Autumn in Venice
The acclaimed author of A Venetian Affair now gives us the remarkable story of Hemingway's love affair with both the city of Venice and the muse he found there—a vivacious 18-year-old who inspired the man thirty years her senior to complete his great final work.In the fall of 1948 Hemingway and his fourth wife traveled for the first time to Venice, which Hemingway called "a goddam wonderful city." He was a year shy of his fiftieth birthday and hadn't published a novel in nearly a decade. At a duck shoot in the lagoon he met and fell in love with Adriana Ivancich, a striking Venetian girl just out of finishing school. Di Robilant—whose great uncle moved in Hemingway's revolving circle of bon vivants, aristocrats, and artistsˆrecreates with sparkling clarity this surprising, years-long relationship. Hemingway used Adriana as the model for Renata in Across the River and Into the Trees, and continued to visit Venice to see her; the Ivanciches traveled to Cuba, placing Adriana beside him as he wrote The Old Man and the Sea. This illuminating story of writer and muse—which also examines the cost to a young woman of her association with a larger-than-life literary celebrity—is an intimate look at the fractured heart and changing art of Hemingway in his fifties.

Autumn in Venice Details

TitleAutumn in Venice
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 5th, 2018
PublisherKnopf Publishing Group
ISBN-139781101946657
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Biography, Writing, Books About Books

Autumn in Venice Review

  • Kricket
    January 1, 1970
    i want to read this because i enjoy hating ernest hemingway.
  • Ace Boggess
    January 1, 1970
    This book offers an insightful and often-compelling look at the later years of Hemingway's life, during which he found inspiration in a strange affection for a young Italian woman. Parts of the book are hilarious and other parts quite moving. Brief parts discuss interactions with other famous figures such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Spencer Tracy, and Marlene Dietrich. Bits of dialogue are captured, wonderfully poetic romantic letters are explored. However, the author pulls no punch This book offers an insightful and often-compelling look at the later years of Hemingway's life, during which he found inspiration in a strange affection for a young Italian woman. Parts of the book are hilarious and other parts quite moving. Brief parts discuss interactions with other famous figures such as Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Spencer Tracy, and Marlene Dietrich. Bits of dialogue are captured, wonderfully poetic romantic letters are explored. However, the author pulls no punches in describing Hemingway's at times ill-tempered and sometimes cruel behavior. It's a straightforward narrative account. If the book has a flaw, it's that it often is too detailed and sometimes comes across as a minute-by-minute play-by-play of Hemingway's daily life. That gets tedious, but always passes and leads to something more interesting and even entertaining. Hemingway isn't one of my personal writing heroes, so if I hadn't won this book in a Goodreads giveaway, I doubt I would've picked it up. I'm glad I did, though. I feel my life has been enriched a little by reading it.
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  • cameron
    January 1, 1970
    This is a hard book to review. I understand how many people could be fed up with yet another Hemingway story, even though it’s true and includes their letters. Hemingway is pretty much the antithesis of political correctness, an ego driven and needy man and and disrespectful to women. However, he was also a genius of a writer, receiving a Pulitzer and a Nobel Prize, hugely generous to his friends with money and help, an alcoholic and mentally ill. And yet...and yet, I found this book so intrigui This is a hard book to review. I understand how many people could be fed up with yet another Hemingway story, even though it’s true and includes their letters. Hemingway is pretty much the antithesis of political correctness, an ego driven and needy man and and disrespectful to women. However, he was also a genius of a writer, receiving a Pulitzer and a Nobel Prize, hugely generous to his friends with money and help, an alcoholic and mentally ill. And yet...and yet, I found this book so intriguing. His need for a 20 yr old muse to stimulate his imagination and writing, the platonic nature of their intense, intimate relationship, the aggrandizement of his interpretation of her Importance, and his total focus and obsession, always, with the writing....the work.I found it utterly fascinating to see his strengths and weaknesses in the spotlight and was surprised to remember how much of a huge international celebrity he was. He was recognized and pursued in every country, he was followed by the press and fans and tourists wherever he went and was Adored and coddled and loved by his wife Mary. He took all this adulation as his due and needed it.Maybe with the suicide of Anthony Bourdain I have been overly aware of older men needing the affirmation of younger women and the deep sadness that is often the part of creative, talented, admired, successful men.
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  • Roxanne
    January 1, 1970
    This is a Goodreads win review. This is about Ernest Hemingway when he his fourth wife travel to Venice. He was 50 at that time and he had not published any books in ten years. While in Venice he falls in love with a young girl. After she gave him inspiration he started writing again. He kept seeing her for many years.
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  • Janis Gage
    January 1, 1970
    There is no fool like an old lech and this portrayal of Hemingway is pretty brutal about Hemingway’s quest after a girl 40 years younger. Sad story about a pathetic old man, an anxious older wife determined to hold on to her man and a girl who caught his attention and was determined to milk him for for she could. No one comes out looking good in this book. I never cared for Hemingway or his books and this is just another confirmation.
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  • Mary Jo
    January 1, 1970
    This is a non-fiction work by an author who has written several other excellent books that tap into his aristocratic Venetian family history. In this story, his great uncle is a friend of Ernest Hemingway when he visits Venice after the war. The book starts in 1949 and mainly focuses on the post-war years. Hemingway with his 4th wife Mary, traveled to Venice and met and played with many of the old Italian families. He drank with them, hunted with them, skied with them and then drank some more. H This is a non-fiction work by an author who has written several other excellent books that tap into his aristocratic Venetian family history. In this story, his great uncle is a friend of Ernest Hemingway when he visits Venice after the war. The book starts in 1949 and mainly focuses on the post-war years. Hemingway with his 4th wife Mary, traveled to Venice and met and played with many of the old Italian families. He drank with them, hunted with them, skied with them and then drank some more. He met Adrianna a 17-year-old and became smitten. She became his muse and he wrote a novel about their relationship, "Across the River and into the Trees" which was not very well reviewed. (He later would redeem himself with "The Old Man and The Sea" before his death by suicide in 1960.)Through this book you get a real flavor of what his life was like in his later years after he became famous. . Living on the Finca in Cuba, on Safari in Africa, unhappy in a New York apartment, electro-shock treatments at Mayo clinic. He was a big man with a big love of life but also a vindictive, hostile, depressed, narcissistic person. I was fascinated by this story.
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  • Marge
    January 1, 1970
    Clearly this is a well-research book with numerous primary sources at its base. For readers curious about/a follower of Hemingway in the later decades of his life and his relationship with a Venetian woman Adriana who is easily young enough to be his daughter, Autumn in Venice reveals her deep influence, her role as his muse at a point when his popularity--often he's described by critics at this period as a washed-up author--and creativity have waned. Granted at times I did feel very bogged-down Clearly this is a well-research book with numerous primary sources at its base. For readers curious about/a follower of Hemingway in the later decades of his life and his relationship with a Venetian woman Adriana who is easily young enough to be his daughter, Autumn in Venice reveals her deep influence, her role as his muse at a point when his popularity--often he's described by critics at this period as a washed-up author--and creativity have waned. Granted at times I did feel very bogged-down by details, but once past them--admittedly at times skimming--I returned to appreciate even more a truly great American author.
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