Illegal
This is a powerful and timely story about one boy's epic journey across Africa to Europe, a graphic novel for all children with glorious colour artwork throughout. From Eoin Colfer, previously Irish Children's Laureate, and the team behind his bestselling Artemis Fowl graphic novels. Ebo: alone.His sister left months ago. Now his brother has disappeared too, and Ebo knows it can only be to make the hazardous journey to Europe. Ebo's epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his sister.

Illegal Details

TitleIllegal
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherSourcebooks
ISBN-139781492662143
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Young Adult, Realistic Fiction

Illegal Review

  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a little ashamed right now, because I received an unsolicited advance copy of this one about two months ago I believe, and I had no interest whatsoever in reading it.Then, out of the blue, I stumbled across this book’s page on Goodreads and upon reading positive review after positing review – all praising this story – I finally decided to give it a try.So if anyone dares say that Goodreads has no influence whatsoever on readers, well they are dead wrong (or don’t consult the site enough to b I’m a little ashamed right now, because I received an unsolicited advance copy of this one about two months ago I believe, and I had no interest whatsoever in reading it.Then, out of the blue, I stumbled across this book’s page on Goodreads and upon reading positive review after positing review – all praising this story – I finally decided to give it a try.So if anyone dares say that Goodreads has no influence whatsoever on readers, well they are dead wrong (or don’t consult the site enough to become addicted to it like I am).This is the very realistic tale of Ebo, a young boy who lives in a poor country. Ebo lost all of his family members. It started with his mother dying at a young age, then his father who fled, then his sister who did the same, and most recently his brother Kwame who decided to go find their sister and then come back for Ebo himself so they can all be together again.It’s realistic because it shows that the authors have done their research or perhaps interviewed men and women who have had the same experience as Ebo. I’ve read previous books about illegal immigration and refugee status – a recent one being the memoir The Girl Who Smiled Beads – and all mention how rigorous, dangerous and heart-breaking leaving one’s country is. Truly, one does not read such stories to be entertained. This was gripping indeed, and certainly moving, but not once did it make me laugh. It has certain joyful moments, but above everything, it has educational scenes. Another reason why this is realistic is because Ebo’s survival isn’t guaranteed. Clearly he’s the hero, so the reader cheers him on, but there is no guarantee he will make it out alive or even find his family.To those of you who still believe that refugees will ruin your country, please remember that the reason why they became refugees in the first place was because they hoped for a better future, so condemning them will solve nothing. How about you help them get an education so they can get a job and contribute like you do instead? It’s all they really want… No one wants to be a charity case.Oh, yes, and amazing book.Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Nasia
    January 1, 1970
    Βαθιά ανθρώπινο και συγκινητικό graphic novel, για ένα θέμα που είναι πιο επίκαιρο από ποτέ. Με απλές λέξεις και σκίτσο/ εικονογράφηση που ανατριχιάζουν περιγράφει καταστάσεις που αποτελούν δυστυχώς καθημερινό φαινόμενο...
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  • Ashley Owens
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars. I received a electronic ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.I really loved this graphic novel. It was emotional in a way I wasn’t expecting. This novel tells the story of Ebo, a boy from Africa who has just found out this his brother has left to try to make a life in Italy, and will eventually send him money. Their sister, Sisi, is already there so they are hoping for a reunion.Because most of this novel takes place either on the sea or outside trekking 3.5/5 stars. I received a electronic ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.I really loved this graphic novel. It was emotional in a way I wasn’t expecting. This novel tells the story of Ebo, a boy from Africa who has just found out this his brother has left to try to make a life in Italy, and will eventually send him money. Their sister, Sisi, is already there so they are hoping for a reunion.Because most of this novel takes place either on the sea or outside trekking across Africa, I definitely felt the struggle and emotional toll that having your life constantly in upheaval which these siblings go through without a break. Things seem to go wrong for them at every turn, and it feels unfair and so sad.I think this novel was very straightforward in its goal to inform readers about this inhumane struggle that many Africans are going through just to get a shot a better life in some way. It makes me want to appreciate everything I have so much more, because the lengths they will clearly go to to get away from their home is incredible. It was a good choice to have the main character of the novel be a child, because that made all of the heartache and struggles even more hard-hitting. It would be good for middle grade children to educate them about this situation in Africa. “Illegal” really made me think and I enjoyed it very much.
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Βαθμολογία: ★★★★★Φανταστική έκδοση, από το περιτύλιγμα (σκληρόδετο, πανέμορφο εξώφυλλο) μέχρι και το περιεχόμενο (ιστορία, σχέδιο). Η υπόθεση είναι άκρως επίκαιρη και συγκινητική. Το τέλος ίσως φαίνεται βεβιασμένο, αλλά δεν έχει σημασία, γιατί αυτό που θέλει να σου δώσει το βιβλίο στο έχει ήδη δώσει.
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  • Ran
    January 1, 1970
    Young Ebo travels to Niger chasing his brother, Kwame, who hopes to make the journey to Europe to reunite with their sister, Sisi. The story is told through Ebo, the youngest brother, who remains the perspective of hope throughout the story and manages to sing his way through some difficult situations. However, the journey is perilous, long, and hard as the brothers make their way across not only the desert, but the sea in their journey towards promised opportunity. This story is beautifully dra Young Ebo travels to Niger chasing his brother, Kwame, who hopes to make the journey to Europe to reunite with their sister, Sisi. The story is told through Ebo, the youngest brother, who remains the perspective of hope throughout the story and manages to sing his way through some difficult situations. However, the journey is perilous, long, and hard as the brothers make their way across not only the desert, but the sea in their journey towards promised opportunity. This story is beautifully drawn, and heartbreaking. *Received ARC through Netgalley.
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  • Alex Panagiotopoulos
    January 1, 1970
    Συμπαθητικό κόμικ που διαπραγματεύεται ευαίσθητο θέμα. Το σχέδιο ήταν πανέμορφο όπως και ο χρωματισμός, το σενάριο δεν βρίσκω λόγο να το αξιολογήσω μιας και είναι ιστορία που διαβάζουμε δυστυχώς καθημερινά στα media. Σίγουρα σκοπό έχει να ευαισθητοποιήσει και να αφυπνίσει, αλλά δυστυχώς μου άφησε την πικρή αίσθηση στο τέλος ότι βγήκε και λίγο σαν αρπαχτή πάνω στην επικαιρότητα όπως τόσα και τόσα άλλα. Για τον ίδιο λόγο δεν συγχαίρω τον εκδότη με την τόσο γρήγορη έκδοση αφού μάλλον βρήκε ευκαιρία Συμπαθητικό κόμικ που διαπραγματεύεται ευαίσθητο θέμα. Το σχέδιο ήταν πανέμορφο όπως και ο χρωματισμός, το σενάριο δεν βρίσκω λόγο να το αξιολογήσω μιας και είναι ιστορία που διαβάζουμε δυστυχώς καθημερινά στα media. Σίγουρα σκοπό έχει να ευαισθητοποιήσει και να αφυπνίσει, αλλά δυστυχώς μου άφησε την πικρή αίσθηση στο τέλος ότι βγήκε και λίγο σαν αρπαχτή πάνω στην επικαιρότητα όπως τόσα και τόσα άλλα. Για τον ίδιο λόγο δεν συγχαίρω τον εκδότη με την τόσο γρήγορη έκδοση αφού μάλλον βρήκε ευκαιρία για εύκολο χρήμα παρά ότι όντως πίστεψε στην επιτυχία του κόμικ σαν κόμικ και μόνο. Αξίζει ένα βλέφαρο κυρίως για την εικονογράφηση, τα πρόσωπα ειδικά κρύβουν πολλά συναισθήματα, πράγμα αξιέπαινο για όχι και τόσο γνωστό σκιτσογράφο.
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  • Bridget
    January 1, 1970
    What a gem of a book! The tone is exactly right, we come to feel the fears, hopes, exhilaration and live through the trauma of Ebo, as he searches for his brother who has headed off to try and get to Europe as a refugee. This is only the beginning though, after rejoicing at finding Kwame, he is then trying to earn enough money to gain passage on a boat for them to go together to Europe, where they hope to find their sister. It is hard to read, and it is quite an emotional experience for the read What a gem of a book! The tone is exactly right, we come to feel the fears, hopes, exhilaration and live through the trauma of Ebo, as he searches for his brother who has headed off to try and get to Europe as a refugee. This is only the beginning though, after rejoicing at finding Kwame, he is then trying to earn enough money to gain passage on a boat for them to go together to Europe, where they hope to find their sister. It is hard to read, and it is quite an emotional experience for the reader to see their struggle in the pages of this gorgeously illustrated graphic novel. Hard, because for every good thing that happens to them, several terrible experiences occur to them. I felt a bit like I needed to take a break from the suffering at times. This was especially the case when they were sleeping in a water pipe which at any time might gush huge tons of water and drown them in their sleep. Gahhhh that was horrible.This book is a must have addition to a secondary school library, you’ll probably need several copies, Social Studies teachers will use it with their classes studying refugees, art students will be drawn to the gorgeously drawn comics. Readers will enjoy, yet be horrified by, the experiences of the brothers. I liked so much about it. I liked the way that the authors didn’t shy away from the horror of the experiences of these people, I loved the change in tone in the colouring, which indicated the timelines and which made the then and now seperate, and yet relevant to the ongoing action in both storylines. This is clever but not too clever for it’s own good. I love that this graphic novel isn’t trying too hard, it just gets on with the stark story and draws you in. The fames are so well placed and the story is clear.I’d love to see another story from this team on a social issue. Take a look at the clip below to see the beauty and sadness. Turn your sound up.https://youtu.be/pM5OLzlu7I4
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful, thought provoking and sad! I still cannot believe people have to go through things like that in order to survive and reach a safer place.
  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    "You, who are so-called Illegal Aliens, must know that nooo human being is illegal. That is a contradiction in terms. Human beings can be beautiful or more beautiful. They can be fat or skinny. They can be right or wrong. But illegal? How can a human being be illegal?""We should never have come.""I never see him again.""They must help us. We are human.""Every person is a human being."This book is emotional, heartbreaking, informative, shocking and a lot more. You're rooting for the storyteller s "You, who are so-called Illegal Aliens, must know that nooo human being is illegal. That is a contradiction in terms. Human beings can be beautiful or more beautiful. They can be fat or skinny. They can be right or wrong. But illegal? How can a human being be illegal?""We should never have come.""I never see him again.""They must help us. We are human.""Every person is a human being."This book is emotional, heartbreaking, informative, shocking and a lot more. You're rooting for the storyteller so much as he battles life and death for a new life in Europe. But it's his journey and experiences that he takes you on which is most important.Couldn't put it down, the illustrations portray the story so vividly. I'm not going to forget.
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  • Jake
    January 1, 1970
    An incredibly well written/drawn graphic novel that depicts the atrocities that are the unfortunately necessary migration of millions of individuals to Europe and other locations to escape war and poverty, and to make a better life for themself. Colfer's story is succinct, sad, and blunt, and Donkin's drawings are expressive, crisp, and thorough in their storytelling.Thank you Baker & Taylor for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. It was my utmost pleasure to read this graphic.
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  • Carole
    January 1, 1970
    This moving graphic novel is based on real experiences of people who struggle to reach Europe in the hopes of a better life. It pulls no punches about the realities of human trafficking and the dangers involved. The story uses flashbacks to explain how Ebo came to be on a small boat in the middle of the sea, and in this way lets the reader know that he does make it through at least some of his perilous journey - a good device for readers who might find the story too upsetting when told chronolog This moving graphic novel is based on real experiences of people who struggle to reach Europe in the hopes of a better life. It pulls no punches about the realities of human trafficking and the dangers involved. The story uses flashbacks to explain how Ebo came to be on a small boat in the middle of the sea, and in this way lets the reader know that he does make it through at least some of his perilous journey - a good device for readers who might find the story too upsetting when told chronologically. Highly recommended for school libraries.
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  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    Refugee stories are always terrifying: the simple hope of a better life balanced against the continuing misery of the journey. I really liked the art in this, and I enjoyed the flashback storyline enmeshed with the present-day storyline, but I'm always going to walk away feeling like I'm complicit in every bit of human suffering around the globe just because I exist. The traffickers who purposefully put refugees on sinking, overloaded, broken boats must be some of the worst scum in the world.
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  • Kayla Leitschuh
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. A surprising new graphic novel from the author of the Artemis Fowl series. Text and illustration work together spectacularly to bring together this touching story about a young boy, Ebo, and his quest for safety.
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I rec'd an ARC of this graphic novel and wholeheartedly believe it should be handed out on street corners and acted out in town squares (are those still a thing,? you get my point though)!
  • Megan Foley
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a graphic novel. The illustrations are brilliantly done and the writer clearly has a great understanding for the topic that he was writing about. This story has a slightly sad ending but the novel really opens your eyes and makes you think about the children and adults that are suffering and the starving, poor children living in Africa.
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    With a powerful narrative and amazing illustrations , I think this falls under the must have graphic novels of 2018!
  • Mandy Stallard
    January 1, 1970
    I personally think that every member of the American government needs to read Illegal. What a timely and relevant graphic novel for middle grade students. This book follows the journey of Ebo and his brother Kwame as they abandon their home in Ghana in the hopes of making their way to Europe to find their sister. The book alternates between "now" and "then" chapters; this set-up allows the reader to gradually discover how Ebo and Kwame end up in a small, leaking boat in the middle of the Mediter I personally think that every member of the American government needs to read Illegal. What a timely and relevant graphic novel for middle grade students. This book follows the journey of Ebo and his brother Kwame as they abandon their home in Ghana in the hopes of making their way to Europe to find their sister. The book alternates between "now" and "then" chapters; this set-up allows the reader to gradually discover how Ebo and Kwame end up in a small, leaking boat in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea.I had several "aha" moments while reading this graphic novel. In one scene, Ebo and the other passengers are worried that they will die in the ocean. When they see a ship heading toward them, Ebo immediately thinks they will be saved. However, another immigrant questions if the ship will stop for them. Ebo replies that the ship has to stop and help them because they are "people." Such a simple notion: that people will help other people; however, as we have seen with recent immigration laws, our government doesn't seem to believe in helping people who aren't desirable immigrants. This book is important, but the realities that Ebo and his brother face are difficult to digest. I think this novel would be most appropriate for 5th grade and up. I would love to see teachers use this book alongside Refugee by Alan Gratz. As educators, it is important for us to show our students the struggles other people face throughout the world. This book will help students build empathy for immigrants within their community and beyond.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    This powerful story is a compilation of many stories Colfer heard about refugees fleeing their homeland across the Mediterranean. In this story two brothers, being raised by a drunk relative, decide to leave their homeland in search of their sister and a better life. The sister had already decided she needed to find peace somewhere. When the brothers are separated, they are once again reunited after the trek across the desert but before taking to the sea. But then the formidable sea takes a toll This powerful story is a compilation of many stories Colfer heard about refugees fleeing their homeland across the Mediterranean. In this story two brothers, being raised by a drunk relative, decide to leave their homeland in search of their sister and a better life. The sister had already decided she needed to find peace somewhere. When the brothers are separated, they are once again reunited after the trek across the desert but before taking to the sea. But then the formidable sea takes a toll of those that are fleeing. SPOILER: The story is wonderfully gripping because of the non-linear narrative and the skill of the illustrators in capturing the emotions of the characters as they move from Africa to Europe.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    ARC from FollettEbo and his older brother Kwame are living in an African village with their Uncle Patrick, who is an alcoholic and barely takes care of them. Their older sister has fled to the city. When Kwame takes off as well, Ebo follows him to Agadez, which is much bigger than Ebo could have imagined. He connects with lots of people and ends up singing at a wedding, where he manages to find his brother. The two get passage on an overcrowded boat. It's a treacherous journey, and Kwame goes ov ARC from FollettEbo and his older brother Kwame are living in an African village with their Uncle Patrick, who is an alcoholic and barely takes care of them. Their older sister has fled to the city. When Kwame takes off as well, Ebo follows him to Agadez, which is much bigger than Ebo could have imagined. He connects with lots of people and ends up singing at a wedding, where he manages to find his brother. The two get passage on an overcrowded boat. It's a treacherous journey, and Kwame goes overboard at one point. Ebo makes it to Europe, where his picture is shown on television. Luckily, his sister sees him and tracks him down. Strengths: This graphic novel delivers a timely story in an appealing format, and offers details about the difficulty that people have when fleeing horrible socio-political situations in troubled countries. Hopefully, this will help the readers understand the effort made to come to countries where life is not so hard for most people, but where people like Ebo and Kwame are considered "illegal". Weaknesses: It was hard to flip back and forth through time between the boat ride and when the boys are in the city. The changes in color palette help, but a linear plot would have been clearer.What I really think: I will purchase a copy, and know that my ESL teacher will be particularly interested in this.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Ebo and his brother Kwame live in a small impoverished African village with their drunk uncle who has cared for them since their mother passed away and sister had left. When Ebo wakes up to find Kwame has left the village to travel and seek refuge in Europe, Ebo works hard to follow and find him. Chronicling numerous small triumphs, but even more heartbreaking losses, this graphic novel packs a great deal of raw emotion into a very short amount of pages. Being on the liberal side of the spectrum Ebo and his brother Kwame live in a small impoverished African village with their drunk uncle who has cared for them since their mother passed away and sister had left. When Ebo wakes up to find Kwame has left the village to travel and seek refuge in Europe, Ebo works hard to follow and find him. Chronicling numerous small triumphs, but even more heartbreaking losses, this graphic novel packs a great deal of raw emotion into a very short amount of pages. Being on the liberal side of the spectrum, I can't understand how people can turn a blind eye to refugees, and this story is a prime example of the hardships that they may face. My only gripe was that the end of the novel felt a bit rushed, and the more positive aspect of the ending didn't allow me to properly recover from the events prior, but perhaps that was Colfer's point. Overall, a very quick read with a great deal of heavy and interesting content that you will certainly read in one sitting.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    Eoin Colfer is one of my fav authors for kids. To see him take a turn writing a heart wrenching graphic novel is a depressing joy. He tells the poignant tale of Ebo, a little boy from waring african nations, and his attempt to find both his brother and his sister. It will take a long journey that I hope none of your children ever need to take. We follow him on leaky boats, deadly deserts, and rat infested tunnels. All for a chance at a life worth living. This graphic novel wouldn’t be what it is Eoin Colfer is one of my fav authors for kids. To see him take a turn writing a heart wrenching graphic novel is a depressing joy. He tells the poignant tale of Ebo, a little boy from waring african nations, and his attempt to find both his brother and his sister. It will take a long journey that I hope none of your children ever need to take. We follow him on leaky boats, deadly deserts, and rat infested tunnels. All for a chance at a life worth living. This graphic novel wouldn’t be what it is without the work of Andrew Donkin, who takes the heartbreaking words and creates images that will stay in your mind long after reading this treasure. There are so many reasons to read this book. For a look at the life of a child on the run, to explain to others, children and adults, about these types of humanitarian crisis, etc. This is not an easy book, but it is a book that needs read.
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  • Greeshma
    January 1, 1970
    It's a refugee's tale but it's also like a patchwork of experience. I barely got time to connect to the story before it ended abruptly. The juxtaposition of the present and the past were a signifier of the time gone and the brevity of the task that's left to be completed but did nothing else. And unlike most true refugee accounts, the plot ended in a resolution. Which is strange as it is good. Because turns out we all are in a dire need of some happily ever after. Even if fictional. Especially a It's a refugee's tale but it's also like a patchwork of experience. I barely got time to connect to the story before it ended abruptly. The juxtaposition of the present and the past were a signifier of the time gone and the brevity of the task that's left to be completed but did nothing else. And unlike most true refugee accounts, the plot ended in a resolution. Which is strange as it is good. Because turns out we all are in a dire need of some happily ever after. Even if fictional. Especially as the stranded. The strips are beautifully laid out and the lettering is brilliant. It's a good book to add to the collection and it's a good insight into the refugee situation in Northern Africa.
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  • Stephanie Bange
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed in ARC form...We hear about illegal immigrants nearly every day in the news. It is easy to dismiss them as a group -- they are objects. This graphic novel does an outstanding job of personalizing the plight of two desperate young boys as they escape the extreme poverty of their village in Ghana, journey through the desert to Tripoli, and cross the Mediterranean Sea to Italy in order to reunite with their family. Readers will care about what happens to Ebo and Kwame, their desperation to Reviewed in ARC form...We hear about illegal immigrants nearly every day in the news. It is easy to dismiss them as a group -- they are objects. This graphic novel does an outstanding job of personalizing the plight of two desperate young boys as they escape the extreme poverty of their village in Ghana, journey through the desert to Tripoli, and cross the Mediterranean Sea to Italy in order to reunite with their family. Readers will care about what happens to Ebo and Kwame, their desperation to escape is palatable and understandable.Full color artwork by Giovanni Rigano is stunning. Full of emotion, the illustrations add so much to the strong text by Eoin Colfer and Andrew Donkin. Together, they are incredibly strong. Appended in the back (and rendered in black and white) is an interview with Helen, an illegal immigrant from Eritrea.Those who read this will understandably empathize with the plight of illegals. Hopefully they will stand up for them and continue to offer aid whenever possible.Outstanding graphic novel for grades 4-up.
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  • Victoria Peipert
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent graphic novel! The illustrations and story were so well done and are a great introduction to the perspective and experiences of emigrants/refugees. I can see this series being enjoyed casually or integrated into educational settings.
  • India
    January 1, 1970
    This was a force to reckon with. My heart was completely lost in the story--the harsh reality that felt as though it would never soften-- and though it is mixed with the gorgeous hope of young Ebo--this is a soul crushingly realistic portrayal of the hardships of immigration.
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  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    Well, if you're ready for a punch in the gut book this would be it. Story of two young refugee boys trying to reach Europe to find their sister. I will not spoil it, surfeit to say I'm holding back tears. Illustrations are very dark and atmospheric. Could be disturbing to younger readers.
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  • Jayne Downes
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful story based on real life events. Makes reader aware of harrowing journeys some refugees are forced to make and many don't survive.
  • Ms. Alderete
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Mr. White for letting my borrow this amazingly heartfelt book about Ebo and his brother, Kwame, and their journey from Ghana to Europe to reunite with their sister.
  • Claudia Silk
    January 1, 1970
    A very moving graphic novel dealing with the migration crisis from Northern Africa to Europe. Although not a true story per se it is based on fact of many migrants. Heartbreaking and enlightening.
  • Chris Haughton
    January 1, 1970
    fantastic book. could not put it down. highly recommended.
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