The Mighty Thor, Volume 5
Marvel Legacy hits Asgard with a bang, with...the death of the Mighty Thor! The final judgment comes as the Mangog arrives. The War Thor will meet the beast head-on, but even the bloodthirst of this Ultimate hammer-wielder may pale in comparison to the Mangog's might! The battle rages even as Jane Foster's cancer takes a turn for the worse, and she might not have to wait for the final judgment at all. The clock is ticking, the War of the Realms is spreading, and Mjolnir cannot save her this time. Can even the legendary Hercules help avert disaster? It's the beginning of the end - one that will lead to the most dramatic return in the Marvel Universe! COLLECTING: MIGHTY THOR 700-706

The Mighty Thor, Volume 5 Details

TitleThe Mighty Thor, Volume 5
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 26th, 2018
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302906603
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Fantasy

The Mighty Thor, Volume 5 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    After a strong opening couple books in Jason Aaron’s Jane Foster Thor run the series has stagnated under the “Mighty Thor” banner, never rising above “meh” and, for the last couple, “zzz…”. That said, Jane Foster’s time as Thor ends on a high note with her final adventure in The Death of The Mighty Thor. As much as I hate how Marvel don’t seem to have any ideas for new stories beyond the now boilerplate death/resurrection plotlines, this death storyline was surprisingly good, not least because A After a strong opening couple books in Jason Aaron’s Jane Foster Thor run the series has stagnated under the “Mighty Thor” banner, never rising above “meh” and, for the last couple, “zzz…”. That said, Jane Foster’s time as Thor ends on a high note with her final adventure in The Death of The Mighty Thor. As much as I hate how Marvel don’t seem to have any ideas for new stories beyond the now boilerplate death/resurrection plotlines, this death storyline was surprisingly good, not least because Aaron throws in a clever bait’n’switch at the end. The volume is bookended by two anthology-style bumper issues – The Mighty Thor #700 and At the Gates of Valhalla (a way cooler title for this final book!) – which weren’t bad but were full of very forgettable short stories. Frog Thor (hoho) does some Frog Thor things, King Thor’s granddaughters are still being daffy, someone called Queen Karnilla is dead, the War Thor rides again. Eh, who cares about the fat Asgardian whether he turns evil or not? And turning a good character evil temporarily is such a hack move. This War of Realms storyline too is doing nothing for me – Malekith shit-stirring as usual, snore. So: onto the main event! Jane Foster’s chemotherapy hasn’t been working because every time she turns into Thor the transformation wipes out the treatment’s effects. She’s been getting sicker this whole time – so much so that if she becomes the God of Thunder one more time, it might kill her. And then Mangog, the ultimate judgment of the gods, lands on the Bifrost Bridge to destroy Asgard once and for all. This sounds like a job for… oh. But will she? Ok, so Hela predictable, clichéd even with the seemingly unstoppable big bad monster slotting in just when the story requires one to be there to punch; I still really enjoyed it. It’s because Jason Aaron’s such a good writer that he can take this sort of archetypical storyline and make it immensely entertaining. He slowly builds up the tension for the reader, showing Mangog bringing Asgard to its knees, contrasted by Jane in the hospital, and you’re waiting for her to heft Mjolnir and call down the thunder one last time – oh, it’s good! It’s made all the more dramatic through the flashbacks from defining moments in Jane’s past – it really feels like events are cresting for an epic end. It was satisfying to finally see the moments leading up to Jane going to the moon to pick up Mjolnir that first time in Original Sin, as well as seeing Jane as Thor without the helmet – unsurprisingly she’s a knockout! Jane and Odinson kissing in the burning ruins of Asgard was just fucking cool and seeing the creative team behind the series having a drink at the bar while Thor and Hercules arm-wrestled was a cute Easter Egg. And then of course the “death” itself was unexpected. I can’t say enough good things about Russell Dauterman’s art. I never heard of him before Jane Foster Thor and I don’t think I’ve seen him draw anything else so far but he’s a name I’ll definitely look out for in the future. He’s got such a cinematic eye, such a confident line and such a great sense of style that every book in the series has looked absolutely incredible thanks to him. Whether he’s drawing dialogue or action, there’s always a vivid kinetic energy on the page and he’s a perfect match for Aaron’s quality writing. Well done, sir! I’d say this is a fine ending to a fine character but we all know superheroes never die – I fully expect to see Jane return as Thor again one day and I look forward to it. It is a mighty ending though – for now!
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Foster goes out on top as Thor. If she takes the hammer one more time, she will die. But Mangog has returned to wipe out Asgardia... Jason Aaron build this up magnificently. He had me devouring this to see what happened. Russell Dauterman and Matthew Wilson are at the top of their game. I'd never heard of Dauterman before his Thor run and now he's one of the top comic artists out there. I love his cinematic eye and clean lines. Wilson's colors make each page pop. These guys actually have me Jane Foster goes out on top as Thor. If she takes the hammer one more time, she will die. But Mangog has returned to wipe out Asgardia... Jason Aaron build this up magnificently. He had me devouring this to see what happened. Russell Dauterman and Matthew Wilson are at the top of their game. I'd never heard of Dauterman before his Thor run and now he's one of the top comic artists out there. I love his cinematic eye and clean lines. Wilson's colors make each page pop. These guys actually have me interested in a mega crossover which rarely happens. Bring on War of the Realms!
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh, I have such conflicting feelings about this volume. I really liked Jane Foster Thor even if the last couple of volumes were not good, and I never wanted her to leave the mantle behind even if her tenure as Thor was meant to be temporary from its very start, not just because of her illness, but because we saw a future Thor in Aaron's original Thor: God of Thunder series, and it was Odinson. Jane Foster was my first Thor, and it was the book that began my affection for Marvel's own corner of Ugh, I have such conflicting feelings about this volume. I really liked Jane Foster Thor even if the last couple of volumes were not good, and I never wanted her to leave the mantle behind even if her tenure as Thor was meant to be temporary from its very start, not just because of her illness, but because we saw a future Thor in Aaron's original Thor: God of Thunder series, and it was Odinson. Jane Foster was my first Thor, and it was the book that began my affection for Marvel's own corner of Norse Mythology, so I'm a bit sad that this era of Aaron's monumental run is over. But while a huge part of this particular volume was just brilliant, top-notch Jason Aaron writing the likes of which I haven't seen from him since the last volume of Southern Bastards (i.e. two years ago), I can't help but feel underwhelmed by the ending. To elaborate I would have to spoil the entire thing, but let's just say that it ends with a bit of a cop-out that goes against what the book has been building up towards for a long time, and while part of me is glad that it ended the way it did, another part of me is left unsatisfied. Still, the final special that is included in this volume lets us know that the story is far from over, and the new chapter in this Asgardian epic is already well underway, so for now I'm hopeful that it will all make sense in the end. And let me just say, Russell Dauterman+Matt Wilson are both some sort of magicians with their astounding artwork and colouring respectively, and it's a shame that we're not getting them for the new Thor series. Nothing against Mike Del Mundo, who is another artist in a class all of his own, but I will never not be in love with Dauterman's intricate designs, creative layouts and impeccable character work, not to mention Wilson's Eisner-winning explosion of colour with so much depth and attention to detail. All in all, this volume was a mixed bag, but I am still left wanting for more, so I'm really looking forward to what Jason Aaron comes up with next.
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  • Paul E. Morph
    January 1, 1970
    I just spent the last two hours tearing through this book, the final arc of the Jane Foster Thor, and I'm now entirely emotionally exhausted... This story-arc may well be one of the absolute highlights of my forty year comicbook reading career. I'm simply... thunderstruck. (That's right; I went there.)A huge thank you to Jason Aaron, Russel Dauterman and all their collaborators for some of the most epic comics I've ever had the privilege to read.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    I kept battling back and forth what I should rate this. It's hard because a lot of it I do like but there's one major thing I thought didn't work. So this is it. The War Thor goes head to head with Mangog right off the bat the final moments are on. Jane is extremely sick through most of this. Dr. Strange warns her one more time she grabs the hammer and she won't survive reverting back. Falcon, Strange, and Odinson, all watch over her so she doesn't pick up the hammer. When Mangog finally gets to I kept battling back and forth what I should rate this. It's hard because a lot of it I do like but there's one major thing I thought didn't work. So this is it. The War Thor goes head to head with Mangog right off the bat the final moments are on. Jane is extremely sick through most of this. Dr. Strange warns her one more time she grabs the hammer and she won't survive reverting back. Falcon, Strange, and Odinson, all watch over her so she doesn't pick up the hammer. When Mangog finally gets to asgardia Odinson and Odin team up one last time to face the mighty beast but there's one more who will join the fight to save them. THOR!!!Good: The fights are, well...fucking EPIC. I mean if you thought the volume couldn't top War Thor verses Mangog you'd be wrong. That fight is insane but Odinson and Odin verses Mangog is just tooooooooo fucking insane. Then of course the Mighty Thor steps up to the plate and goddamn what a showdown. The pacing is breathtaking and reading it in one go is easy because it never lets up. Bad: The ending. I was really let down. The emotional moment could have hit hard but it didn't all thanks to a cheap "Nope" moment. I really was left kind of annoyed as hell. This would have been a easy 4.5 if it weren't for the ending. For that I'd probably lower it to a 3.5-4. But for the epic art alone and fights I gotta bump it to a 4 for rating. The fights are WORTH it, trust me.
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  • Cheese
    January 1, 1970
    Aye t’was a spectacular run. The best thing about this Thor run is that they’ve found a good writer and they’ve let him run with it. Aaron’s run on Thor is ten times better than the Simonson run. I loved the Simonson run, it was epic and full of Norse mythologies and fantastic characters, but Aaron has taken it to another level. It’s a dream run for such a big Thor fan.This was a fitting end to two Thor’s in this issue. The main one obviously being Jane Foster. Jason Aaron made Jane Foster the m Aye t’was a spectacular run. The best thing about this Thor run is that they’ve found a good writer and they’ve let him run with it. Aaron’s run on Thor is ten times better than the Simonson run. I loved the Simonson run, it was epic and full of Norse mythologies and fantastic characters, but Aaron has taken it to another level. It’s a dream run for such a big Thor fan.This was a fitting end to two Thor’s in this issue. The main one obviously being Jane Foster. Jason Aaron made Jane Foster the most badass Thor we could’ve imagined and he intricately weaved a tale that involved all our favourite villains and good guys. The best part was that the Godkiller is referenced throughout and all those unanswered questions are dangled in front of you and some are even answered. Like what happened to the Necrosword? Will it be used again? How did the gods rebuild after their numbers were dwindled so? What is the judgement of the gods? How was Mjolnir created? Does Mjolnir actually speak? Who did Thor sleep with to get 3 daughters? Are the gods unworthy? How come his arm is black but gold in the future? Will we see a sun god Thor?When I finished this I was sad because I thought it was the end, but to thee I say nay! Odinson is now back in the Thor seat and the run continues!
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  • mercedes
    January 1, 1970
    This has been a beautiful ending to Jane’s story. This volume starts off with Mighty Thor #700, a dazzling 55 page issue that I reread regularly. The scenes with Karnilla give me chills every single time, and the fact that we are allowed to see just slightly into what is to come is so effective. In fact, I don’t think I have ever read any issue of Mighty Thor, or Thor (2014), or God Of Thunder where I haven’t gotten chills. Jason Aaron’s writing is absolutely phenomenal and this volume is no dif This has been a beautiful ending to Jane’s story. This volume starts off with Mighty Thor #700, a dazzling 55 page issue that I reread regularly. The scenes with Karnilla give me chills every single time, and the fact that we are allowed to see just slightly into what is to come is so effective. In fact, I don’t think I have ever read any issue of Mighty Thor, or Thor (2014), or God Of Thunder where I haven’t gotten chills. Jason Aaron’s writing is absolutely phenomenal and this volume is no different. In this volume I feel Jane is more humanised. One of our main locations is the hospital Jane is staying at, and it becomes less about The Mighty Thor and more about the mightier Jane, who lets her cancer consume her in order to save the very Gods who wished her dead. We know Jane is brave, but the issues in this volume prove it now more than ever. She is inspiring, and kind, and stubborn, and powerful, and everything I could ever hope to be in life. Jane means so much to me as does her story, and to me, this is a perfect conclusion. I hope this isn’t the last we see of her and I’m sure it isn’t. She has come so far, but I know she is destined for even more great things in the future 💓 thank you Jane, for teaching me so much. Thank you Jason Aaron, for letting her be a character she was never allowed to be; I will be forever grateful.
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)
    January 1, 1970
    Whoa. Awesome volume. Jason Aaron once again proves himself worthy to be the writer of Thor.Jane Foster is boss and this final volume of her as Lady Thor completely seals the deal for me.The very first oversized issue in this volume makes the whole book worth buying...not that the rest of the story isn't as interesting (it is) but holy mole issue 700 is one of my favorite issues of a comic written in a helluva long time.
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  • Aldo Haegemans
    January 1, 1970
    I never would have thought i would like a female thor. I loved this series. So well written.
  • Malum
    January 1, 1970
    SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERSIt's hard to talk about this volume without talking about SPOILERS, so you have been warned.This was a solid four star book until the very end. So what happened to sour me on it? Well...Ever since the debut of this new Thor, we have been working our way toward her death. Heck, they even called this volume The Death of Thor. So did they deliver on this? Nope.It was the old bait and switch. Jane Foster dies for about a minute and a half (to fulfill the b SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERSIt's hard to talk about this volume without talking about SPOILERS, so you have been warned.This was a solid four star book until the very end. So what happened to sour me on it? Well...Ever since the debut of this new Thor, we have been working our way toward her death. Heck, they even called this volume The Death of Thor. So did they deliver on this? Nope.It was the old bait and switch. Jane Foster dies for about a minute and a half (to fulfill the book's title) and then gets defibrillated by Odinson and Odin. Also, her cancer is now apparently totally manageable (even though we were just told it was spreading totally out of control and all of her chemo amounted to nothing). Added to that, she is now seemingly fine with being revived and made partially better by godly powers when she has done nothing but crap all over that idea every chance she has ever had in the past. Yeah, she is no longer Thor, but her character deserved better than such a softball, nonsensical ending. Besides that, this volume benefits and suffers from many of the things that previous volumes have. It's got fantastic art but lazy writing. Jane Foster is a Mary Sue that stubbornly (usually, I guess?) refuses to treat her cancer with anything other than chemo (one person's magic is another person's science, so what's the big deal?) and Odin behaves WAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYY out of character for no real reason than simply to be a foil for Thor. I had high hopes, but Marvel continues to treat its readers like morons.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    The end of an era.
  • Shannon Appelcline
    January 1, 1970
    Here's the thing: no fight against Mangog is ever that interesting. He's just a big, dumb Doomsday-like foe who keeps hitting and hitting until the plot calls for him to be defeated. There can be beautiful visuals (and, there are) but don't expect characterization or nuance.Mangog of course comes out of nowhere to be the big threat that finally brings down the Mighty Thor. And, this is done well enough. Jane is told "Don't pick up that hammer or you'll die". And then of course she has to. There' Here's the thing: no fight against Mangog is ever that interesting. He's just a big, dumb Doomsday-like foe who keeps hitting and hitting until the plot calls for him to be defeated. There can be beautiful visuals (and, there are) but don't expect characterization or nuance.Mangog of course comes out of nowhere to be the big threat that finally brings down the Mighty Thor. And, this is done well enough. Jane is told "Don't pick up that hammer or you'll die". And then of course she has to. There's heroism and sacrifice and pathos. But it's all pretty color by numbers. Meanwhile, the War of the Realms continues to tread waters as too many plots have during Jason Aaron's very decompressed run.Call it 3.5 stars.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Wasnt overly engaged in this as other volumes. Maybe because I read it as single issues. Still emotional and thoughtful, solid artwork. Was a good overall series although probably not Aarons best work.
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Great ending for a equally great comic!
  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    The first half was a bit vexing, with all the plot points and every minor character being revisited and all the unrelenting and messy action sequences, but I felt Aaron and company brought the Jane Foster storyline to a decent conclusion when they made time for some small emotional moments between pyrotechnics. Of course, that darn war of the realms garbage is still hanging out there to be resolved in another Thor title in the future. I'm on the fence as to whether I'll be seeing that through.
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  • Ryan Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Aaron, you are truly worthy.
  • Frédéric
    January 1, 1970
    A great finale for a great character and a great series.Obviously Jason Aaron revels in these kind of epic tales, ranging from brutal to overkill. Boy, does he love writing over the top characters, fighting monstrously violent battles with maximum carnage and debris.And do I love to read them.Because the thing is that even with most of the book filled with A-bomb punches and walls crumbling Aaron doesn't forget to tell a story. A great story at that. A rollercoaster of power, thrills and emotion A great finale for a great character and a great series.Obviously Jason Aaron revels in these kind of epic tales, ranging from brutal to overkill. Boy, does he love writing over the top characters, fighting monstrously violent battles with maximum carnage and debris.And do I love to read them.Because the thing is that even with most of the book filled with A-bomb punches and walls crumbling Aaron doesn't forget to tell a story. A great story at that. A rollercoaster of power, thrills and emotions. And great characters. As Jane Foster.Giving her the Hammer was a brilliant idea. Starting from there it could have gone any way but Aaron & Co. managed to breathe life and power into her, making her worthy of Mjolnir and of our appreciation.
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  • Amanda [Novel Addiction]
    January 1, 1970
    An emotional thrill ride - I love Lady Thor!!!
  • Kayla Eklund
    January 1, 1970
    I never thought I'd cry over a comic, but here we are...
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]Malekith’s scheming has almost reached its peak, and the mighty Mangog has breached its prison – now it is on the war path, and it will not stop until all of Asgardia has fallen. Only one woman could even hope to stop it, but if Jane Foster becomes the Mighty Thor even one more time, there is no doubt that she will die. But the thunder calls to her, and she cannot resist, not when everything she cares about is in jeopardy.It’s hard to do a story called ‘The Death Of The Mi [Read as single issues]Malekith’s scheming has almost reached its peak, and the mighty Mangog has breached its prison – now it is on the war path, and it will not stop until all of Asgardia has fallen. Only one woman could even hope to stop it, but if Jane Foster becomes the Mighty Thor even one more time, there is no doubt that she will die. But the thunder calls to her, and she cannot resist, not when everything she cares about is in jeopardy.It’s hard to do a story called ‘The Death Of The Mighty Thor’ without everyone knowing how it’s going to end. Of course, this is comics, so we’re all so jaded at this point that we know it’s not going to be as straight forward as we think. Jason Aaron manages to walk the line extremely well, selling a tale which has real emotional impact while also staying true to the story he has been telling, and ensuring that the conclusion doesn’t come off as cheap after such powerful story beats. A lesser writer would have oversold the former in favour of the latter, or vice versa, but Aaron knows exactly what he’s doing here, and it’s spectacular to watch it unfold. This could have easily been a fake-out story, but Aaron commits, even if his version of committing might not look as you’d expect. The journey is real, especially for Jane Foster, even if the destination isn’t exactly where you think she’ll end up.There are a few special issues here, with James Harren stepping in as artist to pencil a Mangog focused story in the early part of the story as he breaks free and wrecks the place. While it’s true that Russell Dauterman’s art on the rest of the run is easier on the eye, Harren’s more brutal style really suits a story about gods getting the crap kicked out of them, so it’s a decent choice and allows Dauterman to pencil the bulk of the rest of the story with his usual hyper-detailed style, not to mention Matthew Wilson’s glorious colours. Rounding things off is a one-off special issue that bridges the gap between the end of this series and the beginning of the relaunched Thor, which includes two shorter stories that deal with death and rebirth – closing off this chapter of Aaron’s story while setting up what’s coming next at the same time. These tales are ably penciled by Ramon Perez (who Aaron collaborated with on Wolverine & The X-Men) and Jen Bartel in her first mainstream comics work (I think? Correct me if I’m wrong).The Death Of The Mighty Thor is the end of one chapter and the beginning of another. Jane Foster’s run as the Goddess Of Thunder may be over, but this final story arc is as full of emotion as everything that came before or that will follow. I, like a lot of people I expect, will be sad to see her leave the role, but she has left an indelible mark on the legacy of Thor that won’t soon before forgotten, thanks in no small part to how good her final story arc is.
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  • ellis
    January 1, 1970
    wow was that an ending.also really loved at the gates of valhalla. gonna be keeping the artists (Jen Bartel and Ramón K. Perez) in mind!!
  • Jesse A
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Aaron is the greatest Thor writer of all time. I dont think its especially close.
  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    I hope there’s more Jane Foster Thor after this. Her dynamic was fresh and interesting, with every transformation into Thor allowing her cancer to spread, killing Jane just a little more every time. I liked the Mangog in this; a force that even Odin feared, an apocalyptic monster that forced Jane’s hand even after she’d decided to listen to her friends, stay in bed, and fight her cancer. The War of the Realms isn’t over, and I hope the same is true for Jane Foster’s Thor.
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  • Nicole Westen
    January 1, 1970
    Of all the graphic novels I've read, only two have made me cry; Sandman: The Wake, and this. Well done Marvel, well done indeed.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    i'm not crying in public; YOU'RE crying in public
  • Marissa
    January 1, 1970
    A phenomenal and quite frankly beautiful ending to one of the best runs in comic history
  • Kyle Berk
    January 1, 1970
    Jane Foster has been The Mighty Thor for... seven volumes? The series was relaunched once or twice and she has held the hammer for some time. And dammit I'll miss her. It marks a very specific period in Jason Aaron's run on Thor. Extremely different from when he started out with the God butcher/ God bomb story arcs. And in a way I think I enjoyed the period just as much as when he was writing those stories. Recommending this period will take some preliminary reading not only because it's in the Jane Foster has been The Mighty Thor for... seven volumes? The series was relaunched once or twice and she has held the hammer for some time. And dammit I'll miss her. It marks a very specific period in Jason Aaron's run on Thor. Extremely different from when he started out with the God butcher/ God bomb story arcs. And in a way I think I enjoyed the period just as much as when he was writing those stories. Recommending this period will take some preliminary reading not only because it's in the middle of an already established run, or because it's been divisive among fans, but because if someone wanted to read Thor I'd tell them to read a few other Thor stories so that ones like this can hit better.Comics rely on continuity, that's just how they are. There are comics that can exist with out it, there are those that couldn't exist without it. But taking in the entire breath of Jason Aaron's run is something worth doing not only for this but because his entire run plays on itself. It's well written and uses the long form serialization to great effect. He plays on the themes of what it means to be a god, to be worthy, to be just all throughout his run. And seeing it come up time and time again makes this a very worthy story. And period for the cast of characters.I greatly look forward to the next chapter in the run beginning with Thor #1.But to summarize this collection it's the end of Jane Foster as Thor. The war of the realms rages on, Loki is still a shit, Odin is an ass, and Odinson may find he's worthy again. But Jane Foster must deal with the Mangog as he rages against Asguard.The art is really well done giving it's own flavor to make the Viking god a little bit animated and really poppoed the colors and the "realistic" detail pop.The only thing that holds me back from five stars is that I feel like the issues could have been condensed by one or two, but it isn't a big stain on the reading.This is well worth anybody's time.4 stars.
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  • Daniel Butcher
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Aaron...boom!Love how he weaves in themes from the beginning of his Thor run.
  • Jeffrey E
    January 1, 1970
    Yes, yes, yes! That's how you end a series. Great job.
  • Aaron Wiener
    January 1, 1970
    There’s no parsing words. This rules. The last stand against Mangog is comic book magic. It’s so perfect and so awesome. There are some amazing little treats laid out that fuckin BETTER be resolved in War of the Realms. I’m in love with this Thor run. Jason Aaron is a genius, and Russell Dauterman is amazing. Malekith is really fucking evil.Mangog sort of reminded me of Gorr, The God Butcher. If the God Butcher was right... so was he. I also love the three future Thor girls. There’s so much amaz There’s no parsing words. This rules. The last stand against Mangog is comic book magic. It’s so perfect and so awesome. There are some amazing little treats laid out that fuckin BETTER be resolved in War of the Realms. I’m in love with this Thor run. Jason Aaron is a genius, and Russell Dauterman is amazing. Malekith is really fucking evil.Mangog sort of reminded me of Gorr, The God Butcher. If the God Butcher was right... so was he. I also love the three future Thor girls. There’s so much amazing shit in this volume. All Black NecroGalactus? All Black NecroEgo? All Black NecroLoki? Something really fucking important is going to happen involving this All Black Necrosword and I can’t wait to see what it is. It may involve Knull 🤞 🤞 🤞 All in all, this is a HAPPENIN series. You really should read it. For real. It’s the shit.
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