big-picture world building that either went completely over my head (likely) or was missing (possible). Being dumped into the middle of a story that has been going on, off the page, for who-knows-how-long can be disorienting. And maybe it was meant to be. Or maybe I'm just not smart enough for this book. Or maybe it was a mis-step on the part of the authors. Whatever the reason Okay. So. Hmm. I loved the love story aspect of it and generally got the gist of what was going on, but there was some big-picture world building that either went completely over my head (likely) or was missing (possible). Being dumped into the middle of a story that has been going on, off the page, for who-knows-how-long can be disorienting. And maybe it was meant to be. Or maybe I'm just not smart enough for this book. Or maybe it was a mis-step on the part of the authors. Whatever the reason for it, I finished the book feeling like I had missed something, like there was something there that I wasn't getting. Whatever it was, it made me feel stupid and, honestly, like the authors were having a laugh at my expense. I've no doubt that the book will be lauded for its cleverness and some well-meaning person will try to explain it all to me like I'm a four-year-old and I'll end up feeling even more lacking for having not gotten it. And I know that not every book is for every reader and I am obviously not the right readerly fit for this particular volume. But, if you're going to make me feel stupid, do it on a China Mieville level that makes me want to learn more and get smarter and not in a way that feels like I've just read a two hundred-page inside joke that only the "cool" kids will get.Gods. I apparently have feelings about this one and I didn't realize how deeply negative those feelings were until I started typing this. I still liked the love story, though. It felt rather Nick Bantock-ish, which was a nostalgic kind of fun.
    more
  • c,
    January 1, 1970
    But hunger is a many-splendoured thing: it needn’t be conceived in limbic terms, in biology. Hunger, Red – to sate a hunger or to stoke it, to feel hunger as a furnace, to trace its edges like teeth – is this a thing you, singly, know? Have you ever had a hunger that whetted itself on what you fed it, sharpened so keen and bright that it might split you open, break a new thing out? On Reads Rainbow. Rep: wlw mcsGalley provided by publisherThis book is an epistolary f/f time travel enemies-to-l But hunger is a many-splendoured thing: it needn’t be conceived in limbic terms, in biology. Hunger, Red – to sate a hunger or to stoke it, to feel hunger as a furnace, to trace its edges like teeth – is this a thing you, singly, know? Have you ever had a hunger that whetted itself on what you fed it, sharpened so keen and bright that it might split you open, break a new thing out? On Reads Rainbow. Rep: wlw mcsGalley provided by publisherThis book is an epistolary f/f time travel enemies-to-lovers romance. And if that hasn’t hooked you already, then I don’t know what will.This is How You Lose the Time War is about two agents on opposite sides of the war and what starts out as something like a game trying to best one another, leaving behind gloating letters, but becomes something more like an obsession and then a desperate kind of love.This isn’t a book with a lot of plot. It’s a character-driven, slowburning romance, with a science fiction twist to it. There are only two characters in it (although more are mentioned), it’s more like a conversation between the two of them, in which they slowly undo all the hatred they have for the other side and fall in love.One of my favourite things about this book was how well developed the romance was despite the two characters not meeting face to face for the most of it. And then when it does come it has that intensity and obsessiveness that you don’t get to see a lot of in f/f romances. And, honestly, I have no idea how to describe the feeling that gave me. When you’ve had romance after romance that’s soft and gentle (which, obviously, is no bad thing, but when that’s all you get?), and suddenly you get this one that’s not gentle but is intense and desperate in a way that you’ve only ever seen m/m and m/f romances be and it just kind of leaves you speechless (in an amazing way, sure, but not conducive to writing a review). Anyway, it’s like that. And when I say intense, I mean, “will literally tear apart space and time to get to you” level intense.And this is all developed without having the characters meet face to face until right at the end. This book is gonna be my yardstick for good relationship development from now on.Besides all that, this is also just a really really good book. It’s compulsively readable – I meant to do a thread on Twitter while I was reading it, but I completely forgot because I just didn’t want to put it down at all. Part of that is because the writing is so lovely and the other part is the characters just drawing you in, and making you invested in them.This book was one of my most anticipated reads this year since I found out about it, and it really did not disappoint one bit.
    more
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, this one was just meh for me. I could not get into it at all! The love story between Red and Blue was nice and surprising but it just fell flat for me. I had very little invested into this world and their building romance was not enough to draw me into it. I liked the time travel aspect with the jumping from such two extremes. It was fun and unique but I wish the authors would have done so much more with it. It had some promise but did not deliver. The writing was beautiful and the premise Okay, this one was just meh for me. I could not get into it at all! The love story between Red and Blue was nice and surprising but it just fell flat for me. I had very little invested into this world and their building romance was not enough to draw me into it. I liked the time travel aspect with the jumping from such two extremes. It was fun and unique but I wish the authors would have done so much more with it. It had some promise but did not deliver. The writing was beautiful and the premise was strong, I just wish they did more with it.
    more
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    A woman approaches you. She's wearing a dark coat. She reaches into an inside pocket and holds something out. "Hey you," she says, "look at this." You're not entirely sure what you're looking at; but it's beautiful. Multi-faceted like a diamond. Intricate like one of those sculptures where the artist makes stone look like lace. You try to get a closer look, but she whisks it away and holds out her other hand. This one holds something as alien as the first thing, just as beautiful, just as intric A woman approaches you. She's wearing a dark coat. She reaches into an inside pocket and holds something out. "Hey you," she says, "look at this." You're not entirely sure what you're looking at; but it's beautiful. Multi-faceted like a diamond. Intricate like one of those sculptures where the artist makes stone look like lace. You try to get a closer look, but she whisks it away and holds out her other hand. This one holds something as alien as the first thing, just as beautiful, just as intricate, but wholly different. Even as she tells you to look at it she's pulling it away, but there's something new back in her first hand....This is what reading This Is How You Lose The Time War feels like. An onslaught of sharp and beautiful things, one after the other, no context and no mercy. Neither of the heroes, if heroes is even what you could call them, strike me as the kind of women prone to hand-holding, so I guess this makes sense. 'Keep up or drown and I really don't care which,' is a sentiment I could see coming from either one of them. It's certainly how they feel about each other. At first anyway.Every second line of this novella is the kind of startling perfection most other books would hinge their entire selves around. The worldbuilding, or at least the worldbuilding shown to the reader is flashes and reflections, is rich and raises endless questions. It's not hard to picture a multi-volume sci-fi epic set in this world(s), but at the same time I didn't find myself unsatisfied with the briefness of this story. And the inherent briefness of a novella is nine times out of ten my main issue with the format, so that's high praise from me. It was similar to Kai Ashante Wilson's two breathtaking books that way; the prose is rich enough and just challenging enough that each lines carries the weight of two, or three. If you were to strip this prose back to the barest language I suppose you would find a plot that lands on the scant side. Easy to spoil, with beats that aren't impossible to predict. You might notice that a good third of this novella is just two (human? delightfully unclear) woman confessing their feelings for each other in different ways while nothing else really happens. Although I think even in this scenario you'd have be impressed by how time travel is handled here, how all the usual paradox's aren't ignored so much as not even dignified with a response.But anyway, these complaints that might ruin another book mean little here, because you're not stripping the prose away. It'll be there to paint scenes so soft you could almost sink into them, to carve moments so sharp you might look up from your reading to check you're not actually losing blood. When you finish a book like this you know you've read something special. Even if you didn't love it, even if you flat-out hated it, it's something wholly unlike anything else. And wholly different things are rare gifts in this world. This review cross-posted to here (My thanks to netgalley for supplying me with a review copy of this book).
    more
  • imyril
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my. A little book of rivalry and desire, love and war, poetry and time travel. I don’t actually know how I feel about it yet; I might have to come back and bump it up that final star when I review it. It’s light and yet weighty, brief but overlong, and it contains the universe without dwelling on anything too much. It’s a treasure. The only reason it wasn’t 5 stars straight out of the gate is that it’s a little predictable for all its beauty. And it didn’t, in the end, make me cry on the bus Oh my. A little book of rivalry and desire, love and war, poetry and time travel. I don’t actually know how I feel about it yet; I might have to come back and bump it up that final star when I review it. It’s light and yet weighty, brief but overlong, and it contains the universe without dwelling on anything too much. It’s a treasure. The only reason it wasn’t 5 stars straight out of the gate is that it’s a little predictable for all its beauty. And it didn’t, in the end, make me cry on the bus (altho it came damn close) and you know that’s the surest way to my heart. Make it bleed. Very satisfying....and even writing reviews gives me shivers, so damn straight it has been bumped up to 5 stars on reflection!
    more
  • Racheal
    January 1, 1970
    This book is everything. THIS BOOK IS EVERYTHING. This is the best thing I've read since Circe ripped my fucking heart out last year. It's one of those precious, rare books that somehow managed to leave me in great, gasping sobs, but also feeling full to bursting. The kind that feels like it's carved itself into the squishy meat of my heart.Here lies Racheal's heart, officially wrecked by:Dawn, Octavia ButlerJune, 2016A Taste of Honey,  Kai Ashante WilsonJanuary, 2017Circe, Madeline MillerMay, 2 This book is everything. THIS BOOK IS EVERYTHING. This is the best thing I've read since Circe ripped my fucking heart out last year. It's one of those precious, rare books that somehow managed to leave me in great, gasping sobs, but also feeling full to bursting. The kind that feels like it's carved itself into the squishy meat of my heart.Here lies Racheal's heart, officially wrecked by:Dawn, Octavia ButlerJune, 2016A Taste of Honey,  Kai Ashante WilsonJanuary, 2017Circe, Madeline MillerMay, 2018This is How You Lose the Time War, Amal El-Mohtar, Max GladstoneJune, 2019WHOO. Ok. That was just........... So perfect. SO PERFECT. Beautiful and poetic and original and achingly romantic.*Incoherent screaming*
    more
  • VexenReplica
    January 1, 1970
    Dearest bookphiles, A clever way to send you a letter, don't you think? Abusing 21st century internet here in this strand, that is. How easy and simple it is, sending you a direct impact, yet it diffuses itself among the bytes.I must commend your subduction of me through the written word. Intriguing that, throughout the various strands, this is the only one where this was created in multiplex formats, including dead tree, downloadable, auditory, and braille. Personally, I'd prefer it over in Str Dearest bookphiles, A clever way to send you a letter, don't you think? Abusing 21st century internet here in this strand, that is. How easy and simple it is, sending you a direct impact, yet it diffuses itself among the bytes.I must commend your subduction of me through the written word. Intriguing that, throughout the various strands, this is the only one where this was created in multiplex formats, including dead tree, downloadable, auditory, and braille. Personally, I'd prefer it over in Strand 71, where this was completely composed using scented smoke signals. But then again, that's not the way of you or I, is it?The letters were rich in scope, developing the sense of character that is hard to come by in other forms of communication, either written, verbal, or tactile. Additionally, the glimpses into each life, while brief and episodic, created a tension, although as the narrative progressed, for different things. In many ways, this reads like Delany's Empire Star, and if I'm not wrong, in Strand 68, this was co-written with him. Feel free to check me on that. Not that I mind Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone's combination in this strand--I feel this one works much better, at least from a pacing sense. But you need to head, many times, up- and down-thread to make complete sense of the work. This may delight you to hear, or it may make you shy away from it. But I think you'll enjoy it. In this strand, there is a delightful challenge on one of the many websites of this era, called reddit, where there is an "/r/fantasy book bingo challenge," where you must read books that fall into specific categories. I am delighted to inform you that if you choose to participate in this challenge, this will qualify you for: books published in 2019, novella, Local Author for Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) or Massachusetts (US), and 4-Word Title.May I also suggest that next we meet in Strand 100? I've heard your type refer to it as "100-Acre Woods," due to the Garden presence. I think you'll find a new thread to burn there, as well as a new letter to digest...Love,Vex
    more
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Full review is here, on my blog!~This book is absolutely beautifully written, for starters. It’s also often indescribably weird… but not in a bad way. Not at all.This book basically follows two agents from rival sides in a war across time as they communicate with each other, becoming closer with each letter.Most of the letters are very uniquely presented, whether in tea leaves, or lava from an erupting volcano about to engulf Atlantis, and so on and so forth. They are in different periods of tim Full review is here, on my blog!~This book is absolutely beautifully written, for starters. It’s also often indescribably weird… but not in a bad way. Not at all.This book basically follows two agents from rival sides in a war across time as they communicate with each other, becoming closer with each letter.Most of the letters are very uniquely presented, whether in tea leaves, or lava from an erupting volcano about to engulf Atlantis, and so on and so forth. They are in different periods of time, or places on Earth, some of which only happened in some times, and some of which did actually occur in our own timeline, and Red, an agent of The Agency, and Blue, an agent of Garden, always just miss each other, or are observed from afar by the other.Red and Blue are both strange and interesting people. They are human, or, at least humanoid (most of the time. At least one of them is a shapeshifter, you see). Both female, and both either genetically modified and grown, decanted, and heavily modified with cybernetic implants.So, it is obviously super unique, and it was, in fact, unlike anything I’ve ever read in my life. Seeing these two women get closer and closer, and their letters get more and more intimate as the book goes on was really, really enthralling. The letters were absolutely stunningly written (but then, so were the parts between them), and I was clamoring for the next one and the next one as the book went on.There were times that I would have literally no idea what was going on, but, and this is going to sound odd, but stay with me here… it was all part of the experience.Example:“What is the value of pi to sixty-two decimals?”“‘The sedge is withered from the lake, / And no birds sing.'”A fistful of snow skitters across Siri’s face. “If train A leaves Toronto at six p.m. travelling east at one hundred kilometers an hour, and train B leaves Ottawa at seven p.m. travelling west at one hundred twenty kilometers per hour, when will they cross?”“‘Lo! the spell now works around thee, / And the clankless chain hath bound thee; / O’er thy heart and brain together / Hath the word been pass’d—now wither!'”This is only part of the scene, but what is basically happening here, is that Blue is responding to mathematical problems by quoting famous poems (Keats and Lord Byron in this case).But I have no idea why! There is no explanation to why poetry is the solution to math problems in these riddles, only that they are, and that’s just how it is. And at first, I will admit that I stumbled on it, haaard. “What the fffuu-” said I, at first. But I shrugged it off as a weird book being weird and continued on reading. When I finished, and started writing this review, I looked up that quote on my kindle again and was like ‘Heh… awesome.” like it wasn’t the most random event ever. It was just… part of the whole.So this book isn’t going to be for everyone, but it was certainly for me, in the end, even if I had to take a bit of time in the beginning to really get my bearings on what exactly was happening. I really enjoyed this book, but like I have no idea why poetry solves math, I have no idea what it was about it (other than the beautiful writing, good gods) that captured me and wouldn’t let me go. But that’s what happened.Thanks to the authors, as well as Saga Press via NetGalley for the review copy.
    more
  • Samantha Colwell
    January 1, 1970
    It’s hard to describe this book adequately without screaming at the top of my lungs, “This is what love is!” I’m going to do my best to justly review this thing without my hyperbolic fits, but describing mountains without awe is impossible, and this is the Swiss Alps of books.Here’s the issue, the plot is kind of hard to describe. I tried to put it into words when friends asked, “Calm down, stop yelling at me about love, what’s the book actually about?” I would just end up gesticulating wildly a It’s hard to describe this book adequately without screaming at the top of my lungs, “This is what love is!” I’m going to do my best to justly review this thing without my hyperbolic fits, but describing mountains without awe is impossible, and this is the Swiss Alps of books.Here’s the issue, the plot is kind of hard to describe. I tried to put it into words when friends asked, “Calm down, stop yelling at me about love, what’s the book actually about?” I would just end up gesticulating wildly and repeating, “It’s love letters throughout time!” which reduces this modern literary masterpiece to the 2006 romance-drama The Lake House (though that movie is delightful, because Keanu Reeves). So here’s my best shot: Red and Blue are on opposite sides of a time war. Two enemy factions (one more robot based, one more nature based) send soldiers into the field of time, called the braid. One faction sets a historical landmark in motion (example: saves a man from drowning who will one day father an important philosopher) and the other faction unwinds that butterfly effect (example: returns centuries before that man is born and murders his parents before they meet.) Neither side is described as good or bad, and we’re not privy as readers to their end goals. We just know it’s an endless war waged between factions who control destinies interwoven in time. While this war is being waged, Red finds a letter left for her by Blue, a sophisticated warrior from the other side. Their correspondence becomes a rebellious defiance of their factions. Each letter they send is hidden and woven into the fabric of time. Blue writes Red a letter embedded in thousands of years of tree rings, only revealed when the tree is chopped down to build boats in a siege. Red writes Blue a letter in tea leaves, read paragraph by paragraph in the rim of a teacup. Though their factions continue to battle, Red and Blue fall in love over histories of impossibly beautiful love letters. Red and Blue are both referred to by pronouns “she.” It’s being reviewed on Goodreads as a sapphic novel (hooray!), but I would argue it’s just simply about love, in the grand genderless sense of the word.The novel is written from the perspective of all-knowing time jumpers, so the prose is very foreign to someone looking for a straight-laced Sci-Fi. Honestly, I couldn’t figure out what I was reading until about page 72. It’s what I’m telling people who are preparing to read the book---just hang on, don’t be dissuaded by the experimental language, it’ll all start to knit together. The prose will start to become clear, their episodes of time-weaving more methodical and fluid. It feels like an experiment in what literature can really be---anything. We forget, or maybe only I had forgotten, that mainstream genre and the structure of fiction can and SHOULD be defied. Creativity is not dead. Not every book has already been written, and not every story has already been told. I read This Is How You Lose The Time War in a day. I sobbed, I searched backward through the pages for hidden messages, I stared at the ceiling for a long time, contemplating the enormous emotions I was feeling. Then I started screaming, “This is what love is!”Huge thanks to Bookish First for the pre-pub copy in exchange for an honest review. I cherish my ARC of this and I’ll be buying more copies when it releases July 16th, 2019.
    more
  • Sara Norja
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from Amal El-Mohtar, and spent a wonderful three days reading it out loud with a loved one. An amazing way to read this book: I highly recommend taking Blue and Red's parts and reading them out loud in turn. Reading out loud was a glorious way of experiencing the deep poetry of this book.As for what I thought about this - can I give this twelve million stars, please? I laughed, I cried (yes, actual tears), I felt my heart would shatter and then it was healed again. I received an ARC of this book from Amal El-Mohtar, and spent a wonderful three days reading it out loud with a loved one. An amazing way to read this book: I highly recommend taking Blue and Red's parts and reading them out loud in turn. Reading out loud was a glorious way of experiencing the deep poetry of this book.As for what I thought about this - can I give this twelve million stars, please? I laughed, I cried (yes, actual tears), I felt my heart would shatter and then it was healed again. This novella is both abstract in its high-end worldbuilding -- time can be braided, its strands woven into a sequence pleasing to one's side in a great war; Red's tech-heavy Agency fights Blue's equally terrifying biotech Garden with technology so removed from ours that it's akin to magic; the agents criss-cross through different timelines ranging from places on ancient Earth to far-distant planets -- and intensely, fully grounded in the emotions of the two protagonists, Red and Blue. I don't recall when I've last read such an incredibly emotional book. Their relationship is the beating heart of this book. And when I say the worldbuilding is abstract, I must also mention that each individual setting in this book is full of detail that brings the scenes to life. This is a vibrant, colourful story, and is not only filled with shades of blue and red (although definitely those).Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone's prose sings and shrieks and burns. (Sorry for the mixed metaphor.) This novella is a masterpiece of language, with both ridiculous puns and metaphors that ache with poetry, at the same time as being very compelling reading. The epistolary form works superbly here, and I loved Red and Blue's different voices in their letters. And not to spoil the ending, but this book does pretty much my favourite thing with it. Absolutely one of the best books of the year for me.
    more
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to need at least a month to recover from this book. I'm reeling and I couldn't breathe after I finished it. This goes way beyond beautiful; it's one of those books that reminds me that writing is also an art form. This Is How You Lose the Time War is a 200-page prose poem, an epistolary masterpiece, a masterclass in allusion, a deep dive into character, a perfect manipulation of form and syntax and tone, a bending of the genre to create something that is intrinsically SFF and yet absol I'm going to need at least a month to recover from this book. I'm reeling and I couldn't breathe after I finished it. This goes way beyond beautiful; it's one of those books that reminds me that writing is also an art form. This Is How You Lose the Time War is a 200-page prose poem, an epistolary masterpiece, a masterclass in allusion, a deep dive into character, a perfect manipulation of form and syntax and tone, a bending of the genre to create something that is intrinsically SFF and yet absolutely, gorgeously unique. It's a Shakespearean sonnet, a John Keats love-letter, a Seamus Heaney translation. It's ancient and new, twisted and twined, harsh and jagged and soft all at once, romantic and Romantic. It's art. I cried. I cried so hard, my girlfriend asked me if I was okay, and I had to tell her no. I'm not okay, but it's in the best possible way. When I reread this book and underline all of the phrases that are my favorite phrases, I'm going to underline the whole book. When I reread this book and write down every allusion from "my regards to the vast and trunkless legs" all the way to "while Blake scribbles apocalypses upstairs," I will fill a notebook full of English-major nonsense and present it to my favorite college professor as a teaching tool in how to recognize the classics and bend them into something you can use in a book about time travel romance. When I reread this book tomorrow, next week, next month, repeatedly over and over because I've lost the ability to read anything else, I honestly won't mind. This book stunned me, and I'm content to claim that it's perfect and know that I'm right. Read this work of art. I can't explain to you how much you won't regret it.
    more
  • Tiff at Mostly YA Lit
    January 1, 1970
    This is probably one of the most creative pieces of fiction I've read in years. This Is How You Lose the Time War is astonishingly unique, unabashedly romantic, and a stellar work of literary sci-fi that manages to tell an epic story in a very small frame. For a novella that makes you feel so much, there is a lot that is left unsaid. Red and Blue are on the opposite sides of a war. Red is part of The Agency, a technologically advanced world, and Blue comes from Garden, an environmentally absorbe This is probably one of the most creative pieces of fiction I've read in years. This Is How You Lose the Time War is astonishingly unique, unabashedly romantic, and a stellar work of literary sci-fi that manages to tell an epic story in a very small frame. For a novella that makes you feel so much, there is a lot that is left unsaid. Red and Blue are on the opposite sides of a war. Red is part of The Agency, a technologically advanced world, and Blue comes from Garden, an environmentally absorbed society. Even to say they belong to these societies, or worlds, is making an assumption. All we really know about these two factions is that they have been fighting a long war with many battles that take place through the strands of time. Each faction is able to influence and change things in time by sending in agents like Red and Blue to change the course of "history." They're both superb agents, incredible at what they do, and so, naturally, they have great admiration for each other. That admiration turns into more as Red and Blue begin to make contact through letters hidden in the various strands where they are working. Obviously, it's dangerous for them to even be talking. But as we get drawn further into their correspondence, it's also apparent that this is a love worth the risk. I feel stupid even typing that last sentence, because honestly, this novella deserves more than bald cliches. The writing is absolutely stunning, superbly hewn and beautifully minimal. Every word packs a punch. The concept is downright weird, and written in a way that forces you to read slowly and mine every sentence for clues about the setting. And the characters - oh, the characters! The letters reveal so much, yet so little. It's sort of clear that Red and Blue are both female entities, but to say what they really look like or how they exist is impossible. Red is made up of some kind of humanoid form with many technological adjustments. Blue is...somehow part nature, woven into the tapestry of Garden. The point is, they're totally different, they clearly have been taught to believe in different things, and yet...at the heart of their correspondence is an understanding of how fierce and delicate and wondrous life is, and how much you can get from words and letters and history. It's this that kept me reading. This Is How You Lose the Time War deserves to be savoured and enjoyed by people who love unique, lyrical, literary words. It made me think a little bit of Ted Chiang's Story of Your Life in that it's deeply cerebral and uses sci-fi as the backdrop for a love story. It packs a similar punch. For a reader like me, who only delves into hard sci-fi rarely, it was a joy to read. I hope a lot of people who aren't as interested in sci-fi will take a chance on this, because it's a real genre-bender.
    more
  • C. S.
    January 1, 1970
    This book is like a magic trick, and the authors are surely the greatest magicians of our time.I'm honestly not sure how else to write this review, what else to say. Time War is the latest of several truly spectacular genre pieces with a literary flare I've been blessed enough to read this year, and all of them have had endings that surprised me into grateful, happy tears. In this world, I've begun to feel like every time I pick up a book and care about its characters, I'm gambling with more tha This book is like a magic trick, and the authors are surely the greatest magicians of our time.I'm honestly not sure how else to write this review, what else to say. Time War is the latest of several truly spectacular genre pieces with a literary flare I've been blessed enough to read this year, and all of them have had endings that surprised me into grateful, happy tears. In this world, I've begun to feel like every time I pick up a book and care about its characters, I'm gambling with more than just some idle entertainment. Perhaps it's the books I've read before this, or perhaps it's my increasingly difficult struggles with feelings of anxiety and depression, but good endings don't just feel like winning the lottery. They feel like winning the future back, a little bit at a time.I hope defiantly happy ending tropes continues to develop in 2019, and beyond. We could all sure use them.
    more
  • Kris Sellgren
    January 1, 1970
    This is the strangest, most marvelous science fiction novel I have read lately. Two sides — the Agency and Garden — are fighting for the future of humanity. Each side sends agents into the deep past to tilt history in their favor. Blue, a Garden agent, leaves a letter for Red, who works for the Agency, taunting her with the inevitability of Garden’s victory. Thus begins an exchange of letters between enemies, taking their professional rivalry into ever weirder places. The imagination of the auth This is the strangest, most marvelous science fiction novel I have read lately. Two sides — the Agency and Garden — are fighting for the future of humanity. Each side sends agents into the deep past to tilt history in their favor. Blue, a Garden agent, leaves a letter for Red, who works for the Agency, taunting her with the inevitability of Garden’s victory. Thus begins an exchange of letters between enemies, taking their professional rivalry into ever weirder places. The imagination of the authors shines in describing the ways they leave letters for each other (in tea leaves, in lava, in bee stings) and the technology each side uses to accomplish their goals. Battles are fought between starships, on the Russian front in WW II, on the streets of Renaissance London, at the fall of Atlantis, among the Incans or at the side of Ghengis Khan. But it is the emotional depths arising between Blue and Red that are the heart of this. An utterly amazing story.
    more
  • caravaggion
    January 1, 1970
    I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR A GOOD TIME TRAVEL ROMANCE FOR SO LONG YALL DONT EVEN BELIEVE and finally i have gotten what ive wanted for YEARS big thanks to jen for making me read this also this is finally the f/f that we deserve !!!!it was so beautifully written and made me so emotional oh my god i am weak this combined all my favourite tropes i feel ,,,,so moved so blessedthis review is a mess bc i cant even,,,,,get all my feels together here I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR A GOOD TIME TRAVEL ROMANCE FOR SO LONG YALL DONT EVEN BELIEVE and finally i have gotten what i´ve wanted for YEARS big thanks to jen for making me read this also this is finally the f/f that we deserve !!!!it was so beautifully written and made me so emotional oh my god i am weak this combined all my favourite tropes i feel ,,,,so moved so blessedthis review is a mess bc i can´t even,,,,,get all my feels together here
    more
  • Anat
    January 1, 1970
    I have nothing nice to say... it’s readable which is how I managed to finish it, despite feeling from the get go I should dnf. I hated the writing style, and the letters.. it felt like nothing happens. So much potential from the summary yet I just felt this is how you lose time 😔
    more
  • Bee
    January 1, 1970
    Among the ashes of a dying world, an agent of the Commandant finds a letter. It reads: Burn before reading. Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone have united to create one of the most stunning works of speculative fiction I've ever read. This epistolary novella chronicles the exchanges between two spies on opposite sides of a war that permeates time and space. What began as elaborate taunts between enemies on the battlefield turns into something more. I have only one word for this whirlwind tale: br Among the ashes of a dying world, an agent of the Commandant finds a letter. It reads: Burn before reading. Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone have united to create one of the most stunning works of speculative fiction I've ever read. This epistolary novella chronicles the exchanges between two spies on opposite sides of a war that permeates time and space. What began as elaborate taunts between enemies on the battlefield turns into something more. I have only one word for this whirlwind tale: breathtaking. I finished This is How You Lose the Time War in a single sitting- not because I wanted to as much as I needed to finish it. The lyrical prose combined with the masterful storytelling results in a story that dares you to put it down, and I did not dare. In just over 200 pages this book will steal your heart, shatter it, and then stitch it back together as you watch. I received my copy of This is How You Lose the Time War from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Vanessa Halls
    January 1, 1970
    Every now and then, a book comes a long that is so fresh, so beautiful, so heart-rending, that it only takes a few pages before you know it'll stick with you forever. This is one of those books. Complex, intimate, and romantic as hell, I've never read anything quite like it. I fell in love with Red and Blue and their separate but intersecting lives, rooting for them with all my heart even as my gut began to sour with dread. I can't wait until this comes out, so I can buy it and read it again.
    more
  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Decadent writing and lush imagery make this a feast for the senses, but as a story it didn't quite work for me, I'm sad to say.I’m afraid this book and I got off on the wrong foot. Otherwise how do you explain the fact that every review I’ve seen has been a gushing, five star review? This is How You Lose the Time War is exqui I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Decadent writing and lush imagery make this a feast for the senses, but as a story it didn't quite work for me, I'm sad to say.I’m afraid this book and I got off on the wrong foot. Otherwise how do you explain the fact that every review I’ve seen has been a gushing, five star review? This is How You Lose the Time War is exquisitely written, a poetic masterpiece created by two highly talented and seasoned writers. On one hand, I loved the interplay between not only the characters on the page, but the voices of Max Gladstone and Amal El-Mohtar as they seamlessly weave together the story of Blue and Red. But honestly folks, this book was such a struggle for me to get into and I almost didn’t finish it. What should have easily been read in a day or two stretched into a week or more, because I kept putting it down to read something else. Simply put, you might need to be in the right frame of mind to read this.But what I did learn, the more I got into the story, is that this novella isn’t about plot so much as emotions and atmosphere. The plot, in fact, is very basic, and I can tell it to you without giving anything away.Red and Blue are two agents fighting on opposite sides of a time war. Red works for the Agency and Blue works for Garden, and throughout the years, bloody battles are fought with wins and losses on both sides. After one battle, Red finds a note that says “burn before reading,” a taunting challenge from Blue that Red gleefully accepts. And so the two begin a correspondence of the oddest kind, unique letters sent back and forth over the years and distance of the war, disguised so they won’t be detected. Because it turns out someone is shadowing their every move and knows about the forbidden letters. After all, two agents on opposite sides shouldn’t be writing letters to each other, should they?The letters, which start out mocking, soon become confessional, emotion-filled notes, as Red and Blue begin to respect and eventually, fall in love with each other. But can their doomed relationship last? The Agency and Garden will not tolerate disobedience, let alone deception.This novella is a treat for readers who love language, who want to roll it around on their tongues and savor the various meanings hidden in the sentences. If you love poetry, this can almost be read as one long poem, although that’s not the format it’s written in. As a work of art, it succeeds brilliantly. Without a doubt, This is How You Lose the Time War will be up for numerous genre awards next year, just wait and see.But does it succeed as a piece of fiction, that is the question I’ve been asking myself. And I still haven’t decided. Clearly it has for lots of other readers, but I found it difficult to peel away the many layers of beautiful writing, clever sentences and stunning imagery to find the story underneath. I kept looking for hidden meanings but never found them. For example, what is the significance of "the Agency" and "Garden?" Were they meant to be metaphors for something I just couldn't grasp? Other reviewers have said things like "just go with it" and "don't worry about the plot," but I find that very hard to do. And the length was either too long or too short. I almost think it might have worked better as a short story, that a tighter, leaner narrative without all the dramatic and violent posturing of its main characters would force the writers to get to the point faster.My favorite point in the story was the moment when a terrible decision must be made by one of the characters. It was a brilliant idea and beautifully written. It is at this point that the story becomes a love story. And I actually loved the ending. It was weird and complex and fit with the idea of two people moving up and down the strands of time.But did I fall in love with it like so many other readers? I have to admit it was a unique reading experience, but unfortunately it won’t end up on my “best of the year” list in December. I envy all those readers who did fall in love with this story, but I’m just not feeling the emotions I was hoping to feel at the end. Ultimately, this is a book you’ll have to read for yourself and form your own opinion, and chances are, you’ll enjoy it more than I did.Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
    more
  • Andi
    January 1, 1970
    YAY! I won another goodreads giveaway! Will update this when I get the book! :)
Write a review