Indianapolis
Instant New York Times BestsellerA human drama unlike any other—the riveting and definitive full story of the worst sea disaster in United States naval history.“GRIPPING…THIS YARN HAS IT ALL.” —USA TODAY • “A WONDERFUL BOOK.” —Christian Science Monitor • “ENTHRALLING.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review) • “A MUST-READ.” —Booklist (starred review)Just after midnight on July 30, 1945, days after delivering the components of the atomic bomb from California to the Pacific Islands in the most highly classified naval mission of the war, USS Indianapolis is sailing alone in the center of the Philippine Sea when she is struck by two Japanese torpedoes. The ship is instantly transformed into a fiery cauldron and sinks within minutes. Some 300 men go down with the ship. Nearly 900 make it into the water alive. For the next five nights and four days, almost three hundred miles from the nearest land, the men battle injuries, sharks, dehydration, insanity, and eventually each other. Only 316 will survive. For the better part of a century, the story of USS Indianapolis has been understood as a sinking tale. The reality, however, is far more complicated—and compelling. Now, for the first time, thanks to a decade of original research and interviews with 107 survivors and eyewit­nesses, Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic tell the complete story of the ship, her crew, and their final mission to save one of their own. It begins in 1932, when Indianapolis is christened and launched as the ship of state for President Franklin Roosevelt. After Pearl Harbor, Indianapolis leads the charge to the Pacific Islands, notching an unbroken string of victories in an uncharted theater of war. Then, under orders from President Harry Truman, the ship takes aboard a superspy and embarks on her final world-changing mission: delivering the core of the atomic bomb to the Pacific for the strike on Hiroshima. Vincent and Vladic provide a visceral, moment-by-moment account of the disaster that unfolds days later after the Japanese torpedo attack, from the chaos on board the sinking ship to the first moments of shock as the crew plunge into the remote waters of the Philippine Sea, to the long days and nights during which terror and hunger morph into delusion and desperation, and the men must band together to survive. Then, for the first time, the authors go beyond the men’s rescue to chronicle Indianapolis’s extraordinary final mission: the survivors’ fifty-year fight for justice on behalf of their skipper, Captain Charles McVay III, who is wrongly court-martialed for the sinking. What follows is a captivating courtroom drama that weaves through generations of American presidents, from Harry Truman to George W. Bush, and forever entwines the lives of three captains—McVay, whose life and career are never the same after the scandal; Mochitsura Hashimoto, the Japanese sub commander who sinks Indianapolis but later joins the battle to exonerate McVay; and William Toti, the captain of the modern-day submarine Indianapolis, who helps the survivors fight to vindicate their captain. A sweeping saga of survival, sacrifice, justice, and love, Indianapolis stands as both groundbreaking naval history and spellbinding narrative—and brings the ship and her heroic crew back to full, vivid, unforgettable life. It is the definitive account of one of the most remarkable episodes in American history.

Indianapolis Details

TitleIndianapolis
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 10th, 2018
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781501135941
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, War, World War II

Indianapolis Review

  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    5+++ Engrossing and Informative Stars! From THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER, 1798: "Water, water everywhere, And all the boards did shrink, Water, water everywhere, Nor any drop to drink."U.S.S. INDIANAPOLIS - She was an old girl....just back from repairs after sustaining grave damage from a 1944 kamikaze suicide attack....now, with a new (very) young and inexperienced crew....now, an unescorted, unprotected cruiser (useless against subs) was on the way back from a new mission....a highly classi 5+++ Engrossing and Informative Stars! From THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER, 1798: "Water, water everywhere, And all the boards did shrink, Water, water everywhere, Nor any drop to drink."U.S.S. INDIANAPOLIS - She was an old girl....just back from repairs after sustaining grave damage from a 1944 kamikaze suicide attack....now, with a new (very) young and inexperienced crew....now, an unescorted, unprotected cruiser (useless against subs) was on the way back from a new mission....a highly classified special mission....having delivered a mysterious secret cargo....the components for Little Boy. It's July 30, 1945 just after midnight....Captain Charles B. McVay is 47 today; and submarine commander Hashimoto cannot believe his luck as a bit of moon peeks out from the clouds. He can now see a black shape, he dives....and slams two torpedoes into the unsuspecting INDIANAPOLIS. Destruction is catastrophic and chaos ensues aboard Indy; many die upon impact, others are severely burned or wounded. The order is given to Abandon Ship! In the water with the constant swells of the Philippine Sea, the men are spread out over great distances, but some join together in circular groups. Shark attacks, screams of pain, fear of no rescue, dehydration and few rations lead to dissension among the men. Some drink seawater causing hallucinations, swollen tongues and painful death. Madness turns to fights, blood, more sharks and unspeakable acts, but there are also times of camaraderie, group prayer and heroism.Even with Indy overdue, the rescue of the remaining 316 of 879 was indeed fortuitous as there was much incompetence and outright stupidity by navy personnel; and after a farce of a court martial and tortured life for McVay, (OMG the phone calls and letters) survivor's were so outraged that together, with the help of eighth grader Hunter Scott and William Toti (Captain of a modern day sub, Indianapolis) they worked tirelessly to clear his name. "It is not right for one man to bear all the blame for the mistakes of so many others." In 2017, 72 years later, explorers got their first look at INDIANAPOLIS wreckage 3.5 miles below the surface....an amazing find. (don't know how I missed this news ) The well-researched INDIANPOLIS reads like a novel and Lynn Vincent does a superb job of giving the reader a personalized view of crew members and their loved ones as well as providing illustrations of the ship, rescue operations, and survival groups in the water that lead us all the way to a well-deserved posthumous exoneration for Captain McVay. So much information here....so well-written....Highly Recommend! Charles B. McVay, III - July 30, 1898 - November 6, 1968. Many thanks to Simon & Schuster for the arc COMING JULY 10, 2017 in exchange for an unbiased review. UPDATE - July 20, 2018 - Watched the 2016 USS INDIANAPOLIS movie. (available on Netflix). Compared to the book, very disappointing. Expected more and poor acting (Nicholas Cage not a fav. of mine) put me off, and for a two plus hour flick, it seemed rushed. Did get to see those horrid life boats though....Good Lord!....and a bit of the rescue operation. 3 low stars for the movie.
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  • Steven Z.
    January 1, 1970
    A few days ago, I was sitting on the beach with a few friends and we began discussing the 1970s film “Jaws.” Someone referred to Robert Shaw’s crusty performance and a monologue he gave about the disaster that befell the USS Indianapolis at the conclusion of the World War II. Since I was familiar with Doug Stanton’s work, IN HARMS WAY written in 2003 about the sinking of the ship it immediately peaked my interest. When I returned home I saw an advertisement for a new book on the worst naval disa A few days ago, I was sitting on the beach with a few friends and we began discussing the 1970s film “Jaws.” Someone referred to Robert Shaw’s crusty performance and a monologue he gave about the disaster that befell the USS Indianapolis at the conclusion of the World War II. Since I was familiar with Doug Stanton’s work, IN HARMS WAY written in 2003 about the sinking of the ship it immediately peaked my interest. When I returned home I saw an advertisement for a new book on the worst naval disaster in American naval history, entitled of course, INDIANAPOLIS: THE TRUE STORY OF THE WORST SEA DISASTER IN U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND THE FIFTY-YEAR FIGHT TO EXONERATE AN INNOCENT MAN by Lynn Vincent and Sarah Vladic. This phenomenal new book updates Stanton’s effort and presents a more in-depth account based on significant new documentation, interviews, and takes the story through the exoneration of the ship’s Captain, Commander Charles B. McVay III, who for decades was the navy’s scapegoat for the events that occurred at the end of July and early August, 1945. In 1932 the USS Indianapolis was christened by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as the flagship of the US Pacific Fleet. In the summer of 1945 it was chosen to complete the most highly classified naval mission of the war by delivering two large cannisters of material that was needed to assemble the Atomic bomb that was to be dropped in Hiroshima to the Tinian Islands. Four days after completing its mission it was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine and sunk resulting in over 1193 men either going down with the ship or being thrown overboard with only 316 surviving. The result was a national scandal as the government pursued its investigation and reached a conclusion that was both unfair and completely wrong.Vincent and Vladic’s incremental approach in developing the story is very important as it allows the reader to understand the scope of the tragedy, the individuals involved, and the conclusions reached. The authors delve into the background history of the ship’s actions during the war, mini-biographies of the personnel aboard the ship, and the military bureaucracy that was responsible of the ship’s manifest and orders that consume the first third of the book.After getting to know the important characters in the drama Vincent and Vladic transition to the actual delivery of the weapon components and follows the Indianapolis as she transverses through the Philippine Sea. Capt. McVay asked for a destroyer escort which was standard for this type of operation but was denied, in part because of availability, and in part because he was informed by Admiral Nimitz’s assistant chief of staff and operations officer James Carter that “things were very quiet…. [and] the Japs are on their last legs and there’s nothing to worry about.” What Carter did not mention was that ULTRA intelligence came across the deployment of four Japanese submarines on offensive missions to the Philippine Sea.” Later, Acting Commander of the Philippine Sea Front, Commodore Norman Gillette would characterize the same intelligence as a “recognized threat.” In addition to presenting the American side of events, the authors follow Japanese preparations for the defense of the home islands, and zeroes in on Mochitsura Hashimoto, the Commander of the Japanese submarine I-58 which would sink the Indianapolis.The authors follow the movements of the Indianapolis and Hashimoto’s submarine the days and hours leading up to the attack. Five minutes before midnight on July 30, six torpedoes were fired at the Indianapolis and three hit the ship. Parts of the book read as an adventure story as the authors review calculations dealing with location and speed as the possible target begins to become clearer and clearer. After taking the reader through the attack and resulting sinking of the ship, the reader is presented with at times a quite graphic description of the plight of the sailors who died during the attack, those who jumped off the ship, and the others who abandoned ship under Capt. McVay’s orders. This section of the monograph can be heart wrenching as the men fight for their survival. The carnage and psychological impact of the attack is very disconcerting. After enduring shark attacks, living with no water and little food they resorted to cannibalism, theft, murder, and suicide. The conditions were appalling but others formed groups employing whatever could be salvaged from the ship to create islands of men linked together by netting, rafts, life jackets, or anything else that would float. Apart from men who became delirious and suffered from hallucinations, others found their main enemies to be hunger, dehydration, and sharks who seemed to circle everywhere, and sadly, when it seemed that an individual might be saved a shark attack would take another life.The most chilling part of the narrative is the description of rescue operations that began on August 2nd. At 11:18 am Lt. Wilbur Gwinn flying a routine patrol in a PBM Mariner noticed a huge oil slick below, and after careful observation noticed a 25-mile oil slick. The spotting of the men below sends chills down the spine of readers as the authors details of the rescue as word spread that there were hundreds of men over an 80-mile area. Sadly, many men would die even as rescue operations commenced as they had little reserve after four days in the water. The question must be asked, when the Indianapolis went missing from July 30 onward no one was tracking the ship carefully to report that she had not arrived at her destination? The navy would investigate and reach a conclusion that the authors would totally discredit.The last third of the book is devoted to the legal battle that surrounded who was responsible for the sinking of the Indianapolis and once the decision was reached the authors spend their time describing how a wrongful conviction was finally overturned. The authors follow the investigation and different hearings and the final court martial and analyze the testimony, conclusions, and final reports that were issued. They point out the inconsistencies and outright lies offered by certain naval officers as they tried to rest all the blame on Capt. McVay to cover their own “asses.” In describing the conclusions reached by the navy Vincent and Vladic point out “what was not discussed was the string of intelligence and communication failures that led to something being amiss in the first place—failures of Carter, Gillette, and Naquin, as well as Vice Admiral Murray, a member of the court, were well aware.” (317)The authors dissect the report that called for McVay to be court martialed, especially the information that was left out. For the navy brass that had two ships sunk in the waning moments of the war resulting in over 1000 casualties, someone had to be found responsible. The materials presented reflect where the real blame should have fallen. At Guam, failure to provide an escort for the Indianapolis. Further, Guam took no action when Fleet Radio Unit Pacific intelligence indicated a Japanese submarine had sunk a vessel in the area that the Indianapolis was known to be present. At Leyte, the Philippine Sea Frontier Organization failed to keep track of the Indianapolis and take action when the vessel failed to appear at its scheduled time when a Japanese submarine was located near its line of course.One of the most interesting aspects of the book is the weak defense put up by Navy Captain John Parmelee Cady who by this time had little interest in being a lawyer and was given little time to prepare a defense. Cady’s approach is highlighted by the testimony submarine combat expert Captain Glynn Robert Donaho whose statement should have helped exonerate McVay, but did not. The entire transcript of witness testimony is interesting particularly that of the man whose ship sank the Indianapolis, Mochitsura Hashimoto. Other fascinating components of the book are some of the heroes involved in publicizing and working behind the scenes to bring about justice for the McVay family and those of the survivors and men lost at sea. Chief among them was Commander William Toti who stood at the helm of the namesake submarine the Indianapolis. Another is Hunter Scott, an eleven year old boy who worked assiduously on the history of the disaster and in the end testified before a Senate Committee. Without their efforts and numerous others, one wonders if the degree of closure that was finally achieved would have come about.As one reads the narrative, you grow angrier and angrier at the US Navy for its malfeasance and outright culpability in ruining a man’s life and providing false information for the families of the victims of the disaster. As the authors press on with their account the redemption that is finally earned it does not reduce the uncalled for actions of so many in the Navy and the US government. The authors do a nice job ferreting out those responsible, but that does not detract from the fact that the lies were seen as truth for decades.
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  • Eric Hausman-Houston
    January 1, 1970
    This amazing ship and these amazing men who fought for our freedom need to be remembered. INDIANAPOLIS is a captivating retelling bringing new light to this incredibly important moment in history. More than just a riveting, harrowing tragedy, due to such an unlikely series of events so near to the end of the war, it is ultimately a story of survival and redemption. A must read for all!
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  • Brooke Lorren
    January 1, 1970
    Indianapolis is an outstanding telling of the ship that was entrusted with the responsibility of carrying the atomic weapons that led to the end of World War II in Japan... and then was sunk shortly afterwards. It is the story of how the men survived five days in in shark-infested waters while the Navy bumbled about, not even knowing that the ship was missing until some of the survivors were spotted by a passing plane. It is the story of how the captain of the vessel was unjustly blamed for ever Indianapolis is an outstanding telling of the ship that was entrusted with the responsibility of carrying the atomic weapons that led to the end of World War II in Japan... and then was sunk shortly afterwards. It is the story of how the men survived five days in in shark-infested waters while the Navy bumbled about, not even knowing that the ship was missing until some of the survivors were spotted by a passing plane. It is the story of how the captain of the vessel was unjustly blamed for everything that happened -- and finally was absolved of guilt for the incident, decades after his death from suicide.At times, this book reads almost like a fiction book. The stories of the sailors being surrounded by sharks, going crazy, and struggling to survive, are exciting and horrifying because they are true. You care for the people in this story as you get to know them, and I admit that I cried at the end when the ship's captain finally received justice.This is a beautifully written story that would be great for history buffs, people that are interested in World War II, and people that like to see good finally triumph over corruption and miscarriages of justice.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic have crafted an amazing read in "Indianapolis" that puts you in the middle of a seemingly unbelievable tale of war, loss, brotherhood, victory, faith and determination as they unpack the story of the USS Indianapolis. From the time at sea through the secret journey to deliver components for Little Man to the heart-pounding torpedo attack and sinking of the ship through the survivors time adrift waiting for rescue days later, a clear visual picture is drawn of th Wow! Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic have crafted an amazing read in "Indianapolis" that puts you in the middle of a seemingly unbelievable tale of war, loss, brotherhood, victory, faith and determination as they unpack the story of the USS Indianapolis. From the time at sea through the secret journey to deliver components for Little Man to the heart-pounding torpedo attack and sinking of the ship through the survivors time adrift waiting for rescue days later, a clear visual picture is drawn of the surroundings as well as the people involved in this heroic tale. As fascinating as the story was leading up to the rescue, what happened in the months, years and decades since is also an amazing tale unto its own. The dogged determination of survivors and their families to right the record about what happened combined with the involvement of the final USS Indianapolis submarine commander make for a compelling read. Sara Vladic became enthralled with this story as a teenager and she has made it a key part of her life to capture and share the story of this crew - that passion was evident within the pages. Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic pull from myriad sources to tell a story that keeps you interested from the first page until the end (and even the end pages are an interesting read, too) - this book is a great example of a well crafted narrative nonfiction that I find to be some of the best writing around. In the days since reading it, I have already recommended it to at least 3 people and keep coming back to the story in conversation with others. I received an ARC through NetGalley and Simon & Schuster to read in exchange for my honest review. This book is released July 10th. I look forward to buying my own copy of this in hardback for my personal library.
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  • Nathan
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal, engrossing, riveting, devastating---all of these (and more) apply to Vincent's book about the USS Indianapolis. Following the ship from just a little while before it was attacked by a Japanese sub and ending as recently as last year, Vincent has arranged an amazingly coherent narrative that gives intricate insight into mission details, the actions and personalities of the crew, and pointed answers, almost in a paint-by-numbers fashion, as to just how the sinking of this ship blossome Phenomenal, engrossing, riveting, devastating---all of these (and more) apply to Vincent's book about the USS Indianapolis. Following the ship from just a little while before it was attacked by a Japanese sub and ending as recently as last year, Vincent has arranged an amazingly coherent narrative that gives intricate insight into mission details, the actions and personalities of the crew, and pointed answers, almost in a paint-by-numbers fashion, as to just how the sinking of this ship blossomed into such an untold catastrophe. It would be easy to focus for the most part on the men's struggles at sea (as that is the most publicized part); I mean, isn't that right? As the book is quick to point out, a great majority of today's awareness of the ship comes from the film Jaws, and I'll raise my hand to that effect, as I'm definitely one among that particular crowd. Vincent seems to be quite aware of the fascination of this part of the story, and gives it proper due without giving in to the temptation of sensationalizing the ordeal. Many pages will be turned over to reveal heart-wrenching deaths, survival against the odds, and humbling conclusions that further cement these men (and their loved ones) as champions beyond comprehension. The final third of the book outlines the court-martial trial of the captain of the Indianapolis and subsequent attempts to reinstate him, despite the verdict and the shaky, shady events that preceded it. Modern proponents and allies of the survivors are highlighted as they take up the mantle, working in tandem with what's left of the crew to secure the ship's legacy, writhing in the agony of a stubborn bureaucracy, and celebrating in the ecstasy of legal victory.You'll close the book and likely have a somber moment (or several) in remembrance for the crew and what they had to endure for over half a century. A lesser book might have either been too clinical or weighed too heavily on the survival at sea (as mentioned earlier); Vincent wonderfully reveals the story in its entirety, showing what adversity can cause us to become, for better or for worse, warts and all. A most supreme recommendation from me. You'll be floored. Many thanks to NetGalley, as well as to Simon & Schuster for the advance read.
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  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free Kindle copy of Indianapolis by LynnVincent and Sara Vladic courtesy of Net Galley  and Simon snd Schuster, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as  I read a couple of other books on the events surrounding the sinkng of the Indianapolis, but this one carried it forward I received a free Kindle copy of Indianapolis by LynnVincent and Sara Vladic courtesy of Net Galley  and Simon snd Schuster, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as  I read a couple of other books on the events surrounding the sinkng of the Indianapolis, but this one carried it forward to the present day.  This is the first book by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic that I have read.This is an extremely well written and researched book. The subtitle is an accurate depiction of the contents of the book - The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man. This book reads more like a piece of fiction than history making it an engaging and interesting read.The book covers the events leading up to the sinking of the Indianapolis, the stories of the crew adrift while waiting for resuce, the rescue effort, the hearings after the war and the long fight by the crew to exonerate their captain from blame for the events that occurred. It also points out the inflexibility of the Navy in admitting that they made a mistake even after Congress cleared the captain of any wrongdoing.I recommend this book to anyone who wants to read a comprehensive history of what took place with the sinking of the Indianapolis and the events afterwardes.
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  • Nan Williams
    January 1, 1970
    What an outstanding job the authors did not only to research the history of the Indianapolis, but to research the lives of the men, themselves, and their families. This made the whole accounting much more human than just a clinical dissection of naval history.This was very well written with really nice illustrations.Once the book is published, I plan to buy a hardcopy and read/peruse it slowly, underlining, book marking and digesting it more thoroughly. I received this as an ARC from NetGalley a What an outstanding job the authors did not only to research the history of the Indianapolis, but to research the lives of the men, themselves, and their families. This made the whole accounting much more human than just a clinical dissection of naval history.This was very well written with really nice illustrations.Once the book is published, I plan to buy a hardcopy and read/peruse it slowly, underlining, book marking and digesting it more thoroughly. I received this as an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher, Simon and Schuster.
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  • Lourdes
    January 1, 1970
    I requested and received a free review copy via NetGalley!I really loved this book as it is about history, WWII. The writing is as if you are in the story, and so well defined. The description of the ship, the sailors, their stories, of how it talks about Pearl Harbor, and then the sinkingof the Indianapolis. The writing is detailed and vivid, you feel the fear and terror that the sailors felt. Some of our service members so young that join to be a part of our U.S. Navy.The Indianapolis sinking I requested and received a free review copy via NetGalley!I really loved this book as it is about history, WWII. The writing is as if you are in the story, and so well defined. The description of the ship, the sailors, their stories, of how it talks about Pearl Harbor, and then the sinkingof the Indianapolis. The writing is detailed and vivid, you feel the fear and terror that the sailors felt. Some of our service members so young that join to be a part of our U.S. Navy.The Indianapolis sinking remains the Navy's second greatest loss of life in World War II. Out of a crew of 1,195, only 317 survived. This is like one of my favorite books I read in a long time. I love history, and being married to a sailor, and listening to them go up and down the ship stairwells and all brought back memories for me. My sailor was on the U.S.S. Sierra that was a destroyer tender part of the WWII also. Definitely pick a copy of this book, you will not be dissapointed.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing!! Very readable, very inspiring, hard to grasp in some place the horror that these men went through and the courage of many others to see that justice was finally done to Captain Charles McVay.
  • David Wingert
    January 1, 1970
    I recently finished an advance reader's edition of "Indianapolis" by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic. It is scheduled for publication July 10th. This is the true story of the worst sea disaster in US Naval History and the 50 year fight to exonerate the captain. For those who don't know, this is the ship mentioned in "Jaws". Close to 1,000 men went into the water when it was torpedoed by the Japanese at the end of WWII. Only 317 were rescued 5 days later for lack of food and water, but plenty of sha I recently finished an advance reader's edition of "Indianapolis" by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic. It is scheduled for publication July 10th. This is the true story of the worst sea disaster in US Naval History and the 50 year fight to exonerate the captain. For those who don't know, this is the ship mentioned in "Jaws". Close to 1,000 men went into the water when it was torpedoed by the Japanese at the end of WWII. Only 317 were rescued 5 days later for lack of food and water, but plenty of sharks.The book is a definite read for those into WWII and/or US Naval history.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    One of the most chilling words ever read," For the men who carried the bomb."This is how one crew member of USS Indianapolis signs his checks.Truly amazing read with in depth and personal accounts from those who lived to tell their story."While her trim skin made her one of the fastest large ships in the Navy, it also meant that the bubble of steam and gas produced by an exploding torpedo could easily crack her in two."With not one but two torpedoes hitting her she went down and was never found One of the most chilling words ever read," For the men who carried the bomb."This is how one crew member of USS Indianapolis signs his checks.Truly amazing read with in depth and personal accounts from those who lived to tell their story."While her trim skin made her one of the fastest large ships in the Navy, it also meant that the bubble of steam and gas produced by an exploding torpedo could easily crack her in two."With not one but two torpedoes hitting her she went down and was never found until nearly 72 years after her loss by Paul Allan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzs8w...Absolute amazing July 30th 1945 with almost 1200 men on board USS Indianapolis for a top secret mission to deliver the atomic bomb unbenounced to them. Three hundred of those men went down with their ship, while 900 went into the icy shark infested salt water. The salt water was not kind to these men after 4 days in the water before being finally rescued.There in lies the problem, as Rear Admiral McVay was court martialed not only for his failure to zigzag but also in hazarding his ship.Yet the men stand firm with their knowledge that McVay had no knowledge and the truth of the matter is it "must be recognized threat to decide."Unjust is the term used as it may have been legally ok but with negligence you must have implied knowledge.Could this all have been a terrible misunderstanding, a vendetta, a failure to provide the intel that was in their possession?"Of the 1,195 souls aboard Indianapolis, three of every 4 men died." Many suffered shark bites, had flesh burned exposing bone, had simply lost their minds out at sea from drinking the salt water and having gone hungry for 4 days prior to rescue.Sadly, no one was ever disciplined for failure to provide McVay with intel in their possession yet it's documented that officers on each end of Indy's route had information on one or both subs (Hashimoto) and failed to pass it to Rear Admiral McVay.McVay eventually married multiple times, tried to put the blame and shame behind, yet succumbed to it all committing suicide using .38 revolver to the temple.In April, McVay was awarded a 2nd bronze star during a quiet ceremony for his efforts in the Kamikaze strike at Okinawa.The sinking of Indianapolis was second only to Pearl Harbor as the Navy's greatest loss in WWII.On Oct 12, 2000 an exoneration resolution was passed clearing McVay of any wrong doing (House Joint Resolution 48) with help from Hashimoto himself in the form of a letter explaining the situation in detail.Charles McVay IV (Quatro) his living son received the Bronze star.I simply cannot fathom this amount of suffering but I'm blessed in knowing they all fought for our freedom we have today!Thank god for them all!Thank god for their story's to pass on to the next generation.May they never be forgotten.A fab read by remarkable women who took on a task larger than life and did it with justice, integrity, compassion, and love.Thank you Lynn Vincent, her publisher, NetGalley, and Aldiko for this wonderful E-Read ARC copy in exchange for this honest review.I'd also like to share my review for "All the Gallant Men" by Donald Stratton https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
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  • Juli
    January 1, 1970
    I am ashamed to admit that I knew nothing of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis during World War II until I saw a documentary on it during Shark Week on Discovery Channel in 2007. Years of history classes...many on the two world wars....for a college degree....and I knew nothing about the most disastrous sinking in US Naval history. Most stories about the sinking of the USS Indianapolis focus on the sharks that attacked both dead bodies and live sailors in the water after the sinking, but this I am ashamed to admit that I knew nothing of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis during World War II until I saw a documentary on it during Shark Week on Discovery Channel in 2007. Years of history classes...many on the two world wars....for a college degree....and I knew nothing about the most disastrous sinking in US Naval history. Most stories about the sinking of the USS Indianapolis focus on the sharks that attacked both dead bodies and live sailors in the water after the sinking, but this book focuses on the entire story, not just the dramatic survival parts. Information on the ship, its officers and crew, the war, its mission just before the ship was torpedoed, the men who died and the survivors who floated in the ocean for four days before being rescued. The intent of the authors is to present the information necessary to prove that Captain Charles McVay III was not at fault. Captain McVay was court martialed after the sinking, but later pardoned. His naval record was wiped clean decades later after his death. The authors definitely did a lot of research. The facts are presented in an interesting and detailed fashion, while still being respectful of the Sailors who lost their lives in the sinking. This book dispels a lot of rumors and misinformation caused by movies and television shows. For example, the sharks did not appear for a couple days after the sinking not instantly as portrayed in a recent movie. The animals were lured in by the scent of corpses and injured sailors in the water. A majority of the deaths after the sinking were not due to shark attack. About 300 men went down with the ship. 900 went into the water. After dehydration, injuries, salt poisoning, lack of food, exhaustion....and sharks....took their toll on the survivors, only 316 sailors survived. The book also explains why Captain McVay was not zigzagging the boat at the time it was torpedoed, and why it took four days for suvivors to be rescued. The Indianapolis had just completed delivery of top secret war materials (uranium and materials for the nuclear bombs dropped on Japan) so it's position and orders were secret. Nobody knew where the ship was and when it was supposed to return to port except for a very, very few people. It took days for them to realize the ship was even missing. Very interesting book! I enjoyed hearing the entire story. I never knew the ship was severely damaged by a suicide bomber just months before a torpedo sank the ship. I never knew why the captain was not zigzagging, as ships were usually directed to do to make it harder to target them. Because I learned about the sinking initially on a Shark Week documentary, I thought most of the men in the water were attacked by sharks. Not true. Some were, but most died of exposure, exhaustion and untreated injuries. All in all, a great, very informative book. I will definitely read more by these authors!**I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Simon & Schuster via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**
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  • Anne Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    Most people today know the story of the Indianapolis, if they know it at all, from the movie Jaws. While hunting a great white shark, boat captain Quint tells Hooper and Brody of being on the Indy (as she was known by the crew) when she sunk, sharks circling until the men were pulled from the water after delivering "the bomb". The full story, told here for the first time, is much more complex, dramatic, and heartbreaking. Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic do full justice to the story of the Indy, her Most people today know the story of the Indianapolis, if they know it at all, from the movie Jaws. While hunting a great white shark, boat captain Quint tells Hooper and Brody of being on the Indy (as she was known by the crew) when she sunk, sharks circling until the men were pulled from the water after delivering "the bomb". The full story, told here for the first time, is much more complex, dramatic, and heartbreaking. Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic do full justice to the story of the Indy, her crew, and her captain in this new book, The Indianapolis: The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man. Vincent and Vladic have done incredible, in-depth research with only primary sources- including speaking with survivors- to piece together a saga every bit as gripping and full of personal drama as the sinking of the Titanic or Lusitania. The stories of the crew, how they lived, how they came to be on Indy in the first place, their families and plans for the future connect you to them intimately. Indy's final, famous mission was a series of coincidences and Naval negligence from first to last. Originally she was not slated to carry uranium for the first atomic bomb, but due to damage from a kamikaze strike she was in California finishing repairs and called into action because of the sterling reputation of her captain, Charles McVay III. After successfully delivering the uranium, Indy was slated to travel to Guam for training. Despite knowing there was submarine activity in the route McVay was to take, he was told by authorities the route was safe, and given no escort. The recounting of the torpedo strikes, the sinking, and the five nights the survivors spent in the water are told in a straightforward piecing together of memories. No additional drama is needed to make the tale emotional, dramatic,, and viscerally terrifying and heartbreaking.The story of the Indianapolis does not end when the 316 survivors were pulled out of the water. Vincent and Vladic follow the crew back to the States, and then all too troubling tale of the courtmarshal of Captain McVay for negligence in allowing his ship to be sunk. It took over fifty years and an amazing amount of intense battling before this injustice was rectified and McVay's record cleared. Thoroughly researched and deeply moving, the story of the Indianapolis is a tale of courage, strength, and determination in the face of overwhelming odds. Despite Vincent and Vladic's prose occasionally falling victim to non-fiction book's tendency of dramatically foreshadowing what is to come (the typical "it was a mistake they would soon come to regret" type of chapter ending) and the fact that they can't seem to go more than three sentences without using similes or metaphors in describing anything, The Indianapolis is a well told, compelling story. Fans of Erik Larson's Dead Wake will appreciate the attention to detail not only from the American point of view, but the Japanese as well. An absolute must-read for military history buffs, naval history buffs, or anyone curious about the story behind the tale told in Jaws, The Indianapolis is a powerful, fast-paced, emotionally moving, account of the greatest disaster in U.S. naval history. I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsA wholly American ship, she was built between 1930 and 1932. She first sailed in 1932 and was christened the USS Indianapolis. By 1945, the Indianapolis became master of the seas from Pearl Harbor all the way to Japan. The end of the Pacific War was fast coming when she was tasked with a top secret mission at the end of July to deliver the core of the bomb that was to fall on Hiroshima. Her commander was Captain Charles B. McVay. Four days later, the Indianapolis was struck by two Japanes 5 starsA wholly American ship, she was built between 1930 and 1932. She first sailed in 1932 and was christened the USS Indianapolis. By 1945, the Indianapolis became master of the seas from Pearl Harbor all the way to Japan. The end of the Pacific War was fast coming when she was tasked with a top secret mission at the end of July to deliver the core of the bomb that was to fall on Hiroshima. Her commander was Captain Charles B. McVay. Four days later, the Indianapolis was struck by two Japanese torpedoes and she went down. Three hundred men went down with the ship. Nearly nine hundred made it into the sea. Only three hundred and sixteen men survived the harrowing tale of endurance, determination and sheer luck. What follows in this remarkable tale is the story of the Indianapolis’ war in the Pacific. It tells the story of the grit and determination of Admiral Spruance, the sharp wits of Captain McVay and the bravery of her men. It also tells of McVay’s court martial and the fifty-year battle to clear his name. It speaks of the lack of the Navy’s ability to admit their responsibility in the disaster, the survivors’ struggle to survive in the water against all odds in a sea surrounded by sharks and the loyalty of the surviving men to their Captain is joining the fight to clear his name. This is an extremely well-researched story. The two authors did everything in their power to tell the real story of the Indianapolis – from her birth to her death. It is written in a clear and concise manner, not in overly technical or legalese in language. It is easy for anyone to read, whether an historian or a casual reader who is interest in the Indianapolis’ history. It is a wonderful book and very informative and interesting. I am glad that I read it. Of course, I’ve seen the Spielberg film about the ship and have seen the Jaws film where Robert Shaw speaks his immortal lines. I want to thank NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for forwarding to me a copy of this most remarkable history to read, enjoy and review.
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  • Patricia Romero
    January 1, 1970
    Coming from these two authors, I knew this was going to be a good book. And it was. I don't usually do Military history. But something about this story pulled at me.A true account of what happened to the ship and crew of the USS Indianapolis. After delivering precious cargo that would effectively end the war with Japan, she has limped on a course to complete the repairs that were not finished before they were pulled for a special top-secret mission. But they never made it. Torpedoed by the enemy Coming from these two authors, I knew this was going to be a good book. And it was. I don't usually do Military history. But something about this story pulled at me.A true account of what happened to the ship and crew of the USS Indianapolis. After delivering precious cargo that would effectively end the war with Japan, she has limped on a course to complete the repairs that were not finished before they were pulled for a special top-secret mission. But they never made it. Torpedoed by the enemy and sank. A story of bravery, of teen-aged boys stepping up when needed. Of the fight to survive for those left alive in the dark water surrounded by deadly oil slicks and sharks. I am not going to lie, it was hard to read some of this but then these young men sacrificed their lives and as we learn more about each one we become invested in their survival.A story of how a crew and an enemy came forward to save their Captain from an unjust court-martial.Any military fans will love this in-depth look at our military history. I know I will never forget this one.Netgalley/ Simon and Schuster  July 10, 2018
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  • Paul Pessolano
    January 1, 1970
    “Indianapolis, The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man” by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic, published by Simon and Schuster.Category – Naval Military History Publication Date – July 07, 2018.In the Armed Service the best is considered “outstanding”, in the literary world “must read”, this book fits both categories.Few people know what happened to the USS Indianapolis and its crew on July 30, 1945. This book tells the horri “Indianapolis, The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man” by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic, published by Simon and Schuster.Category – Naval Military History Publication Date – July 07, 2018.In the Armed Service the best is considered “outstanding”, in the literary world “must read”, this book fits both categories.Few people know what happened to the USS Indianapolis and its crew on July 30, 1945. This book tells the horrid truth of its sinking and what happened to the 1200 men aboard the ship and the ensueing cover-up by the Navy. At midnight a Japanese submarine put two torpedoes in the Indianapolis and she sunk within 15 minutes. It is estimated that 300 men went down with the ship and 900 made it into the water. These 900 men were adrift on the ocean for five nights and four days. They suffered from dehydration, lack of food, shark attacks, and insanity. It was only through sheer luck that an allied plane discovered the men on the water. Only 317 of the 900 made it to safety.The Navy failed to provide destroyer escort for the ship, did not keep track of her movements, although they knew where she should be at any time, and attempted to lay blame on the ships captain.This is but a brief outline of this tragic event, there is much more to the story than what is written here. Again, this is an “outstanding” and “must read” novel.
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  • Cherie'
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Good Reads and Simon and Shuster for an advanced copy of Indianapolis, The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-year fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic. This book is available today at book stores. Charles McVay is the Captain of the USS Indianapolis, the largest naval fleet in the history of the modern world commissioned in 1932. The ship is like a tank on the water. From bow to fantail the USS Indianapolis was 610 fe Thank you Good Reads and Simon and Shuster for an advanced copy of Indianapolis, The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-year fight to Exonerate an Innocent Man by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic. This book is available today at book stores. Charles McVay is the Captain of the USS Indianapolis, the largest naval fleet in the history of the modern world commissioned in 1932. The ship is like a tank on the water. From bow to fantail the USS Indianapolis was 610 feet, had a beam of 66 feet from port rail to starboard. It spanned 13 presidents from FDR to GW Bush, it inspired filmmaker Spielberg, and a 11 boy name Hunter Scott.On March 19, 1945 the USS Franklin while in the pacific ocean was hit by Japanese Kamikaze's and killed 724 and wounded 265 but didn't sink.The USS Indianapolis was ordered to carry a top secret package to Tinian, which was successful. After leaving to their next location, on Sunday July 31st 1945 the unthinkable happened, Hashimoto's submarine (Japanese) hit the ship with two torpedoes and it sunk and fast. Captain McVay made the decision for all aboard to get a life jacket and abandon ship. Most jumped, a lot drown, some committed suicide, some got stuck and went down with the ship. One particular guy got lucky SFC Outland got tangled in a line and the ship dragged him under water and he almost died, just at the last second somehow the line untangled and he got free. On the water the ones that didn't have life jackets would let others put their arms of someone in front of them. These men fought to stay alive despite watching others getting eaten by sharks and hearing the screams of that horror. Despite the horror, some men managed to keep somewhat of a sense of humor with witticism. They talked a lot to each other, some fights broke out and some men didn't want the ones that were bit by sharks near them due to the blood. They talked about the most humane way to kill a friend when they were starting to hallucinate, dying from burns, shark bites, dehydration, and pain. The men were covered in so much oil and you couldn't really tell whom most were. Even though the SOS was sent it was ignored by George Atteberry whom recalled the rescue boats saying it could be an enemy trap "jap trap." No one reported that the Indianapolis did not arrive at it's next scheduled location either. On Thursday after 4 days on the oil slick waters burnt from the sun, starving,and dehydrated, some of the survivors noticed a plane in the sky and then were screaming and using mirrors from the kits of the rafts to reflect. It was Aviation Jim Graham that noticed the oil slick, then several hundred men in the water several miles apart from each other. From the plane more rafts were dropped for the floaters. Then from Chuck Gwinn's plane whom was checking an antenna line flapping from the rear of his plane noticed people in the water too. Lt Andrian Marks is flying his plane the Doyle reported a message at Peleliu of the survivors to send help. The office didn't pass on the message and sat on it.Soon there is a court marshall for Captain McVay for not zig zagging to avoid enemy sub. Then comes Hunter Scott an 11 yo boy who did a project on USS Indianapolis for school and went to interview survivors on the horror suffered by these men, he took it all the way to the President. It took Hunter to help exonerate Captain McVay convicted due to not zig zaging.After the rescue, Captain McVay told his wife: everyday I will see the faces of men I lost, I will live a long, long time with that punishment, Then chapter 6 ends with: He was wrong about that which keeps you reading for more.In court to exonerate, the guy Hashimoto is called to the stand, you know the guy who torpedoed the USS Indianapolis. I mean could you imagine if Bin Laden showed up in court? I enjoyed this book very much, my book is full of sticky's as I kept notes, the Authors told you just enough about the USS Indianapolis crew that you could remember them throughout the book. This book has a lot of emotions, including shock, funny moments, horror, faith, courage, and tragedy. It is full of scandal then ultimate justice. This book will stay with me a long time plus knowing that my dad served for over 20 years and this could of happened to him aboard his ship. Not likely in the 80's and 90's but there is always that chance.Thank you to the Authors for their thorough research and not giving up on this book and I have an understanding of the importance and legacy of the USS Indianapolis.Cherie'
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  • Emilio III
    January 1, 1970
    I was first introduced to the Indianapolis story like a lot of people – from the movie Jaws. Quint's riveting speech about his time in the waters after the sinking of the Indianapolis was one of the more memorable scenes in the movie. The authors quote the speech word for word. Richard Dreyfus once said in an interview that he wasn't acting when he was listening to actor Robert Shaw deliver the speech. He was totally transfixed by the story that was being told.Over the years I have read and watc I was first introduced to the Indianapolis story like a lot of people – from the movie Jaws. Quint's riveting speech about his time in the waters after the sinking of the Indianapolis was one of the more memorable scenes in the movie. The authors quote the speech word for word. Richard Dreyfus once said in an interview that he wasn't acting when he was listening to actor Robert Shaw deliver the speech. He was totally transfixed by the story that was being told.Over the years I have read and watched numerous accounts of the story. What drew me to read this account was the addition of the subsequent investigation, court-martial trial, and the efforts to clear the captain's name. Not only is this a story seventy-plus years in the making, but the authors spent a considerable amount of time bringing it all together. The end result is a compelling story that touches on one historical event after another.The story is told in a mostly linear fashion, starting with some background on the ship and crew, previous battle history, including Okinawa and Iwo Jima, the delivery of the atomic bomb, the sinking, the five days in the water, and the rescue. Interspersed with this narrative are references to recent efforts to clear the captain's name, the only person faulted for the sinking, Additionally, the authors weave in the perspective of the Japanese submarine captain Mochitsura Hashimoto.The writing is detailed and vivid. You feel the fear and terror that the sailors felt. You empathize with their situation. One of the more frustrating elements of the Indianapolis story is the many missed opportunities that could have either prevented the entire ordeal or at least hasten the rescue. One example of a missed opportunity involved an Army aircraft that witnessed the sinking as it happened. The aircraft was at nine thousand feet. They saw what they later described as a spectacular naval battle. Unfortunately, the pilot mistook the fireworks display as a training exercise that he had been briefed on before his flight.The story of the young Hunter Scott and his attempts, along with Indianapolis survivors and Commander William Toti, to clear Captain McVay's name lacks the drama of the sinking but is nonetheless compelling.After reading the book, I watched co-author Sara Vladic's documentary Indianapolis: The Legacy. I recommend viewing the documentary after reading the book. You can find it on Amazon Prime. In addition to interviews with many of the survivors, the documentary incorporates images and video that add another level to the story you've just read. There was one short video of survivors being pulled out of the water that caught my attention. Many of the sailors were covered in diesel oil from head to toe. While certainly an irritant, the oil might have actually aided in the survivability by serving as a protectant against the sun and prolonged exposure to the elements.The Indianapolis sinking remains the Navy's second greatest loss of life in World War II. Out of a crew of 1,195, only 317 survived. The actual ship's final resting place was discovered on August 19, 2017, by the high-tech research vessel Petrel.This review is based on a pre-publication copy provided by NetGalley.
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  • Debra Jeakins
    January 1, 1970
    INDIANAPOLIS:THE TRUE STORY OF THE WORST SEA DISASTER IN U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND THE FIFTY YEAR FIGHT TO EXONERATE AN INNOCENT MAN BY LYNN VINCENT. starts with an eighth grader watching the movie "JAWS." Anyone who has watched the movie knows the scene where Quint talks about his being one of the survivors of the Indianapolis. But this eighth grader wanted to learn more. And he did learn, and so did the two authors of this book. They contacted the survivors, the families of the survivors and the INDIANAPOLIS:THE TRUE STORY OF THE WORST SEA DISASTER IN U.S. NAVAL HISTORY AND THE FIFTY YEAR FIGHT TO EXONERATE AN INNOCENT MAN BY LYNN VINCENT. starts with an eighth grader watching the movie "JAWS." Anyone who has watched the movie knows the scene where Quint talks about his being one of the survivors of the Indianapolis. But this eighth grader wanted to learn more. And he did learn, and so did the two authors of this book. They contacted the survivors, the families of the survivors and the Japanese people of this disaster, the captain of the sub that sank the Indi. This book starts where all true stories should start: at the beginning. The history of the building, and launching and the whole story . The Indianapolis is famous or infamous for carrying the makings of the first atomic bomb, code name Big Boy. A very very ultra classified cargo , the men of the Indianapolis dropped the bomb & its scientists off at a secluded island and left to go in for a refresher training, but she never showed. She was sunk by a Japanese sub and her men left out in the ocean, some very critically burned to fight off the sharks and the elements. The captain of the ship was rescued, court marshalled and found guilty and suffered for many years while his crew tried and tried again to overturn the court-marshall , for they knew he was a hero ,not responsible for the death of the ship & so many of the crew. But the Navy does not like to admit its was wrong. Along comes an eighth grader: Hunter Scott & he takes up the survivors cause and advocates on national television after deep research into the ship & the disaster. The rest of the story you all are going to have to read to find out. Never before have I read such a moving book of life on board a ship during WWII as this one. Watching these men work day after day, each of them real people, with families ,fighting what was then an enemy. The jokes the boredom & life aboard the Indianapolis coming to an abrupt end. The death by the elements, by sharks and yes by suicide. These men who respected their captain and knew he was innocent and knew that the system let them down when they needed help , fought for decades to vindicate not only the captain but their beloved Indianapolis ! I laughed , I cried and I, for a time lived with those brave men who served aboard the Indianapolis & I really hope you pick up this book and take a bit of time with them as well, you will not be sorry. I recieved this book free from goodreads in exchange for a honest review.
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  • Schuyler Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic’s collaborative history of the nation’s worst naval catastrophe is well constructed and researched. The result is an astounding record of submarine warfare against American warships and how a ship’s commander can be made culpable for over 800 deaths, a wrong only rectified after 50 years of bitter dispute.The USS Indianapolis was a heavy cruiser launched in 1932 and through the years, before her sinking on July 30, 1945, she amassed a distinguished record of service. Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic’s collaborative history of the nation’s worst naval catastrophe is well constructed and researched. The result is an astounding record of submarine warfare against American warships and how a ship’s commander can be made culpable for over 800 deaths, a wrong only rectified after 50 years of bitter dispute.The USS Indianapolis was a heavy cruiser launched in 1932 and through the years, before her sinking on July 30, 1945, she amassed a distinguished record of service. Eight battle stars had been awarded to her crew. She was instrumental in America’s victory at Iwo Jima and delivered the parts for the atomic bomb that demolished Hiroshima. But with the torpedoing that killed almost 900 of her 1,195 crewmen, her story became more about the sinking and the survivors of 4 days of brutal suffering from exhaustion, dehydration, saltwater virulence, drowning, and shark attacks.The drama was painfully extended fby the court-martialing of the ship’s commander, Captain Charles B. McKay III. Naval officers far from the scene were more interested in covering their own rear ends than in finding the real cause of the sinking. They piled on McKay and he was shamefully convicted of failing to zigzag his ship despite testimony from numerous experts that it wouldn’t have made of difference in getting torpedoed. It was a pitifully weak conviction. He suffered with that indignity until 1968 when he shot himself in despair. Congress eventually exonerated him in 2000, long after his death. The surviving crewmembers never waivered in their support for their commander. The book extensively covers the sinking, the survival, the trial, and the painful aftermath using straightforward language and thorough research. The trial proceedings deserve special mention for their accuracy and interest. Both authors had accumulated an immense amount of research materials; Vincent in her role as a veteran investigative reporter and Vladic as an acclaimed filmmaker with a particular interest in the Indianapolis disaster. It’s an amazing collaboration of material that combines the explicit facts with riveting personal accounts. One cannot read the story without both being disgusted with naval authority failings and sorrowful at the suffering of the victims and the ship’s commander. It’s an amazing accounting that I won’t soon forget.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing! I am obsessed with the story of the U.S.S. Indianapolis because "Jaws" is my favorite movie and that is where I first heard about this tragic event in our history. Listening to Quint tell that story in "Jaws" gets me every time. Because of that, I read "In Harms's Way" by Doug Stanton and I recommend that book all of the time. Now, I will also recommend this book all of the time because the authors have provided such a captivating, detailed account of what happened to this This book is amazing! I am obsessed with the story of the U.S.S. Indianapolis because "Jaws" is my favorite movie and that is where I first heard about this tragic event in our history. Listening to Quint tell that story in "Jaws" gets me every time. Because of that, I read "In Harms's Way" by Doug Stanton and I recommend that book all of the time. Now, I will also recommend this book all of the time because the authors have provided such a captivating, detailed account of what happened to this ship, its captain, the men serving our country and their families. Its a true story about the U.S.S Indianapolis on a secret mission to deliver the atomic bomb in hopes of ending WWII. After the mission is completed the ship is hit by torpedoes fired from Japanese submarine. What happens next is a story of survival and bravery until the men are rescued about 5 days later. The government essentially held Captain McVay responsible for the sinking of the ship and the deaths of hundreds of men. However, because of the fierce loyalty the men had to their captain, as well as many other people who recognized the governemnet's error, Captain McVay was exonerated, sadly, much too late. There are so many parts of this book that I found heart warming and you could tell the authors were trying to do this story justice. I couldn't believe that the Japanese captain responsible for sinking the ship was so helpful to get Captain McVay's record cleared. What really touched me was that the authors listed all the men who served on the ship towards the end of the book. I felt like I was visiting a war memorial site as I read this book. It was so well written and I highly recommend this book.Thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Shuster, Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic for sending me an free electronic ARC of this book.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from the author. I had the opportunity to review or not.Lynn and Sara have written an amazing account of the sinking and horror experienced by the officers and men of the USS Indianapolis in World War II. Their research is in-depth and expansive while cutting to the salient facts in the telling. I have been interested in the tale of the Indianapolis since seeing the movie of the disaster, and subsequent reading of the novel “Abandon Ship.” Their book brings to I received a free copy of this book from the author. I had the opportunity to review or not.Lynn and Sara have written an amazing account of the sinking and horror experienced by the officers and men of the USS Indianapolis in World War II. Their research is in-depth and expansive while cutting to the salient facts in the telling. I have been interested in the tale of the Indianapolis since seeing the movie of the disaster, and subsequent reading of the novel “Abandon Ship.” Their book brings to life the reality of the horror, fear and bravery of the men who called Indianapolis home during those dreadful days.The mistakes, negligence and lack of accountability is a story unto itself as the Navy refuses to acknowledge their part in the horrors the men experienced. The fate of Captain McVay, the last commander of the Indianapolis, is a discussion that could go on for a long time as he becomes the only Captain to undergo a court martial whose ship was sunk. The history of the survivors is fascinating as the men try to continue with their post-war lives. Their efforts to clear the name of their Captain is touching and the loyalty to him and their fellow ship-mates heartwarming. The writing is clear, concise and addictive. I lost more than one night’s sleep reading this wonderfully crafted, thoughtful book.
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  • Debra Pawlak
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance reading copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review. This was an outstanding book that was not only well written, but thoroughly researched. The authors brought to life the men who served on the U.S.S. Indianapolis during World War II. Entrusted with a top secret mission (carrying the atomic bomb) near the end of the war, the ship was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine--after they had delivered their cargo. The ship sunk in about 12 minutes resulting in t I received an advance reading copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review. This was an outstanding book that was not only well written, but thoroughly researched. The authors brought to life the men who served on the U.S.S. Indianapolis during World War II. Entrusted with a top secret mission (carrying the atomic bomb) near the end of the war, the ship was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine--after they had delivered their cargo. The ship sunk in about 12 minutes resulting in thousands of lives lost. No one came looking for them despite their failure to reach port. Instead a pilot spotted the survivors by chance five days later. By then, many men had succumbed to their injuries or were attacked by sharks. This story is not for the faint of heart, but depicts what happened before, during and after the attack. Unfortunately, the captain was singled out and court martialed on some suspect charges. In reality, he had no control of the situation, but did the best he could to save as many men as possible. He was a true hero and the survivors knew it. Their story is an important one and I recommend anyone who is interested in World War II or history in general to read this book. I believe it will be available sometime in July 2018. Kudos to the authors who not only told the story, but brought peace to many of the survivors by telling their story.
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  • Kelley
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so good. I need to qualify this review by stating that I am not a fan of "war" books. I selected this because I love history and the legal aspect of this story interested me. This story is so well told. Despite the large number of people involved the author does an excellent job helping you keep them all straight which also helps you really get to know and care about them as individuals. Beyond that, this entire story from start to finish is a tale that desperately needed to be told This book is so good. I need to qualify this review by stating that I am not a fan of "war" books. I selected this because I love history and the legal aspect of this story interested me. This story is so well told. Despite the large number of people involved the author does an excellent job helping you keep them all straight which also helps you really get to know and care about them as individuals. Beyond that, this entire story from start to finish is a tale that desperately needed to be told. I realize there are other books about this incident and I have not read them, but the amount of research and work that went into writing this must have been immense. Beyond that, you can tell by how this is written that this was a labor of love and telling this tale was a true passion.Such an important tale, so well told. The tragedy, resilience, tenacity, heartbreak and in the end ultimately a long-awaited triumph to right a long-standing wrong. Hats off this all of these men, in the same vein of "unbroken" what these men, dead and alive, endured is unthinkable and their story deserves to be shouted from the rooftops. I hope this is made into a movie because goodness knows not enough people read these days and this story deserves to reach audiences far and wide.
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  • J. F.
    January 1, 1970
    Book Review: Indianapolis: The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Manby Lynn Vincent, Sara VladicMany famous books have been written about the sinking of USS Indianapolis. Movies too. Richard Newcomb, author of "Abandon Ship" was the first to realize that an injustice had occurred with respect to the ship's commanding officer, Charles B. McVay III. Of all captains in the history of the U. S. Navy, McVay is the only one to Book Review: Indianapolis: The True Story of the Worst Sea Disaster in U.S. Naval History and the Fifty-Year Fight to Exonerate an Innocent Manby Lynn Vincent, Sara VladicMany famous books have been written about the sinking of USS Indianapolis. Movies too. Richard Newcomb, author of "Abandon Ship" was the first to realize that an injustice had occurred with respect to the ship's commanding officer, Charles B. McVay III. Of all captains in the history of the U. S. Navy, McVay is the only one to have been subjected to court-martial for losing a ship sunk by an act of war. McVay was posthumously exonerated in 2000.Doug Stanton, author of "In Harm's Way", was the first to interview scores of survivors, then write a "survival story" that focused on the ordeal the men faced while adrift at sea.Co-authors, Ms. Vincent and Ms. Vladic, in a lifetime's epic endeavor spanning sixteen years, assiduously narrates the ship's mission, the survival story, and the trial, scandal and exoneration of the ship's captain, all based on well-researched "primary sources". Plus, the inside story of how a superspy shepherded the core of the atomic bomb sailing on the Indy into its final assembly in Tinian, a first we are told. Were the writers equal to the task? A third of the story is focused on the exoneration, legal proceedings and court records, and a fourth of the volume on appendices.Neither first nor original, but overall the product makes for compelling reading, far beyond historical reportage, a well-written, chronologically-arranged "human naval history" that brings out feelings and emotions, and places the Indy and her sailors, once again, in proper historical context - one of the worst sea disasters ever.Review based on an advance reading copy presented by NetGalley and Simon & Schuster.
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  • Gail Hollingsworth
    January 1, 1970
    I've read several books on the story of the Indianapolis but this one covers a more in depth account of the history before during and after the sinking. Lives were lost but miraculously many survived. I'm in awe of the five days of survival in shark infested waters, the strength of the men that "held on". I'm also astounded by the time it took for the sinking to be realized. Also the court martial of Captain Charles McVay was a shame and a disgrace. I'm saddened to know that he passed away befor I've read several books on the story of the Indianapolis but this one covers a more in depth account of the history before during and after the sinking. Lives were lost but miraculously many survived. I'm in awe of the five days of survival in shark infested waters, the strength of the men that "held on". I'm also astounded by the time it took for the sinking to be realized. Also the court martial of Captain Charles McVay was a shame and a disgrace. I'm saddened to know that he passed away before he was cleared of the charges brought against him. But at least his two sons knew. He was blamed for not making radio contact but how could he when the Japanese torpedo destroyed all the equipment. It took fifty years for that to be recognized and just this last year remains of the ship were discovered. My father in law served in the navy during WWII, so anything relating to that time period is so interesting to me. Those that survived the sinking of the Indianapolis as well as those that survived the war is a true testament to the human spirit.I received a complimentary ebook copy of this novel from the publisher through Netgalley.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    I have read a few books on the USS Indianapolis disaster. This one is ranked as the best I have read in awhile on the subject. Very detailed and informative. The USS Indianapolis was torpedoed and sank by a Japanese submarine on July 30, 1945, after delivering components for the making of the atomic bomb in the Philippine Sea. 300 men went down with the ship while 900 made it to the ocean alive. For the next five nights and four days, almost three hundred miles from the nearest land, the men bat I have read a few books on the USS Indianapolis disaster. This one is ranked as the best I have read in awhile on the subject. Very detailed and informative. The USS Indianapolis was torpedoed and sank by a Japanese submarine on July 30, 1945, after delivering components for the making of the atomic bomb in the Philippine Sea. 300 men went down with the ship while 900 made it to the ocean alive. For the next five nights and four days, almost three hundred miles from the nearest land, the men battled injures, dehydration, insanity, and fought each other. Many were killed by sharks. Only 316 survived. It also details the aftermath where a Navy board of inquiry charged the commanding officer, Captain Charles McVay III, and court martialed him for the sinking. He was wrongly accused and made a scapegoat. With years of hate mail from the family members of those that were killed, Captain McVay shot himself in the head with a 38 revolver on November 6, 1968. Years later, the survivors and a young boy fought to exonerate the captain.
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    Exceptional non-fiction account of the greatest naval disaster in US history -- there were more lives lost in the sinking of this ship than any other in American history (only 316 of the 1195 aboard survived). Part of the book's great appeal is that the story is so multi-faceted, relating the Indianaopolis's last secret mission (carrying parts of the nuclear bomb that would be dropped on Hiroshima), the torpedoing of the ship, the ordeal of the men who survived the sinking only to be adrift at s Exceptional non-fiction account of the greatest naval disaster in US history -- there were more lives lost in the sinking of this ship than any other in American history (only 316 of the 1195 aboard survived). Part of the book's great appeal is that the story is so multi-faceted, relating the Indianaopolis's last secret mission (carrying parts of the nuclear bomb that would be dropped on Hiroshima), the torpedoing of the ship, the ordeal of the men who survived the sinking only to be adrift at sea for nearly 4 days before being rescued, the rescue operation, and the subsequent court-martialing of the captain and the 50-year attempt to clear his name. The book is not only a page-turner, but is that rare book that you can't help but tell others about. And although other accounts have been written of the Indianapolis, this is a must-read -- the definitive account-- as it includes recent developments and more details from interviews with survivors than have ever before been compiled.
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  • Dan Shonka
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I won this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. Vincent and Vladic's story of the USS Indianapolis is without a doubt one the finest non-fiction books I've ever to read. They weave the story with superb character detail that allows the reader to connect to the men who manned the ship. They also take you through much of the ship's history as it led up to the fateful night in July, 1945. Most of us know at least a little about the horrors the crew faced. However, I had no idea of the Navy bras First off, I won this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. Vincent and Vladic's story of the USS Indianapolis is without a doubt one the finest non-fiction books I've ever to read. They weave the story with superb character detail that allows the reader to connect to the men who manned the ship. They also take you through much of the ship's history as it led up to the fateful night in July, 1945. Most of us know at least a little about the horrors the crew faced. However, I had no idea of the Navy brass's commitment to wrongfully pinning the blame on Captain McVay. I found the author's note about the methodology very interesting. Their style of writing and the pace of the story builds momentum to the point where the book is nearly impossible to put down. On top of that, it stirs a whole boat-load of emotions. I highly recommend this book!
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