Bandwidth (An Analog Novel Book 1)
“A future we can all recognize—and one that we should all be genuinely afraid of.” —Ars Technica on CumulusA rising star at a preeminent political lobbying firm, Dag Calhoun represents the world’s most powerful technology and energy executives. But when a close brush with death reveals that the influence he wields makes him a target, impossible cracks appear in his perfect, richly appointed life.Like everyone else, Dag relies on his digital feed for everything—a feed that is as personal as it is pervasive, and may not be as private as it seems. As he struggles to make sense of the dark forces closing in on him, he discovers that activists are hijacking the feed to manipulate markets and governments. Going public would destroy everything he’s worked so hard to build, but it’s not just Dag’s life on the line—a shadow war is coming, one that will secure humanity’s future or doom the planet to climate catastrophe. Ultimately, Dag must decide the price he’s willing to pay to change the world.

Bandwidth (An Analog Novel Book 1) Details

TitleBandwidth (An Analog Novel Book 1)
Author
ReleaseMay 1st, 2018
Publisher47North
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Thriller

Bandwidth (An Analog Novel Book 1) Review

  • Dee Arr
    January 1, 1970
    {Video review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiWYz... }Consider a world one step away from where we now reside, where logging on is as easy as waking up, where you carry your daily news feeds and conversations in your head and are able to access it whenever it is needed.Combine this instant access with the political realities of a political lobbyist and you have stepped into the world of Dag Calhoun. Add in today’s accusations of news manipulation but make the twists more insidious, more person {Video review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiWYz... }Consider a world one step away from where we now reside, where logging on is as easy as waking up, where you carry your daily news feeds and conversations in your head and are able to access it whenever it is needed.Combine this instant access with the political realities of a political lobbyist and you have stepped into the world of Dag Calhoun. Add in today’s accusations of news manipulation but make the twists more insidious, more personal. What kind of power could be wielded if one could manipulate the thoughts of a single person by affecting his or her personal feed? Author Eliot Peper captures this world, fleshing it out for the reader and giving it life. As we descend into a realm of political intrigue, the author deftly weaves a tale that details the realities of Dag’s life, exposing the dangerous path he sometimes must tread. While light on the science aspect, the portrait of a man tossed by the whirlwinds of his own creations was fascinating. Dag is a complex character, torn by the desire to forge a different trail even as he is followed by the demons of his past. The behind-the-action scenes are realistic, providing the perfect backdrops. The author’s prose is descriptive and tight, with a matching plot that kept me turning pages from the beginning all the way to the end. Highly recommended. Five stars.
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  • Tulay
    January 1, 1970
    Really slow.Made a bad decision with this selection, it was free with Amazon First Book of April. After reading first 8% of it didn't even get what author was telling me, went back to beginning with my full attention on every word read it again. But finally finished the book, but it was really slow going.
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  • Paul Falk
    January 1, 1970
    Right off the bat, author Eliot Peper thrust me into a life-and-death situation. Barely had time to get my feet on the ground and already I'd narrowly dodged a hail of bullets. Gave me insight for what lie down the road. Intense action to get this well-written narrative rolling. Heart thumping, my kind of opening scene. Knew I wouldn't fall asleep. As the storyline unfurled, I became intimately aware of the digital footprint we all leave in our daily wake. Our very souls are up for the taking. S Right off the bat, author Eliot Peper thrust me into a life-and-death situation. Barely had time to get my feet on the ground and already I'd narrowly dodged a hail of bullets. Gave me insight for what lie down the road. Intense action to get this well-written narrative rolling. Heart thumping, my kind of opening scene. Knew I wouldn't fall asleep. As the storyline unfurled, I became intimately aware of the digital footprint we all leave in our daily wake. Our very souls are up for the taking. Startled to realize just how easily we could be manipulated through this digital kingdom we nonchalantly thrive in. Nowhere to hide. Twists and turns guided me down a vicious path of well-drawn characters to an ending I never saw coming.Some of Dag Calhoun's roles as lobbyist frequently placed his life at serious risk. Just narrowly missed eating a bullet with his cup of coffee. Not a good way to end a meeting. The person he had chosen to meet with was not so fortunate. Often wondered if there could ever be enough compensation for that. He'd cornered the market as a razor chewing lobbyist. A hungry tiger expert at raising his clients goals above all else. A dream maker. He'd finally reached the pinnacle of the lobbyist game. The world, so it seemed was at his feet. Not for long. It was all about to change.Dag had met a woman who had invited him over to her hotel room. A romantic rendezvous loomed in the immediate future. Just what he needed. When he arrived, the door had been left ajar. She was not there. Alone, he was stunned to find damning documentation and intimate pictures of his life, his work plastered all over the walls of the hotel room. Stunned, he'd been targeted and sabotaged. Beyond damage control. Enough evidence was there to bring him and his company crashing down. Who was this woman? The one that called herself Emily.Dag needed to confront her. Had to find out her motivation behind the gut-wrenching hotel fiasco. His painstaking search led him to one of the remote San Juan Islands. When he secretly arrived there, she was not alone. Far from it. The island harbored a school for wayward youths. Those that needed saving. It also turned out that Emily was a polished political activist. An art that she'd taken to the highest level. Dag didn't know what he had gotten himself into. The hunter becomes the prey. In over his head from which there would be no escape.Orchestrated over years, Dag's life had been literally hacked. His every thought, every emotion had been created by a team of skilled psychologists. He's been setup. Made him into the man he was. Thought he was. Like Legos. Built from the ground up. The very essence of his being, his mind, his thoughts had been constructed at the will of others. Unknowingly, Dag had become the Frankenstein of psychological conditioning. Brainwashed to another's way of thinking. My nerves frayed. Realization hit me like a 5 lb hammer across the skull. I'd realized the most frightening consequence of all. It's all so plausible. Just waiting to happen.My thanks sent to NetGalley and 47North for this ARC in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Brad Feld
    January 1, 1970
    Spectacular.I've been a friend and avid reader of Eliot's books since the first draft of his first book in the Uncommon Series. It's been a delight to follow his writing career.With Bandwidth, he's at a new level. My favorite genre is what I like to call "near-term sci-fi" - tech that is within five to ten years but set in a contemporary context.As we still try to figure out as a society what impact of social media - specifically Twitter and Facebook - has played (and is playing) in current soci Spectacular.I've been a friend and avid reader of Eliot's books since the first draft of his first book in the Uncommon Series. It's been a delight to follow his writing career.With Bandwidth, he's at a new level. My favorite genre is what I like to call "near-term sci-fi" - tech that is within five to ten years but set in a contemporary context.As we still try to figure out as a society what impact of social media - specifically Twitter and Facebook - has played (and is playing) in current socio-political manipulations, Eliot's conception of "the Feed" as the core part of our existence is spot on. And, the hidden hideaway of Analog in San Francisco is deliciously ironic as a counterpart to The Battery.But best of all is the fast pace, short chapters, endless twists and turns, and - as is revealed near the end - game upon game upon game - which is an essential part of the meaningless meaning that humans give life.
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  • Lucas Carlson
    January 1, 1970
    If the privacy atrocities of Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scare you, but this near-term sci-fi thriller may read to you more as a horror than a thriller.Eliot Peper has truly shown his writing strengths flourish in this novel, providing not only a great mix of sci-fi visioning but also fantastic storytelling technique. He is able to add the texture that helps turn a book into an extraordinary experience.Don't miss this novel, it's going to be one of the most talked about books of the year fo If the privacy atrocities of Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scare you, but this near-term sci-fi thriller may read to you more as a horror than a thriller.Eliot Peper has truly shown his writing strengths flourish in this novel, providing not only a great mix of sci-fi visioning but also fantastic storytelling technique. He is able to add the texture that helps turn a book into an extraordinary experience.Don't miss this novel, it's going to be one of the most talked about books of the year for sure.
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  • Britta
    January 1, 1970
    ok. I made it to about 70%, but a lot of that was skimming. The idea of manipulating our "feeds" was pretty timely, considering recent news about Facebook posts being used to manipulate voters. And the idea of "the ends justifying the means" definitely deserves some study. But I just never got caught up in this particular story. As I said, a lot of skimming. I just wanted to get the story and I wanted it to develop a bit better. So, what I read was "ok", hence the 2 stars for a book I didn't fin ok. I made it to about 70%, but a lot of that was skimming. The idea of manipulating our "feeds" was pretty timely, considering recent news about Facebook posts being used to manipulate voters. And the idea of "the ends justifying the means" definitely deserves some study. But I just never got caught up in this particular story. As I said, a lot of skimming. I just wanted to get the story and I wanted it to develop a bit better. So, what I read was "ok", hence the 2 stars for a book I didn't finish, but I just didn't care enough to actually push through to the end.
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    This book really worked for me. It could have been a bit more technical, but I think the author strikes a good balance for tech/non-tech readers. It could have also included more AI/machine learning to make this more realistic for a near-future novel. With that said, it's elegantly put together, taps into human and political intrigue, and flows seamlessly. Being a life-long northwesterner, I was drawn in by the kayaking and San Juan Islands backdrop for the island group. Definitely will seek out This book really worked for me. It could have been a bit more technical, but I think the author strikes a good balance for tech/non-tech readers. It could have also included more AI/machine learning to make this more realistic for a near-future novel. With that said, it's elegantly put together, taps into human and political intrigue, and flows seamlessly. Being a life-long northwesterner, I was drawn in by the kayaking and San Juan Islands backdrop for the island group. Definitely will seek out more of Eliot Peper's work.
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  • Don
    January 1, 1970
    Bandwidth takes place in the near future at a time when the Internet has become even more integrated into the lives of all humans, and as a result, the corporations that control the digital feed control much of the world. Commonwealth is the company that has become the dominate provider of the feed and as a result has become the most powerful of companies. The company guarantees it’s feed to be totally secure. In order to maintain order as Commonwealth sees fit, they hired Apex which is the prem Bandwidth takes place in the near future at a time when the Internet has become even more integrated into the lives of all humans, and as a result, the corporations that control the digital feed control much of the world. Commonwealth is the company that has become the dominate provider of the feed and as a result has become the most powerful of companies. The company guarantees it’s feed to be totally secure. In order to maintain order as Commonwealth sees fit, they hired Apex which is the premier Washington lobbying firm. Apex sells it’s nearly always successful lobbying activities to the highest bidder, and their best agent is Dag Calhoun, a talented, athletic, charismatic man who has a combination of talents akin to such characters as James Bond, Dirk Pitt, Harry Bosch, and perhaps Jack Taylor.In the course of doing his work for Apex, Calhoun has assisted powerful corporations to achieve their own selfish profit-motivated goals even if it is clearly to the detriment of the environment where severe weather conditions have dramatically increased. And what if the “feed” is not really so secure, so that the information that is provided to individuals is really manipulated by people with hidden agendas. So, there is a clear dystopian quality to this story – there are very clear good guys and bad guys, and I think you’ll enjoy the resolution.Mostly, I want to comment about the quality of Peper’s writing – which is brilliant. Emily Kim was the character who challenged Dag to consider the negative impact his work was having on the world, and in a conversation with Emily, Dag says, “’Everything we do, everything we believe, everything we are, we think it’s ours to choose.’ His voice quickened, words rushing to get out. ‘But even something as inconsequential as wanting a lawn in front of our homes isn’t a true choice. It’s the product of a never-ending series of historical accidents. We take the world we’re bon into for granted. We imagine that we control our thoughts and dreams. We think we’re free to be who we want to be. But there’s this vast hidden architecture that shapes us, and we don’t even know it. It’s like we’re actors in a play who don’t realize we’re working off a script.’”I don’t know anyone else who writes like this. Peper fills out his story with a great cast of characters who are believable. This is an intense and captivating story. Eliot Peper is my newest favorite author, so I invite you to check out his other five novels, a well as Bandwidth.
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  • Sean Randall
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't read a Peper since last august, and if truth be known I haven't read a new book in over 3 weeks. I don't get reading drought very often, but it's frustrating when I do. I was encouraged to pick this up because it's not generally available yet, and so providing an early review may encourage people to buy it when it officially comes out at the beginning of May.Normally, when I read any sort of thriller or detective story, I'm not one to stop and think. Either I get a burst of adrenaline I haven't read a Peper since last august, and if truth be known I haven't read a new book in over 3 weeks. I don't get reading drought very often, but it's frustrating when I do. I was encouraged to pick this up because it's not generally available yet, and so providing an early review may encourage people to buy it when it officially comes out at the beginning of May.Normally, when I read any sort of thriller or detective story, I'm not one to stop and think. Either I get a burst of adrenaline because my instincts were proved right and I saw something coming, or I'm convinced I'm a blind idiot who couldn't pin a murderer with gunpowder on his fingers. Rarely do I stop to consider, because I'm too selfish to want the story to unfold.In Bandwidth, though, I was almost prescient: when Dag hides his kayak, observes Kim at breakfast, asks for paper in Analog and when Emmanuel gets the jump on him at the market I was able to see, almost as if I had read it a long, long time ago, what was to come next. I had that thrill of being proved mentally correct time and time again, and that helped ensure a huge sense of satisfaction whilst reading.I read a little yesterday evening, paused to watch half an hour of something with the little one before putting her to bed, another chapter before I, too, retired. But I was awake, before 5 in the morning, the cold, pre-dawn light little comfort. I sat up in bed, gorging myself on this crazily addictive story - and it was there, the cold April air freezing my shoulders and upper body, that I read Chapter 33. I couldn't put it down after that; and the sun and birds were well up before I closed the book with a profound sense of "more, please!" Of course, we need more in both directions now, please, mr. Peper. We need to go forward, of course, we need to know the impact of what's happened here, but we also need to go back and see precisely how the feed came to be. What you've painted here is serious and heavy - also "very noir", of course - and I can almost guarantee I'll read it again before the year is out to get more shades of meaning, see the deeper nuances. But even having done that, I do think there's scope to go back, to fill in back story of the technology, the sociology and psychology of a recession-torn world falling into something like the feed. You have, as the poet says, miles to go before you sleep with this one, and I hope you can continue to flush out the world and fill in the detail in many such exquisite novels to come. I'll be pre-ordering anything as soon as it becomes available.
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  • Alexander LaFortune
    January 1, 1970
    If you're looking for a plotty, finely-rendered blast through an entirely plausible near future, buy this book. The story of Dag Calhoun, mercenary consultant and lobbyist striding the globe, serving the eternal (but fickle) masters of wealth and power, takes a turn toward intrigue as all kinds of shit starts to hit the previously smoothly-turning fan of his life. He searches his way across the globe to find answers, in carefully drawn settings and among ever-shifting loyalties, trying not to lo If you're looking for a plotty, finely-rendered blast through an entirely plausible near future, buy this book. The story of Dag Calhoun, mercenary consultant and lobbyist striding the globe, serving the eternal (but fickle) masters of wealth and power, takes a turn toward intrigue as all kinds of shit starts to hit the previously smoothly-turning fan of his life. He searches his way across the globe to find answers, in carefully drawn settings and among ever-shifting loyalties, trying not to lose sight of what he believes in. His never-ending state of imbalance as the fish out water, making all kinds of mistakes, both fits and subverts the techno-thriller tone and allows for lots of short infodumps, which are generally handled well. The premises of the book are fundamentally optimistic; it's a study in what, given essentially unlimited power by the absurd potency of software and connectivity, humans choose to do with and to each other. The background issue of anthropogenic climate change is given all due weight; indeed, it seems almost impossible to imagine writing a novel of global scope these days without placing it front and centerThe occasional digressions into rumination and philosophy give us a little more insight into out viewpoint character, but we don't get to see much of the thoughts of the others. That said, each of the supporting cast has their own, clear voice, and their stories unfold in their own time along Dag's. As said, this is a plot-driven story, but some patches of beautifully well-crafted description stand out among the narration; our author's travels, showing through. I'd love to know where he got "books are sharks", and what on earth made him think that the relatively mild but ongoing Anthropocene extinction would nearly wipe out a clade of fish so well-wrought that the single greatest holocaust earthly life had ever seen, at the end of the Permian, barely touched them. I'd also love to know what the heck is the big deal about 100 grams per square meter cartridge paper.Eliot made a point of getting advance copies out to a few folks, and it's great to see his craft developing. Comparisons to Malka Older's Infomocracy are appropriate and welcome given that any political thriller written today must take in the reality of ubiquitous networking and the inherent malleability of the human psyche, as 'Stephen Bury' did so long ago with Interface. This novel stands along its allies as a careful and entertaining consideration of how we might as a people navigate the next few years of fear, uncertainty, and nearly undoubtedly extinction if we get this shit wrong.
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  • Jonathan Cloud
    January 1, 1970
    A compelling story for our timeIt's hard to make the planetary challenges we face today come alive, but this book does it with an almost casual grace. At first a little confusing and with a dozen wild twists and shocking turns, but masterfully done, and Peper ties it all together in the end, with just enough of a surprise to leave you ready for the promise of Book 2. His afterword and invitation are also a warm and personal touch that leave no doubt as to the author's own integrity.
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  • Eric Walker
    January 1, 1970
    Bandwidth wastes no time from the first page dropping you right into the action as it captivates your imagination of a world not that far into the future. You will quickly figure out that the main character Dag Calhoon, a lobbyist representing high-powered tech and energy executives, starts questioning the world he has been helping create. In this world, every person has a "feed" (like social media) that is always in peoples mind and is integral to how the world works. As the story evolves, Dag Bandwidth wastes no time from the first page dropping you right into the action as it captivates your imagination of a world not that far into the future. You will quickly figure out that the main character Dag Calhoon, a lobbyist representing high-powered tech and energy executives, starts questioning the world he has been helping create. In this world, every person has a "feed" (like social media) that is always in peoples mind and is integral to how the world works. As the story evolves, Dag stumbles upon a group of activists that have hijacked peoples feeds in order to sway public option and global markets. He eventually is faced with big decisions as he tries to figure out what is right/wrong and whom to trust.This book is not what I would consider your typical Sci-fi books but more "near-term sci-fi" as it seems more within reach in the next decade.Even though this is a future looking book, with everything in the news these days around political, environmental, and social media control issues it almost seems closer than you think. This book has them all and intertwines them into a great page-turning novel.  As always with Eliot's books, this is a very fast paced story with a lot of twists and turns to make you really think. Not to mention the precision of detail he puts into describing the situations, buildings, food, and drinks that paints a perfect picture of what you should be seeing. Finally, I appreciated the short chapters as I always find myself with interrupting children when finally find time to sit down and read.
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  • Mary Wark
    January 1, 1970
    All well that end wellTimely in the idea of how much of our lives are hijacked by social media. Most of the story is through the main character thought processes and that it drags at times. But over all inventive and refreshing mixed message for the future.
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  • We Are All Mad Here
    January 1, 1970
    Because it's only fair to say why I didn't like a book - it was this kind of sentence that did it:"But it was also the first ray of light entering a boarded-up house in a condemned neighborhood as a hopeful squatter adjusted his sweaty grip on a crowbar and pried the plywood from a broken window."
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  • Marian
    January 1, 1970
    I'm in for more.It took me a bit to get into this one, and going from news sites to this book, to Twitter, and back again felt like I was reading all the same stuff. So, even though this book is set in the future, it felt pretty darned timely. And not terribly cheering. Even so, the book started moving for me, then racing along. The protagonist as a lobbyist was interesting. Yes, I want to see where this story goes.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    Exciting, thoughtful and intriguingAll the characters were richly textured. The "good* as well as the bad. The story is close enough to our reality to make it really terrifying but hopeful as well. The growth of the main character testament to that. The best books give you a lot to chew on afterwards and this accomplishes that in spades.
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  • Jacob Chapman
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Peper is a master of crafting near term plausible science fiction futures and Bandwidth may be the best one yet. While the storyline of the book is one of political intrigue and shadowy global players vying for economic gain, political control and impact, the themes it tackles are much more immediate. Personal data privacy, the ability to manipulate free will via media, the tension between private and public action to resolve global crises and many other issues of current import are woven Eliot Peper is a master of crafting near term plausible science fiction futures and Bandwidth may be the best one yet. While the storyline of the book is one of political intrigue and shadowy global players vying for economic gain, political control and impact, the themes it tackles are much more immediate. Personal data privacy, the ability to manipulate free will via media, the tension between private and public action to resolve global crises and many other issues of current import are woven throughout the book. As I finished Bandwidth I found myself daydreaming about each of these themes. Bandwidth is an entertaining book but more, it is a catalyst for thinking about how we can shape the world in which we want to live.
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  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    Recent Reads: Bandwidth. Eliot Peper's near-future thriller treads the risky politics of a world in the grip of climate change. Dag is a lobbyist, changing minds to change policy. But his feed's been hacked, and someone has changed his mind for him. Weaponised empathy might change the world, but is it the right answer? A timely political thriller, exploring a world where smart algorithms target individuals and the way they think.If Bruce Sterling had written Islands In The Net today, in the ligh Recent Reads: Bandwidth. Eliot Peper's near-future thriller treads the risky politics of a world in the grip of climate change. Dag is a lobbyist, changing minds to change policy. But his feed's been hacked, and someone has changed his mind for him. Weaponised empathy might change the world, but is it the right answer? A timely political thriller, exploring a world where smart algorithms target individuals and the way they think.If Bruce Sterling had written Islands In The Net today, in the light of Facebook and 2016, it might well have been this book.(ARC sent by publisher for review)
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  • Enso
    January 1, 1970
    Cross-posted from my blog at http://www.openbuddha.com/2018/01/30/..."Bandwidth" by Eliot Peper is his second science fiction novel. A follow up, of sorts, to 2016's "Cumulus." "Cumulus" even gets a one sentence mention early in the book, implying that they may exist in a shared universe. "Bandwidth" follows the story of Dag, a lobbyist (no, stay with me, don't go!) on the path to...redemption? See, Dag has spent his adult life helping the movers and shakers, the captains of industry and the meg Cross-posted from my blog at http://www.openbuddha.com/2018/01/30/..."Bandwidth" by Eliot Peper is his second science fiction novel. A follow up, of sorts, to 2016's "Cumulus." "Cumulus" even gets a one sentence mention early in the book, implying that they may exist in a shared universe. "Bandwidth" follows the story of Dag, a lobbyist (no, stay with me, don't go!) on the path to...redemption? See, Dag has spent his adult life helping the movers and shakers, the captains of industry and the megacorporations, get their agendas enlivened and supported in the world. Frankly, it looks like, even in Dag's reflection, to have mostly been a shitshow of exactly the kinds of things we fear that lobbyists do. For example, helping energy tycoons not only get access to cheap oil but to then also profit from rising sea levels and fires by getting their inland real estate empires approved. That said, it is clear that not everything that Dag has worked on has been horrible but it has all been a sort of realpolitik.The book opens with a near death (by gunfire) experience by Dag and an encounter with something that forces him to question both what he's doing with himself and also the nature of what is going on around him. Dag goes investigating to understand. One of the things that I enjoyed about this section is that it plays on expectations. We expect Dag to eventually solve his mystery, and he does, but then we find that the mystery neither has simple answers nor does it end there. "Bandwidth," at a number of points, avoids taking the easy genre or thematic "outs" that are available and subverts or questions our expectations (and Dag's). Is he an amoral power climber out for himself? Is he a somewhat broken man who has tried and failed to move on? Can anyone be as simple as one of these answers (or any other simple answer)? Peper manages to inject a fair amount of self-reflection and moral complexity into his characters. This is true not only for Dag but even for some of the "villains" of the book. Even the worst tycoon in this book is not _simply_ a caricature but is given some evidence of personal complexity it.The story is, itself, relatively well written as far as the plot goes. I wasn't blown away by the overall arc but I was not let down by it either. Where I did feel the book shines is in the characterization of Dag, as our protagonist, and the questioning he goes through as events unfold around him. I found myself strongly identifying with a lot of the murky waters he finds himself in and his wonder of what it says about himself, the people to which he finds himself connected with, or even those he opposes. Peper does not have Dag offer easy answers either. It seems, in many ways, that the best we can do is simply...the best that we can do. Dag finds a certain amount of joy and peace in the book but no easy answers or solutions as well. It is this part of the book that I enjoyed the most as it seemed to me the most real, and certainly moreso than many science fiction novels that I read, which often have rather flat characterizations.I also appreciated the the novel moves to center stage real world issues that we're all living through right now: global warming, climate refugees, the subversion of democracy. In that regard, the world felt very real though, I must say, somewhat optimistic (even with half of California being a burned husk in it) since it is supposed to be an unknown number of decades in the future. As a technologist and hacker, I would have liked more detail in some of the technical issues or aspects raised in the book but I recognize that these can often detract from overall story.I definitely recommend this book and I think it shows significant growth for Peper as an author from "Cumulus," as much as I really enjoyed that book at well.*Note*: I was given a pre-release copy of this book for the purposes of review. I am not so shallow that it destroys my ability to review the book, I hope.
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  • Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Peper once more crafts a prescient, tense thriller from an extrapolation of the interplay of tech and society. It's a fast-paced adventure that, while branded as near-future scifi, is the sort of work that reflects real life more and more as time goes on. And it's a good read to boot!
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  • Tac Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Pepper continues to turn out excellent near future, techno-thriller, sci-fi. This may be his best book yet. Full of corporate and political espionage, Peper explores the limits of our highly digital lives. Even if you're not a techno-nerd, you'll still love the well developed and sympathetic characters and the fast paced well thought out story. Do yourself a favor and check this out.
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  • Dan Ancona
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an advance reader copy and - full disclosure - Eliot's a friend of mine, and I think he's a gem of a human being. That aside, this was a terrific read. On one level, it's a fun, fast-paced adventure that's full of vividly rendered surprises around every corner, and one that takes a really interesting dogleg about a third of the way through. And an another level, he's grappling with some profound ramifications of how our networked society impacts the construction of cogn I was lucky enough to get an advance reader copy and - full disclosure - Eliot's a friend of mine, and I think he's a gem of a human being. That aside, this was a terrific read. On one level, it's a fun, fast-paced adventure that's full of vividly rendered surprises around every corner, and one that takes a really interesting dogleg about a third of the way through. And an another level, he's grappling with some profound ramifications of how our networked society impacts the construction of cognitive liberty.The craft is impressive, too. If you read a lot of near-term hard SF, you're probably used to pretty forgettable characters. It's not really what we're here for with this stuff, right? But Eliot does a great job giving Dag real dimensionality by putting him in tough spots where he has to face his deepest grooves. And, he knows how to write an ending.With all the news about the impact of social media on global democracies, these are crucial issues to be considering right now. Not sure there are more entertaining or thought-provoking ways of going about that than giving this one a read.
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  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    What if what we see isn't reality but the reality others want us to see? What does it mean when one company has more users who use it daily than any country has citizens? Who has the power, and who has influence?I loved the questions raised by Elliot's book. And I imagine I'm going to be thinking about them for some time -- he does a great job laying out a very plausible near-term future, one where the levers of power are not what you'd expect.Why 4 stars then? This is a story that could have ea What if what we see isn't reality but the reality others want us to see? What does it mean when one company has more users who use it daily than any country has citizens? Who has the power, and who has influence?I loved the questions raised by Elliot's book. And I imagine I'm going to be thinking about them for some time -- he does a great job laying out a very plausible near-term future, one where the levers of power are not what you'd expect.Why 4 stars then? This is a story that could have easily been twice as long, with room for the characters to more fully emerge. I felt at times that they existed in service of the story, and I wanted more time with them. But that's a minor quibble. It's a fun read, and it's a worthy contribution to a genre that makes us question where we're heading, and why.
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  • Joshua
    January 1, 1970
    Is it a utopia? Dystopia? Or Both? This novel seems to take all of the looming concerns of our global society (i.e. climate change, information overreach and manipulation, corporate espionage) and merges it all together to form a narrative where the protagonist seemingly takes a determined path in effecting change in global trends but finds himself adrift then "born again".This is a science fiction novel; however, the reader isn't thrust into the deep end as in a William Gibson cyberpunk thrille Is it a utopia? Dystopia? Or Both? This novel seems to take all of the looming concerns of our global society (i.e. climate change, information overreach and manipulation, corporate espionage) and merges it all together to form a narrative where the protagonist seemingly takes a determined path in effecting change in global trends but finds himself adrift then "born again".This is a science fiction novel; however, the reader isn't thrust into the deep end as in a William Gibson cyberpunk thriller but instead presented with a possible stream of milestones that are not so fantastical given our frame of recent historical achievements and catastrophes.
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  • Fat Al
    January 1, 1970
    No. Just don’t.
  • Lisa Barnett
    January 1, 1970
    The writing was sloppy. The characters were barely fleshed out. The PREMISE, though!
  • Paul Kurtz
    January 1, 1970
    I selected this as my free Kindle book for this month. I normally enjoy a good mystery, but this book managed to make what could have been good political intrigue and mystery boring. It was so vague about what was really going on that it was very difficult to follow. It also seemed to push a political agenda (global warming) that I am not very interested in.
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  • Andy Coleman
    January 1, 1970
    A SIMPLE MAN'S REVIEW:I was drawn to this novel with the promise of technology, and there is a bit, but ultimately this is a "political thriller". Not really the type of book I would seek out.The story is set in the near future, and the world is experiencing the effects of climate change. The population is also tied into a "feed", sort of like Facebook turned up to 20. So the question becomes, if you could control the feed, what might you accomplish?The book raised some interesting questions, an A SIMPLE MAN'S REVIEW:I was drawn to this novel with the promise of technology, and there is a bit, but ultimately this is a "political thriller". Not really the type of book I would seek out.The story is set in the near future, and the world is experiencing the effects of climate change. The population is also tied into a "feed", sort of like Facebook turned up to 20. So the question becomes, if you could control the feed, what might you accomplish?The book raised some interesting questions, and was surely written soon after Facebook announced that they were manipulating feeds in a "social experiment". I enjoyed the social engineering aspect but the political side was too much. I won't be reading the sequel, but if you enjoy that sort of thing.. Read it!
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  • Liambard
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this book up for free on the amazon promo and really liked the sound of it. I wanted to like it so persevered but by 20% I had enough. I just couldn’t connect with it at all, a tough read for me.
  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    Made it to the 4th page.Maybe I'm not giving the book enough of a chance, and perhaps it gets better. However, I'm four pages into the novel and the overindulgence of adjectives ruins the pacing and completely shattered the illusion. I stopped to read some reviews and noticed several other readers have had the same issue. I think I'll put this one away. Thanks!IIf you don't have problems with superfluous flowery adjectives and adverbs that often seem haphazardly plucked from the well-worn pages Made it to the 4th page.Maybe I'm not giving the book enough of a chance, and perhaps it gets better. However, I'm four pages into the novel and the overindulgence of adjectives ruins the pacing and completely shattered the illusion. I stopped to read some reviews and noticed several other readers have had the same issue. I think I'll put this one away. Thanks!IIf you don't have problems with superfluous flowery adjectives and adverbs that often seem haphazardly plucked from the well-worn pages of a dog-eared Thesaurus, then maybe this is the book for you.
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