The Flatshare
Tiffy and Leon share a flatTiffy and Leon share a bedTiffy and Leon have never met… Tiffy Moore needs a cheap flat, and fast. Leon Twomey works nights and needs cash. Their friends think they’re crazy, but it’s the perfect solution: Leon occupies the one-bed flat while Tiffy’s at work in the day, and she has the run of the place the rest of the time. But with obsessive ex-boyfriends, demanding clients at work, wrongly imprisoned brothers and, of course, the fact that they still haven’t met yet, they’re about to discover that if you want the perfect home you need to throw the rulebook out the window…

The Flatshare Details

TitleThe Flatshare
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 18th, 2019
PublisherQuercus
ISBN-139781787474406
Rating
GenreRomance, Contemporary, Fiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Adult

The Flatshare Review

  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    now available in both hardback and eBook format in the UK / IrelandYasssssss!!! Oh I have been waiting for a book like this one to come along FOR YEARS! The Flatshare is exactly what I want from a romantic comedy/dramedy type book... It's got hugely likeable protagonists in the form of Tiffy and Leon, a highly original setup for the meeting of these two characters, a cast of interesting supporting characters and side storylines but most of all... It feels fresh!!! Hallelujah for that. I have fou now available in both hardback and eBook format in the UK / IrelandYasssssss!!! Oh I have been waiting for a book like this one to come along FOR YEARS! The Flatshare is exactly what I want from a romantic comedy/dramedy type book... It's got hugely likeable protagonists in the form of Tiffy and Leon, a highly original setup for the meeting of these two characters, a cast of interesting supporting characters and side storylines but most of all... It feels fresh!!! Hallelujah for that. I have found myself getting so jaded when it comes to this genre of book but this one is a veritable diamond in the rough. 'The Flatshare' does not feel like so many of the countless romantic-comedy/dramedy books I've read throughout the years.The setup for this book is a bit bonkers but it really works. Tiffy and Leon are flatmates with a twist. They share a bed! But Leon is in the flat only during the day as he works night shifts. Whereas Tiffy is in the flat at nights and on the weekends. Their lives are so separate that they haven't even met... I mean we know where this is going right? BUT THE JOURNEY IS FABULOUS! Tiffy and Leon start leaving generic post it notes for each other around the flat (regarding things such as bin day, leftover food etc) but these notes gradually evolve into a deeper intimacy and the two find themselves wondering a lot more about the other person and if maybe there is a significant connection. The pacing is perfect btw, I thought the book might have the error of using the notes as the sole point of contact between the two leads for too long, but, the author got it spot on with how she kept building upon their burgeoning relationship. Tiffy is the traditional quirky type of leading lady that we so often get in these books BUT because of the great writing and the fact that she has a fabulous backstory and is a character laden with genuine feelings and emotions, her quirkiness feels authentic to who she is as a person. And who she is is also incredibly relatable. She's got a wonderfully human quality about her and is fabulously dynamic in that at times she's spunky but others is vulnerable and weak. Leon bless him is just lovely. He's so quiet but filled with lots of hidden emotions. The backstory regarding his mum and his brother and how that translates to his chosen career is quite touching to read about. So what I really wasn't expecting is that this story is far more emotional than I ever thought possible from a light read. This is because it deals with some heavy issues regarding destructive and controlling relationships; all of which I thought were handled in quite an appropriate fashion for such an accessible / easy read. And what happily contrasted with that emotional side of the book were a great number of humorous moments. I laughed out loud FREQUENTLY at the fabulous jokes and witty dialogue between the characters. FYI, for those of us who enjoy that sort of thing, there are some fabulous patriarchy bashing jokes in the book that are absolute gems! If you're a fan of romantic comedies and romantic dramadies then this book is definitely one you should pick up when it's published in April 2019. *An e-copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Quercus, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is a charming and lovely piece of contemporary fiction from Beth O'Leary that takes an interesting premise of a one bedroom flat in London being shared by two occupants who never meet, each in residence, sleeping in the same bed, when the other is out or working. A more exploitative version of this is the overcrowded sharing of accommodation in the desperate working conditions experienced by trafficked, illegal and migrant workers. This is a more benign and comic take focusing on the dire f This is a charming and lovely piece of contemporary fiction from Beth O'Leary that takes an interesting premise of a one bedroom flat in London being shared by two occupants who never meet, each in residence, sleeping in the same bed, when the other is out or working. A more exploitative version of this is the overcrowded sharing of accommodation in the desperate working conditions experienced by trafficked, illegal and migrant workers. This is a more benign and comic take focusing on the dire financial straits many workers face in a city with sky high rents. Compassionate palliative care nurse, Leon Twomey, a man of few words has a girlfriend, Kay, and a younger brother, Richie, in prison after being framed for armed robbery. Leon needs money to pay Richie's lawyer to secure an appeal hearing, so Tiffany 'Tiffy' Moore moves in, and for months they never meet, their paths never cross, but a quirky and offbeat relationship develops between the pair of them through the form of post-it notes.Tiffy is still hankering after her ex-boyfriend, the wealthy and manipulative Justin who has evicted her from his flat after getting involved with another woman. She is an assistant editor for a niche independent DIY and crafts publisher, overworked and paid a pittance. Her star client author is Katherin, a woman who writes books on the art of crocheting, and who will do nothing without Tiffy in attendance. Tiffy is supported by her friends, counsellor Mo and hotshot barrister, Gerty, and fellow workmate, Rachel. It gradually begins to emerge that Tiffy's relationship with Justin was a much darker and murkier affair as Tiffy begins to experience disturbing feelings and flashbacks. Upset and slowly beginning to recognise that she was a victim of emotional abuse, she is startled to discover just how much Gerty and Mo hated Justin for what he was doing to her, but had kept silent, knowing Tiffy would never have listened to them. Leon is familiar with emotional abuse, having seen his mother experience it at the hands of the type of men she chose as he was growing up. Beth O'Leary writes a captivating novel that shines thanks to her stellar characterisation, you cannot help but fall for Tiffy and Leon, and the brilliant supporting cast of Richie, Gerty, Mo and Rachel. Then there are Leon's terminal patients at the hospice, for whom Leon will do anything, like embarking on finding the lost love of the crocheting Mr Robert Prior, and the young, feisty Holly, smart enough to intuit she is Leon's favourite patient, despite him never saying it. This is such an appealing, fun and entertaining read, whilst touching on the most serious of issues of abuse and miscarriages of justice. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Quercus for an ARC.
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  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    Three dull, unsatisfied stars gave my shiny place in the minority among the readers who gave so much stars to this one⭐⭐⭐I mostly like chic-lit books especially written by Irish and British writers. I like Marian Keyes’ books which shouldn’t be defined as soft chic lit ones because of the characters’ heavy baggages and emotional problems ( alcoholism, denial the dead of loved ones, abuse victims)On this book our heroine Tiffi suffers from emotional abuse and with flashbacks of her relationship s Three dull, unsatisfied stars gave my shiny place in the minority among the readers who gave so much stars to this one⭐️⭐️⭐️I mostly like chic-lit books especially written by Irish and British writers. I like Marian Keyes’ books which shouldn’t be defined as soft chic lit ones because of the characters’ heavy baggages and emotional problems ( alcoholism, denial the dead of loved ones, abuse victims)On this book our heroine Tiffi suffers from emotional abuse and with flashbacks of her relationship she starts to realize she was gaslighted by her ex’s manipulative lies. But the way of storytelling about the heroine’s trauma wasn’t strong enough, it didn’t make me feel sorry for her. I found her emotional turmoil a little superficial and unreliable.And of course I didn’t like our hero so much. I found him a little indecisive, passive, boring. At the end as soon as he thought he was rejected by heroine, he just gave up and he never showed how he felt about her. He never wanted to meet her at first because he had issues about changing things in his life( which is ridiculous excuse) then as soon as he discovered she had a great body, he asked for a date !!!The things I liked most are: hero and heroine’s communication way with post its.And supporting characters Richie and Rachel( they deserve their own book)Maybe I read too many angsty books lately so I increased my pain level and this book was too soft, painless and a little boring for me.
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  • Umut Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Let's cut it short if you don't want to read the whole review. If you like to read contemporary feel good books that'll cheer you up, chick-lits, light spring/summer reads, you MUST read this book. It's a very good example of its kind that I haven't seen in a long time as a Sophie Kinsella fan. On the cover it says the new Jojo Moyes. As far as I'm concerned, this is much better! And, it's not a depressive book under the shelter of its umbrella. When I opened the book and started to read about T Let's cut it short if you don't want to read the whole review. If you like to read contemporary feel good books that'll cheer you up, chick-lits, light spring/summer reads, you MUST read this book. It's a very good example of its kind that I haven't seen in a long time as a Sophie Kinsella fan. On the cover it says the new Jojo Moyes. As far as I'm concerned, this is much better! And, it's not a depressive book under the shelter of its umbrella. When I opened the book and started to read about Tiffy, this immediately gave me Sophie Kinsella vibes. I LOVE Sophie Kinsella, she’s the sun of my gloomy days. Any time you feel bad, pick up a book of hers, and it’ll cheer you up. But, as I moved on, it got actually more emotional than I anticipated. Also, there’s definitely more to this book than traditional chick-lit romantic comedies. Race, controlling relationships, and backstories of these characters made it actually deeper and richer than I expected. However, the writing and the way O’Leary brought these subjects to life doesn’t make you gloomy at all. It comes to the surface very authentically and organically. Not depressive AT ALL. Plus, the jokes and humour is always there to make you smile every now and then 🙂The set up of the story is what I loved the most. Tiffy and Leon never see each other as they live in the same flat at different times. I think it was a difficult task for the writer too, to develop a relationship through post-it notes that they start to leave to each other. It was very interesting and very well done.All in all, it was a really easy going, bright, yet emotional read that I enjoyed a lot. Would definitely recommend it these Spring days.
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  • Miriam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    The highlight of any book for me, is when I finish reading it and all I want to do is start reading it all over again. "The Flatshare" by Beth O'Leary was one of the those books. I fell head over heels in love with the characters Tiffy and Leon and found their story truly adorable."Tiffy and Leon share a flat. Tiffy and Leon share a bed. Tiffy and Leon have never met....... Tiffy Moore needs a cheap flat, and fast. Leon Twomey works nights and needs cash. Their friends think they're crazy, but i The highlight of any book for me, is when I finish reading it and all I want to do is start reading it all over again. "The Flatshare" by Beth O'Leary was one of the those books. I fell head over heels in love with the characters Tiffy and Leon and found their story truly adorable."Tiffy and Leon share a flat. Tiffy and Leon share a bed. Tiffy and Leon have never met....... Tiffy Moore needs a cheap flat, and fast. Leon Twomey works nights and needs cash. Their friends think they're crazy, but it's the perfect solution: Leon occupies the one-bed flat while Tiffy's at work in the day, and she has the run of the place the rest of the time. But with obsessive ex-boyfriends, demanding clients at work, wrongly imprisoned brothers and, of course, the fact that they still haven't met yet, they're about to discover that if you want the perfect home, you need to throw the rulebook out the window...."The author has written a really funny, realistic yet utterly bonkers premise that had me entertained from the very first page. I was so addicted to it, I found it very hard to put down and completely devoured it in less than two days. I'm not normally a 'chick lit' or romance fan but this grabbed my attention as soon as I saw the bonny cover and upon reading an initial first impression of the book, I knew I was going to find it immensely entertaining. Such a feel good and uplifting story you instantly feel like you are friends with all the characters. I did have a particular soft spot for Leon's brother Richie, who I was rooting for all the way through the story that he'd get his appeal. His lawyer, Gerty (who is Tiffy's friend) is just brilliant and together with her 'are they, aren't they' flatmate Mo, they make a fabulous pairing too. I loved the ending and found it so appropriate considering Tiffy and Leon's relationship being based on messages written on post it notes left all over the flat. You cannot help but be left with a big smile on your face and all I wanted to do once I finished the book was jump straight back into the story and read all about it once again!Would I recommend? Most definitely!! A truly delightful read, perfect for anyone looking for a nice, easy uplifting read, you won't disappointed and I hope to read more by this exceedingly talented author in the future.Five stars and then some!
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  • Trish at Between My Lines
    January 1, 1970
    I can’t remember the last time I gave a romance book 5 stars. They just don’t seem to fully do it for me anymore. Well until The Flatshare came along and stole my jaded heart.I’ve all the love for* the unique blurb. It’s genius!* the adorable characters that I immediately fell in love with* the quirky friends * all the post-it notes, from funny to tender, I was smitten with them* the chemistry and the lack of stupid misunderstanding which drives me crazy in most romance books.Beth O’Leary...you I can’t remember the last time I gave a romance book 5 stars. They just don’t seem to fully do it for me anymore. Well until The Flatshare came along and stole my jaded heart.I’ve all the love for* the unique blurb. It’s genius!* the adorable characters that I immediately fell in love with* the quirky friends * all the post-it notes, from funny to tender, I was smitten with them* the chemistry and the lack of stupid misunderstanding which drives me crazy in most romance books.Beth O’Leary...you have a new fan!
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  • Cortney LaScola - The Bookworm, Myrtle Beach
    January 1, 1970
    I just adored this book. Cute and fluffy love story about two amazing characters with their collection of equally amazing friends and family.Fantastic book, especially for a debut author! Cannot wait to see what else she writes.
  • ALPHAreader
    January 1, 1970
    My first read of 2019 and it’s a favourite! Beth O'Leary’s 'The Flatshare' was AMAZING - I inhaled it in two days, and then went back for a re-read straight away. "Tiffy & Leon share a flat. Tiffy & Leon share a bed. Tiffy & Leon have never met."It's a clever romantic premise that plays out in duelling-narrative chapters, when our protagonists initially communicate via Post-It notes left around the house, and by picking up on one another's moods, days, and personal battles via the so My first read of 2019 and it’s a favourite! Beth O'Leary’s 'The Flatshare' was AMAZING - I inhaled it in two days, and then went back for a re-read straight away. "Tiffy & Leon share a flat. Tiffy & Leon share a bed. Tiffy & Leon have never met."It's a clever romantic premise that plays out in duelling-narrative chapters, when our protagonists initially communicate via Post-It notes left around the house, and by picking up on one another's moods, days, and personal battles via the social-cues left around the flat. Interestingly, Beth O'Leary says she got the idea for this set-up while living with her doctor-in-training boyfriend, when he worked long hours and she perceived his mood from things like how many coffee-cups were left on the drying-rack, and if his runners laying out meant he'd managed to squeeze in some exercise before work. What elevates this novel and the romance aside from the quirky and ingenious premise, are the personal obstacles Tiffy and Leon are overcoming. For her it's a recently disintegrated long-term relationship, and the dawning realisation that her ex was a lot more possessive and calculating than Tiffy ever allowed herself to examine. For Leon, it's his brother who is in prison and currently campaigning for appeal - coupled with his job as a palliative-care nurse who is trying to track down the long-lost love of one of his patients ... eventually these various threads that account for a lot of Tiffy and Leon's anxieties that leave an imprint on the flat, leak out into their real-world evolving relationship with brilliant results. Honestly, I need this quirky love story to be adapted into a rom-com movie (my request is for Riz Ahmed to play Leon) because my SOUL needs it! I haven’t fallen so hard for a book and its author since Rainbow Rowell’s 2011 debut ‘Attachments’ (which ‘The Flatshare’ gave me some vibes to in the best way, plus some Mhairi McFarlane feels - which you KNOW means a lot coming from me!) And, honestly, I haven't instantly re-read a book as soon as finishing since Sally Thorne's 'The Hating Game' - which is high-praise indeed! 'The Flatshare' is a stellar debut, and needs to be on everyone’s must-read list because Beth O’Leary is a UK author who KNOCKS IT OUTTA THE PARK first time out. Wow.
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  • Paulette
    January 1, 1970
    This is a debut novel from Beth O’Leary I loved the quirkiness of the story line and the romance… not my usual genre. I was pleasantly surprised…. Beth, I think you might start a trend now….I loved the premise of the book, two strangers sharing a one bedroom flat in central London…. Leon is struggling to make ends meet, his younger brother Richie in in jail framed for robbery, he needs to pay the lawyer for his upcoming appeal. Leon has an idea, Tiffy answers Leon’s ad looking for someone to sha This is a debut novel from Beth O’Leary I loved the quirkiness of the story line and the romance… not my usual genre. I was pleasantly surprised…. Beth, I think you might start a trend now….I loved the premise of the book, two strangers sharing a one bedroom flat in central London…. Leon is struggling to make ends meet, his younger brother Richie in in jail framed for robbery, he needs to pay the lawyer for his upcoming appeal. Leon has an idea, Tiffy answers Leon’s ad looking for someone to share his flat …. They both work alternate hours - Leon works nightshift as a Palliative care nurse and Tiffy works her 9 to 5 day job.Tiffy has the place to herself when Leon is at work and visa versa…. but it’s a one bedroom flat, they have to “share a bed”. There aren’t a lot of options in central London - when your boss pays minimum wage, Tiffy’s split up with her boyfriend and needs a solution fast to get out…… she agrees and moves in. …. Over the next couple of months’, they come and go like to ships passing in the night, they still have never met. This quirky and cutesy relationship develops as they communicate back and forth with post-it notes. It is a fabulous read the character development with Leon and Tiffy. The supporting characters of Richie, Mo, Gerty, and Robert Prior and Holly patients at the hospice where Leon works. It’s a moving story that touches on emotional abuse, injustice and reminds us never to judge a book by its cover.I highly recommend this book, can’t wait to see what Beth writes next.
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  • Kim Calingasan
    January 1, 1970
    “Tiffy and Leon shares a bed. Tiffy and Leon has never met.” — This is such a cute, feel good book you need to bring with you on any trip, a cheer you up if you’re having a bad day, a unique romantic comedy that made me plaster a smile all throughout the duration of reading. Told in both Tiffy and Leon’s perspective. I am totally captivated by the spell that Beth O’Leary has created in its pages. Tiffy and Leon are total opposites of each other. But completely complements one another. The idea/s “Tiffy and Leon shares a bed. Tiffy and Leon has never met.” — This is such a cute, feel good book you need to bring with you on any trip, a cheer you up if you’re having a bad day, a unique romantic comedy that made me plaster a smile all throughout the duration of reading. Told in both Tiffy and Leon’s perspective. I am totally captivated by the spell that Beth O’Leary has created in its pages. Tiffy and Leon are total opposites of each other. But completely complements one another. The idea/setup of this book was one of a kind, quirky but somehow worked perfectly from a reader’s perspective. The scenes especially in Tiffy’s pov were all relatable and enjoyable to read. Leon’s pov was also interesting and only got better. Tiffy is an editor of crochet and diy books and has an emotional past relating to a relentless and manipulative ex-boyfriend. Leon is a hard working nurse whose brother was imprisoned for false accusation. Hence his need for money has led to this peculiar arrangement of Flatshare. The rule is quite simple, they share a bed but not at the same time. Tiffy has the flat to herself from 6pm to 8am. She will have left when Leon comes back from work at 9am. They communicate through post it notes. At first working out how to live together. Ultimately, they grew to get intimate and shared much more with each other through these post-it notes. It’s not one of those typical love stories you’ll read. And it borders on a strangers to friends to lovers trope. I already know i’ll like it from the synopsis. You’ll be agitated how the 2 of them will meet and after several near possibilities, eventually saw it each other at again, the most unconventional of ways! I definitely never imagined that would be how they see each other first. Hilarious and embarassing! There’s an equal contrast of funny and drama. But the drama bit is not excessively written, enough to make you feel empathically sad for the character but next scene will make you laugh your wits off! I’ll say no more. I was so glad to read this one, it’s already on my top fave books of 2019! Highly recommend you to pick this up and be delighted! 4.5/5 🛌
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  • Sylvie
    January 1, 1970
    3.85/5 stars.The first time I read the summary of this book it sounded like K-drama and that was enough reason for me to read.A lot of the concepts in The Flatshare reminded me of 'Don't You Forget About Me' by Mhairi McFarlane which I read not so long ago (i.e. both MC's have crazy ex-boyfriends). I loved the first half of the book, I honestly thought it would be an easy 5 stars read for me, how the main characters interacted with each other via post-it notes and all the excitement of them not 3.85/5 stars.The first time I read the summary of this book it sounded like K-drama and that was enough reason for me to read.A lot of the concepts in The Flatshare reminded me of 'Don't You Forget About Me' by Mhairi McFarlane which I read not so long ago (i.e. both MC's have crazy ex-boyfriends). I loved the first half of the book, I honestly thought it would be an easy 5 stars read for me, how the main characters interacted with each other via post-it notes and all the excitement of them not knowing each other but the chemistry is very obvious, but unfortunately the second half of the book became much too predictable.All in all this was not only a cute, funny, fluffy full of rainbows debut novel but it was emotional and relatable as well. Definitely worth to read!
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  • Evie Braithwaite
    January 1, 1970
    This was a charming love story about two people strapped for cash in London, navigating the demands of a job, rent and relationships, who meet under the most peculiar of arrangements. The Flatshare includes likeable characters, publishing industry jokes, and a touching exploration of the impact of emotionally abusive relationships. O’Leary’s writing was so charismatic and readable that I risked a car nearly knocking me over when attempting the art of reading-while-walking. It was worth it."Tiffy This was a charming love story about two people strapped for cash in London, navigating the demands of a job, rent and relationships, who meet under the most peculiar of arrangements. The Flatshare includes likeable characters, publishing industry jokes, and a touching exploration of the impact of emotionally abusive relationships. O’Leary’s writing was so charismatic and readable that I risked a car nearly knocking me over when attempting the art of reading-while-walking. It was worth it."Tiffy & Leon share a flat. Tiffy & Leon share a bed. Tiffy & Leon have never met.”This premise! It shouldn’t work, yet it works so well. The story unfolds over duelling-narrative chapters and for the first few months of their living arrangement, Tiffy and Leon communicate via Post-It notes that they leave around the flat. Think sticky notes left besides left-over mushroom stroganoff or a batch of stress-baked flapjacks. Over time, they begin to pick up on each other’s moods and quirks solely through the cues they leave around the flat: the unwashed dish left on the counter, the half-drunk cup of tea.Besides the quirky setup, the protagonists are overcoming their own personal obstacles. Tiffy is trying to move on from her recently disintegrated long-term relationship and is coming to realise how emotionally abusive her ex, Justin, truly was. Leon, on the other hand, is campaigning for the appeal of his wrongly convicted younger brother while simultaneously working night-shifts as a palliative nurse. These anxieties and life-events slowly reveal themselves in the Post-It notes and I too was falling for each of them as the notes excessively piled up. After months of their notes ping-ponging back and forth, the anticipation of them finally meeting was excruciating. And oh, the moment they finally do is golden. I was grinning like an idiot. This is a quirky romantic novel that illustrates the importance of solid friendships, owning your flaws, finding true love and has a poignant moral behind it all. Despite the hurdles each of them must conquer, love and trust come to the forefront and makes for a feel-good novel that I can’t wait to re-read in the near future. O’Leary has created the perfect British rom-com which was such a joy to read! I couldn’t recommend this more and can’t wait for this to be out in the world.Thank you to Quercus for providing me with an eARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Brandie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. My only complaint is Leon’s chapters were choppy and took some getting used to. Otherwise, I loved it.
  • Stacey (prettybooks)
    January 1, 1970
    The Flatshare was technically one of my favourite books of 2018, despite being published this year!Tiffy Moore needs a room. Leon Twomey needs extra money. The solution to their problems? To share a bed, of course... You've heard about flatsharing, but bed sharing? It may sound unusual, but in today's London, with sky-high rents and extortionate house prices, it probably does exist. Tiffy and Leon are never in their flat at the same time due to different work hours, and so have never actually sp The Flatshare was technically one of my favourite books of 2018, despite being published this year!Tiffy Moore needs a room. Leon Twomey needs extra money. The solution to their problems? To share a bed, of course... You've heard about flatsharing, but bed sharing? It may sound unusual, but in today's London, with sky-high rents and extortionate house prices, it probably does exist. Tiffy and Leon are never in their flat at the same time due to different work hours, and so have never actually spoken – aside from through Leon's nosey girlfriend and the Post-It notes they leave each other. And yet, over time, love blossoms... Continue reading this review over on Pretty Books. Thank you to the publisher for providing this book for review!
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  • Tracey (Life and Literature)
    January 1, 1970
    Tiffy and Leon share a flat and a bed, but they have never met. Tiffy works days, and Leon works nights, so they are never in the flat at the same time. But they get to know each other by the notes that they leave all around the flat. A wonderful friendship develops and they start wondering what would happen if they actually met. Tiffy and Leon were just so likeable and so relatable. Tiffy is quirky, witty and fun, while Leon is so adorably awkward. And while on the surface this appears to be a Tiffy and Leon share a flat and a bed, but they have never met. Tiffy works days, and Leon works nights, so they are never in the flat at the same time. But they get to know each other by the notes that they leave all around the flat. A wonderful friendship develops and they start wondering what would happen if they actually met. Tiffy and Leon were just so likeable and so relatable. Tiffy is quirky, witty and fun, while Leon is so adorably awkward. And while on the surface this appears to be a light read it actually delves into some pretty heavy subject matters. But all without dragging the book down and feeling too heavy. While Tiffy and Leon shine as the main characters there are a whole host of supporting characters who really are just as awesome. I can definitely see me picking this up again for a reread. It was just so enjoyable!
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review.The Flatshare is a super cute and fun debut and I really enjoyed it!I thought the odd flatshare arrangement was really unique. Since Tiffy and Leon work different shifts and Leon is always away on the weekends, their paths never need to cross – and Leon’s jealous girlfriend will make sure of it. However, they still need to communicate to each other sometimes and they start leaving each other notes. As time goes on, the n I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review.The Flatshare is a super cute and fun debut and I really enjoyed it!I thought the odd flatshare arrangement was really unique. Since Tiffy and Leon work different shifts and Leon is always away on the weekends, their paths never need to cross – and Leon’s jealous girlfriend will make sure of it. However, they still need to communicate to each other sometimes and they start leaving each other notes. As time goes on, the notes go more from business to personal. I really enjoyed the notes and how their relationship develops. It’s several months before they do actually meet in person (in spectacularly awkward fashion) and I loved how it developed further from there, as well. Their banter was funny and quirky and I completely shipped them.I really thought all the characters were well done. I loved Tiffy’s group of friends and the different perspectives they brought to the story. I also liked Leon’s brother who managed to still be a point of lightness in the story, even though he was going through some awful stuff. I even thought Justin, Tiffy’s abusive ex-boyfriend, was well done – though obviously I hated him. While they were sometimes a little over-the-top, all the characters came off as real and relatable and I enjoyed reading about them, even when it didn’t feel like a lot was going on at times.The story isn’t all fun and romance, though. There are a couple of really heavy topics woven throughout the book. Leon’s brother, Richie, is in jail for a crime he claims he didn’t commit and Leon has been working tirelessly to get him an appeal. Tiffy is dealing with trying to break free of her psychologically and emotionally abuse ex-boyfriend who keeps popping back up. It seems I’ve read a lot of books lately with this particular plot line and while I’m happy that such a prevalent and important topic is being addressed more often, it is really hard for me to read. It’s hard to not get frustrated with the person being abused because it’s so obvious what has been happening and it’s hard to understand how that person doesn’t see it. I did really appreciate Tiffy’s journey, though.There were a couple things I didn’t love, though. The chapters from Leon’s point of view had kind of a weird narrative and structure. Leon is a really quiet guy and doesn’t use any more words than absolutely necessary. Dialogue was also presented more like a script than with “he said/she said” format. It took a long time to get used to how his chapters were written. It was a little off-putting at first, but eventually I kind of stopped noticing it. Also, while it never got super graphic, there was more focus on sex than I prefer in my books. And though it doesn’t take up much of the story at all, there are a few mentions of American politics that I didn’t love. I read fiction to get away from all the craziness of real life. And doesn’t Europe have enough of their own problems to talk about instead of bringing the US into it?Overall, I really enjoyed The Flatshare. I loved the characters and the humor and the romance. Even though there were some heavy topics, I really enjoyed almost every moment of the book. I thought it was a very impressive debut and it’s a book I know I will read again.Overall Rating (out of 5): 4 Stars
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  • Nina Draganova
    January 1, 1970
    Мнооооого, ама много сладурска книжка. Определено имах добро предчувствие още когато прочетох заглавието и името на автора.В началото я четях бавно , защото езика на който е написана е малко труден за разбиране от такива динозаври като мен, въпреки че дъщеря ми говори на него.Очевидно ще трябва да го науча, защото не се очертава да се върнем към по-добрия от моята младост. Като изключим това, има очарователни хрумки и много приятно чувство за хумор.От тази история лъха доброта, което ме спечели. Мнооооого, ама много сладурска книжка. Определено имах добро предчувствие още когато прочетох заглавието и името на автора.В началото я четях бавно , защото езика на който е написана е малко труден за разбиране от такива динозаври като мен, въпреки че дъщеря ми говори на него.Очевидно ще трябва да го науча, защото не се очертава да се върнем към по-добрия от моята младост. Като изключим това, има очарователни хрумки и много приятно чувство за хумор.От тази история лъха доброта, което ме спечели.Дори ще преглътна и края напоен обилно с петмез.С две думи : Изкефи ме :)П.С.Този път обаче , корицата не подхожда изобщо.Прекалено стилна и спретната ;)
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  • Ingstje
    January 1, 1970
    I really don’t read these kind of novels often enough, I forgot how much fun they are! The Flatshare is a perfect novel to lift your mood and I couldn’t think of a better timing.The main characters are Leon, Leon’s brother Richie and Tiffy. Leon is an introvert and might come across a bit awkward at first. At least I had to get a little used to him and his use of stocky sentences but I either got used to it or he changed gradually while I wasn’t aware because that all fell away at some point and I really don’t read these kind of novels often enough, I forgot how much fun they are! The Flatshare is a perfect novel to lift your mood and I couldn’t think of a better timing.The main characters are Leon, Leon’s brother Richie and Tiffy. Leon is an introvert and might come across a bit awkward at first. At least I had to get a little used to him and his use of stocky sentences but I either got used to it or he changed gradually while I wasn’t aware because that all fell away at some point and I can’t even pinpoint where it happened exactly. As for Tiffy, she’s the opposite really of Leon, extraverted, full of energy, sociable and she has a bit of a special taste in clothes and furniture. Her idea of decorating a place is a lava lamp and a bean bag :-).Their agreement to live together without ever being in the apartment at the same time was original and I was impressed how well it was organised, it really works and they never meet. How to get them to interact then? Well the author opened up their communication with a single little post-it note. Soon enough I was reading their exchanges like they were sparring in a game of ping-pong and the further along the more they share with each other and the more personal it gets. I loved how they were their true selves in the notes, how they open up to each other. They are attentive and interested, they get to know each other really well and so was I, falling for both characters a little more as I went along. What I really wanted then was for them to finally meet and then preferably to fall deeply in love at first sight. The anticipation of that moment of meeting one another was excruciating! It was bound to happen but how and when? Well I won’t say much about it but the moment was golden! Oh my lord, their moment made me grin from ear to ear.I felt it was all quite romantic even if the messages didn’t even contain romance, I just quite enjoyed the old-fashioned way of writing to each other and I felt their connection. Leon and Tiffy were also both very likeable characters that I enjoyed reading about. I’m not going to talk about the one person who made my toes curl or the hurdles they also faced in the novel, because overall it’s a feel-good novel that will put a smile on your face.
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  • K.
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warnings: emotionally abusive relationship, gaslighting, stalking (none of this is the romantic relationship in the story, and I do not give even the tiniest of fucks if you think any of this is a spoiler, I would have preferred to know it going in and I'm sure many others feel the same), wrongful imprisonment.So I went into this book assuming that it was going to be a straight up romance, similar to The Hating Game or The Kiss Quotient where the romance is the bulk of the story and whil Trigger warnings: emotionally abusive relationship, gaslighting, stalking (none of this is the romantic relationship in the story, and I do not give even the tiniest of fucks if you think any of this is a spoiler, I would have preferred to know it going in and I'm sure many others feel the same), wrongful imprisonment.So I went into this book assuming that it was going to be a straight up romance, similar to The Hating Game or The Kiss Quotient where the romance is the bulk of the story and while there are definitely other things happening in the background, everything pales in comparison to twu wuv. This was not that. I mean, it kind of was in that it's the classic fan fic "there was only one bed" trope, which I've been absolute garbage for since season 3 of Dawson's Creek (all aboard the SS Pacephine!). But a hell of a lot of the story was tied up in Leon trying to get his brother out of jail and in Tiffy slowly coming to the realisation that her relationship with her ex was indescribably toxic and emotionally abusive. I loved the notes they left to each other and how their friendship developed through the notes. I loved how much of a slow burn the romance was. I loved the sideplots, especially the Johnny Smith storyline. It's a sweet romance that packs a surprising punch.
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  • Reyes
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by Quercus Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks!That was a very pleasant surprise! I thought The Flatshare would be your typical chick-lit/romcom but instead I got a funny, cute book that deals with the aftermath of an abusive relationship in a way that was quite realistic and moving. When I started the book I was worried that the note-sharing would drag for too long, but their exchanges were so adorable that I found myself wishing that the author woul ARC kindly provided by Quercus Books via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks!That was a very pleasant surprise! I thought The Flatshare would be your typical chick-lit/romcom but instead I got a funny, cute book that deals with the aftermath of an abusive relationship in a way that was quite realistic and moving. When I started the book I was worried that the note-sharing would drag for too long, but their exchanges were so adorable that I found myself wishing that the author would have postponed Tiffy and Leon’s meeting for a bit longer. Tiffy was very relatable, her friends were a good balance of hilarious/sweet/outrageous characters and Leon made it straight to my favourite bbfs list. Charlie’s story was maybe a bit too much - it felt more like a plot device to bring the characters together rather than the reason shaping Leon’s character, and the ending (the epilogue in particular) was borderline cheesy, too neat and perfect in my opinion, but I’d still recommend this book to pretty much anyone looking for an easy and cute read.
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  • Bookread2day
    January 1, 1970
    My review on bookread2day.wordpress.comI can’t believe that Beth O’Leary wrote Flatshare on her train journey to and from work. I hope that awards will be flying towards Beth O’ Leary’s fabulous creation for The Flatshare. Now we are blessed as author Beth O’ Leary is writing full time. With Flatshare totally unputdownable I’m looking forward to Beth O’ Leary next book.The Flatshare is a fantastic fresh and different idea. Two people are need of something in two different ways. Leon needs money My review on bookread2day.wordpress.comI can’t believe that Beth O’Leary wrote Flatshare on her train journey to and from work. I hope that awards will be flying towards Beth O’ Leary’s fabulous creation for The Flatshare. Now we are blessed as author Beth O’ Leary is writing full time. With Flatshare totally unputdownable I’m looking forward to Beth O’ Leary next book.The Flatshare is a fantastic fresh and different idea. Two people are need of something in two different ways. Leon needs money and Tiffy has just broken up with her boyfriend Justin and now is desperate for a flat. The only way Tiffy can afford a place is to Flatshare. When she sees a Flatshare for the price she can afford, the only thing is its one room with a double bed. With Leon renting out his flat, he is a nurse working nights, and Tiffy is assistant book Editor, who works days. Without actually both meeting each other post-it- notes are left to each other. The most funniest note for me was Hi Leon, would you mind putting the toilet seat down please?. I was desperate to read The Flatshare. The best part for me is I can’t recommend this book highly enough. I’m hundred percent sure every reader will love this book.
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  • Laura Peden
    January 1, 1970
    The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary is one of the best romantic comedy books I’ve read in a long time. I don’t often request romance titles from NetGalley. In fact only 2/25 I’ve received so far for 2019 are romance. The stories & characters are too often cliche for me. This one’s premise reminded me of an old movie I love called The More The Merrier with Jean Arthur. This one revolves around 2 strangers, Tiffy & Leon, sharing a flat in London. Leon is a night nurse & only occupies the fla The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary is one of the best romantic comedy books I’ve read in a long time. I don’t often request romance titles from NetGalley. In fact only 2/25 I’ve received so far for 2019 are romance. The stories & characters are too often cliche for me. This one’s premise reminded me of an old movie I love called The More The Merrier with Jean Arthur. This one revolves around 2 strangers, Tiffy & Leon, sharing a flat in London. Leon is a night nurse & only occupies the flat from 9-5 & spends his weekends with his girlfriend outside the city. Tiffy has the place to herself the rest of the time. Through circumstances they don’t actually meet face to face; their only correspondence involves post-it notes left for one another & occasional texts. They’re complete opposites & comedy ensues. There’s really only one issue I have with the book. Chapters alternate between Tiffy & Leon’s POV. In his chapters the author intentionally omits pronouns in an attempt to shape Leon’s no-nonsense personality. His internal dialogue reads like memos or to-do lists. I found it extremely distracting. I almost DNF a few times but I didn’t want to give up on this story & I’m glad I didn’t. I didn’t like it but I got over it. My worry is too many people are going to chuck it across the room in frustration. I would have rated it 5⭐️ but because of this issue it’s 4 for me. Thank you to NetGalley & Flatiron Books for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Juliana
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this digital ARC.I was very excited about this book because of the premise. Two people sharing a bed but not at the same time? What could possibly happen? There were things that I liked about this book and disliked. Leon and Tiffy were both good characters that had depth to them. I enjoyed getting to know them and their friends/family throughout the book. There was a nice build-up with when and how they were going to finally meet and that did not disa Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this digital ARC.I was very excited about this book because of the premise. Two people sharing a bed but not at the same time? What could possibly happen? There were things that I liked about this book and disliked. Leon and Tiffy were both good characters that had depth to them. I enjoyed getting to know them and their friends/family throughout the book. There was a nice build-up with when and how they were going to finally meet and that did not disappoint. Justin was an awful character (but well-written) and the way the author touched upon gaslighting and emotional abuse was done pretty well.Then there was the writing style. I get that Tiffy and Leon are different people but the style was pretty different between the two of them. While I liked Leon and his story, I hated the way it was written. It felt juvenile and not as well thought out as when it was Tiffy's chapters. That definitely hindered my enjoyment of the story as a whole. The notes that Tiffy and Leon left for each other were probably my favorite part of the whole story. I don't think book brought anything particularly special to the table and it felt middle of the road for me so that's why it's getting 3 stars.
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  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    I'm legit crying over that epilogue. This is one of my favourite books of the year so far. It was laugh out loud funny and utterly heart-warming and uplifting. My copy is filled with about a million annotations at lines that made me laugh or made me smile because I'm pretty sure I was laughing and smiling the whole way through this book. The characters were wonderfully quirky and I loved our two leads, Tiffy and Leon. The post-it notes sent between them were hilarious and really sweet. It was su I'm legit crying over that epilogue. This is one of my favourite books of the year so far. It was laugh out loud funny and utterly heart-warming and uplifting. My copy is filled with about a million annotations at lines that made me laugh or made me smile because I'm pretty sure I was laughing and smiling the whole way through this book. The characters were wonderfully quirky and I loved our two leads, Tiffy and Leon. The post-it notes sent between them were hilarious and really sweet. It was such a refreshing take on the classic love story and I adored everything about it!
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  • Lynette Noni
    January 1, 1970
    Cute.
  • Tamsien West (Babbling Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Funny, sweet and oh so very readable! The story features some really wonderful, nuanced friendships, lots of publishing industry jokes, and a really mature exploration of the impact of emotionally abusive relationships.The tag line, that the main characters share a bed but have never met, could easily have become very silly very fast. But it really worked! Living in a city with skyrocketing rental costs I can understand the financial strain on young people working in jobs that pay poorly, and th Funny, sweet and oh so very readable! The story features some really wonderful, nuanced friendships, lots of publishing industry jokes, and a really mature exploration of the impact of emotionally abusive relationships.The tag line, that the main characters share a bed but have never met, could easily have become very silly very fast. But it really worked! Living in a city with skyrocketing rental costs I can understand the financial strain on young people working in jobs that pay poorly, and the idea of economizing by sharing with someone who works opposite shifts to you is not entirely unreasonable. The book's setting in London definitely helps make that possible/believable.
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  • Rachel Hall
    January 1, 1970
    A sparkling romantic debut with a two endearing protagonists, real chemistry and a truly original way of meeting!As a reader who gives a wide berth to any kind of chick-lit and romantic comedies, I have to admit I enjoyed this story immensely! It is warm-hearted, uplifting and brilliantly humorous and it comes with the added benefit of great characterisation, sizzling chemistry and a well-plotted storyline. Despite the downside of being a little bit predictable, author Beth O’Leary injects sever A sparkling romantic debut with a two endearing protagonists, real chemistry and a truly original way of meeting!As a reader who gives a wide berth to any kind of chick-lit and romantic comedies, I have to admit I enjoyed this story immensely! It is warm-hearted, uplifting and brilliantly humorous and it comes with the added benefit of great characterisation, sizzling chemistry and a well-plotted storyline. Despite the downside of being a little bit predictable, author Beth O’Leary injects several sizeable sub-plots which add depth and also means the true course of love encounters plenty of hiccups along the way!Assistant book editor at a niche publishing house and quirky dresser, Tiffy Moore, is a vibrant young woman in dire straits. Dumped by her manipulative boyfriend, Justin, and earning a pittance, she is in need of cheap flat, no matter what it entails. Meanwhile self-contained palliative care nurse, Leon Twomey, works nights in a hospice, spends weekends at his bossy girlfriends, and needs ready money in order to finance his brother’s prison appeal. Both are willing to share a flat if it means they can save money and when Tiffy responds to an online advertisement with the added entanglement of sharing a bed - albeit at different times, it sets in motion a very peculiar form of cohabitation! And both of the new flatmates have their own very compelling and deeply personal reasons for needing the new arrangement to work.As they begin their journey of sharing a flat and a bed, a dual narrative alternates between Tiffy and Leon both written in the first-person and comes with the added bonus of each being easily distinguishable. Tiffy’s narrative is verbose, full of random outpourings and superlatives, whilst Leon’s is oddly stilted, made up of short sentences and very few pronouns and also includes many of the Post-it exchanges between the pair. As the pair co-exist we see Leon’s fondness for his patients, including precocious eight-year-old leukaemia patient, Holly, and an elderly and fiendishly quick knitter, Mr Robert Prior, remembering his wartime romance and also come to appreciate Leon’s commitment to his younger brother, Richie, in prison for armed robbery. Meanwhile Tiffy’s preoccupation with an emotionally abusive ex-boyfriend and making a success of the imminent publication of a soon to be bestselling crochet book keeps her fully occupied. As Tiffy introduces a beanbag, a tie-dyed bed blanket, oddles of offbeat outfits and and some retro chic into Leon’s home, it comes with the upside of her abundant baking awaiting Leon after a night shift. And so begins a communication via Post-it notes between the two flatmates despite the duo having never met, Richie having spoken to Tiffy and everyone of the staff and patients at St Marks hospice being sceptical of introverted Leon’s female flatmates actual existence! But as both find unexpected pleasure in communicating via Post-in notes, thanks to Tiffy’s fondness for oversharing, it is only a matter of time before they meet.But when their initial meeting takes place in a rather awkward domestic circumstance it is just the first of the obstacles the pair have to overcome. As Leon goes in search of Mr Prior’s lost love and Tiffy attempts to launch a new cult craze of crocheting with former hippie and author, Katherin, their paths, and lives, begin to cross in some very novel ways. The appeal of this story is largely due to characterisation of not only lead protagonists, Tiffy and Leon, but the supporting cast from no-nonsense criminal barrister, Gerty, tactful counsellor, Mo, cheeky Richie, Tiffy’s zany colleague, Rachel, right through to odious Justin, Both Tiffy and Leon are hugely sympathetic and caring individuals with the added benefit of also being vulnerable and hence it is impossible not to vie for their union, cheer on Richie’s appeal and itch to see off Justin. As Tiffy starts to recognise the truth behind an unhealthy relationship with Justin that stole her confidence and left her a nervous wreck, Leon must overcome his desire for space, let his feelings show and wholeheartedly commit to sharing his life. Each must take a leap of faith if they are to ever find the thing that will make their lives complete. As much as the story is a light-hearted and uplifting comedy it does touch on the subjects of gaslighting, emotionally abusive relationships, the conditions experienced in prison and the difficultly of rectifying miscarriages of justice. Hugely entertaining, wonderfully witty and filled with subtle insights into relationships. Whilst the story admittedly never kept me on tenterhooks, I would throughly recommend for readers of contemporary fiction. I also hope to read more of a talented debut author. An accomplished novel that will surely give hope to every potential London renter! A memorable story of two people’s lives changing in parallel and finally intersecting with unexpectedly humorous and touching results. I particularly appreciated the old-fashioned romantic element of Tiffy and Leon’s story and how it was grounded in far more than sexual attraction and takes both protagonists on their own individual journey of self-discovery. As the final quarter of the novel raises the stakes and climaxes with Richie’s appeal and a crochet book launch, Tiffy must make the ultimate decision to finally erase Justin from her life before these star-crossed flatmates can even consider taking the plunge..!With thanks to Readers First who provided me with a free copy of this novel in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • *The Angry Reader*
    January 1, 1970
    ***ARC received for an honest review***I went into this read with super low expectations and was pleasantly surprised. Tiffy, sliding out of a relationship, suddenly needs a place to stay. Leon, who works nights, has come up with the weird plan to rent out his single bedroom flat for the hours he’s not there. They communicate through adorable little notes that give you a peek into their personalities and let you watch them start to like one another. Tiffy and Leon each have a supporting cast tha ***ARC received for an honest review***I went into this read with super low expectations and was pleasantly surprised. Tiffy, sliding out of a relationship, suddenly needs a place to stay. Leon, who works nights, has come up with the weird plan to rent out his single bedroom flat for the hours he’s not there. They communicate through adorable little notes that give you a peek into their personalities and let you watch them start to like one another. Tiffy and Leon each have a supporting cast that’s fully involved as they metamorphosize from weird flat mates to more. Recalcitrant Leon is a nurse. Compassionate and beloved - he’s not the chattiest of fellas. His notes take some getting used to bc he doesn’t use pronouns. But they sum up Leon for you. And Tiffy...Tiffy. Seems ridiculous. And that name. But there’s this surprisingly intense issue that arises in the book related to her. I kept thinking I’d get frustrated by the way she handled it. I kept waiting for her to do something unrealistic. But I ended up really liking this unexpected depth. And I think unexpected depth is the phrase for this sweet little book. It neatly floated just between fluffy and intense in a happy middle ground that felt like Baby Bear’s porridge. Y’all know I’m like a crunchy taco. Hard on the outside but oh so soft and cheesy and gooey in the middle. I will perpetually enjoy an intelligent light read - and this had wit and supportive friends and a heroine who saved herself and therapy and emotional triggers and realizations about deep-seeded fears and gaslighting all with an underlying light that shone from Tiffy herself. I’ve been busy and intense lately. This was the perfect happy not sappy read for a weekend of work-traveling.
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  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    The Flatshare was a pleasant surprise [@flatiron_books #partner] described as a feel good novel about finding love in unexpected waysTiffy and Leon share an apartment. Tiffy and Leon have never met. Leon has the night shift and Tiffy works days. Then they start writing each other 📝 notesThat was one of my favorite parts about the novel — the note writing, the banter and how Tiffy and Leon became friends. The slow build was a slow burn which I loved, the banter wasn’t cheesy and there were some The Flatshare was a pleasant surprise [@flatiron_books #partner] described as a feel good novel about finding love in unexpected waysTiffy and Leon share an apartment. Tiffy and Leon have never met. Leon has the night shift and Tiffy works days. Then they start writing each other 📝 notesThat was one of my favorite parts about the novel — the note writing, the banter and how Tiffy and Leon became friends. The slow build was a slow burn which I loved, the banter wasn’t cheesy and there were some real serious themes being addressed such as emotional abuse and navigating the criminal justice system. For all my international (British) friends, sense of place is also strong here. 💭💭 Tell me about the time you unexpectedly liked s book👇🏽👇🏽👇🏽 also let me know if you have this one your TBR, if not it’s one to look out for if you love romantic stories with the right amount of banter + slow burn. It’ll make a perfect summer read (comes out in the US May 28,2019)https://www.instagram.com/absorbedinp...
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  • Kari | Books For The Living
    January 1, 1970
    Loved loved LOVED it! Review coming soon
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