She-Hulk, Volume 3
The Leader is back! And the heavy-headed villain has decreed it: Jen Walters must die! On a single-minded mission of destruction, the Leader is using all his gamma-enhanced super-intelligence to strike at her - but is his goal more than simply Jen's death? What does he truly want? And how do you hurt an almost indestructible She-Hulk? By turning Jen against herself! Can the She-Hulk triumph over the Leader's machinations of doom, or has the villain thought her into a corner she'll never escape from? Witness the next stage of the sensationally savage She-Hulk legacy! COLLECTING: SHE-HULK 159-163

She-Hulk, Volume 3 Details

TitleShe-Hulk, Volume 3
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 15th, 2018
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302905699
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel

She-Hulk, Volume 3 Review

  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    She-Hulk: Jen Walters Must Die, the third volume of Mariko Tamaki’s She-Hulk run, represents the end of her contribution to the series. This one features a challenge by The Leader--the most interesting and memorably drawn and colored character in this volume—who creates a way to fight Jen Walters by creating a Jen doppleganger to destroy “herself” with. Some of the dialogue is entertaining, as you expect with Tamaki, but the real impact of this arc is on Jen Walters facing her fears and her PTSD She-Hulk: Jen Walters Must Die, the third volume of Mariko Tamaki’s She-Hulk run, represents the end of her contribution to the series. This one features a challenge by The Leader--the most interesting and memorably drawn and colored character in this volume—who creates a way to fight Jen Walters by creating a Jen doppleganger to destroy “herself” with. Some of the dialogue is entertaining, as you expect with Tamaki, but the real impact of this arc is on Jen Walters facing her fears and her PTSD, her trauma and loss of Bruce. I liked the first volume a bit better, but this volume was close.
    more
  • Ken Moten
    January 1, 1970
    I seem to be one of the few people fascinated with superhero stories where the action part is secondary. This may tie into my perfering realism to fantasy, but who knows. This story arch by Mariko Tamaki was a very interesting one. Comic-book Superheroes with PTSD is not a new thing, but it was very interesting watching it through the view of Jen Walters whose non-superhero life is a late 30-ish(?) attorney in Manhattan. This volume is the resolution to this story and the climax is not She-Hulk I seem to be one of the few people fascinated with superhero stories where the action part is secondary. This may tie into my perfering realism to fantasy, but who knows. This story arch by Mariko Tamaki was a very interesting one. Comic-book Superheroes with PTSD is not a new thing, but it was very interesting watching it through the view of Jen Walters whose non-superhero life is a late 30-ish(?) attorney in Manhattan. This volume is the resolution to this story and the climax is not She-Hulk beating the bad guy, but Jennifer finally going to therapy. I was not a Jen Walters/She-Hulk-fan before, but these three volumes did inspire me to read John Byrne's work on the character. I am half-way through volume 2 as of writing this and it is amazing. It makes the fourth wall deconstructing of Deadpool look amateurish.
    more
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    This wasn't as great as the other two volumes, in my opinion. The plot didn't really interest me at all. I didn't quite get the way Grey Hulk was dealt with. While I enjoyed Jen's mental interactions with people from her past, nothing here really intrigued me. There wasn't a lot of interactions with the relationships I appreciated from this run (Patsy and Brian (I think? the assistant). Oddly enough, she ends up in kind of the same place she always ends up at the end of a run: moving to another This wasn't as great as the other two volumes, in my opinion. The plot didn't really interest me at all. I didn't quite get the way Grey Hulk was dealt with. While I enjoyed Jen's mental interactions with people from her past, nothing here really intrigued me. There wasn't a lot of interactions with the relationships I appreciated from this run (Patsy and Brian (I think? the assistant). Oddly enough, she ends up in kind of the same place she always ends up at the end of a run: moving to another office?Anyway, once again, Marvel made another universe wide change to their formatting and I'm bummed to see this is the end of Tamaki's run. I really enjoyed having a more internal, introspective book instead of another book where Hulk just smashes things. Once again, it is hella refreshing to have a woman writing for a female character. Some men write women well (Brian K. Vaughn for example), but a lot can hurt the character as much as they help (Slott's end of Jen's previous run).So, I congratulate Tamaki on working on X 23 but I am sad to see this run come to an end.
    more
  • Julie Ehlers
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe it's because I'm not really versed in the whole Hulk back story, but I feel like there have been diminishing returns with this She-Hulk series. I just wasn't very invested in this volume, and some of it felt a little goofy to me. Apparently this is the last volume of the series, which is a shame because there aren't many comics with female superheroes and female writers, but I confess that even if this hadn't been the final volume I might have considered calling it quits.
    more
  • Ana Rînceanu
    January 1, 1970
    Why is this ending?! This was so good!
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    With everything happening in the world, I want to hand this to every teen and say, you got this. We need you in this fight.
  • Ellis
    January 1, 1970
    i don't know if i loved the way grey hulk was resolved - if all jen needed was to talk to bruce, well, she does that in her head all the time, why was this time different?still - the art's excellent (hoo those watercolor segments), the writing is otherwise solid, and i love this portrayal of a healing jen walters. i am heartbroken that this series is over, but look forward to the next one!
    more
  • Mohamed
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't truly into the whole conflict with the Leader in this volume, though the last two issues redeem the storyline.
  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    Jen Walters Must Die, sadly, brings the conclusion to the latest run for the She-Hulk. It’s a shame, really, since this series has been so wonderful. It’s explored a lot of difficult to talk about and emotional subjects, as well as covering issues like loss and trauma. But don’t worry; this isn’t the end to She-Hulk forever. She’ll hopefully get rebooted soon, and in the meantime she’s going to be in the rebooted Avengers series! Jason Aaron (one of my favorite Marvel authors) will be writing Jen Walters Must Die, sadly, brings the conclusion to the latest run for the She-Hulk. It’s a shame, really, since this series has been so wonderful. It’s explored a lot of difficult to talk about and emotional subjects, as well as covering issues like loss and trauma. But don’t worry; this isn’t the end to She-Hulk forever. She’ll hopefully get rebooted soon, and in the meantime she’s going to be in the rebooted Avengers series! Jason Aaron (one of my favorite Marvel authors) will be writing that, and he intentionally decided to go with Jen instead of Bruce. That’s an interesting choice, and I can’t wait to see where that one leads. Also, you might have noticed that the series has been changed from ‘Hulk’ to ‘She-Hulk’ again. The numbering has also changed to the more classic style, with this volume including issues 159-163 (obviously this series did not actually get one hundred and fifty nine issues out of it, which is a shame if you ask me). (view spoiler)[ She-Hulk Volume three is no exception to the wonderful writing we’ve been getting from this series. We get to see Jen continue to explore the depths of her emotions while learning to cope with loss, try to run a business, and help equal rights (mutants are still under attack for a lot of different things) along the way. It’s beautifully written and unafraid to explore the heavier side of things, which is such a refreshing change. This volume has a little bit of everything; it’s got a villain (The Leader), emotional exploration, comedy (thanks mostly to Hellcat and her oblivious nature), drama, human rights, teenagers standing up for themselves, etc. Basically the only thing it’s missing is a romantic subplot, which I’m actually okay with. I think it’s safe to say that Jen Walters is currently not at a place that would result with her making healthy relationship choices, so her staying out of one is for the best right now. There are three main plots for this volume, as well as half-dozen subplots. The first one involves the Leader, unsurprisingly. The second focuses more on Jen trying to find a better, healing, path for herself. And the third major plot focuses on mutant rights and a young girl that Jen promised to watch over (this was probably my favorite; it’s both cute and inspiring). All in all this was a pretty good send off to the series. It really stuck to its goals and core concepts, never allowing any wavering. I love and respect that. Plus the writing itself is beautiful, as is the character doubt and growth we see Jen/She-Hulk go through. I’m sad to see this one go, and I can promise you that I’ll be keeping my eyes on Mariko Tamaki to see what she comes up with next. At least I can comfort myself with the reminder that She-Hulk is being brought into the Avengers, and the writer is sure to continue doing justice to her character there. (hide spoiler)]For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
    more
  • Gabriel Pinto
    January 1, 1970
    Nuevamente, la voz interior/narrador resuena mucho más que el argumento mismo. Creo que mucho del diálogo se pierde por lo irregular del dibujo... Es como si las ideas inteligentes y profundas planteadas por Tamaki se diluyeran en estos dibujos tan "feos" y poco expresivos.
    more
  • Avi Grundner
    January 1, 1970
    Some really beautiful writing, and a lovely conclusion to Jen's character arc through the latest Marvel universe transitions. Another one I'm super sad to see go- but I can't wait to see what Mariko Tamaki does next.
  • Daniel Butcher
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting look into Jenn's mind and how she manages her trauma and loss. It does provide an ending and closes down this run, which has been very focused on her mind, so the next writer can take up her new adventures.
  • Patricia Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely art and an enjoyable story.
  • Emmanuel Nevers
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Walters title returns to "Legacy" number and regains the "She" in SHE-HULK! This has been very great and I have loved this run so much especially the message in the last issue.
  • Laura Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    I did not think I would like this series but it turns out I really have. I hope to read more!
  • Jennette
    January 1, 1970
    Last vol and it sucked
  • Izza
    January 1, 1970
    3 stars | This was way better than the second volume, but nowhere near as good as the first one.
  • CJ - It's only a Paper Moon
    January 1, 1970
    3.2there was something off about this book. I enjoyed it but there were some things that could have been explained.
  • Juhani
    January 1, 1970
    I love this comic. It's damn near perfect.
Write a review