I Know You Know
From author Gilly Macmillan comes this original, chilling and twisty mystery about two shocking murder cases twenty years apart, and the threads that bind them.Twenty years ago, eleven-year-olds Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby were murdered in the city of Bristol, their bodies dumped near a dog racing track. A man was convicted of the brutal crime, but decades later, questions still linger.For his whole life, filmmaker Cody Swift has been haunted by the deaths of his childhood best friends. The loose ends of the police investigation consume him so much that he decides to return to Bristol in search of answers. Hoping to uncover new evidence, and to encourage those who may be keeping long-buried secrets to speak up, Cody starts a podcast to record his findings. But there are many people who don’t want the case—along with old wounds—reopened so many years after the tragedy, especially Charlie’s mother, Jess, who decides to take matters into her own hands.When a long-dead body is found in the same location the boys were left decades before, the disturbing discovery launches another murder investigation. Now Detective John Fletcher, the investigator on the original case, must reopen his dusty files and decide if the two murders are linked. With his career at risk, the clock is ticking and lives are in jeopardy…

I Know You Know Details

TitleI Know You Know
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 18th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062698612
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Fiction, Mystery Thriller

I Know You Know Review

  • Bkwmlee
    January 1, 1970
    The summary for this book describes it as an “original, chilling, twisty mystery,” which I definitely feel is fitting, however I would also add one more word to that description: clever! This is one of those books where it’s best to go in knowing as little as possible and let the flow of the story take you on a ride that is at once thrilling and completely unpredictable! I’ve read my fair share of thrillers / psychological suspense novels the past few years, but none of them have been quite as u The summary for this book describes it as an “original, chilling, twisty mystery,” which I definitely feel is fitting, however I would also add one more word to that description: clever! This is one of those books where it’s best to go in knowing as little as possible and let the flow of the story take you on a ride that is at once thrilling and completely unpredictable! I’ve read my fair share of thrillers / psychological suspense novels the past few years, but none of them have been quite as unique as this one. At the heart of the story are two murder investigations that take place 20 years apart: human remains are found at a construction site where a new shopping center was to be installed and almost immediately, when it is discovered that the remains were excavated from the exact same spot where the bodies of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby -- two 11-year-old boys from a nearby housing estate who had been brutally murdered -- were found 20 years ago, a long-closed murder investigation is brought back into the spotlight. At the same time, the boys’ childhood best friend Cody Swift, who narrowly escaped the same fate that Charlie and Scott endured, returns to Bristol – the town where he grew up and also where the murders took place – in a search for answers after being haunted by the deaths of his two friends for most of his life. He decides to use his experience as a filmmaker to produce a true crime podcast documenting his search in the hopes that people who might have been involved or knew anything about the case but were afraid to speak up previously would now come forth and set things straight. Presented as entire chapters interspersed throughout the story, each episode of the podcast was narrated by Cody and featured interviews with people who had been involved with the investigation several decades ago as well as residents of the housing estate that was forever changed after the murders. The rest of the chapters alternated between the perspectives of two other central characters in the story – Charlie’s mother Jessica Paige, who tries desperately to keep long-held secrets about the case buried, and also Detective John Fletcher, who had been the lead investigator on the original case and coincidentally was also the one who discovered the remains in the new case. In addition to these alternating perspectives, the narrative also features a dual timeline, with each chapter covering both the case in the present as well as the one that took place in the past. Despite the many threads to the story, the author Gilly Macmillan was able to tie everything together brilliantly, creating a tautly-written page-turner that I honestly found very hard to put down. As with most books from this genre, I picked up the clues throughout the story and thought I had everything all figured out, but then I got to the end and, well, all I am going to say is that I was completely wrong. I don’t want to say too much about the ending of course, but I was definitely floored by the “surprise twist” (though admittedly there was also some “follow up” to the ending that I was expecting but never got so in that sense, it was a little less satisfying). The other unique aspect with this story was the way the characters were written – I’m not going to go into much detail on this for fear of spoiling the story, but I will say that this was not the typical “protagonist vs antagonist” setup that we are used to seeing with these stories…with this one, the roles were far from clearly defined, which, for me, added another layer of complexity to the story. A word of caution – don’t be surprised if, by the time you get to the ending, you end up disliking every single character in this story….Overall, I definitely enjoyed this one, though I did have a slight problem with the way the transitions were done between the dual timelines, which confused me at first (and since I read an ARC version, it didn’t help that the formatting was already a bit off). I had to read the first two non-podcast chapters twice, but after I figured out the pattern, I was able to plow through the rest of the book without much issue. Needless to say, this one is highly recommended! I have not read Gilly Macmillan’s previous works but rest assured that I will be adding her other books to my TBR to read at a later date!Received ARC from Harper Collins / William Morrow via Edelweiss.
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  • Mary Kubica
    January 1, 1970
    Gilly Macmillan is a master when it comes to creating perfectly-plotted psychological suspense and characters with real emotion and depth. I KNOW YOU KNOW is a smart thriller that will keep readers on the edge of their seats, from the first gripping chapter all the way through to the mind-blowing finale. Add this to your to-read list.
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  • Judy Collins
    January 1, 1970
    The talented and international bestselling author, Gilly Macmillan returns following Odd Child Out (Jim Clemo #2) with an unputdownable multi-layered standalone thriller with a “killer” plot twist– I KNOW YOU KNOW.  5 Stars +++ Absolutely love this book and the cover!  A true-crime podcast stirs up new evidence in a twenty-year decades-old murder with an explosive ending you will not see coming!    For fans of unsolved mysteries and the popular podcast, Serial as well as Harlan Coben’s The The talented and international bestselling author, Gilly Macmillan returns following Odd Child Out (Jim Clemo #2) with an unputdownable multi-layered standalone thriller with a “killer” plot twist– I KNOW YOU KNOW.  5 Stars +++ Absolutely love this book and the cover!  A true-crime podcast stirs up new evidence in a twenty-year decades-old murder with an explosive ending you will not see coming!    For fans of unsolved mysteries and the popular podcast, Serial as well as Harlan Coben’s The Five (a favorite).  True crime buffs will devour! For the true crime devotee, there are twenty different kinds of true-crime podcasts: episodic, serialized, cold cases, current events, historical, and thematic. Some of these are similar, to Serial and S-Town and some are wildly different, both in topic and method, but they are all the kind of true crime podcast that will leave you questioning the human psyche, social relationships, and the legal system.I KNOW YOU KNOW is a perfect example and will feed your true crime obsession. A twenty-year-old cold case. Read it, and you will find out why!   In part, due to the author’s brilliant and clever crime writing.   Her best yet!   MacMillan skillfully maximizes suspense by juggling narrators and the timing of the two cases, as well as using the podcast episodes and distinct voices to connect past with the present to the shocking final twists. Set in Bristol, England an estate at night near an old Greyhound racing dog track. Who doesn’t love Greyhounds! (Some of my friends have adopted the retired Greyhounds). A group of friends at play. Kids are always in the wrong place at the wrong time.  From a decades-old brutal murder of two young boys, abandoned on wasteland.  Still a mystery years later.  Now an award-winning filmmaker Cody Swift, haunted by the murder of his two best friends, returns to Bristol to find out what really happened. Scott Ashby (age 11) and Charlie Paige (age 10) were beaten to death in Bristol, England in 1996. Sidney Noyce - a mentally challenged adult, was charged with the murder.  He spent time with the boys at the dog track kennels on the morning before Scott and Charlie disappeared.  He was a 24 yr. old man at the time with the mental age of a 10 yr. old boy. A boy in a man’s body. No prior criminal record.  He was likable by many.  The gentle giant. Did he receive a fair trial?In 2017, he commits suicide in prison, after twenty years.    He was serving a life sentence. However, he never stopped proclaiming his innocence.  Was there something more sinister going on behind the scenes? Cody begins a Podcast (Dishlicker Podcast) entitled, “It’s Time To Tell.”  You see, not everyone believes Sidney Noyce was guilty.  Was he a sitting duck? There were also the detectives and the parents.   Who to believe?  Everyone is hiding secrets.  Many pieces to the puzzle.  A complex chain of events. The thought of Noyce being innocent intrigued Cody.  He begins a personal investigation into the murders of his best friends.  He starts from the beginning with “It’s Time to Tell” Episode I – Three Deaths and an Article and ends with Episode 11 – Wrong Time, Wrong Place.  He has a knack for storytelling. But there is still more to the story after the final episode.How would you feel if things changed twenty years later, to have it unearthed once again?  This opens up emotions and conflicted feelings.  From the loss of his friends and his guilt that he survived is a darkness he has lived with. Digging up the past will not be easy, but if the reporter is correct that Noyce did not kill his friends, then someone needs to solve this mystery.  Who really committed the murders?For those still remembering and struggling with the darkness – It’s time to tell. Charlie was still alive when he was found and the last word he said was “ghost”.  What did it mean? However, there are some who do not want this double murder investigation stirred up again. One being Jessica (Jess) Paige, Charlie’s mother (loads of doubt here) and suspicions, who turns to wealthy Felix Abernathy (he has always done favors for those people who need those favors to remain a secret) - to try and stop Cody’s probing. He became very useful to some very influential people in Bristol.  What are his secrets and motives?  Jess has married since the murder of Nick.  Jess has hidden the past from her daughter, Erica.  “Cody Swift has lit a stick of dynamite that could blow everything in her life to smithereens. She knows already that his podcast could be a new and dark dawn in her life.” Lots of hidden dark secrets. But, why?  Throw also into the mix: Detective Supt. Howard Smail, whose career was ended by the case and D.I. John Fletcher, who originally built the case against Sidney.  What about the powerful man, Felix —What is he hiding?  After the violence of Cody’s best friends’ murders, his home and community have never felt the same again.  The brutality of the crime that ripped everything apart. Cody was the third boy in the friendship group who got away.  How could this have happened?  However, some want to keep the truth buried.  If Sidney Noyce was innocent, then someone else is guilty.As Cody Swift digs deeper and his podcast episodes began to unravel the real truths—some are in great danger if certain facts come out. There is also Owen Weston, the crime reporter who mounted a crusade to convince others that Sidney Noyce was innocent. What really happened that night? Then another missing person is found dead?  Do the two cases connect? Wow, this one will be on my Top Books of 2018. Well-researched, a master of suspense, connecting past with the present, I KNOW YOU KNOW  a supercharged, complex, multilayered crime page-turner thriller, heavy on character development, cop procedural, and psychological suspense.   Highly entertaining. Well done and bloody good!   Highly topical— A taut, gripping novel about the deadly secrets of the past. A real crime podcast is at the heart of I KNOW YOU KNOW.   The author takes us through the complicated lives of children to adulthood. Mistakes, regrets, betrayals, deceit, fears, secrets.  Through the podcast episodes, we see a wealth of emotions, even being years after the crime. Many different tales, opening old wounds from the past which are threatening to their lives today. From the victim’s mother, Jess, Cody, and even the detectives, among others.   Each character is dynamite in their own ways; however, I thought Cody and especially Jess’s characters were quite intriguing looking back from past to present.  Highly relatable characters. Readers will find an exploration into Jess’s history from a scared young mother, a dark past she would like to keep buried to keep from ruining her current life, yet she possesses the reliance and strength to go up against the worst of enemies. Jess was my favorite character.  She will keep you guessing. I KNOW YOU KNOW is sure to appeal to fans of true crime and especially Harlan Coben, Linwood Barclay, Mary Kubica, Shari Lapena, and Michael Robotham (my favorites).  Readers of Charlie Donlea’s Don’t Believe It will enjoy the podcast episodes and interviews of the victims’ families, the cops, and those affected by the tragedy, as well as those who are guarding their secrets of the past.I loved the hot air balloons (my former hometown held an annual balloon rally) and loved the hashtag #awaitthedate.  Our dog race track here in West Palm Beach, FL is located across from the Palm Beach International Airport.  Not sure I will ever ride by again without thinking of this story. On a side note: Hazel Collins (the person who made the report and character in the book). Ironically, I have an aunt named Hazel Collins Lail my favorite – now age 90 in a nursing home in NC with Alzheimer's and a stroke victim.  Each time I read her name, thought of her. I also have a cousin Anabelle (Ann) Collins, deceased.  For more than 15 years Hazel has been in a home has no clue of any of her family or where she is. She was moved to hospice 20 yrs. ago to die and they had to move her out to a nursing home.  She keeps on ticking. Would love to know her secrets. Speaking of juicy secrets to enhance your reading experience, highly recommend reading listening to these interviews with Gilly: I thoroughly enjoyed  Jean Book Nerd In her interview, you will learn many interesting facts about I KNOW YOU KNOW.  I really enjoyed how she created: ‘Dishlicker’ is a slang word for ‘greyhound’ which is why Cody chose the name for his production company. The location of the murders was real and fascinated Macmillian. She is a true-crime podcast addict and this was her most complicated book to plot to date.  (and the best, I will add). Also, note the interview with Gilly and Mary Kubica (another good one). The Art Of Domestic Suspense by CRIME READS. Podcast Interview with Gilly MacMillan and Hank Garner "Stories Behind the Stories" The Author Stories Podcast. A special thank you to HarperCollins and Edelweiss for an advanced reading copy of #IKnowYouKnow.  I also purchased the audiobook narrated by Steve Brand, Steve West, and Imogen Church for a highly entertaining and satisfying performance.JDCMustReadBooks
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Podcast, multiple POVs, past & present! Yes pls! RTC
  • Jamie Rosenblit
    January 1, 1970
    Hands down one of the best thrillers I have read this year - the dual timeline/flashback/podcast format kept the plot moving quickly and kept me guessing - all while maintaining a great element of suspense. As plot twists were revealed, I found myself needing more and more - until the very last page. The plot is centered around a 20 year old murder of 2 young boys and the three perspectives are Cody, the third best friend of the boys who survived that night by lucky fortune, Jess, the mom of one Hands down one of the best thrillers I have read this year - the dual timeline/flashback/podcast format kept the plot moving quickly and kept me guessing - all while maintaining a great element of suspense. As plot twists were revealed, I found myself needing more and more - until the very last page. The plot is centered around a 20 year old murder of 2 young boys and the three perspectives are Cody, the third best friend of the boys who survived that night by lucky fortune, Jess, the mom of one of the boys and Detective John Fletcher, the officer who found the bodies of the two boys. There are a lot of people in this story that are keeping secrets - but what are they are why? The answers might surprise you, I know they surprised me.I received an advance copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    I first came across the “book within a book” concept in Emily Carpenter’s The Weight of Lies, and I totally fell in love with it. Since then there have been a few books that have featured social media or podcasts in their stories, such as Are You Sleeping by Kathleen Barber and Our House by Louise Candlish, and I have hoovered them up hungrily. I love Gilly Macmillan’s writing, and her new book was one of my most anticipated new releases this year, but when I discovered that it, too, features a I first came across the “book within a book” concept in Emily Carpenter’s The Weight of Lies, and I totally fell in love with it. Since then there have been a few books that have featured social media or podcasts in their stories, such as Are You Sleeping by Kathleen Barber and Our House by Louise Candlish, and I have hoovered them up hungrily. I love Gilly Macmillan’s writing, and her new book was one of my most anticipated new releases this year, but when I discovered that it, too, features a true crime podcast I was ecstatic (and threw my whole reading schedule up in the air by snatching it up before my other books from my TBR pile patiently waiting for attention)! You may have gathered my adoration for this book from my star-crossed rating – this was one very clever mystery!Reviewing mysteries that rely on shock and surprise and unexpected developments is always tricky, because one little spoiler can ruin the book for someone. I advise to go into this one blind – you will thank me later. But for those of you who absolutely have to know a little bit about it, I will try to tread very carefully:During the excavations for a new shopping centre, human remains are unearthed near the scene of the double murder of two teenage boys from a nearby housing estate twenty years ago. For the detectives who found the two victims all those years ago, this latest discovery brings back terrible memories – murders of children always hit the hardest. At the time, a mentally handicapped young man was found guilty of the murders and jailed, and has recently died in prison whilst serving his sentence for the crime. But with a John Doe on their hands so close to the crime scene, the detectives are left wondering: could the two cases be connected? At the same time, Cody Swift, a young filmmaker who used to be best friends with the two murdered teenagers, has returned to his hometown to look for answers to some questions that have always bugged him in the years since his friends died. Together with his girlfriend Maya, he sets out to interview all people involved in the case, and publish his findings in a true crime podcast. But as Cody gets closer to the truth, there are some people who will do anything to keep the past hidden ...I loved the podcast element in this story, with its breadcrumb like trail of clues surrounding the murder of the two teenagers. As the red herrings come rolling in, I was ready to pat myself on the shoulder for being such a good detective and figuring it all out – only to be proven massively wrong yet again. It’s safe to say that no one in this story is as they seem. Isn’t that the best kind of mystery? I thought so. Totally engrossed, I kept turning the pages way past the time of night where I could expect to be a functioning human being the next day.In summary, I loved everything about this extremely clever mystery, from its flawed, believable characters to the chilling crime at the centre of the story – and of course the “book in a book” (or “podcast in a book”) theme, that added that special something to the story. Told from multiple POVs, this one kept me guessing until the “big bang” at the very end that upended all my carefully constructed theories. Brilliantly written, as is Macmillan’s usual style, it gets all the stars from me – very highly recommended!Thank you to Edelweiss and William Morrow Paperbacks for the free electronic copy of this novel and for giving me the opportunity to provide an honest review. *blog* *facebook* *instagram*
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  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    For twenty years, Sidney Noyce has claimed his innocence for the murders of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby. In 1996, their bodies were found dumped by a dog track near the estate where they lived. Their friend, Cody Swift, who was ten like Charlie, lived, and now, twenty years later, is reviving the case via a podcast, It's Time to Tell. He too has his doubts about Sidney's guilt. He returns home to Bristol to start investigating. But not everyone wants this case reopened, including Charlie's mot For twenty years, Sidney Noyce has claimed his innocence for the murders of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby. In 1996, their bodies were found dumped by a dog track near the estate where they lived. Their friend, Cody Swift, who was ten like Charlie, lived, and now, twenty years later, is reviving the case via a podcast, It's Time to Tell. He too has his doubts about Sidney's guilt. He returns home to Bristol to start investigating. But not everyone wants this case reopened, including Charlie's mother, Jessica, who has started a new life, with a new family. And then there's the investigating detective, John Fletcher, who found the boys. Charlie died in his arms; you don't forget a case like that. Now, he's investigating another body--found buried in a location near where the boys died. Are the two cases related? Is there a murderer still out there? I still remember the moment I discovered Gilly Macmillan, and her books are such a treat. This one was no exception. This is a stand-alone novel, or at least not one of her Jim Clemo novels, and I found it to be a highly enjoyable and compelling mystery. When I first realized that part of the book was being told via the podcast format, I felt a bit of deja-vu, as I had just recently finished another book in that structure (Sadie), but have no fear: the organization of this one is fresh and flawless. The book is told via the podcast; Jessica's point of view; and Fletcher's perspective--both now and back then, when he was a rookie cop, investigating the boys' death. You have to get used to the book swinging back and forth in time with Fletcher, but it doesn't take much, and it's worth it, because Macmillan parallels things so well in time. The juxtaposition of the past and present with the two cases (current body, the boys' case - plus Cody's podcast) is really brilliant. Plus, we get to see the trajectory of Fletcher's life and the many decisions that have led him to where he his today. His character, for me, was fascinating and one of the best surprises of the book. One of my favorite aspects of any Macmillan novel is her characters. They are always so detailed and fully fleshed out. That is the case here: you will find yourself transported back to the estate twenty years ago, with Charlie, Scott, and Cody running around, and then to the present, with Cody and his podcast, Jessica struggling to keep her new life afloat, and Fletcher, unraveling the details on a new--potentially related--case. There are multiple mystery threads to keep any detective fan happy: what happened to Charlie and Scott all those years ago? Was it really Sidney Noyce? How about the body Fletcher just discovered nearby? Just a coincidence? I loved the way Macmillan weaved the pieces of all these stories together. There are some wonderful and unexpected turns here. I adore a book that surprises me, and it was great to have some twists and turns that shocked me. Overall, this is a fascinating and compelling mystery that expertly weaves together the thread of two cases separated by twenty years. The characters are well-detailed and the book is beautifully plotted. It's hard to go wrong with a Macmillan mystery, and this one is no exception. 4+ stars. I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Edelweiss in return for an unbiased review (thank you!). Blog ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Google+ ~ Instagram
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Wasn't impressed but maybe you will be
  • Linda Lipko
    January 1, 1970
    This tale holds the reader, until the plot thickens and becomes too convoluted. Still, it is worth the read because this is an author who knows how to write suspense. Approximately 20 years earlier, two eleven year old boys were found buried in a space behind a local dog race track. Detective John Fletcher was on scene, and sadly, one of the children died in his arms.Fast forward to current time when the body of a man is found in the same area, and detective Fletcher is anxious to find a thread This tale holds the reader, until the plot thickens and becomes too convoluted. Still, it is worth the read because this is an author who knows how to write suspense. Approximately 20 years earlier, two eleven year old boys were found buried in a space behind a local dog race track. Detective John Fletcher was on scene, and sadly, one of the children died in his arms.Fast forward to current time when the body of a man is found in the same area, and detective Fletcher is anxious to find a thread linking the murder of the boys and the murder of a local near-do-well man who scammed many out of their life savings.Cody Swift was one of the three boys who were constantly at each other's side in a run down, poverty-stricken neighborhood. Two were murdered, and because he disobeyed his mother and was made to stay inside on the night his childhood friends were murdered, his life was spared.Now an adult, and still haunted by the death of his friends, Cody starts a pod cast. Opening up the story of the tragic death of his friends upsets more than a few members of the community, including John Fletcher.A mentally challenged man was charged with the crime of murdering two boys. He hung himself. Cody and others doubt that the man charged was guilty. John Fletcher may know this truth, and hopefully the pod cast will solve who really murdered the young boys.The premise of the book is good; the writing is above average, but still, I was disappointed at the convolution at the end. When I have to go back and read pages because the story is difficult to follow, then, I deem the book wanting. I wish that the end would have been wrapped up in a more clear manner.
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  • Nancy Ahyee
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance reader’s edition of this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. Expected publication is in September 2018.“I Know You Know” tells the story of the murder of two 11-year-old boys, revisited 20 years later after the man convicted of the crime (Sidney Noyce) kills himself in prison and a man’s body is uncovered near the original murder site. Scott Ashby and Charlie Paige were best friends, along with Cody Swift. Cody was being punished the night the boys were killed, which is the reaso I received an advance reader’s edition of this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. Expected publication is in September 2018.“I Know You Know” tells the story of the murder of two 11-year-old boys, revisited 20 years later after the man convicted of the crime (Sidney Noyce) kills himself in prison and a man’s body is uncovered near the original murder site. Scott Ashby and Charlie Paige were best friends, along with Cody Swift. Cody was being punished the night the boys were killed, which is the reason he wasn’t with them. As an adult, Cody begins recording and airing a podcast and starts dredging up details based on an article by a reporter who covered the original trial and doesn’t believe that the right man was convicted. Interesting premise, not so interesting execution.The first few chapters hooked me pretty well. I wanted to find out how the murders 20 years ago tied to the discovery of the body in the present day. Throughout the book, we meet many characters who are developed well – the detectives on the original case, Charlie’s mother and her current family, her former “boyfriend” Felix, and a variety of other characters who seem more incidental to the story. The exception in character development is Cody Swift, and he’s the one we should know the most about. He felt to me like a faceless public radio personality. His voice in my imagination was very humdrum and quiet, almost like he was introducing “the soothing sounds of smooth jazz” or something – not at all like a true crime/detective recording, which is what he was portraying. And every chapter that was an episode of the podcast had the lines: “My name is Cody Swift. I’m a filmmaker and your host of ‘It’s Time to Tell,’ a Dishlicker Podcast Production.” By the end of the book, I had had enough of Cody’s introductions, and his podcasts were excruciatingly boring. I’m not a listener of podcasts, but if they all play dialog like this, I’m not missing anything.“Annette, hello! Is that really you?”“You’re all grown up, Cody Swift. Look at you!”“You recognized me right away!”“You’ve still got that up-to-no-good look about you.”“Really? I’m not sure that’s a good thing!”***Spoilers ahead***I felt like there were a lot of things wrong with the plotlines.First, you have a detective who is portrayed as really caring about putting away the person who killed the two boys, but he destroys evidence, covers up for pimp-turned-PR-guy Felix, helps frame the lead investigator on the case to get him pulled off the case, convinces witnesses to fit their statements and testimony to his story, and pries a false confession out of the mentally handicapped Sidney, ignoring all other leads.Second, when the new body is uncovered near where the boys were killed, the reader almost has to believe that the murders are unrelated and years apart because how could the man’s body not be discovered at the same time as the boys. Through the course of the book, however, we learn that the boys were killed because they saw the other crime taking place. Why would the killer hide one body and leave the other two out in the open? And supposedly the killer hid the body so well that it wasn’t found for 20 years?! And the man who was killed was reported missing two days later, and no one questioned whether there was a connection? There’s also the fact that Charlie was found alive, and muttered the word “ghost” before he died in the detective’s arms. The author tries to bring that reference full circle at the end of the book, and it’s completely irrelevant in my opinion. But you’re telling me that no one investigated that 20 years before?Third, we find out that Cody actually knew all along what happened to his friends, kept quiet all of these years, and only came forward when the article came out because he wanted a publicity stunt to start a new business…using the pimp/PR guy as his PR guy.Finally, the actual killer is already dead and doesn’t even get his comeuppance. What a letdown!I just didn’t enjoy this at all. And the book title should have just been “It’s Time to Tell.” That’s the name of Cody’s podcast, and it just seems more fitting. I didn’t find a reference to “I Know You Know” anywhere.My opinion…skip this one.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you very much Harper Collins Canada and William Morrow for an e-ARC of I Know You Know by Gilly Macmillan. Available September 18, 2018.Twenty years ago two boys, Charlie and Scott, were found murdered and a man was convicted. When questions arise as to whether justice was served, Cody Swift starts a podcast to investigate. He was friends with the two boys and wants justice but many people wish the past would stay buried. Charlie’s mother Jessica in particular wants the podcast stopped bef Thank you very much Harper Collins Canada and William Morrow for an e-ARC of I Know You Know by Gilly Macmillan. Available September 18, 2018.Twenty years ago two boys, Charlie and Scott, were found murdered and a man was convicted. When questions arise as to whether justice was served, Cody Swift starts a podcast to investigate. He was friends with the two boys and wants justice but many people wish the past would stay buried. Charlie’s mother Jessica in particular wants the podcast stopped before her past is dragged up again. Meanwhile, Detective Fletcher, the man who found the boys so many years ago, is called to the same scene again. This time a long dead body has been uncovered and now he must decide if these two cases are linked.My favourite part of I Know You Know was the podcast style interruptions along the way. It was such an interesting and different way to bring up characters and facts from the original case without the usual time jumps. Most of the information about the original case was discussed in the “episodes” or memories of the characters brought back. I thought it made the whole story move smoother as well as adding realism to bits and pieces being doled out as the plot is revealed. It made for a very twisty story and I was sure I knew the truth a couple times just to have more information revealed to change my mind. I Know You Know is a twisty, complicated, fun book and I highly recommend it.
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  • Cassie-Traveling Sister-
    January 1, 1970
    I want to thank the publisher for personally sending me a copy of this wonderfully written book! This book is the type of book that holds the readers attention , as they turn each page wondering which character is telling the truth and is everyone lying and keeping secrets? Cody swift has been dealing with the brutal murders of his two best friends for twenty years and believes deep down that the wrong person was sent to prison. So he decides to start a podcast and dig into his friends murders w I want to thank the publisher for personally sending me a copy of this wonderfully written book! This book is the type of book that holds the readers attention , as they turn each page wondering which character is telling the truth and is everyone lying and keeping secrets? Cody swift has been dealing with the brutal murders of his two best friends for twenty years and believes deep down that the wrong person was sent to prison. So he decides to start a podcast and dig into his friends murders with each episode he does he digs deep into police files and peoples past that surround the murder. Just before he begins his podcast the police are investigating human remains that were found at the same location his friends were found murdered. Does this have anything to do with his friends case? The story bounces back and forth between twenty years ago and the present. The story is told in the point of view Cody, detective fletcher who investigated his friends case twenty years ago and now the new case and Jessie Paige the mother of one of the murdered boys. Cody is dead set on finding the truth while being threatened and told to stop , does he have an ulterior motive as well? I enjoyed how Gilly Macmillan gives a deep character thriller that your immediately pulled into that digs into the past and present! It will definitely not let you down! It will leave you wondering how long can secrets be kept and what really happened twenty years ago?
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  • Mrs Mommy Booknerd http://mrsmommybooknerd.blogspot.com
    January 1, 1970
    #FirstLine ~ The weather is raw.This book was quite spectacular. I thought it was brilliantly plotted and paced, with a premise that was both engaging and original . The characters are all complex and the back stories are also quite intriguing. You never really know where the story is going to take you, which is fantastic! A fast paced, intense and emotionally charged read that is perfect for fall and book clubs! A must read!
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  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Goodreads Firstreads and William Morrow for an arc of I Know You Know by Gilly Macmillan. The following is my honest review of the book:If you've never had the opportunity to read anything by Gilly Macmillan and you like thrillers, I highly recommend you pick up one of her books and dive in. To date, I've been hooked on everything I've read by her.In this book, two boys were brutally murdered twenty years ago and their bodies were dumped near a dog racing track.. Due to a piece of luck Thanks to Goodreads Firstreads and William Morrow for an arc of I Know You Know by Gilly Macmillan. The following is my honest review of the book:If you've never had the opportunity to read anything by Gilly Macmillan and you like thrillers, I highly recommend you pick up one of her books and dive in. To date, I've been hooked on everything I've read by her.In this book, two boys were brutally murdered twenty years ago and their bodies were dumped near a dog racing track.. Due to a piece of luck and some bad childhood behavior, a third boy, a friend of theirs, was grounded and not allowed to play with the boys that evening. Therefore he escaped the attack but was left haunted by their deaths for years to come. When a body is discovered at the same location many years later (although the body was left long ago), Detective John Fletcher wonders if the two cases are somehow connected. A special needs man was convicted of killing the boys after he confessed to Fletcher, but all is not as it seems.In the meantime, Cody Swift, the surviving friend, has decided to create a podcast to explore the possibility that the wrong man was convicted of the crime that occurred so long ago. As Cody begins to question people who were involved with the case, it is apparent that lies were told and secrets were kept. How did John Fletcher gain his confession? Where was the mother of one of the murdered children when the crime was occurring? Is there a connection between the discovery of the recently found body and the murder of the boys from years ago? Who killed the boys and why?I absolutely loved the format used to tell this story. It alternates between the past and the present and is told from various character viewpoints. In addition, episodes of the podcast by Cody Swift are interlaced with the narrative. The result is a multi-perspective telling of the story and the reader really becomes unsure who is believable and who is not. Beyond that, the formatting allows the reader to get a true sense of who characters are based on the feelings others had about them. For instance, the man who is convicted of the crime is mentally challenged. One character paints a picture of a short tempered suspect who likely snapped at not being included. His mother, however, tells the story of a man who never grew up and just wanted to fit in, although he was often tortured by the neighborhood boys. Then Cody Swift, tells his perception of the man based on how he felt about him when he was a child and now looking back on him as an adult. It's very interesting to get such a broad perspective of a character and realize how easily people get misunderstood. The same applies for Charlie's (one of the murdered boys) mother, Jess. At one point, as a reader, you want to hate her and feel nothing but disgust for her. But in other scenes, your heart simply breaks for her. She was a young mother, with no support system, and had no idea how to cope. Then her child is murdered. Can you imagine the guilt, grief, and possibly even relief she felt? Macmillan makes sure you can imagine it just so. One particular passage really grabbed me: (it occurs after Charlie's mom has left him alone all night):His eyes were red and puffy, the imprint of a creased pillow slip looked like a scar on his cheek. "Where were you?" he said. "I didn't know where you were." The reproach in his voice and in his eyes shamed her. Claustrophobia and the squalor of the flat settled on her shoulders like a heavy cloak and she screamed at him. "Shut up!" Charlie stared at her. He was beautiful, she thought. Why was she shouting? Light came through the kitchen window and framed the back of his head, turning his mat of hair golden. His forearms were slender and strong. His face was bursting with feelings she couldn't cope with. As a reader, her feelings of shame, despair, and love are palpable. It's impossible not to feel her struggle. So well written, in my opinion (as was the book as a whole!). Without a doubt, this was a great read and highly recommended.
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  • Nancy McFarlane
    January 1, 1970
    I Know You Know is framed through a series of true crime podcasts produced by Cody Swift, whose two best friends were murdered 20 years earlier, when they were just 10 years old. Cody is convinced the man who was convicted of their murders was not guilty and hopes that time will uncover facts that weren’t discovered then. Coincidentally, as the podcast starts the bones of a long missing man are discovered near the spot that the boys’ murder took place. Detective Fletcher, one of the two detectiv I Know You Know is framed through a series of true crime podcasts produced by Cody Swift, whose two best friends were murdered 20 years earlier, when they were just 10 years old. Cody is convinced the man who was convicted of their murders was not guilty and hopes that time will uncover facts that weren’t discovered then. Coincidentally, as the podcast starts the bones of a long missing man are discovered near the spot that the boys’ murder took place. Detective Fletcher, one of the two detectives who discovered the murdered boys 20 years earlier is given the new case. The story switches back and forth from 20 years ago to present and is told mainly from the view point of Cody, Detective Fletcher, and Jessica Paige, the mother of one of the murdered boys.Cody is vigilant in trying to find the truth, even when being threatened and told to stop. Or, does he have an ulterior motive? Jess, who has a new life with a husband and 16 yo daughter, has not told her daughter about the son she had when only 16. She has vowed to be a real mother to Erica and is riddled with guilt because of how neglectful she was as a very young mother. Or, is she riddled with guilt because she actually had something to do with harming her son? Fletcher has always been overly ambitions and has ignored procedure to accomplish what he thought was justice. But, was he a good guy who just wanted to catch the bad guy or was he corrupt? Gilly MacMillan gives us a thrilling saga that spans 20 years, a saga you are immediately pulled into. Switching back and forth from the past to the present lets you really get to know the characters and why they developed as they did. You will go from loving them to hating them and back again until you finally find out their true character and what really happened 20 years ago.
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  • Barbara Senteney
    January 1, 1970
    Cody Swift is a filmmaker who lost his 2 best friends at age 11. He was supposed to go with them, and play by the dog tracks where the boys knew they weren't allowed to be. Jessica Page the mother of Charlie ( one of the murdered boys mother's was drunk when she came home to the news that the boys were dead. She has 72 missing minutes she can't account for. A young retarded man 9 Sidney Noyce )was quickly scooped up and coerced into an admission of guilt. Fletcher the lead detective took the sce Cody Swift is a filmmaker who lost his 2 best friends at age 11. He was supposed to go with them, and play by the dog tracks where the boys knew they weren't allowed to be. Jessica Page the mother of Charlie ( one of the murdered boys mother's was drunk when she came home to the news that the boys were dead. She has 72 missing minutes she can't account for. A young retarded man 9 Sidney Noyce )was quickly scooped up and coerced into an admission of guilt. Fletcher the lead detective took the scenic route to the station and told that it was basically his fault they died for not getting help, and so the long story of police jumping the gun to pin the murder on the first suspect to come along. Cody is out to get the truth. He is doing live podcast on the internet and asking all the right questions. Questions some may not want answered. Jessica is now a mother and wife and lives a quiet life, but there was once a wild side to this sweet looking woman. Did her neglect cause the death of her son and his friend?Or could she have been the suspect all along? This story was well written and thought out. The characters are memorable, although some are less than likeable. Cody was vigilant in finding out the truth so you had to admire his loyalty and commitment. Jess was sad and riddled with guilt. Fletcher the detective was not to be trusted, although I wasn't sure if he was a good or bad guy. The lines seemed to sway towards corrupt. Cody never believed simple minded Sidney Noyce could have done the murders, they had teased him for years and he had never hurt anyone, Cody knew this as truth because he was there. so who did kill the boys? Loved this story and will be looking forward to further books by this author.OMG the ending I never saw it coming. A real thriller here guys
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Just, wow! Still reeling after completion of this well-written, throughly absorbing thriller. Once again, hats off to yet another British author. Is it something in the tea? Because the writers from across the pond excel at their craft.In 1996 two young boys were brutally murdered (is murder ever NOT brutal?) their bodies dumped near a dog track. A mentally challenged man was convicted of the crime and sentenced to prison. Twenty years later, haunted by the deaths of his childhood best buds Wow! Just, wow! Still reeling after completion of this well-written, throughly absorbing thriller. Once again, hats off to yet another British author. Is it something in the tea? Because the writers from across the pond excel at their craft.In 1996 two young boys were brutally murdered (is murder ever NOT brutal?) their bodies dumped near a dog track. A mentally challenged man was convicted of the crime and sentenced to prison. Twenty years later, haunted by the deaths of his childhood best buds, Cody Swift begins a podcast series tackling long lingering questions about the murders. This reexamination of the past threatens the lives and careers of the families and detectives connected to the case. Is the truth worth the cost?Gilly Macmillan's page turner hooked me from the start, kept me reeled in, then shocked me with the final few pages.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book and kept interested all throughout the story. It kept you wondering about who was guilty of what. None of the characters had a likable personality, so it was hard to feel bad for any of them. The story was tricky and twisting. Definitely a great beach read or plane ride book. A page turner and good mystery.
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  • Lexi Magnusson
    January 1, 1970
    This one was definitely fun. Macmillan is a FANTASTIC writer. Her metaphors specifically sometimes leave me with goosebumps. She really is crazy talented. This book kept me guessing. I loved it. ***It was a little hard to follow on audio because it jumps from past and present so much. That isn't the fault of the author, just the format.
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  • Kristin (Always With a Book)
    January 1, 1970
    Review posted on blog.
  • Leslie Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    A chilling and twisty murder mystery about two cases twenty years apart, a present-day podcast, in this framed tale, I KNOW YOU KNOW. Cody Swift lost his two best friends twenty years ago, when he was eleven. Now, a filmmaker, he wants to get to the bottom of the truth and so has begun recording and airing a podcast, 'Time To Tell,' about the grim murders. But there's new evidence brought to light: a long-dead body has been discovered in the same location as the boys were left decades before. Th A chilling and twisty murder mystery about two cases twenty years apart, a present-day podcast, in this framed tale, I KNOW YOU KNOW. Cody Swift lost his two best friends twenty years ago, when he was eleven. Now, a filmmaker, he wants to get to the bottom of the truth and so has begun recording and airing a podcast, 'Time To Tell,' about the grim murders. But there's new evidence brought to light: a long-dead body has been discovered in the same location as the boys were left decades before. The new discovery launches a new investigation. Now, John Fletcher, the original investigator reopens the case from twenty years ago. Could the two murders be linked? How? I KNOW YOU KNOW is told in a frame-style of storytelling; that is, we weave in and out of past and present via Cody Swift's present-day podcast, backstory of the detectives, present-day story of the detectives, and a present-day telling of one of the mother's of the deceased boys (Jessica Paige) who had moved on, remarried, and had another child. Keep in mind, too that I KNOW YOU KNOW might be more of a police procedural/crime read than Macmillian's earlier work of domestic suspense. It would follow perfectly after reading Tana French or Karin Slaughter. The first several chapters had me very intrigued and in awe of Macmillian's deft writing skills. But I will admit to the overall reading experience being slightly cumbersome with the switching between time periods and the podcast (which doesn't typically bother me, so it could just be me that day). There's a good amount of backstory and character development, which Macmillian always excels at, but not all details come to fruition. I personally felt the story revolved most around Jess Paige, the mother of the dead boy, Charlie and wanted to delve into her story. Overall, I found I KNOW YOU KNOW a complex, multilayered tale about failed humanity, a miscarriage of justice, and how we cope with tragedy. In terms of comps, I found similarities in the storytelling techniques of Louise Candlish's OUR HOUSE (podcast) meets GIRL IN THE DARK (Marion Pauw) for the 'limited cognition' suspect. For all my reviews, including author interviews, please see: www.leslielindsay.com Special thanks to WilliamMorrow for this review copy. All thoughts are my own.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Three and a half star is my actual rating despite most of the characters depicted are totally unlikable. Also, some readers may find the story line involving the twenty-year-old murders of two preteen boys difficult. However, Ms. Macmillan expertly recounts a very complex tale filled with very interesting, if detestable, characters.Twenty years ago Detective John Fletcher solved the case of the murders of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby. But when the convicted murderer commits suicide in prison an Three and a half star is my actual rating despite most of the characters depicted are totally unlikable. Also, some readers may find the story line involving the twenty-year-old murders of two preteen boys difficult. However, Ms. Macmillan expertly recounts a very complex tale filled with very interesting, if detestable, characters.Twenty years ago Detective John Fletcher solved the case of the murders of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby. But when the convicted murderer commits suicide in prison and another dead body is uncovered near the old murders's site the past begins to haunt him. Coincidentally, Cory Swift the best friend of the dead boys begins a podcast called It's Time to Tell at the same time. The action shifts from past to present and details the lives of the families and police officers involved with the podcast wrecking havoc on all of them. Are the old and new murders connected? Was the wrong man convicted? Will anyone involved escape the re-investigation unscathed? More importantly, do any of these people deserve peace? Avarice, manipulation, amorality, and damning secrets are just a few of the themes Ms. Macmillan adroitly weaves into this character study. Once you start it, you will not want to stop reading this grim tale of failed humanity.Thank you First Reads Giveaway and William Morrow for my ARC and an early opportunity to read the latest Gilly Macmillan!
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I KNOW YOU KNOW is a mystery. It is not an exciting one and seems pretty bland at times during the first half of the book. But it becomes more and more of a page turner until the last couple of chapters become a delightful surprise. Twenty years ago two boys were murdered. Although someone was found guilty of the murders and put away, was he really responsible? Now a 20-year-old skeleton of a man is unearthed near where these murders occurred. Are they related?Although the subject matter is defi I KNOW YOU KNOW is a mystery. It is not an exciting one and seems pretty bland at times during the first half of the book. But it becomes more and more of a page turner until the last couple of chapters become a delightful surprise. Twenty years ago two boys were murdered. Although someone was found guilty of the murders and put away, was he really responsible? Now a 20-year-old skeleton of a man is unearthed near where these murders occurred. Are they related?Although the subject matter is definitely meant for an adult, the writing style often sounds young adult, which bores this reader. Some adults prefer “easy reading,” so this may not detract you. It is, however, one of the reasons I do not rate I KNOW YOU KNOW highly.I prefer books that are not so easy to put down as this one is. But, because it does become a really good mystery with an unpredictable finish, I am tempted to call I KNOW YOU KNOW a four-star book. In all honesty, though, I have to consider that it bored me in the beginning. So I rate it three.If you are not put off by a book with a YA writing style, consider this, and try I KNOW YOU KNOW.I won this book through librarything.com.
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  • Melody
    January 1, 1970
    I've enjoyed Gilly Macmillan's books in the past so I was eager to read her latest release, I Know You Know. Twenty years ago, eleven-year-olds Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby were murdered and their bodies were found near a dog racing track. Their other friend, Cody Swift was supposed to join them but because of a ripped new shirt, he was forbidden to leave the house as a form of a punishment by his mother. This had saved him from following his friends' fate, but that fateful day and what happene I've enjoyed Gilly Macmillan's books in the past so I was eager to read her latest release, I Know You Know. Twenty years ago, eleven-year-olds Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby were murdered and their bodies were found near a dog racing track. Their other friend, Cody Swift was supposed to join them but because of a ripped new shirt, he was forbidden to leave the house as a form of a punishment by his mother. This had saved him from following his friends' fate, but that fateful day and what happened to his friends continue to haunt him right into his adulthood. Now a filmmaker, Cody still has questions over his friends' murder and the trial which had put a man behind bars. But an article from an investigative journalist has roused his suspicion that the case isn't what it seems to be; and most of all he is perplexed by the suicide committed by the "perpetrator". With these in mind, he decided to start a podcast as a means of uncovering new evidences and at the same time, encourage people to speak up should they know anything what happened on that fateful day. Meanwhile, the police has found a long-buried body located near the location where the two boys were; and this discovery led the police to launch an investigation and makes Detective John Fletcher (who investigated the boys' case) to reopen his files and decide if the two cases are linked. I Know You Know has a gripping plot and once again I was captivated by Gilly Macmillan's storytelling. What I liked about this story is aside from the alternative timeline between the present and the flashbacks, there are also the podcast narratives in between which made this story such an intriguing read. This format was a huge draw in my opinion because of the different accounts and opinions of the narrators and made me wonder about them and what their motives are. The characters development is great too, and I liked reading about the three boys' friendship - the only happier moments among all the dark sides of human nature and behaviours. I do have one or two questions surrounding the case, but they don't affect my reading pleasure and my overall view of the book so that says a lot about the author's writing.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Review can be found on my blog here: https://booksonthebookshelf.wordpress...Thank you to the Publisher Harper Collins and Edelweiss for the free eARC copy of this book to read and review.This was the first novel I have read by Gilly Macmillan and was thrilled to receive a copy of this book after reading so many wonderful reviews on this book.This book follows the story of two murder cases that are 20 years apart. Are the murders related somehow?20 years ago two children Charlie Paige and Scott Review can be found on my blog here: https://booksonthebookshelf.wordpress...Thank you to the Publisher Harper Collins and Edelweiss for the free eARC copy of this book to read and review.This was the first novel I have read by Gilly Macmillan and was thrilled to receive a copy of this book after reading so many wonderful reviews on this book.This book follows the story of two murder cases that are 20 years apart. Are the murders related somehow?20 years ago two children Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby, both age 11, are murdered and their bodies were found near a dog racing track. A man was found guilty and convicted of the murders but several years later many questions surrounding the case re-surface. Cody Swift was friends with the boys who were murdered all those years ago, and wants to find answers to his many questions about the case.20 years later another dead body is found in the same location as the two boys who were murdered all those years ago. The body appears to have been there for quite some time. The detective who worked on the murder case 20 years ago is called upon to work on this new case, and must retrieve all the old files to compare to the new murder investigation.This book was a good read from beginning to end. It captivates you and commands your interest quite early on, and leaves you wanting to know more as you turn the pages to uncover the truth of what happened all those years ago when those two young boys were murdered and how it relates to the recently discovered body that was found in the same location.Everything is not as it appears to be and secrets are revealed. The story unfolds and jumps from the present timeline to the past, but is easy to follow along.There were some parts of the book that I found slow going and hard to get into, especially the podcasts parts in the book, but it all came together nicely to tell the story. I really enjoyed reading about Jess, Charlie's mother. Her character I found to be quite interesting. Overall a good book and I look forward to reading more titles by this author.3.5 stars
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  • Connie Fischer
    January 1, 1970
    When Detective John Fletcher is called to a scene where some bones are found in a pit, he remembers back to the time when he and his partner, Danny, found two boys in a pit: one dead and one alive. Fletcher held the injured boy as they waiting for an ambulance encouraging him to live but he died a short while later. A young man named Sidney Noyce, who was mentally challenged, was convicted of the deaths of Scott Ashby, age 11, and Charlie Paige, age 10. Noyce always said he was innocent until th When Detective John Fletcher is called to a scene where some bones are found in a pit, he remembers back to the time when he and his partner, Danny, found two boys in a pit: one dead and one alive. Fletcher held the injured boy as they waiting for an ambulance encouraging him to live but he died a short while later. A young man named Sidney Noyce, who was mentally challenged, was convicted of the deaths of Scott Ashby, age 11, and Charlie Paige, age 10. Noyce always said he was innocent until the day he killed himself in prison. If he truly was innocent, then who killed these boys?Now, 20 years later, a podcast is being filmed by Cody Swift who had been best friends with the two boys. They had all grown up in a rundown neighborhood.Jess is the single mother of Charlie, one of the boys killed. She is not happy that Cody has decided to do this podcast. After her son was murdered, she was charged with negligence. Now, she is married to Nick and mother to Erica and has refused to be interviewed by Cody for his podcast. Many people had disapproved of Jess when she was a single mother because she left Charle with people and went out drinking and partying.As the podcast is filmed in segments, Cody interviews different people who had been involved. Some of the people include various members of the police, neighbors, and Scott’s parents.The story switches back and forth in time as bits and pieces come to light including the fight for power in the police department.I was so looking forward to reading this book because this author is known for her terrific writing. However, I was disappointed. The switching back and forth became almost dizzying and difficult to keep up with. For me, this was a huge distraction to keeping up with the plot. However, I’m sure this is just a one-off for me and I definitely look forward to reading more from this author.Copy provided by Edelweiss in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.I Know You Know by Gilly Macmillan is a thoroughly enthralling mystery with a compelling storyline.Twenty years earlier, Cody Swift's friends, ten year old Charlie Paige and eleven year old Scott Ashby, were brutally beaten to death. The case was quickly solved and mentally challenged Sidney Noyce was convicted for their murders. After Sidney commits suicide in prison, a newspaper article by Owen Weston raises questions about Sidney's guilt and Cody decides to revisit the crime. Throug 4.5 stars.I Know You Know by Gilly Macmillan is a thoroughly enthralling mystery with a compelling storyline.Twenty years earlier, Cody Swift's friends, ten year old Charlie Paige and eleven year old Scott Ashby, were brutally beaten to death. The case was quickly solved and mentally challenged Sidney Noyce was convicted for their murders. After Sidney commits suicide in prison, a newspaper article by Owen Weston raises questions about Sidney's guilt and Cody decides to revisit the crime. Through a series of podcasts, he interviews Owen, disgraced ex-Detective Superintendent Howard Smail and Detective Superintendent John Fletcher. Cody also interviews his own mother along with Scott's mum, but Charlie's mum, Jessy absolutely refuses to meet with him.  Despite threats against him and his girlfriend/producer Maya Summers, Cody continues publishing his podcasts as he tries to learn the truth about who murdered his friends.Jess is now happily married  with a teenage daughter. She has completely reinvented herself and while her husband knows about Charlie, her daughter does not.  Desperate to keep her past from colliding with her present, Jess goes against her husband's wishes and contacts the one man she can count on to help silence Cody.  Is Jess just trying to protect the life she has made for herself? Or is there a far more sinister reason behind her refusal to co-operate with Cody's requests for an interview?In the present, DS Michael  Fletcher is still on the job and he remains partnered with longtime friend Detective Sergeant Danny Freyer. Their current investigation involves the recently recovered body of a man who turns out to have been reported missing twenty years earlier.  Fletcher is quick to notice the burial site is eerily close to where Scott and Charlie's bodies were found.  This discovery along with the recent death of the boys' killer leaves Michael with the very uneasy feeling the cases might be connected.A series of flashbacks from Michael's perspective offers startling insight into the investigation into the Charlie and Scott's murders. Fletcher is a rising star who is quite ambitious. He is not a fan of DS Smail and throughout the investigation, he is on the losing side of his power struggle with his superior. He is determined to not only catch the killer but also make sure he is credited with cracking the case. How far will DS Fletcher go to attain this goal? And what does this mean for the investigation in the present once he realizes the two cases might be connected?Seamlessly weaving between the past, the present and Cody's podcasts, I Know You Know is a suspenseful mystery. Cody is a sympathetic character who is determined to uncover the truth about his friends' killer. Jess is an interesting character who has come a long way from her wild child days but what is her motivation in keeping silent about the past? DS Fletcher's career stalled after Sidney's conviction which raises intriguing questions about what happened to derail his meteoric rise through the ranks.  Gilly Macmillan brings this clever novel to an absolutely brilliant twist-filled and stunning conclusion.  Fans of the genre do not want to miss this outstanding mystery.
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  • Michaela
    January 1, 1970
    20 years ago, two 10-year old boys were murdered. A suspect is quickly found, arrested, and later convicted of the crime. He commits suicide in prison years later. However, his guilt is questioned by a journalist. This is picked up by a childhood friend of the two boys, who starts digging into past events - communicating his findings via a podcast. The book alternates between the events 20 years ago and the present time. Using a podcast transcript as part of the story is intriguing. The book was 20 years ago, two 10-year old boys were murdered. A suspect is quickly found, arrested, and later convicted of the crime. He commits suicide in prison years later. However, his guilt is questioned by a journalist. This is picked up by a childhood friend of the two boys, who starts digging into past events - communicating his findings via a podcast. The book alternates between the events 20 years ago and the present time. Using a podcast transcript as part of the story is intriguing. The book was suspenseful and quite the page turner - but I was slightly disappointed by the abrupt (in my opinion) wrap-up at the end. It certainly was an unexpected twist, but I still had some questions about the connection of various characters that remained unanswered. It almost seemed as if the author was still telling the story and then received a phone call that the deadline was tomorrow and it needed to be finished NOW. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the book very much. This is the 3rd book I read of Gilly Macmillan and I liked all three of them.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely a great read! A twenty year old murder of two young boys comes back to life in all of its ugliness through a podcast! To reopen and investigate further will open old wounds and buried secrets. Some involved are not happy! Did the police make a mistake? Can this podcast help to put this case to a close?
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  • Kate Ayers
    January 1, 1970
    Three eleven-year-old boys out playing. One gets grounded by mom for ripping his shirt. The other two die before reaching home. Now, twenty years later, the body of an adult male shows up near the place the boys were found. Did they convict the wrong guy or is this a coincidence? The cops and the surviving kid have to find out. Pretty good read.
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