Dare to Love a Duke (The London Underground, #3)
For a dashing duke and the proprietress of a secret, sensual club in the London Underground, passion could lead to love… if they dare Thomas Powell, the new Duke of Northfield, knows he should be proper and principled, like his father. No more dueling, or carousing, or frequenting masked parties where Londoners indulge their wildest desires. But he’s not ready to give up his freedom just yet. The club is an escape, a place where he can forget about society and the weight of his title… and see her, the woman he’s wanted forever.Lucia—known as Amina—manages the Orchid Club, a secret society where fantasies become reality. But for Lucia, it’s strictly business, profitable enough to finance her dream: a home for the lost girls of the streets. Surrounded by lovers, she only observes, unwilling risk her future for any man. No member has ever intrigued her...until him, the masked stranger whose heated looks sear her skin. After months of suppressed longing, they dare to give in to temptation… But the late duke’s legacy comes with a shocking secret, and the scandal threatens to destroy everything Tom loves… his family, the Orchid Club, and even Lucia.

Dare to Love a Duke (The London Underground, #3) Details

TitleDare to Love a Duke (The London Underground, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 24th, 2018
PublisherAvon
ISBN-139780062499462
Rating
GenreRomance, Historical Romance, Historical, Regency, Historical Fiction, Adult, Regency Romance, Fiction

Dare to Love a Duke (The London Underground, #3) Review

  • Sissy's Romance Book Review
    January 1, 1970
    Dare to Love a Duke by Eva Leigh is book Three in The London Underground Series. This is the story of Thomas Powell, the new Duke of Northfield and Lucia aka 'Amina'. I have read the previous books, but feel this is easily a standalone book. Lucia runs the Orchid Club working to earn money to help other girls/ladies on the streets. Tom is the a newly titled Duke but is slow to give up his standing with the Orchid Club. Tom has started a friendship of sorts with Lucia and the desire to be with he Dare to Love a Duke by Eva Leigh is book Three in The London Underground Series. This is the story of Thomas Powell, the new Duke of Northfield and Lucia aka 'Amina'. I have read the previous books, but feel this is easily a standalone book. Lucia runs the Orchid Club working to earn money to help other girls/ladies on the streets. Tom is the a newly titled Duke but is slow to give up his standing with the Orchid Club. Tom has started a friendship of sorts with Lucia and the desire to be with her. But things don't go easy as a secret comes forward which adds to their setting them back. Overall really enjoyed this book and has been a great series.
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  • AnnMarie
    January 1, 1970
    Dare to Love a Duke is the third book in The London Underground series by Eva Leigh. It can be read as a standalone if you haven't read the others in the series. I have, and even if you haven't read them before this one, I say read them anyway, they are just as good as this one is.Thomas Powell is the new Duke of Northfield. Before his father died Thomas lived his life to the full, doing everything that he knew he would have to stop once the weight of being the Duke fell on his shoulders. One of Dare to Love a Duke is the third book in The London Underground series by Eva Leigh. It can be read as a standalone if you haven't read the others in the series. I have, and even if you haven't read them before this one, I say read them anyway, they are just as good as this one is.Thomas Powell is the new Duke of Northfield. Before his father died Thomas lived his life to the full, doing everything that he knew he would have to stop once the weight of being the Duke fell on his shoulders. One of those things was to attend the Orchid Club. A place where anything goes when it comes to sexual encounters, and all of it done without privacy. Everybody is masked so inhibitions don't exist. Thomas isn't interested in taking part in what is going on, he has caught the eye of the manager of the place and only wants to spend time talking with her.Lucia, known as Amina is that woman. She has brought herself up on the streets and worked her way into the position she now holds as manager. She's a beautiful person inside and out. Her reason for running the club is mainly to save her wages in order to set up a school and home for the lost girls on the streets. Lucia and Thomas only see each other in the club, they don't touch, they just talk and that continues happening right up until the day that Thomas discovers a scandalous secret that could ruin him and his family if it was to become known.I won't tell you what it is, but it does end up bringing Thomas and Lucia closer. Starting with them having a whole night of unbridled passionate lovemaking (in private not in the club). Instead of separating afterwards and going their own ways as planned, they can't keep away from each other. That is until something happens that could tear them apart forever. I loved this book so much, it is hard to write a review without going into detail of the parts I love so much about it. Thomas is such a wonderful man, I loved how he handled things in the story, especially the ending. It was just perfect. Lucia is such a kind person, never putting herself first, never feeling deserving of being put first, and I love how Thomas helps her to realise her worth. They are the perfect couple and I loved their story.There is only one little thing that niggles me and that is that Lucia is meant to manage the club only so that she can save money for the girls' home and school. But when she finds the means of her dream becoming a reality, she still plans on running a sex club and opening more than one. Why? Is it because she wants to make sure there are more job opportunities for people? Possibly. Apart from that conundrum, the book was perfect and I definitely recommend it.
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  • Shivani Seth
    January 1, 1970
    https://notjustabuzzword.com/2018/09/...I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review!
  • Smitten
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on Smitten by Books Review blog 4.5 Stars ~ Top Pick Leigh’s finale to the London Underground is everything I wanted! First and foremost, this story is a heart-tugger. It grabs a hold with lots of confessions, secrets, and such sweet sorrow. Both hero and heroine seem as if their worlds are too far apart and no way for them to be together. Trust in Eva Leigh to make things happen.Second, I highly enjoy and love the inclusion I’ve experienced in this series and Dare To Love A D Originally posted on Smitten by Books Review blog 4.5 Stars ~ Top Pick Leigh’s finale to the London Underground is everything I wanted! First and foremost, this story is a heart-tugger. It grabs a hold with lots of confessions, secrets, and such sweet sorrow. Both hero and heroine seem as if their worlds are too far apart and no way for them to be together. Trust in Eva Leigh to make things happen.Second, I highly enjoy and love the inclusion I’ve experienced in this series and Dare To Love A Duke is no exception. From a queer secondary set of characters to the description of non-white people in historical romance England, it’s fabulous. It might rub some people the wrong for me to point this out, but I believe it needs to be said. The call for cultural and sexual inclusion has been quite vocal and I am excited to see it appearing from an author with a bigger publishing house.Third, is there anything more delicious than an imminent HEA for an illegal female immigrant managing a highly controversial and illicit sex club? There is absolutely not. We’ve seen the mistresses get their romance, the courtesans, and even brothel owners. The lovely heroine, Lucia, is not quite any of those. She’s fierce, independent, and ambitious. Throughout the course of this series she’s always been mentioned, hung in the wings, a fabulous, untouchable entity and when we finally get to know her… it’s glorious.History is filled often with ambitious women, who’ve suffered to make something of themselves only using their body. Often their portrayals are depicted with violence and horrific acts. So, imagine my joy and surprise to see a woman, a sex worker, climb to the highest peak and then have the potential for even more. Huzzah! How does it happen? I can’t tell you, it would spoil the surprise.Lucia has multiple inspirational thoughts throughout this story. One stuck with me, All she could do was hope, but hope seldom made for a sound foundation. Without warning, the whole structure could collapse, burying you alive underneath the rubble of your dreams. This book is filled with both hero and heroine trying to gain their dreams, to be the best person they can possibly be and falling in love in the process of fighting against insane odds.I waxed poetic on the heroine, let me now on the hero, Tom. The new Duke of Northfield. He’s not an average duke. He’s half-Irish and knows a thing or two about being looked down upon for not having pure English blood. Kind-hearted and progressive, he has respect towards women, from the lowliest servant to the highest of the land. They are all equal in his eyes and that respect endeared him to me. He never talks down to Lucia or attempts to run roughshod with trying to protect her. The whole of the story his battles are waged against his circumstances and though Lucia is entangled in them, his stance towards her is extremely modern.Finally, the last part of this story I fell for is the sex scenes. Many romance readers claim they don’t really read sex scenes; they typically skim them, etc. I won’t begrudge any reader for doing this, we all have our preferences. Except, Lucia and Tom have something special and Leigh has always been able to weave a good web with intimacies between characters, spilling emotions, spinning metaphors in a way that are grabbing and all the more meaningful. I read every word.I can only hope for more stories within this world Leigh has created. In fact, I really want Maeve’s story, Tom’s sister. And I pray to the sweet stars that she’s involved in something highly unbecoming of a lady. Because ladies were meant to break rules, to bend the laws of the acceptable, and if they get to fall in love along the way that’s even better.For readers who enjoy Sarah MacLean.~ Landra
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  • Shia
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this novel. It is #3 in The London Underground series and can be completely read as a stand alone novel. I didn't read the first two books and was still able to follow and enjoy the plot line. Let me just say that this beginning.. HOLY MOLY! WHAT A HUGE SHOCKER! I have never encountered a historical romance novel with THIS much of a rule breaking focal point rebelling against such a strict society nature! However, it was soooooo dang good! I was just as stumped and shocked to th I really enjoyed this novel. It is #3 in The London Underground series and can be completely read as a stand alone novel. I didn't read the first two books and was still able to follow and enjoy the plot line. Let me just say that this beginning.. HOLY MOLY! WHAT A HUGE SHOCKER! I have never encountered a historical romance novel with THIS much of a rule breaking focal point rebelling against such a strict society nature! However, it was soooooo dang good! I was just as stumped and shocked to the core as Tom was when he walked into the Orchid club and saw what he saw! I mean it's very hard to imagine a SEX CLUB in the regency era where being prim and proper was a necessary skill for survival! -- Characters --Tom - I loved how prior to his father's death, Tom was all about breaking the rules and following his heart because he knew once he was Duke all of that would go out the window. I also loved how instead of partaking in the frivolities of the Orchid Club, from the first night he went there he only had eyes for Lucia and for an entire year didn't need to sleep with her to fall in love with her. It was a first for me in a very long while for a HR novel how a regency aristocratic male took his time to develop appreciation and love for a woman below his station because of WHO she is. This affection only grew once he realized her reasonings for wanting to keep the club open and how big heart heart was. What I didn't like about Tom was how he kept using his sister as a reason to not follow his heart. I'm the type of person that no one should get in the way of your happiness, especially if it hinders that person from growing themselves. For example, Tom refuses to love Lucia and refuses to deny the father of his sister's boyfriend of anything! This forces him to make decisions he himself is not proud of and that irritated me because it took away the choices for his sister to acknowledge how wrong her potential father is and to make her own decisions as far as letting her brother continue to sacrifice himself for her gain or support him and learn that she may be better off without that conniving father-in-law. I also really admired Tom for putting himself literally in Lucia's and the other servants' shoes - this humbles him enough to encourage him to fight for what's right and advocate for justice and peace. Lucia - first off, the woman on the cover isn't a Caucasian! I love this especially as Lucia is herself not an aristocratic female and actually has Italian roots. She was born and raised in poverty, becoming a prostitute on the streets who gets hired by the manager of the Orchid club and strives gains strength to put herself in a valuable position to where the manager position went to her upon the current one's death with no questions asked. Lucia's drive was very admirable - it is tough to go from a poor situation like hers and still have hope to be better. What was even more remarkable was how big her heart is and how she continued to give back to everyone - from the workers she employed to the young girls she educated and aimed to opening a school for. Lucia is a very strong woman and so much more deserving of the title of Duchess. -- Plot --The plot line was very unique (I mean sex club...HELLO) and was paced very well. I had no difficulty following Tom and Lucia's perspectives and really enjoyed how their love took its time to grow into what it was. It wasn't all about lust but more about the importance of taking what you are given and learning to use that to make the world a better place. Tom's inheritance puts him in a very powerful position to acquire allies and make political decisions that focus on justice and equality. Lucia's treatment of her employees and volunteering to teach the girls encourages equality and hope despite your circumstances. This book not only humbled Tom, but humbled me and reminded me that I can make a difference no matter how small as long as I fight for it. Dare to Love a Duke Releases Dec 24, 2018!Preorder Here**Thank you to Edelweiss, HarperCollins Publishers and Ms. Leigh for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.**
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  • b.andherbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Now that's how you do it! What a fantastically sensual and angsty in the best way romance, with one of the swooniest HEAs I've read this year. I'll write a better review when I'm not on my phone but all the yes.
  • Megan Lavey-Heaton
    January 1, 1970
    There are books that you like, those that you love, and those you would be trapped on a desert island with. This, dear potential reader, is a desert island book.The heir to a dukedom has been playing the field and is looking for a challenge when he is drawn to the manager of the Orchid Club, a sex club where anything goes as long as it's consensual. However, when his father dies, Tom realizes he needs to grow up for the sake of the people he is now in charge of and for his sister, Maeve. Putting There are books that you like, those that you love, and those you would be trapped on a desert island with. This, dear potential reader, is a desert island book.The heir to a dukedom has been playing the field and is looking for a challenge when he is drawn to the manager of the Orchid Club, a sex club where anything goes as long as it's consensual. However, when his father dies, Tom realizes he needs to grow up for the sake of the people he is now in charge of and for his sister, Maeve. Putting the pressure further on him is the father of Maeve's beau, who is basically forbidding any union between Maeve and his son unless Tom toes the conservative line that his father walked. So Tom engages in one very hot night with the Orchid Club's manager, Lucia, then goes off to start adulting. Then everything promptly goes to hell.There is a lot of amazing catnip for me in this book. At the tip top are the family units established in the series. Tom's father was strict but clearly loved his son. Tom's relationship with Maeve is amazing, and it reminds me a lot of my own relationship with my oldest brother. Tom and Lucia both have non-English parents (he is part-Irish and she is part-Napoli), and their respective heritages are lovingly woven throughout the story. I especially love how Lucia explains the role of religion in her life without any of it turning preachy or it being shoved down anyone's throat. Lucia's found family with Kitty and Elspeth is even more adorable. There is also a same sex relationship that is beautifully written. It is completely organic and natural, just the way it should be in real life.I love Tom's struggle between toeing the line in the House of Lords and standing by his own progressive needs. He is aware that his actions are going to wind up hurting someone, be it Maeve, Lucia, or innocent people. In one very beautiful scene where he is wrestling with this, he tells Lucia that he just wants to be a good man. The book illustrates very well that no matter what the steps you take to be a good person, you're going to fail somewhere. But as long as you can overall make a net positive in the world, then you are doing OK. Lucia's journey throughout the story to avoid her mother's pitfalls while holding her memory close is just amazing, and I love in the beginning the prayer she sends to her mother in the afterlife. These are both extremely good people, and Tom doesn't hold Lucia's past over her head, which is refreshingly adult.I also loved the easter eggs to previous books that Leigh has written, and the sex is very, VERY hot and amazingly written. If you don't care for explicit intimate scenes, this story is not for you. I also loved the ending immensely.This was my favorite book in the "London Underground" series, and it makes me want to revisit the entire series to slot missing pieces into place.
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  • Felicia Grossman
    January 1, 1970
    This book was everything I ever wanted from a regency (and probably a few things I didn't know I wanted but needed). I loved every moment of it and clearly read it in one sitting. I have a ton to say about it. I'm sure I'll leave things out, but OMG: first, let's talk about having an ambitious heroine where ambition is an admirable quality. Lucia is fabulous and wonderful, not just because of the unselfish, brave and charitable things she does, but because of how good she is at her job and how d This book was everything I ever wanted from a regency (and probably a few things I didn't know I wanted but needed). I loved every moment of it and clearly read it in one sitting. I have a ton to say about it. I'm sure I'll leave things out, but OMG: first, let's talk about having an ambitious heroine where ambition is an admirable quality. Lucia is fabulous and wonderful, not just because of the unselfish, brave and charitable things she does, but because of how good she is at her job and how darn hard she works at it and worked to create her place. You respect and appreciate every single choice she made in her life, even the difficult ones. Not one of them is treated as tragic, but instead as real and necessary as all of the choices Tom has to make navigating a his world, a world where duty and happiness are often at odds. Further, it was so darn wonderful that Lucia never had to be "fixed," to get her HEA, instead she needed to find someone who was worthy of being her partner and earning her trust.And Tom did not disappoint as a hero in any way. He never shirked anything, not acknowledgement of his own privilege, not his love for his mother and sister, and not his own conscious. The choices he had to make were hard but he acknowledged his good fortune to be in the position to make them. The consequences terrifying at times but he acknowledged to he and his family would all survive, no matter what (and he acknowledged that others would suffer greater consequences by far). In short, he acknowledged the world outside his own--in a clear and non-condescending--something extremely rare for a titled regency hero. And the way he ordered his priorities in fixing matters at the end--exactly right. The writing was lovely and the sex was hot and the side characters were fun and well developed and the HEA was clever and satisfying, but this book was so much more than all of that. The moment Tom acknowledged that it'd be hypocritical to judge sex works as men of his class paid for sex all the time, a reader who has always been uncomfortable with books where the opera singer mistress is used for sexual experience and tossed aside in favor of the blue-blooded virginal heroine, cheered. Everything in this book was perfect--from Tom's careful consideration of the power dynamics between them to the realistic way the coworkers at the club were portrayed (i.e. a true work family) to the fact that the stakes of exposure were actually higher for Lucia (and such was acknowledged). These characters deserved their wonderful HEA and I was so happy to see them get it. I recommend this book a million times over.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed on my blog, Becky on Books, on 12/28/18.This one may be my favorite of the series...!I absolutely loved Tom and Lucia. Both have weighty responsibilities--Tom because he was born to them, and Lucia's because she worked her butt off to build a better life for herself and in the process has both made a new family for herself and decided that helping girls in situations similar to those she once faced to make a better life for themselves would be her new mission. They have equally precario Reviewed on my blog, Becky on Books, on 12/28/18.This one may be my favorite of the series...!I absolutely loved Tom and Lucia. Both have weighty responsibilities--Tom because he was born to them, and Lucia's because she worked her butt off to build a better life for herself and in the process has both made a new family for herself and decided that helping girls in situations similar to those she once faced to make a better life for themselves would be her new mission. They have equally precarious situations--Tom's because of a socially dangerous secret that his father kept, and Lucia's because her clandestine business and all of its employees depend on the fact that it is an (open) secret in London. Of course they are from wildly different social tiers--he's a duke, and she's the illegitimate daughter of a former Italian housekeeper and the son of a wealthy English family--a family that refused to take orphaned Lucia in, causing her to have to make her own way in a foreign country. She'd come a long way from the girl she'd been then by the time she meets Tom, but that vulnerability was still there, beneath the surface.Ms. Leigh definitely takes her authorly responsibility to figure out what her characters are most afraid of and do that very seriously, because oh goodness, does she throw a lot at Tom and Lucia here. There were moments it was nearly impossible to see how they could possibly come through everything and still manage an HEA, but thankfully they manage to find a way, and it is brilliant.The ending really should have come with a wear waterproof mascara when reading warning, though. I'm just saying. ;)Dare to Love a Duke is the third in The London Underground series, but would work just fine as a standalone. Other series characters play small roles--the men as friends and sometime-supporters of Tom, the women popping up in the epilogue--but you don't have to have read their stories to thoroughly enjoy this one.(But do yourself a favor--read all three. They. Are. So. Good. Rulebreaking heroines and the men that love them FTW!)Rating: 4 1/2 stars / AI voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Wraps up just a little too nicely in a bow, but sexy as all get out.
  • Landra Graf
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come!
  • nikkia neil
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss for this ARC.Keep me happily reading too late. Unconventional, daring, and scorching hot!
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