No One Tells You This
BuzzFeed: “Exciting Summer Books”Goop: “15 Books We’re Reading This Summer”Vogue.com: “13 Books to Thrill, Entertain, and Sustain You This Summer”Bustle: “15 Best Nonfiction Books Coming Out In July 2018”Town & Country: “Best New Books to Read This July”Elle.com : “The 40 Best Books to Read This Summer” InStyle: “11 Books to Bury Your Nose in This Summer”If the story doesn’t end with marriage or a child, what then?This question plagued Glynnis MacNicol on the eve of her 40th birthday. Despite a successful career as a writer, and an exciting life in New York City, Glynnis was constantly reminded she had neither of the things the world expected of a woman her age: a partner or a baby. She knew she was supposed to feel bad about this. After all, single women and those without children are often seen as objects of pity, relegated to the sidelines, or indulgent spoiled creatures who think only of themselves. Glynnis refused to be cast into either of those roles and yet the question remained: What now? There was no good blueprint for how to be a woman alone in the world. She concluded it was time to create one. Over the course of her fortieth year, which this memoir chronicles, Glynnis embarks on a revealing journey of self-discovery that continually contradicts everything she’d been led to expect. Through the trials of family illness and turmoil, and the thrills of far-flung travel and adventures with men, young and old (and sometimes wearing cowboy hats), she is forced to wrestle with her biggest hopes and fears about love, death, sex, friendship, and loneliness. In doing so, she discovers that holding the power to determine her own fate requires a resilience and courage that no one talks about, and is more rewarding than anyone imagines. Intimate and timely, No One Tells You This is a fearless reckoning with modern womanhood and an exhilarating adventure that will resonate with anyone determined to live by their own rules.

No One Tells You This Details

TitleNo One Tells You This
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 10th, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster
ISBN-139781501163135
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Feminism, Biography Memoir, Biography, Womens, Cultural, Canada

No One Tells You This Review

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader & Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    Glynnis MacNicol was about to turn 40, and all-of-sudden, she began to question her life’s purpose. Up to that point, she’d had it all in her mind- a successful career and an exciting life. But should she want more? Should she want what society says every 40 year old woman should have? This memoir chronicles MacNicol’s 40th year, as she takes a deeply personal journey of self-discovery. It’s a tough year for her emotionally, she has an ill family member, and she has to walk through many highs an Glynnis MacNicol was about to turn 40, and all-of-sudden, she began to question her life’s purpose. Up to that point, she’d had it all in her mind- a successful career and an exciting life. But should she want more? Should she want what society says every 40 year old woman should have? This memoir chronicles MacNicol’s 40th year, as she takes a deeply personal journey of self-discovery. It’s a tough year for her emotionally, she has an ill family member, and she has to walk through many highs and lows. Ultimately, what she discovers about being the master of her own fate is positively empowering. I was grateful for the brave and open way she told her story. No One Tells You This is insightful, bold, and thoughtful. Recommended for fans of memoirs, especially for those that challenge traditional social mores. Thank you to Glynnis MacNicol, Simon Schuster, and Netgalley for the complimentary copy.
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  • Valerity (Val)
    January 1, 1970
    Not every woman is meant for couplehood, marriage, babies and PTA. And not every woman grows up wanting a life that includes all of those things. On the cusp of turning 40, the author has been thinking about her options and wondering why she isn’t more panicked about being in a relationship or her biological clock ticking down. With her mother going through serious health problems and her sister’s marriage experiencing a breakup as she’s about to have her 3rd child, it seems like things are fall Not every woman is meant for couplehood, marriage, babies and PTA. And not every woman grows up wanting a life that includes all of those things. On the cusp of turning 40, the author has been thinking about her options and wondering why she isn’t more panicked about being in a relationship or her biological clock ticking down. With her mother going through serious health problems and her sister’s marriage experiencing a breakup as she’s about to have her 3rd child, it seems like things are falling apart around her in the family. When she’s called on to step in and help out, it gives her even more to think about. She begins to wonder if there even are any happy endings. This book grew on me as I read it, kind of a mix of a midlife angst, and being single at age 40. Then there’s also the major angle of her mom’s illness, some very serious issues that she deals with, talking about her wonderful friends and her enjoyment in her job writing, and ability to travel and have adventures. Lots of food for thought in several areas and an enjoyable memoir of a Canadian writer living in NYC who travels. My thanks for the advance digital copy that was provided by NetGalley and author Glynnis MacNicol for my fair review. Simon & SchusterPublished: July 10, 2018
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  • Lydia
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir isn't just for single ladies- it's for all of us who feel like life is passing us by and we can't see or fathom where the time has gone. It's for those trapped in memories of childhood and times past, feeling as though we are still living in those moments. It's also a memoir for anyone who has watched an older woman in their life who they loved deeply, become lost inside herself because of something beyond her control. Loved this book a whole lot- I don't hand out 5 star reviews very This memoir isn't just for single ladies- it's for all of us who feel like life is passing us by and we can't see or fathom where the time has gone. It's for those trapped in memories of childhood and times past, feeling as though we are still living in those moments. It's also a memoir for anyone who has watched an older woman in their life who they loved deeply, become lost inside herself because of something beyond her control. Loved this book a whole lot- I don't hand out 5 star reviews very often!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    No One Tells You This-- is a debut memoir that highlights life of a unmarried single woman without the possibility of a socially expected life that includes a husband and family. Glynnis MacNicol is a full-time writer and co-founder of The List. Her award winning writing has been featured in numerous notable publications including the NYT, The Guardian and Forbes, she lives in NYC.As a dutiful daughter and sister with too many friends to count, Glynnis led the extremely busy life of a profession No One Tells You This-- is a debut memoir that highlights life of a unmarried single woman without the possibility of a socially expected life that includes a husband and family. Glynnis MacNicol is a full-time writer and co-founder of The List. Her award winning writing has been featured in numerous notable publications including the NYT, The Guardian and Forbes, she lives in NYC.As a dutiful daughter and sister with too many friends to count, Glynnis led the extremely busy life of a professional woman. Soon after her arrival to help her sister care for her niece and nephew following pregnancy and the birth of a new baby, she flew to Toronto to check on her parents.It was readily determined that Glynnis mother would require long term nursing care. Fortunately in Canada, this kind of nursing care was available to citizens-- without the extremely complicated and costly process of dealing with the U.S. Medicare system and spend-down requirement. About a year later, Glynnis returned to Toronto to sell her parent’s home, and visit her mother at her nursing care facility. Glynnis father was initially involved in the care of his wife-- until he wasn’t. Curiously, there was no further mention of him in the book. On a writing assignment, Glynnis flew to Iceland, where her extraordinary trip and writing abilities were showcased. In Iceland, the atmosphere shifted and bubbled constantly, fueled by geo-thermal volcanic energy. Independent farmers built and operated their own mini power stations, bread was left in covered pots marked with small flags and baked on the beach. On a glacial river raft tour, their vessel “careened wildly” down the rapids. The Australian women placed in the back of the boat, were drenched numerous times, cried and begged to return. At the front of the boat, their tour guide held Glynnis ever so tight (knowing she was single) hoping to get her email address to stay in touch.In NYC, where Glynnis had lived for years, she moved into a rare apartment vacancy upstairs from one of her best friends. The dating apps were fun to chat with a variety of guys. Glynnis never felt like the stereotypical woman her age: supposedly needy, desperate, seeking a committed relationship to have a baby. A past relationship with a man she referred to as “646” left her wary and hesitant to renter the dating pool. Extracting herself from what little comfort she had with 646 wasn’t easy as she hoped it would be.When Glynnis decided to drive cross country with a friend to San Francisco, a small Wyoming working ranch they visited opened up another world for her: she and her friend loved the natural beauty of the trees, meadows, hiking trails and wildlife. Returning to the ranch a month later on a writing assignment, she quickly discovered fly fishing in a icy river nearby was not her thing. It was during a cruise when Glynnis began to fully appreciate her single status. Weren’t single women sometimes viewed with suspicion, associated with metaphorical dangerous beings as witches, furies, sorceresses and harpies? The married women she interviewed weren’t suspicious of her at all, didn’t clutch their husband’s in her presence— in fact, several of the women envied her! The single life was just too good; the freedom she had to come and go wherever she pleased was truly exhilarating! **With thanks and appreciation to Simon & Schuster via NetGalley for the DDC for the purpose of review.
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  • Shereen Lee
    January 1, 1970
    An cool and eccentric story about nostalgia and aging. Would recommend a read if this is a genre you're already interested in, but since I'm not that emotionally invested in memoirs I just found this okay.
  • Corinna Fabre
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not even sure where to begin reviewing No One Tells You This. This book is breathtaking and poignant to the point of surreal. Glynnis leads by example: by taking readers through her trials, tribulations and moments of peace as partners in her journey, she imparts the kind of wisdom that can't be achieved by smacking you over the head with proselytization, but instead flows from a deep well of empathy and experience.Her writing is expert and never crossing the line into glib or saccharine, wh I'm not even sure where to begin reviewing No One Tells You This. This book is breathtaking and poignant to the point of surreal. Glynnis leads by example: by taking readers through her trials, tribulations and moments of peace as partners in her journey, she imparts the kind of wisdom that can't be achieved by smacking you over the head with proselytization, but instead flows from a deep well of empathy and experience.Her writing is expert and never crossing the line into glib or saccharine, which is so easy to do in this genre. I feel like I'm writing about this as if it's some sacred tome but, to me, this is a near-perfect example of what writing in this arena can be.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    As a single woman over 40 who has chosen not to marry or have children I can't tell you how excited I was to receive this book. It gets so tiresome when people are constantly making you feel less than complete because you lack a partner and a family. Like most of us Glynnis is still learning how to navigate through life, making mistakes and figuring it out along the way. I very much related to how everyone around Glynnis relies so deeply on her, after all she has the time and freedom to take car As a single woman over 40 who has chosen not to marry or have children I can't tell you how excited I was to receive this book. It gets so tiresome when people are constantly making you feel less than complete because you lack a partner and a family. Like most of us Glynnis is still learning how to navigate through life, making mistakes and figuring it out along the way. I very much related to how everyone around Glynnis relies so deeply on her, after all she has the time and freedom to take care of everyone else right? 'snorts' This is a very personal memoir and she is not afraid to share everything, whether it's pretty or not. Her mother's decline due to Parkinson's is heartbreaking. It's especially poignant that her mother wanted to get married and have a family to make sure that she wouldn't die alone then the disease took away her memories and she died isolated by her own mind. The takeaway from this book for me is that sh*t happens that we have no control over. Situations and people change constantly and the goal in life is not to reach as many of the traditional milestones as possible but rather to live the happiest life possible, whatever form that may take.I received this book for free through a Goodreads Firstreads giveaway but this has not influenced my review in any way.
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  • Booksandchinooks (Laurie)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Simon&Schuster Canada for a free copy of this book for an honest review. This is a very engaging memoir by the author as she comes to some revelations as to the direction her life is going. Glynnis is celebrating her 40th birthday, alone, as the book begins. She lives a very busy life in NYC but has never found ‘the one’ or had children. As she contemplates this she has to come to terms with whether her life, as it is, is enough or if she should be trying harder to find a partne Thank you to Simon&Schuster Canada for a free copy of this book for an honest review. This is a very engaging memoir by the author as she comes to some revelations as to the direction her life is going. Glynnis is celebrating her 40th birthday, alone, as the book begins. She lives a very busy life in NYC but has never found ‘the one’ or had children. As she contemplates this she has to come to terms with whether her life, as it is, is enough or if she should be trying harder to find a partner or to become a single mother. She is also very busy as a part time caretaker for her mother who has an all consuming fatal illness. Glynnis flies back and forth to Toronto, her hometown, to assist with her mom and to help her recently separated sister as she has her third child. The author leads a very fulfilling life and she has to decide whether this is enough or if she will have regrets going forward by not following the traditional route of being a wife and mother. The writing is great and the book kept my interest throughout. It is compelling to see what decisions Glynnis makes about what her life will look like after age 40 and beyond.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    **I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway, and there several spoilers in this review**This is a very honest memoir that really gives you a glimpse of how complicated life gets as you grow older and how hard it is to know if you've made the right choices. MacNicol describes with candor what it was like losing her mother slowly to degenerative disease, helping her sister with 3 kids including a newborn after the husband walked out (and thoroughly exemplifying how kids can be incredibly annoying an **I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway, and there several spoilers in this review**This is a very honest memoir that really gives you a glimpse of how complicated life gets as you grow older and how hard it is to know if you've made the right choices. MacNicol describes with candor what it was like losing her mother slowly to degenerative disease, helping her sister with 3 kids including a newborn after the husband walked out (and thoroughly exemplifying how kids can be incredibly annoying and yet loved) as well as several terrible relationships full of red flags with bad men. This isn't a person who has decided against marriage and kids and is completely satisfied without, it's one who is constantly wishing she had it even though she likes her independence. I think she would jump right into it if she came across a decent guy who was in a similar place in life. Chapter 19 onwards gets inspiring, starting with onslaught of married friends with children starting to open up to her about how much they wish they had her life, and how they are equally torn between loving their families and hating the lives they have. It just shows how no one is sure of their decisions and everyone thinks someone else has made the better decision. She also goes on a roadtrip trailing Laura Ingall's series (loved that callback to my childhood :') and then to Wyoming where she falls in love with the nature there and has a lot of good experiences. I'm not sure I understood whether she plans to go back to there in the end, or if she will stay in Toronto (which she returns to as her mother gets worse). The following of her mothers progression is heart-breaking and reminds me of what happened with my grandmother. And it makes me pray I never have to go through it with my own mother. Overall, this book is very sobering in its portrayal of life. But it's comforting in how it tells you whatever you are doing, you are probably not completely screwing up, and others out there are as envious of you for something as you are of them. And that any life you choose will be filled with good as well as bad. Anyways, this book deserves 5 stars for how well it communicates life as it is and makes you feel so many emotions all at once. Recommend whether you are in anything close to her situation or not.
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  • Kayo
    January 1, 1970
    Why do I think Sex and the City 2.0 , minus the sex. Lol
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Won in the First Reads giveaway.This made me seek out articles by Glynnis MacNicol, I hope she writes more books. I don't know how to review a memoir that I liked by a person I think is really cool. I hope to return to it when I'm 40 (in 13 years, which is strange but not too scary).My only criticism is that she got a detail about Grey Gardens wrong, Little Edie didn't live there for the rest of her life.
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  • Janice
    January 1, 1970
    I very much enjoyed this book of a woman seeking to define herself outside the usual, expected societal parameters. It was insightful, well-written and entertaining.
  • Starr Waddell
    January 1, 1970
    The universe, perhaps, brought this book to me at exactly the moment I needed it. Although my situation is a bit different than the author's, I am in somewhat the same headspace. I'm nearing 40 and coming to terms with that fact that I'll most likely never meet someone that I grow old with. Glynnis' words resonated; I felt her words deep inside my soul. Thank you, Glynnis, for sharing your story. I helped me a lot.
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  • Jordana Horn Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    Just stunning. Beautifully written, and the rare book that only gets better as you read on. I wish we were friends!
  • Robin Bonne
    January 1, 1970
    DNF.
  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Clear-eyed, vulnerable, and open-hearted without being maudlin or navel-gazey. And for me, the perfect combination of the relief of seeing yourself well-defined on a page, and a touchstone for the next decade or so of my life.
  • paige
    January 1, 1970
    The writing speeds along; it's a quick read with many head nodding moments, but by and large I found myself wondering what the book is even about. It seems like the chapters should dovetail chronologically, but I still found the timeline and characters hard to follow. I wonder if it would work better if it were developed into a work of fiction, or if it were presented as a collection of essays.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the memoir quite a bit. I understand it was her real life but the parts with her mother's illness were quite lengthy and I felt detracted a bit from the story. She didn't connect it enough to her situation of becoming comfortable with being 40, unmarried and childless. The end seemed rushed and I didn't quite understand how she was able to just work on a dude ranch for a month when she spent so much time in the book talking about how she had no time to travel and having shoehorn it in I enjoyed the memoir quite a bit. I understand it was her real life but the parts with her mother's illness were quite lengthy and I felt detracted a bit from the story. She didn't connect it enough to her situation of becoming comfortable with being 40, unmarried and childless. The end seemed rushed and I didn't quite understand how she was able to just work on a dude ranch for a month when she spent so much time in the book talking about how she had no time to travel and having shoehorn it in tiny breaks.
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  • Verena
    January 1, 1970
    “I knew I could be alone, but what if I gave myself permission to prefer it? What would that be like?”
  • Karen LeBlanc
    January 1, 1970
    No One Tells You This by Glynnis MacNicol, A Memoir explores the writer’s journey into midlife and a reconciliation with choices she has made. Single and successful and living in New York City, Glynnis MacNicol turns 40 at the start of her memoir and decides to spend it alone on an overnight trip to a nearby beach resort where she is plagued by the question: “If her story doesn’t end with marriage or a child, what then?” Not a feminist manifesto but rather an alternative narrative of modern-day No One Tells You This by Glynnis MacNicol, A Memoir explores the writer’s journey into midlife and a reconciliation with choices she has made. Single and successful and living in New York City, Glynnis MacNicol turns 40 at the start of her memoir and decides to spend it alone on an overnight trip to a nearby beach resort where she is plagued by the question: “If her story doesn’t end with marriage or a child, what then?” Not a feminist manifesto but rather an alternative narrative of modern-day womanhood, Glynnis does some soul searching as a single woman of a certain age, giving a voice to what it’s like swimming against the current of societal norms and cultural expectations. As the reader, I felt like a close friend of Glynnis, a confidant she trusted to lay bare her innermost insecurities, fears, and vulnerabilities. Glynnis doesn’t idealize her age and stage of life but she does reframe a stereotypical way of thinking about middle-age singlehood. Glynnis reminds us all that life is a trade-off and the decisions we make both open doors and close certain paths. I look forward to reading about her next 40 years.
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  • Lady Alexandrine
    January 1, 1970
    *SPOILERS AHEAD*"No One Tells You This" describes an intimate journey of a woman, that had to face her mother’s illness and death and her own loneliness. Glynnis MacNicol viewed her 40th birthday as a disaster. She was single, childless and clueless about what would the future bring. She realised that maybe she would never have children, maybe she would always be alone, without a partner, a man on whose arm she could lean. Where was her happy ending? The author bitterly reflected that there were *SPOILERS AHEAD*"No One Tells You This" describes an intimate journey of a woman, that had to face her mother’s illness and death and her own loneliness. Glynnis MacNicol viewed her 40th birthday as a disaster. She was single, childless and clueless about what would the future bring. She realised that maybe she would never have children, maybe she would always be alone, without a partner, a man on whose arm she could lean. Where was her happy ending? The author bitterly reflected that there were no happy endings as far as she could see. She actively participated and helped her family members and friends – and she realised that their lives were far from perfect. There was no certain happiness in our uncertain world. Even if you were married and had loving children, you could die completely alone. There were no happy endings!The author had an exciting life she had always wanted, she made a successful career in New York, but after the glittering success, she felt burned out, lonely in a big city, pathetic, wasting her time dating unavailable men. So, she embarked on a journey and during her journey she tried to determine her own fate. I liked this book very much. Glynnis MacNicol is extremely likable and her story is extremely readable! She is a girlfriend you would like to meet to talk over a cup of coffee or a glass of wine. This book read like an intimate journal. I had a similar experience when I read diaries of Sylvia Plath. It was hard to enjoy "No One Tells You This" sometimes, because it recorded illness of a loved one, death, loneliness, fears of everyday life. Sometimes it felt like staying a long time underwater. It was interesting to see things from the author’s unique perspective, but after a while my lungs started to kill me and I just wanted to break the surface and take a breath of fresh air. I think the author expects too much from herself. Sadly, women in general seems to be masters of torturing themselves, overanalysing every action, wondering if they are ever going to be good enough. Nowadays, at least some women are free to choose their own fates, to lead lives they want. But, paradoxically, having so many choices makes it difficult to make a choice. And even when women decide then they are hunted by regrets. Personally, I don’t think that something like bad decisions really exist, there are just decisions that make us who we are. My impression after reading this book is that acceptance is important. We all have doubts and regrets, but there is no point in suffering and giving yourself a hard time. Sometimes life is hard and full of pain, but it is no one’s fault and it is not some kind of sign that our life is wasted. What is the author’s conclusion at the end of the book? The readers need to read "No One Tells You This" to understand it. I recommend Glynnis MacNicol's book to every women that ever had any doubts or regrets about her choices. I received "No One Tells You This" from the publisher via NetGalley. I would like to thank the author and the publisher for providing me with the advance reader copy of the book.
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  • Dana Portwood
    January 1, 1970
    What happens when you overthrow cultural norms and decide to live life the way you want to live it? In her memoir No One Tells you this., Glynnis Macnicol challenges the cultural assumptions that women are more "whole" as part of a married couple and as a mother. The year Glynnis turns forty, her mother is dying of Parkinson's disease, most of her friends are married and becoming parents and Glynnis is at the end of a string of unsuccessful and unfulfilling relationships. While I am married, and What happens when you overthrow cultural norms and decide to live life the way you want to live it? In her memoir No One Tells you this., Glynnis Macnicol challenges the cultural assumptions that women are more "whole" as part of a married couple and as a mother. The year Glynnis turns forty, her mother is dying of Parkinson's disease, most of her friends are married and becoming parents and Glynnis is at the end of a string of unsuccessful and unfulfilling relationships. While I am married, and do have children, I was still very much able to relate to the realization that I no longer have "all the time in the world" to do all the things I may have imagined I would do. At 45, my life is in a state of fundamental transition and I found Glynnis' thoughts relatable to anyone who is considering their choices and options in light of their mortality.While Glynnis's musings occasionally become a bit long winded, I appreciate her courage to challenge her response to complicated cultural assumptions and her invitation for her audience to do the same.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    Glynnis offers a sobering glimpse of how much there is more to life than the conventional expectations our society places on us. I look at myself, I turn 32 in September, and I’m a single mother of three and attempting to make life happen. Is my life over? Maybe my life is just finally beginning. I highly recommend this book because it dives deeply into topics and makes you really think how you are living your life. I hold the title itself as truth, No one tells you this, there is more to life o Glynnis offers a sobering glimpse of how much there is more to life than the conventional expectations our society places on us. I look at myself, I turn 32 in September, and I’m a single mother of three and attempting to make life happen. Is my life over? Maybe my life is just finally beginning. I highly recommend this book because it dives deeply into topics and makes you really think how you are living your life. I hold the title itself as truth, No one tells you this, there is more to life out there than the conventional. Bravo & a vast amount of applause @noonetellsyouthis , because of people like you, I can be okay & manage my present and embrace my future. Thanks to people such as yourself and the many other influencers in my life, I can be super stoked about my blog that I’ll be launching, I can laugh & play with my children, and function daily to hold it all together. Thank you Simon & Schuster for the e-copy ARC of this book.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    No One Tells You This is a compelling memoir about a Canadian author who lives in NYC, but grapples with a mother who has Parkinson's and living in a society who still feels that women can't be fulfilled without marriage and family. Parts of the book resonated with me. I am single and have no children and am content with my life. And the author loves Laura Ingalls Wilder as I do. There is one mistake, the author mentions the Homestead Act and states it was passed in 1863 instead of 1862. Thanks No One Tells You This is a compelling memoir about a Canadian author who lives in NYC, but grapples with a mother who has Parkinson's and living in a society who still feels that women can't be fulfilled without marriage and family. Parts of the book resonated with me. I am single and have no children and am content with my life. And the author loves Laura Ingalls Wilder as I do. There is one mistake, the author mentions the Homestead Act and states it was passed in 1863 instead of 1862. Thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5I thought Glynnis MacNicol's No One Tells You This was going to be a narcissistic memoir about how MacNicol's life sucked and how she needs us to know how great she is anyway. It's not that.The parts of it where she discusses being 40 and 'alone' are often the most drab parts. Where MacNicol excels is in her story telling. Her relationship with her mother is absolutely heartbreaking, and it sometimes seems like this book is fiction because MacNicol has so many wild experiences. Perhaps I 3.5/5I thought Glynnis MacNicol's No One Tells You This was going to be a narcissistic memoir about how MacNicol's life sucked and how she needs us to know how great she is anyway. It's not that.The parts of it where she discusses being 40 and 'alone' are often the most drab parts. Where MacNicol excels is in her story telling. Her relationship with her mother is absolutely heartbreaking, and it sometimes seems like this book is fiction because MacNicol has so many wild experiences. Perhaps I am too young to fully appreciate the struggles of a 40 year old, but perhaps that is not the point of the book afte rall.
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    I had never heard of Glynnis MacNicol before, although I was intrigued by the title. I think she is the voice of so many women of a 40 -ish age. Women have become a force in the workplace and are more and although our current political climate seems hell bent on taking away our basic reproductive rights, health care etc. women are fighters, women have their tribes of women who help one another and support each other no matter what. I loved this book! It was funny and fresh and honest.
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  • Morgan Schulman
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest review This book was really depressing, which seemed a bit counter to the author’s intent. She has an off and on obsessive affair with a married man,, with no real empathy for the wife and kids (they do not get a mention), and feels sad when her friends marry and have children, seeing it as a loss for herself as opposed to a time to celebrate others’ joy. While this may be honest, it doesn’t do much to change stereotypes about single I received an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest review This book was really depressing, which seemed a bit counter to the author’s intent. She has an off and on obsessive affair with a married man,, with no real empathy for the wife and kids (they do not get a mention), and feels sad when her friends marry and have children, seeing it as a loss for herself as opposed to a time to celebrate others’ joy. While this may be honest, it doesn’t do much to change stereotypes about single childfree women. She does write well, however.
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