American Moonshot
Instant New York Times BestsellerAs the fiftieth anniversary of the first lunar landing approaches, the award winning historian and perennial New York Times bestselling author takes a fresh look at the space program, President John F. Kennedy’s inspiring challenge, and America’s race to the moon.“We choose to go to the Moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one we intend to win.”—President John F. KennedyOn May 25, 1961, JFK made an astonishing announcement: his goal of putting a man on the moon by the end of the decade. In this engrossing, fast-paced epic, Douglas Brinkley returns to the 1960s to recreate one of the most exciting and ambitious achievements in the history of humankind. American Moonshot brings together the extraordinary political, cultural, and scientific factors that fueled the birth and development of NASA and the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo projects, which shot the United States to victory in the space race against the Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War.Drawing on new primary source material and major interviews with many of the surviving figures who were key to America’s success, Brinkley brings this fascinating history to life as never before. American Moonshot is a portrait of the brilliant men and women who made this giant leap possible, the technology that enabled us to propel men beyond earth’s orbit to the moon and return them safely, and the geopolitical tensions that spurred Kennedy to commit himself fully to this audacious dream. Brinkley’s ensemble cast of New Frontier characters include rocketeer Wernher von Braun, astronaut John Glenn and space booster Lyndon Johnson.A vivid and enthralling chronicle of one of the most thrilling, hopeful, and turbulent eras in the nation’s history, American Moonshot is an homage to scientific ingenuity, human curiosity, and the boundless American spirit.

American Moonshot Details

TitleAmerican Moonshot
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 2nd, 2019
PublisherHarper
ISBN-139780062655080
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Science, Space, Politics, North American Hi..., American History, Biography

American Moonshot Review

  • Will Byrnes
    January 1, 1970
    “We choose to go to the moon--we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because the challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win.” – JFK at Rice University- September 12, 1962 “The Eagle has landed.” – Neil Armstrong, July 20, 1969JFK delivering his “we choose t “We choose to go to the moon--we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because the challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win.” – JFK at Rice University- September 12, 1962 “The Eagle has landed.” – Neil Armstrong, July 20, 1969JFK delivering his “we choose to go to the moon” speech at Rice University – image from History HubPublic Affairs Officer – Three minutes, 45 seconds and counting. In the final abort checks between several key members of the crew here in the control center and the astronauts, Launch Operations Manager Paul Donnelly wished the crew, on the launch teams' behalf, "Good luck and Godspeed." There have been many events in American history that can bring one to tears, decades later. There is no shortage of dark moments in our violent past, domestic and international. I was alive in 1963 when JFK was murdered, and when RFK and MLK were killed by sinister forces. Recalling those moments can bring tears of grief, a sense of a blow to us all, as well as a feeling of personal loss. 9/11 was a Pearl Harbor trauma for the 21st century. I choke up even thinking about it. But there have also been moments when threatened waterworks were of a very different sort. Moments of joy and pride, being at Woodstock, the 1969 and 1986 Mets, (OK, so maybe those two were not national events in the same way, fine) the election of Barack Obama and that day in July 1969 when a promise was kept, an ages-long dream was no longer deferred, and in the name of our global humanity, a human being first set foot on the moon. For me, in my lifetime, there has never been a prouder moment to be an American.Saturn C-1 - a predecessor to the Saturn V that would boost the Apollo missions - Image from This Day in AviationPublic Affairs Officer – Two minutes, 30 seconds and counting; we're still Go on Apollo 11 at this time. Douglas Brinkley has been charting the history of the United States since the 1990s. The guy has some range. He was a mentee of Stephen Ambrose, which should be recommendation enough. In addition, he was literary executor for Hunter S. Thompson, and was the authorized biographer for Jack Kerouac. He has been active in and has written about the environmental movement, and has been attacked by occasional Republicans, which usually means he is doing something right. Brinkley is CNN’s goto expert on things presidential, having written books about many of them. His focus here is on the brief, but impactful presidency of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, and how he led the nation to the signal achievement of transporting a man to the moon and bringing him safely home. Douglas Brinkley - image from politicaldig.comPublic Affairs Officer – We just passed the 2-minute mark in the countdown. Brinkley follows JFKs early life, from so-so student, enduring considerable medical miseries and enjoying a very active social life, both in two prep schools and then in two different colleges to someone with a keen interest in and talent for public policy. Of particular interest is the impact of seeing the face of fascism in 1932 when he toured Germany in a bit of a reconnoiter for his politically connected father, who would be appointed the US ambassador to the United Kingdom a few years later. Wernher von Braun - image from Space.comPublic Affairs Officer – T minus 1 minute, 54 seconds and counting. Our status board indicates that the oxidizer tanks in the second and third stages now have pressurized. We continue to build up pressure in all three stages here at the last minute to prepare it for lift-offFor much of the book, Brinkley parallels JFK’s rise with the career of Wernher von Braun, the German rocket expert who had overseen the development of the V-1 and V-2 rockets that Hitler used in attacking England. Von Braun is a fascinating character, however much his Hitlerian expedience marked him as a war criminal. Thousands of slave laborers perished in the Peenemünde rocket development site that he ran. He had dreamed of making space flight a reality ever since he was a child, and was willing to do whatever it took to move this goal forward. Post World War II, with the USA and the Soviet Union gearing up for the possible next great war, von Braun’s expertise was in high demand. He found his way to American forces in Germany, bringing with him a considerable supply of materials and research. Under a program called Operation Paperclip, von Braun and many other technically expert Germans, were brought to the United States to aid in the impending showdown with the Soviet Union. You will appreciate Tom Lehrer’s parodic ditty about him.Apollo 11 en route to Launch Pad 39A - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – One minute, 25 seconds and counting. Our status board indicates the third stage completely pressurized. Von Braun was, and remained a key player in the USA’s space program, being the force behind the development of the huge Saturn-V launch vehicle that sent most of the Apollo missions on their way. He remained a subject of considerable controversy, which he parried by becoming as American an immigrant as he possibly could. He had a gift for public relations, which led to a TV show promoting space travel, and a consultancy with Walt Disney to help design Tomorrowland at Disney’s new theme park. His articles appeared in many national magazines, which helped keep the space program in the national consciousness, a beautiful thing for those who supported American space efforts. It also made him a powerful friend in the new president. The two men were more than just convenient allies.Apollo 11 at Launch Pad 39A - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – We're approaching the 60-second mark on the Apollo 11 mission. We get a good overview of JFKs career, his heroism in the Pacific, and the subsequent fame he received for his PT-109 adventure, after a book written about the episode became a national best-seller, with help from his father. On domestic policy he was certainly of a liberal bent, but his foreign policy placed him much more in a conservative posture. He had seen what authoritarianism looked like and was eager to challenge it wherever possible, seeing the Soviet Union as the major authoritarian threat in the world. The crew heads to Launch Pad 39A - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – 55 seconds and counting. Neil Armstrong just reported back: "It's been a real smooth countdown". Brinkley catches us up on the progress, or lack of same, in the USA’s space program in the 1950s, as it was fraught with military branch in-fighting and was short on successes. But the launch of Sputnik was the wakeup call it took to refocus American interest in space. There remained naysayers, and many who believed that resources targeted to space exploration and development would have been better spent on more earthbound pursuits. But there was a growing sense that the country needed to make some serious headway in the exploration of space, lest the country be left in the dust by the Soviet advances, with repercussions that were not only military, but political and economic as well. Spacecraft communicators in mission control - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – We've passed the 50-second mark. Power transfer is complete - we're on internal power with the launch vehicle at this time. What Brinkley captures here is Kennedy’s view of the whole enterprise as a main act in the Cold War, the peaceable competition of the Western states, led by the USA, with the Eastern bloc, led by the Soviet Union. The East and West were not only doing kinetic battle in proxy wars like Vietnam, but struggling to win hearts and minds across the planet. Kennedy saw that US success in the space race would elevate the status of the West, leading many to tilt West instead of East when looking for alliances. He also emphasizes that Kennedy saw the space effort as a form of Keynesian economy-boosting similar to the infrastructure development of the FDR era. Kennedy was also quite aware of the likelihood that the research undertaken in this project would leapfrog the USA ahead in technological development, with impact in fields across the economy. Brinkley offers an impressive list of some of the developments that were created or boosted by the space program.Apollo 11 at ignition - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – 40 seconds away from the Apollo 11 lift-off. All the second stage tanks now pressurized. 35 seconds and counting. Just as Trump is a clear master of the new tech of Twitter, JFK was an early master of the PR potential of television, holding press conferences every sixteen days to make sure the messages his administration wanted in the public eye remained there. The focus on locating much of the NASA program in southern states was his version of a Southern Strategy, looking to build support for himself and Democrats by channeling federal investment where it was likely to do the most political good. But also, the nation was emerging from a recession, and a big public works project, like Eisenhauer’s national highway program, would pump enough money into the sluggish economy to get it moving again. It succeeded wildly in that.Launches - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – We are still Go with Apollo 11. 30 seconds and counting. Astronauts report, "It feels good". T minus 25 seconds. One thing that the book makes eminently clear was that Vice President Johnson was not only all in on supporting the Apollo program, he in fact was much more knowledgeable about the realities of space exploration challenges than JFK ever was. In addition, while Kennedy, privately, was more concerned with the potential military advantages of the space program, Johnson was more firmly in the peaceful-uses camp. Liftoff - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – LIFT-OFF! We have a lift-off, 32 minutes past the hour. Lift-off on Apollo 11. One of the great joys of reading a well-researched work of history is the opportunity to pick up some nuggets of odd intel here and there. For example, where the term “moonshot” originated, JFKs fondness for Joe McCarthy, the existence of a program that you probably never heard of that preceded and spurred US manned space flight, who was really the first man to orbit the earth, and a new update on the first words from the Moon. Apollo 11 clears the tower - image from NASAPublic Affairs Officer – Tower clearedThe 1960s was certainly a very exciting time in the USA. There was a lot going on, not all of it wonderful, but there was a drive to move beyond, to move forward, to fulfill not only the dream of our fallen leader but a dream that had been shared by humanity for as long as people had looked up and wondered about that thing in the sky. Douglas Brinkley has given us an insightful and informative look into the nuts and bolts of how Apollo 11 came to be, into some of the geopolitical forces of the Cold War, into the domestic political battles that were being engaged, into the economic considerations that fed JFKs need to push forward, and into the personalities that proclaimed the mission as achievable and then used all their powers to drive the mission forward to a glorious fulfillment. He shows the impact of the program on our relationship with the Soviet Union, and the impact the program had on our economy. In doing this, he has captured the feel of the time, the excitement about, as well as fear for, the manned space missions, and ultimately the joy in seeing the dream realized. He has given us a sense of who the people involved really were, and what drove them. It is a very readable history, and for someone who has been a lifelong fan of space exploration, it is no exaggeration to say that American Moonshot is out of this world. Apollo 11 at about 4,000 feet - image from NASAReview posted – April 26, 2019Publication date – April 2, 2019Lunar Module at Tranquility Bay – image from NASA=============================EXTRA STUFFBrinkley’s personal siteHe has a twitter page, but it has not been updated since 2013. I found no personal Facebook page for him.Brinkley non-book writings and/or appearances (partial)-----CNN-----Vanity Fair-----NY Times-----RollingStone-----Foreign PolicyInterviews-----The Reading Life with Douglas Brinkley with Susan Larson – audio – 28:56Really, this one should doItems of Interest-----Operation Paperclip----- Peenemünde-----V-1 flying bomb-----V-2 Rocket-----A 1955 video in which von Braun describes his plan for not only a manned moon mission, but a permanent space station-----The NASA log of the Apollo 11 flight from which I extracted the “Public Affairs Officer” announcements included in the review-----JFK’s We choose to go to the moon speech at Rice University – Video – 18:15-----A transcript of that speech-----C-SPAN – a nice documentary on the 25th anniversary of Apollo 11 missionMusic-----Space Oddity-----Telestar - by The Tornadoes
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  • Jeff J.
    January 1, 1970
    Not exactly what I expected. It’s marketed as a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, and while it does cover the space program up to the moon landing, the real focus is on President Kennedy’s career and his contributions to the space program. It may not be false advertising but be wary.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    The fiftieth anniversary of the first lunar landing inspires the acclaimed historian to take a fresh look at the American space program, at President John Kennedy’s inspiring challenge, and at the race to the moon.Drawing on new primary source material, Douglas Brinkley brings this fascinating history to life as he turns the spotlight on the men and women who made this giant leap possible while exploring the technology and the political tensions of the time. Readers will find much to appreciate The fiftieth anniversary of the first lunar landing inspires the acclaimed historian to take a fresh look at the American space program, at President John Kennedy’s inspiring challenge, and at the race to the moon.Drawing on new primary source material, Douglas Brinkley brings this fascinating history to life as he turns the spotlight on the men and women who made this giant leap possible while exploring the technology and the political tensions of the time. Readers will find much to appreciate in this living history that chronicles one of our nation’s most thrilling events as it pays homage to the scientists and engineers whose magnificent efforts embody the curiosity and spirit of America. Highly recommended.
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  • Steve Majerus-Collins
    January 1, 1970
    Douglas Brinkley's new book on the space race is a decent read but nowhere near as wonderful as I both hoped and expected. I'm no expert on any of this, but I learned precious little and came away strangely unfulfilled, as if Brinkley had promised to show me something about my country and its history that would enlighten or astound me. That just didn't happen.I've read some pretty good books on the race to the moon, from Tom Wolfe's sterling The Right Stuff to Norman Mailer's Of a Fire on the Mo Douglas Brinkley's new book on the space race is a decent read but nowhere near as wonderful as I both hoped and expected. I'm no expert on any of this, but I learned precious little and came away strangely unfulfilled, as if Brinkley had promised to show me something about my country and its history that would enlighten or astound me. That just didn't happen.I've read some pretty good books on the race to the moon, from Tom Wolfe's sterling The Right Stuff to Norman Mailer's Of a Fire on the Moon, both providing glimpses of what it all meant.Brinkley settles for a fairly thin account of how it happened but the why isn't really there, just some obvious Cold War competition. It's deeper than that, though, because there is no way to tell story of man walking on the moon without delving further.We did this astonishing thing. Seventeen Americans walked on the lunar surface, all of them now dead or aged. It's been almost half a century since the last mission. Where are our rocket cars, our spaceships to Mars, our chance to vacation in orbit? I'm a space age kid. I want more now.Anyway, this isn't a bad book for someone looking to get their bearings and to understand something of what happened. Eventually, though, someone's going to write something immortal about that time, that place and those people because, let's face it, none of it will ever be erased from human memory.
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  • Frank
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to this on hoopla thanks to my local library.Excellent research and thoughtful writing. For a science book it sure had a wonderful human touch. The narration was also well done. I loved how the author wrapped things up in the epilogue.
  • Maria Rose
    January 1, 1970
    As the author of this book, I vividly remember all those space programs, that we were able to watch on our TV's and heard live Neil Armstrong's proclamation--"That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind". This book gives us a review of what steps it took to achieve the lunar landing, from the development of the rocket that engineered the launch, the technology that was developed that we use today. We can thank President Kennedy for pushing Congress to fund the Space program. Th As the author of this book, I vividly remember all those space programs, that we were able to watch on our TV's and heard live Neil Armstrong's proclamation--"That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind". This book gives us a review of what steps it took to achieve the lunar landing, from the development of the rocket that engineered the launch, the technology that was developed that we use today. We can thank President Kennedy for pushing Congress to fund the Space program. This year on July 20, 2019, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.I got a signed first edition of this book as a reminder of this event. I also want to know where's our space program going now.
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  • Sandi
    January 1, 1970
    Great read I was,so always excited by this American space program wish it was still going
  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    Entertaining overview of the early days of the American Space Race with particular focus on the latter portion of the Eisenhower years and of course the Kennedy years. There's no doubt after reading this that the space race was steeped in a cold-war "beat the Russians" narrative. Much of the funding of NASA depended on this framing as Kennedy privately admitted to his advisors that his administration has to be mindful of invoking military uses (whether direct or indirect) resulting from the mass Entertaining overview of the early days of the American Space Race with particular focus on the latter portion of the Eisenhower years and of course the Kennedy years. There's no doubt after reading this that the space race was steeped in a cold-war "beat the Russians" narrative. Much of the funding of NASA depended on this framing as Kennedy privately admitted to his advisors that his administration has to be mindful of invoking military uses (whether direct or indirect) resulting from the massive NASA spending, in order to secure congressional funding especially from moderate to conservative Republicans. Americans were paying in their taxes at the space-race height as much as 50 cents per week to cover costs to NASA. Kennedy was also mindful to spread the Keynesian spending wealth: "...instead of dispensing the entire plum of Project Apollo development to a single contractor, the administration spread the financial allocations among hundreds of happy companies. It was the New Frontier’s infrastructure stimulus approach applied to a lunar voyage..."I also didn't realize how the Houston space center was the result of indirect legal bribery by Texas oil interests, a local congressman, and of course LBJ. "Houston pulled off the Apollo program. For Brown (of Brown and Root), though, the victory was just another proud episode in a long career of federally funded infrastructure deals. That Brown and his crowd crossed ethical and, perhaps, legal lines was a matter of debate for decades."The books talks a lot of the former Nazi Rocket scientist Wehner Von Bruan as absolutely key to the U.S. ultimate victory in landing on the moon. And the book certainly does not sugarcoat his Nazi background, rightly claiming his "Faustian" bargain he made. "Words can never aptly describe how difficult life at Dora-Mittelbau (a slave-labor camp used for the Nazi's V2 rocket program) was for its workers. Von Braun, a colonel in the SS, was deeply complicit in these war crimes. He was a regular visitor to Mittelwerk (and other slave camps)."
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  • Ned Frederick
    January 1, 1970
    I have to confess, I strapped myself into American Moonshot, hoping for a high-flying sequel to Tom Wolfe’s, The Right Stuff...In other words a colorfully embellished but factual account that fleshes out Project Apollo the way Wolfe’s book colorized and narrated Project Mercury. Author Brinkley eventually gets to Project Apollo, briefly and in closing, and it takes him nearly half the book just to reach Kennedy’s historic 1961 pledge launching America’s Moonshot, “I believe that this nation shou I have to confess, I strapped myself into American Moonshot, hoping for a high-flying sequel to Tom Wolfe’s, The Right Stuff...In other words a colorfully embellished but factual account that fleshes out Project Apollo the way Wolfe’s book colorized and narrated Project Mercury. Author Brinkley eventually gets to Project Apollo, briefly and in closing, and it takes him nearly half the book just to reach Kennedy’s historic 1961 pledge launching America’s Moonshot, “I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth.” By the time I read those words, I was getting pretty hangry waiting for the main course to be served after long hours nibbling on only occasional technical tidbits or astronaut derring-do. Sad to say, the Apollo 11 mission is a throwaway chapter at the end of the book. Much respect to author Brinkley, nevertheless. This is a serious thoroughly-researched narrative about our transformation into a spacefaring nation. However, it is heavily weighted with political machinations and in my opinion not nearly enough about the people and technical challenges at the business end of the long chain of events that culminated in Apollo 11.. More aerodynamics and less political dynamics would have brought the book more into orbit with the account I had hoped to read. If you are of a similar bent, I.e, bored by lengthy tales about political shenanigans, you can just skim those parts. There is plenty of the cool stuff for the more nerdy among us.
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  • Tony
    January 1, 1970
    For what it is, this is a wonderful book. However, adjustment of expectation may be warranted. This book covers the early days of the space program in the context of U.S. and the world geo-political / Cold War landscape. It tracks technology advancements and political circumstances that led to the space race culminating on the moon landings. There are many books that focus solely on the astronauts, controllers and engineers and never venture out from the labs, sims, and space craft of the U.S. / For what it is, this is a wonderful book. However, adjustment of expectation may be warranted. This book covers the early days of the space program in the context of U.S. and the world geo-political / Cold War landscape. It tracks technology advancements and political circumstances that led to the space race culminating on the moon landings. There are many books that focus solely on the astronauts, controllers and engineers and never venture out from the labs, sims, and space craft of the U.S. / NASA space program. I initially thought I would not enjoy this book because of it scope, and suspect that may be causing some of the lower reviews, but I learned so much and was impressed by the author's research, clarity and narrative delivery depicting the Geo-political world of the 50s and 60s and providing such insight into the Eisenhower and Kennedy presidencies framed against the back drop off space exploration. Highly recommended.
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  • Charlie Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    A COMPLETE history of the American space program from Goddard until the moon landing. The arguments for and against the space program are presented during and after President Kennedy's term as president. Every character having the most minute effect on the space program, whether pro or con, is presented.A most thorough account of the concurrent history is explained. The major character is President John F. Kennedy and the book is centered around his desire and foresight in development of the pro A COMPLETE history of the American space program from Goddard until the moon landing. The arguments for and against the space program are presented during and after President Kennedy's term as president. Every character having the most minute effect on the space program, whether pro or con, is presented.A most thorough account of the concurrent history is explained. The major character is President John F. Kennedy and the book is centered around his desire and foresight in development of the program to make America first on the moon.
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  • GarudaLead
    January 1, 1970
    This was the first book I read about NASA and the Moonshot and it was a great first book on the subject. It gives you great insight into Kennedy and his thoughts and motivations about the space race with. It gives you a solid backdrop with background on the birth of rocketry during WWII as the role that Khrushchev and the Cold War played.If you wanted to start reading on the subject on the history of NASA or the Moonshot, this book will give you a solid foundation and understanding. I now want t This was the first book I read about NASA and the Moonshot and it was a great first book on the subject. It gives you great insight into Kennedy and his thoughts and motivations about the space race with. It gives you a solid backdrop with background on the birth of rocketry during WWII as the role that Khrushchev and the Cold War played.If you wanted to start reading on the subject on the history of NASA or the Moonshot, this book will give you a solid foundation and understanding. I now want to learn more will be looking for other great books on the subject all thanks to this book!
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  • Rebekah Bailey
    January 1, 1970
    Yeah, it's about the space program. However, I found it to be more of a thinly veiled review of Kennedy's political career. History does not come naturally to some of us, and requires the help of someone who can make it come alive. This author is not one of those people, and I found the book to be a dry recounting of a lot of facts, date, and names that are destined to never take root in my memory. I'd like to give it 2 stars, but I suspect I may not be qualified to do so, having confessed to my Yeah, it's about the space program. However, I found it to be more of a thinly veiled review of Kennedy's political career. History does not come naturally to some of us, and requires the help of someone who can make it come alive. This author is not one of those people, and I found the book to be a dry recounting of a lot of facts, date, and names that are destined to never take root in my memory. I'd like to give it 2 stars, but I suspect I may not be qualified to do so, having confessed to my history handicap.
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books where you finish it and want to reread it right away. It was that good. Serving at once as both a biography of JFK and also a history of the space program, this book really delivers the goods on so many levels. The narrative is very engaging, the chapters are kept short and succinct, and it is well illustrated with photos. If you are into space exploration, this is the book to start with.
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  • Scott Kardel
    January 1, 1970
    American Moonshot is unlike all of the other books I have read about the space race in that it is largely centered on JFK and the politics behind our race to the Moon. Douglas Brinkley does an excellent job of telling the story and digging into the roots of the space race with events that transpired before, during and after World War II and how the Cold War gave birth to the American space program.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Well written and highly enjoyable book about the American space program. It is fabulously researched and laid out, giving the reader real insight into the people who were part of this effort and the broader context into which it fit. As the book proceeds the focus is on JFK and his role in this race to the moon. It's a long book to read but immensely worth it. Brinkley has done a masterful job.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    Heard them talking about this on NPR so bought it when I got home. It had more politics than space than I prefer but I guess the title tells you that. And I've read so many space books, I probably don't really need that and probably I should be learning this stuff.
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  • Phil Oakley
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent narrative style written from inside the story. Reads much like a good novel. Wouldn’t be surprised to see it as a Netflix or HBO movie. Newly discovered material about Kennedy and an interesting view of Werner von Bronn Braun.
  • Jack
    January 1, 1970
    long, detailed, very good
  • Michael Kelley
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful book
  • Onceinabluemoon
    January 1, 1970
    Love books that remind me what of it used to feel like to be a proud american. Space, an incredible endeavor, kennedy, an outstanding man, coupled together, thought it was a terrific read.
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