Gods of Jade and Shadow
The Mayan God of Death sends a young woman on a harrowing, life-changing journey in this dark fairy tale inspired by Mexican folklore, for readers of The Song of Achilles and Uprooted.The Jazz Age is in full swing, but Casiopea Tun is too busy cleaning the floors of her wealthy grandfather’s house to listen to any fast tunes. Nevertheless, she dreams of a life far from her dusty small town in southern Mexico. A life she can call her own. Yet this new life seems as distant as the stars, until the day she finds a curious wooden box in her grandfather’s room. She opens it—and accidentally frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death, who requests her help in recovering his throne from his treacherous brother. Failure will mean Casiopea’s demise, but success could make her dreams come true.In the company of the strangely alluring god and armed with her wits, Casiopea begins an adventure that will take her on a cross-country odyssey, from the jungles of Yucatán to the bright lights of Mexico City—and deep into the darkness of the Mayan underworld.

Gods of Jade and Shadow Details

TitleGods of Jade and Shadow
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 6th, 2019
PublisherDel Rey
ISBN-139780525620754
Rating
GenreFantasy, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Mythology, Adult

Gods of Jade and Shadow Review

  • شيماء ✨
    January 1, 1970
    Me, flirting with this cover: Hey, have I seen you from somewhere? You remind me of a book....that I should get to know (。•ᴗ-)✧ Me, flirting with this cover: Hey, have I seen you from somewhere? You remind me of a book....that I should get to know ‎(。•̀ᴗ-)✧
    more
  • enqi ☁️✨ [joon's]
    January 1, 1970
    "a dark fantasy set in 1920s Mexico inspired by Mayan mythology" and is that a hades & persephone reference i see? this is WONDERFUL. sign me up
  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    "a dark fantasy set in 1920s Mexico inspired by Mayan mythology" this sounds AMAZING
  • Rebecca Roanhorse
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, my heart! So, so very good. This is a evocative and moving fairy-tale about a downtrodden girl and the Maya God of Death and how they both find each other and their humanity together. Moreno-Garcia consistently knows how to find my heartstrings and pull them - not in a sappy way but in quiet moments of vulnerability and honesty. Her vision of 1920's Mexico and, more strikingly, the Maya Underworld, are vivid and enchanting and bring the story alive. I'm convinced both are/were equally real. Oh, my heart! So, so very good. This is a evocative and moving fairy-tale about a downtrodden girl and the Maya God of Death and how they both find each other and their humanity together. Moreno-Garcia consistently knows how to find my heartstrings and pull them - not in a sappy way but in quiet moments of vulnerability and honesty. Her vision of 1920's Mexico and, more strikingly, the Maya Underworld, are vivid and enchanting and bring the story alive. I'm convinced both are/were equally real. Also, this book is highly addictive. I read it in 24 hrs, having to know the fate of both the main characters, which is, in Moreno-Garcia fashion, quite bittersweet. Loved it. Highly recommend.
    more
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    I was pretty excited for this because I especially loved Sylvia's last book, The Beautiful Ones. And then she's done really great Mexican settings in the two other books I've read by her as well!What I really liked here was the MC—Casiopea was the perfect character and I loved reading her wittiness in her dialogue and her remarks that she would give to Hun-Kamé. I seriously loved Hun-Kamé, too, especially as his character progressed in the book! The two together had such great chemistry!There we I was pretty excited for this because I especially loved Sylvia's last book, The Beautiful Ones. And then she's done really great Mexican settings in the two other books I've read by her as well!What I really liked here was the MC—Casiopea was the perfect character and I loved reading her wittiness in her dialogue and her remarks that she would give to Hun-Kamé. I seriously loved Hun-Kamé, too, especially as his character progressed in the book! The two together had such great chemistry!There were several POVs in this one, but I really wish that it was only Casiopea and Hun-Kamé. I was kind of bored at times with Casiopea's cousin and Hun-Kamé's brother. Minor detail—but I felt like Casiopea's name had a lot of syllables so I had to keep shortening it to Cas in my head as I read it! The writing and world descriptions were beautiful and the tale was very cool. Another complaint was I wish it ended on the chapter before the last one because I'm unsure if this is a stand alone, but I think it is? But with the last chapter, I'm not sure? Anyway, I love the authors other books more, but this is still a cool, original story to check out.
    more
  • Iryna *Book and Sword*
    January 1, 1970
    Big thanks to Random House Publishing Group and NetGalley for a digital arc of this book. My WEBSITEMy INSTAGRAMMy WORDPRESS BLOG
  • Bookteafull (Danny)
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my goodness, do you yourself a favor and purchase this when it gets published in August! This standalone myth-making tale was truly one of a kind! The narrative takes place in Mexico in the 1920s and follows Casiopeia, our servant protagonist, as she embarks on a dark journey after opening her grandfather's locked chest. Hoping to find gold that she can use to escape her dreary life, she becomes shocked to realize what the contents of the chest actually are: the magical bones of the Mayan g Oh my goodness, do you yourself a favor and purchase this when it gets published in August! This standalone myth-making tale was truly one of a kind! The narrative takes place in Mexico in the 1920s and follows Casiopeia, our servant protagonist, as she embarks on a dark journey after opening her grandfather's locked chest. Hoping to find gold that she can use to escape her dreary life, she becomes shocked to realize what the contents of the chest actually are: the magical bones of the Mayan god Hun-Kame. As a shard of bone sinks into Casiopeia's skin - thus fusing her life with that of the god's - she finds herself forcibly partaking on a quest to assist Hun-Kame in taking back the throne of Xibalba (Mayan Underworld) from his deceitful, power hungry brother. The idea behind Gods of Jade and Shadow was as fascinating as the world-building. Moreno-Garcia builds up the atmospheric elements of the Underworld while beautifully executing the integration of a slow-build romance, Mayan history, and a new perspective on the flapper-era. The author's writing made capturing the entirety of every scene effortless. Whilst this book wasn't complex by any means, it still made me think about Mexican culture and how religions are being impacted by the modernization of civilization and development of technology. The concept of what eradicates a religion was also briefly addressed and made me think about all the ones that have unfortunately become extinct. As for the characters, they all came across as clear, distinct, and relatable in their own way - which is a surprising feat to accomplish. The only reason I didn't rate this book a full five stars was because, at times, the pacing came across as a bit slow. And not gunna lie, the ending left me just a smidge salty even tho I appreciated what the author was trying to convey. The storyline conclusion was satisfying in a logical sense, but emotionally? I was not fully sated. If you get invested in romances, you'll understand where I'm coming from when you finish this. This book has so much to offer, and it's legitimately a good book. I'm not sure it'll be your favorite, but I can say without a doubt you'll be able to gain something from it. That's it for now! Thank you, NetGalley for providing me with an ebook version of this story. Yet another awesome read urging me forth to purchase the actual physical copy.
    more
  • Amy Imogene Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike anything I’ve ever read....so beautiful. This Mayan death god myth-making tale was one of a kind and its great to see one of the most anticipated 2019 YA fantasy releases living up to its expectations. Let’s have more Mexican/Mayan inspired fantasy?! Review to come! Many thanks to Random House Publishing Group -Ballantine via NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Racheal
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this one! It's a standalone fantasy set in Mexico in the 1920s, and it follows a young woman who's a servant in her grandfather's home until one day when she's left behind while the rest of the household goes on a daytrip and she decides to open the locked chest that's always been at the foot of her grandfather's bed. Thinking to find gold or something to help her escape her life of drudgery, she instead ends up releasing the Mayan god Hun-Kamé and becoming inextricably linked wit I really liked this one! It's a standalone fantasy set in Mexico in the 1920s, and it follows a young woman who's a servant in her grandfather's home until one day when she's left behind while the rest of the household goes on a daytrip and she decides to open the locked chest that's always been at the foot of her grandfather's bed. Thinking to find gold or something to help her escape her life of drudgery, she instead ends up releasing the Mayan god Hun-Kamé and becoming inextricably linked with him until he can take back the throne of Xibalba, the Mayan underworld, from his treacherous, power-hungry brother.First off, I have to say that this has absolutely fascinating ideas and world-building-- just an amazing sense of place, both with the Mexican spin on the flapper-era as well as with all the interesting Mayan trappings. This inspired me to learn so much about the Yucatan, Mayan history, and the various Mexican wars and rebellions of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Don't take that to mean that the book was confusing or a chore to read, though! I think it has just the right amount of exposition to give you the full picture of what was happening at any given moment. It's just that it made me realize how little I actually knew and how much I suddenly wanted to know!It also got me thinking more than I expected it to, though it isn't a super complex or heavy book; it's just that there were a lot of ideas that captured my curiosity and gave me something to chew on. On top of Mexican history, it had me pondering differing views on what gods are and how they came to be, the idea of gods being place-specific and how that would interact with a new age of globalism, how modernity and shifting technologies effected people at the time, immortality and how it might affect an individual's attitudes about time and change.It also made me think a lot about the ways in which non-Christian religious beliefs are often talked about, and how it's (sadly) notable that the author brings these gods and beliefs to life without treat them as cute little surface level fairytales. Indigenous religions are too often talked about in ways similar to if you said Christians believe a white, bearded man lives in the sky and grant wishes to those who talk nice to him, and that their most important ceremonial food is "hotdish". You take away all the context of the people's rich inner worlds and it all sounds silly.The characters also felt very clear to me, namely the prickly, willful Casiopeia, lofty and commanding Hun-Kamé, and the piss-ant bully that is Casiopeia's cousin Martín. It's nice to see the way they all shift and change over the course of the book, particularly Hun-Kamé.So, ok, there's so much good stuff going on here. What's stopping it from being a 5-star book? For me it came down to the writing style and pacing, which I think had both positive and negative aspects.First of all, the book is written in a very matter-of-fact tone, which usually isn't my favorite style. It eventually won me over, though, because it does manage to have a surprisingly good sense of atmosphere, and the creatures, places, and objects are unique and macabre enough to stand on their own without any flowery adornment. I spent a while in the middle scenes just marveling at the author's skill at drawing some very specific scenes and character mannerisms with impressive brevity. Overall the writing really evokes the feeling of a myth or fairytale, and does it without feeling too distant from the characters, which is an incredibly hard line to walk. As for the pacing, I found that it felt very measured in a way that made it hard for the story to ever gain any real momentum. The major confrontations and peak emotional moments were written in almost the exact same way as the rest of the book, so there was often no sense of passion or urgency, and the stakes felt kind of low. Like I understood intellectually that the stakes were actually super high, but it never felt that way. But on the other hand, though, there were moments where I appreciated that the story didn't go in the drama-filled direction I anticipated, so... pluses and minuses.When it comes down to it, what I can say is that I ultimately found the conclusion to be very satisfying on a plot level but a bit dissatisfying on an an emotional one. You know, though, my main "doorways" are definitely language and character (I love me some angst!), so I think that I'm generally a little more critical than a lot of people will be on these fronts. I will say that the fact that I still loved this as much as I did even with these specific weaknesses says a lot for this book. While it didn't get me in the heart the way that I might have hoped, it more than made up for it in the interesting ideas and unique, vibrant world, and I think that those who take it more for the journey than for a big emotional pay-off will get a lot out of it!
    more
  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    *HEART ACHE* THIS IS SO AMAZING. If you're at all into anything achy with mortals and immortals and a fairy tale feel .......... THIS IS FOR YOU.Just absolutely fantastic and so gorgeous.
  • Becca | Pages & Postcards
    January 1, 1970
    This was so unique! I really enjoyed it. Full review to come closer to the publication date.ARC received via Netgalley and Random House Publishing Group in exchange for an honest review.BLOG ~ INSTAGRAM ~ TWITTER
  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    I got approved for one of my most anticipated adult fantasy novels of 2019! It's about Mayan gods in the 1920s, it's going to be so good
  • sofia (sam willows)
    January 1, 1970
    I GOT AN ARC!!!!!
  • Anna At A Wondrous Bookshelf
    January 1, 1970
    In 1920s Mexico, Caseopea lived a very unhappy life cleaning floors of her wealthy grandfather and dreaming of a better life away from her chores. One day she comes across a mysterious wooden box and accidently frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death who takes her on a journey in hopes of regaining back his throne from his treacherous brother.Part Jane Eyre and part Cinderella story, Moreno-Garcia’s Gods of Jade and Shadow is a beautiful fantasy tale based on Mayan mythology. In a time with s In 1920s Mexico, Caseopea lived a very unhappy life cleaning floors of her wealthy grandfather and dreaming of a better life away from her chores. One day she comes across a mysterious wooden box and accidently frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death who takes her on a journey in hopes of regaining back his throne from his treacherous brother.Part Jane Eyre and part Cinderella story, Moreno-Garcia’s Gods of Jade and Shadow is a beautiful fantasy tale based on Mayan mythology. In a time with so much negative emphasis on Mexico, it’s easy to forget that Mexico is a country with a very rich heritage, mythology and folklore. Moreno-Garcia successfully retells this myth with a beautiful prose and description of a Mexico of the 1920s.I highly recommend this novel which is scheduled to be published in August 2019.I would like to thank Random House Publishing Group-Ballantine and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Benjamin
    January 1, 1970
    I am so excited about this book coming out, but also afraid that it won't be as good as I expected it to be.2019 is already rocking!
  • Stephanie ((Strazzybooks))
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ 45%. This one just isn't for me. I wasn't into the romance and there was a lot of telling rather than showing. I think other readers will love it for those reasons and more - the descriptions, god with mortal love, etc. the mythology was also interesting.
    more
  • John Mendez
    January 1, 1970
    GoodreadsWebsiteGenres: Fantasy, Historical Fiction, Mythology, Adult, YA, Romance, Fairy Tale, Urban Fantasy, Alternative History, Literary FantasySimilar books: War for the Oaks, Obsidian and Blood Trilogy, Bear and the Nightingale, Grim Fandango (Game)Previous books in the series/by the author reviewed: NoneRating: Highly Recommended if you want to read a 1920's Mexico Urban Fantasy with a strong Romance PlotlineHere's the TL;DR for my review (SPOILERS!):Pros1920's Mexico is a fully realized GoodreadsWebsiteGenres: Fantasy, Historical Fiction, Mythology, Adult, YA, Romance, Fairy Tale, Urban Fantasy, Alternative History, Literary FantasySimilar books: War for the Oaks, Obsidian and Blood Trilogy, Bear and the Nightingale, Grim Fandango (Game)Previous books in the series/by the author reviewed: NoneRating: Highly Recommended if you want to read a 1920's Mexico Urban Fantasy with a strong Romance PlotlineHere's the TL;DR for my review (SPOILERS!):Pros1920's Mexico is a fully realized setting.The Mayan mythology explored here was fun. I can't say I've ever read an Fantasy novel featuring these gods before.Casiopea Tun is an enjoyable protagonist, a young woman who's just beginning to gain confidence in herself after a lifetime of being oppressed by her family.Hun-Kame is the deposed god of the Mayan Underworld, and I liked his journey to reclaiming his throne from his treacherous brother.Good prose. The author's language rests squarely on the stained glass end of the stained glass-window pane spectrum of textual beauty.MixedThe pacing was deliberately slow. The book had a slow start, slow middle, and slow end. There was very little action. This isn't a bad thing if you want to read an action-light book, but if you're in the mood for a thriller page turner, this ain't it.ConsI didn't fully buy the romance between Casiopea and Hun-Kame. Something about it didn't click with me, but it might click with you.A lot of the male characters, particularly the human antagonists, were misogynists. Because the author painted them so strongly as misogynists they became a little 2D in their villainy. I wanted them to be more interesting.Spoiler-tastic ReviewI got this book for free before it's release date for the purpose of an honest review. It will be released in August 2019.'Gods of Jade and Shadow' is a fairy tale set in Mexico 100 years ago. Set in an art-deco world where Mayan traditions, Christian upbringings and modern technology clash and converge, this is a book filled with artistic style and substantive characters.Casiopea is the disappointing only daughter in a family where sons are preferred, living in a small town in southern Mexico. She has no plans in life besides being her grandfather's housekeeper, having spent her entire life up until this point being gaslight by her ungrateful family. But when she opens a secret box in her grandfather's room, she releases the ghost of one of the Mayan death-gods, drawing her into a web of internecine divine and mortal conspiracy.Hun-Kame is the deposed god-king of Xibalba, the Mayan underworld. He had his head cut off by his brother and was imprisoned on Earth in the home of one of his priests, Casiopea's grandfather. But when Hun-Kame is released by Casiopea, Hun-Kame and Casiopea are inextricably bound; she gains part of his godly power, while he gains her mortality. This forced partnership pleases neither of them, so they decide to do whatever it takes to free themselves of one another.What follows is an adventure spanning from the jungle-infested Mayan temples in the Yucatan, to Mexcio City, to Texas and California. They must work together, trying to overcome the forces which want to kill them both. I liked the plot, for the characters were forced to cooperate and learn more about themselves. Hun-Kame was forced to develop some humanity, a novel feature for a divine creature, while Casiopea was forced to make decisions for herself and show agency.Finally, the author's prose was strong. She uses clear language, spiced up with clever imagery with sparkling use of words. In particular I liked her magic, which she described in an almost McKillip-ish fashion.Now, as always, I have some constructive criticism.The book was slowly paced. Some books can pull off being slowly paced, allowing the reader to revel in a drawn-out story told over time with little action or tension. This book almost worked like that for me. I would have liked it if there was a little more action or if the stakes were higher towards the end.The romance between the two leads didn't work for me. Now I'll admit that I don't generally like Romance subplots, and this book was a Romance subplot writ-large. This book just wasn't my type. If you're like me and don't actively enjoy romance subplots, this book might not be for you. But if you do enjoy romance subplots, then you probably actually would like this book and this isn't criticism at all.That's it! I liked this book. I can Recommend it to your Average Fantasy reader, and Highly Recommend it to a Fantasy reader who is in the mood for some 1920's Mexico Urban Fantasy goodness with a strong Romance plotline.
    more
  • Jessica ☕
    January 1, 1970
    This is the kind of book that consumes you while it is being read. At the same time vibrant and melancholy, thrilling and introspective, it lodges in your sternum and sits there like a weight after you finish. It further cements Ms. Moreno-Garcia's place on my "preorder every single book" list. Casiopea is a young Cinderella figure in the home of her wealthy grandfather, undervalued and abused because of her mother's marriage to an indigenous man. In a small act of quiet rebellion, she unlocks a This is the kind of book that consumes you while it is being read. At the same time vibrant and melancholy, thrilling and introspective, it lodges in your sternum and sits there like a weight after you finish. It further cements Ms. Moreno-Garcia's place on my "preorder every single book" list. Casiopea is a young Cinderella figure in the home of her wealthy grandfather, undervalued and abused because of her mother's marriage to an indigenous man. In a small act of quiet rebellion, she unlocks a private chest in her grandfather's bedroom, unwittingly unleashing a Mayan god of death named Hun-Kamé. With his resurrection, a countdown has begun, and they have a short amount of time to accomplish certain tasks needed to gain back Hun-Kamé's throne in the land of the dead before his evil twin brings hell to earth. It has a haunting, gothic feel, and Casiopea's heartfelt and tragic longing for the simple joy of stargazing, dancing, or riding in an automobile makes her lovable and sympathetic. I can't recommend this enough. Please read it and talk to me about it, everyone!arc received from the publisher
    more
  • Lina~Blackbird Queen
    January 1, 1970
    I had this on my "want to read" list when it was just about Mayan mythology. Then, today, I look it up, and one thing catches my eyes."1920s Mexico"Me:GUYS, THE 1920's IS MY FAVORITE PERIOD IN HISTORY! Y'ALL HAVE NO IDEA HOW EXCITED I AM!
  • Ash | EmeraldBookOwl
    January 1, 1970
    2019 seems like THE year for some really good releases. Here is yet another one that has already stolen my heart. When I read "Dark fantasy" and "1920s Mexico"... I'm sold.But then throw in some "Mayan mythology" and I may just die from anticipation!
    more
  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    (Spoiler Free)Casiopea is a girl who dreams of the stars and freedom, but she's stuck in her small town in Yucatan, Mexico. One day, she opens a wooden chest, and accidentally unleashes Hun-Kamé, an ancient Maya god of death who had been trapped and betrayed by his brother. She's fierce and he's broody and together they embark on a journey to reclaim Hun-Kamé's kingdom.The characters in this book were so solid and layered. They constantly break the conventions that their archetypes traditionally (Spoiler Free)Casiopea is a girl who dreams of the stars and freedom, but she's stuck in her small town in Yucatan, Mexico. One day, she opens a wooden chest, and accidentally unleashes Hun-Kamé, an ancient Maya god of death who had been trapped and betrayed by his brother. She's fierce and he's broody and together they embark on a journey to reclaim Hun-Kamé's kingdom.The characters in this book were so solid and layered. They constantly break the conventions that their archetypes traditionally fall into. By doing this, Moreno-Garcia creates a well rounded and nuanced narrative driven by its characters. The antagonists are slightly more wooden, but they are given the backstory to their actions, and I really enjoyed the final showdown between Casiopea and her "enemy", her cousin, Martin.Our main protagonist, Casiopea shines. She's strong, vulnerable and unapologetically herself. I loved reading from her perspective and she has quickly become one of my favorite characters in literature. Casiopea is a girl who feels so much that it spills into Hun- Kamé. They are both so, so lonely and have been for so long that their relationship feels tragically poetic. It's one of the strongest points in the novel. Moreno-Garcia is an expert at building tension and slow burn bittersweet angst. This story pulls from the Popol Vuh and Maya mythology and I am so happy to read Latinx rep from an ownvoices author. Although this book takes place in the 1920's , as a Xicana, it felt so warm to read about characters going on journeys in places ( the Baja California scenes!) and eat food that I am familiar with( I'm talking about the bolillo dipped in coffee scene se me hizo agua la boca). Silvia Moreno-Garcia continues to be a bright voice in the Latinx SFF communtiy and I can't wait to see what's next!
    more
  • Isabel
    January 1, 1970
    Loosely inspired by the Maya epic Popol Vuh, this book follows the exploits of Casiopea, a girl living in southern Mexico in the 1920s, when she accidentally frees the Maya god of death/lord of Xibalba from a curse. She embarks with him on a quest across Mexico to take win his throne from his treacherous twin brother. I adored the colorful snapshots of different cities in the 1920s (Casiopea's journey takes us from her town in the Yucatán to Mérida to Veracruz to Mexico City to El Paso to Tijuan Loosely inspired by the Maya epic Popol Vuh, this book follows the exploits of Casiopea, a girl living in southern Mexico in the 1920s, when she accidentally frees the Maya god of death/lord of Xibalba from a curse. She embarks with him on a quest across Mexico to take win his throne from his treacherous twin brother. I adored the colorful snapshots of different cities in the 1920s (Casiopea's journey takes us from her town in the Yucatán to Mérida to Veracruz to Mexico City to El Paso to Tijuana). The fashion, the music the fancy hotels, and Casiopea's fascination with automobiles... all helped bring the setting to life. Gods and demons, witches and ghosts weave seamlessly through the historical setting, giving this book a wonderful historical-but-creepy atmosphere.If you were fond of Silvia Moreno-Garcia's spare, precise prose in "Prime Meridian" or in her short story collection "This Strange Way of Dying," then you'll love this. Though I loved the descriptions of historical Mexico, I will say that the creepiness of Xibalba and other elements of the supernatural (especially the scene with the ghosts!!) were where the prose REALLY shone. Received a copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Gods of Jade and Shadow is a gorgeous book! Steeped in Mayan mythology and the zeitgeist of Mexico’s Jazz Age, the book has an amazing sense of place and diversity of cultural referents. Casiopea is a scrappy, likeable heroine; Hun-Kamé is deliciously dark and mysterious; and even Martín, Casiopea’s cousin and foil, is quite complex and compelling in his own right. I’m definitely excited to read more by Silvia Moreno-Garcia!I received an ARC of this book at Emerald City Comic Con. (Big thanks to Gods of Jade and Shadow is a gorgeous book! Steeped in Mayan mythology and the zeitgeist of Mexico’s Jazz Age, the book has an amazing sense of place and diversity of cultural referents. Casiopea is a scrappy, likeable heroine; Hun-Kamé is deliciously dark and mysterious; and even Martín, Casiopea’s cousin and foil, is quite complex and compelling in his own right. I’m definitely excited to read more by Silvia Moreno-Garcia!I received an ARC of this book at Emerald City Comic Con. (Big thanks to Del Rey, because this was awesome!)
    more
  • Anabel
    January 1, 1970
    This mini-review is based on the ARC, which I received for the ECCC Fantasy Book Club event. We had the opportunity to share our feedback with the marketing team and editor.The tone shifts and relationship really detracted from the story for me. It felt like the editing had just gone through it's initial rounds, and definitely needing a lot more tightening. Some parts really carry the "YA for late middle school" vibe, while others suddenly ran a lot darker. I kind of wish the author full embrace This mini-review is based on the ARC, which I received for the ECCC Fantasy Book Club event. We had the opportunity to share our feedback with the marketing team and editor.The tone shifts and relationship really detracted from the story for me. It felt like the editing had just gone through it's initial rounds, and definitely needing a lot more tightening. Some parts really carry the "YA for late middle school" vibe, while others suddenly ran a lot darker. I kind of wish the author full embraced the American Gods but with Mexican mythos vibe, did a bit more showing than telling, and scrapped the fairly problematic relationship. I really feel like the romance's chemistry was forced, and the reader was just carried along until the inevitable happened versus naturally growing to love the characters and the excitement to see something growing from them.The good: The second half of the story had much stronger writing, got a lot darker (in a thematic/adult way that took the reader seriously), and had some great descriptions of the Underworld, one depicted that I had never experienced in fiction!
    more
  • ♔ Dark Lordette Jennymort ♔
    January 1, 1970
  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Signed paper-ARC - free loot from ECCC.
  • Rachel Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    This ARC was provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. As he straightened up, his eyes all darkness, a curious thing happened. The speck did not fade, instead turning vermillion, and it lodged behind those dark eyes, unseen. But Xibalba, so intimately connected to its lord, must have seen, must have known. Xibalba sensed the echo of this silent goodbye. The Book Casiopea Tun is the granddaughter of a sickly miser, treated like a scullery maid or worse by her family because of the This ARC was provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. As he straightened up, his eyes all darkness, a curious thing happened. The speck did not fade, instead turning vermillion, and it lodged behind those dark eyes, unseen. But Xibalba, so intimately connected to its lord, must have seen, must have known. Xibalba sensed the echo of this silent goodbye. The Book Casiopea Tun is the granddaughter of a sickly miser, treated like a scullery maid or worse by her family because of the circumstances of her birth. One day, Casiopea decides she can no longer stand the treatment she opens the forbidden chest in her grandfather’s room, one she believes will contain enough spare coin to get her away from her dusty town and to a better life. Instead, Casiopea finds a pile of bones. These bones become Hun-Kamé, a Mayan god of death, who demands Casiopea assist him in reclaiming his power from his usurper brother. They set off on an adventure the likes of which Casiopea had only read about in books, and through it Casiopea and Hun-Kamé become forever changed. My Thoughts This was a fantastic read. Casiopea Tun is the hero we need even though we don’t deserve her. I felt for her throughout the book, being so torn between a life that could never give her happiness and the dangerous future ahead. We experience most of the story through her eyes, experience the wonder and horror of Xibalba and the gods through her perspective. It is because of Casiopea that we see the change in Hun-Kamé, the immortal becoming something much more tangible. Though Hun-Kamé is always something other-worldly, there are times when it seems he longs to exist in Casiopea’s world. I won’t say much about the end of the story, but I was certainly tearing up during my lunch break. Overall Gods of Jade and Shadow masters a tone that is hard to pull off. It blends a very factual tone with an incredibly fantastical plot and does so without missing a beat. Each character is a mix of strong qualities and flaws, the mortals feeling real and the immortals feeling larger-than-life until mortality is brought into the mix. This is an amazing read; I can’t recommend it highly enough. 5/5 Would Read Again.
    more
  • booksneedcaffeinetoo
    January 1, 1970
    The things you name do grow in power, but others that are not ever whispered claw at one's heart anyways, rip it to shreds even if a syllable does not escape the lips. This book was one I have been dying to read ever since I saw that beautiful cover and learned it included Mayan mythology. Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for an honest review.I really enjoyed the plot and Gods of Jade and Shadow had one of the most satisfying endings I've read in a while. One of my The things you name do grow in power, but others that are not ever whispered claw at one's heart anyways, rip it to shreds even if a syllable does not escape the lips. This book was one I have been dying to read ever since I saw that beautiful cover and learned it included Mayan mythology. Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for an eARC in exchange for an honest review.I really enjoyed the plot and Gods of Jade and Shadow had one of the most satisfying endings I've read in a while. One of my favorite things is when a god or other supernatural being does not understand sarcasm. And yes, this book blesses us with this. Lorary is like the most minor character ever but he was definitely my fave. I love demons. Casiopea was such a spitfire. She was great. Didn't take the blatant racism or misogyny her family members dished at her. Plus she didn't let others take credit for her awesomeness. Hun-Kamé is a literal god. I want to keep readers surprised so I'll just leave it at that. 😏Overall, I liked the plot, but not the writing-style. The prose was rich and at times...whimsical(?)....that doesn't feel like the right word and "quirky" doesn't do it justice either. maybe...rosy? Ah. I'm bad with describing things. This is why I'm not the writer. That was a long winded way of saying that the writing-style wasn't for me. It was similar to the style I find in historical fiction books (and is why I usually don't read historical fiction), so if you like historical fiction, the writing-styles of books like American Gods or The Song of Achilles, reading books with non-Western European mythology, or books with spitfire heroines, then you'll adore Gods of Jade and Shadow.3.5/5Content Warning: suicide, terminal illness/hospice themes, domestic abuse, child abuse, poverty, racism, colorism
    more
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    A breathtaking tale of liberation that blends Jazz Age Mexico with Maya myth. The journey that Casiopea Tun and the god Hun-Kamé take together leaves them both forever changed ... and the reader as well. Get this book, guys.
  • lady victoriana
    January 1, 1970
    after the beautiful ones i will read anything by this author
Write a review