Letting Go of Gravity
Twins Parker and Charlie are polar opposites.Where Charlie is fearless, Parker is careful.Charlie is confident while Parker aims to please.Charlie is outgoing and outspoken; Parker is introverted and reserved.And of course, there’s the one other major difference: Charlie got leukemia. Parker didn’t.But now that Charlie is officially in remission, life couldn’t be going better for Parker. She’s landed a prestigious summer internship at the hospital and is headed to Harvard in the fall to study pediatric oncology—which is why the anxiety she’s felt since her Harvard acceptance is so unsettling. And it doesn’t help that her relationship with Charlie has been on the rocks since his diagnosis.Enter Finn, a boy who’s been leaving strange graffiti messages all over town. Parker can’t stop thinking about those messages, or about Finn, who makes her feel free for the first time: free to doubt, free to make mistakes, and free to confront the truth that Parker has been hiding from for a long time.That she keeps trying to save Charlie, when the person who really needs saving is herself.

Letting Go of Gravity Details

TitleLetting Go of Gravity
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 17th, 2018
PublisherSimon Pulse
ISBN-139781534403161
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Fiction, Realistic Fiction

Letting Go of Gravity Review

  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4.5 StarsParker and her twin bother, Charlie, were once very close, but Charlie's cancer became a wedge, which slowly, but surely, pushed them apart.One of the things I really loved about this book was Leder's exploration of how Charlie's cancer affected the whole family. Because their parents were so consumed with worry for Charlie, Parker took it upon herself to be the perfect child. She kept a low profile and out of trouble, while excelling academically, earning herself a scholarship Rating: 4.5 StarsParker and her twin bother, Charlie, were once very close, but Charlie's cancer became a wedge, which slowly, but surely, pushed them apart.One of the things I really loved about this book was Leder's exploration of how Charlie's cancer affected the whole family. Because their parents were so consumed with worry for Charlie, Parker took it upon herself to be the perfect child. She kept a low profile and out of trouble, while excelling academically, earning herself a scholarship to Harvard and a prestigious summer internship. She thought being "perfect" would alleviate some of her parents' woe, but what it did was increase Parker's anxiety, which eventually manifested as panic attacks.There was a part of me, that really understood Parker's motivation and also her hyper-overprotectiveness of her brother. My father's cancer deeply affected my family. I could relate to the worry and the concern you have for your ailing loved one. Even after he was in remission, I was very aware of anything "unhealthy" he did. We can't help it, because we love that person, and we always carry that fear that they can get sick again. In that respect, I was a lot like Parker.I also empathized with Charlie. It was tough to be around him during the first half of the book. He was in remission for the second time, but he missed a whole year of school. His friends were leaving him behind, and everyone was treating him as if he was still sick. None of them could see beyond his past and his illness, and Charlie was just trying to figure out who he was now.Both Charlie and Parker were trying to decide what they really wanted post cancer. Charlie was being reckless, while Parker was committing to a life she really didn't want to live. Thank goodness they had lots of great people to help them find their way.Even from another continent, Em, Parker's best friend, lent her support. And, Parker also got support from someone, who had been there for her many years ago, Finn. Finn was probably one of my favorite characters in the book. He was trapped in his life by his guilt, accepting less than he deserved, but he was a beacon for Parker. He helped her see that there were endless possibilities for her to explore.Ruby, who initially came off as a Parker-fangirl, ended up being a crucial part of Parker and Charlie's healing. She managed to be the voice of reason, and helped bridge that gap between the twins. She was also so easy to love.This book delivered quite the emotional punch. I was crying quite a bit during the first half of the book. This family was in so much pain, and it dripped off the page. Their pain became my pain. I was so invested in Charlie's health, Parker's well-being, and them finding their way back to each other, that when things started looking up, I found myself elated.I am getting a little choked up thinking about the ending, because I really loved it. It was beautiful and poetic and a little sad, but mostly uplifting.Overall: A wonderful coming of age tale, which packed an emotional punch.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • KristynRene
    January 1, 1970
    Edelweiss granted me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. And honest is what I will offer you.DNF at 1/3 of the book, 1.5/5 Stars.September 5th, 2016 I lost my twin brother in a car wreck. I know what the literal loss of a twin feels like. The ins and outs of grief. I wholly believed this book would give me some sort of affirmation. Instead, this book told the stories of caricature versions of people I couldn’t tolerate reading more about. My twin brother was outgoing and charismatic, very Edelweiss granted me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. And honest is what I will offer you.DNF at 1/3 of the book, 1.5/5 Stars.September 5th, 2016 I lost my twin brother in a car wreck. I know what the literal loss of a twin feels like. The ins and outs of grief. I wholly believed this book would give me some sort of affirmation. Instead, this book told the stories of caricature versions of people I couldn’t tolerate reading more about. My twin brother was outgoing and charismatic, very reckless and we butted heads. I was the introverted, good grades-driven kind of girl who kept to myself and told on my brother all the time. I understood the characters, originally. At the end of the day, this story was kind of insulting to the layers of us under the skin. The real people under those cliche attributes. And here I was, searching this book for something deep. Don’t come here looking for anything thought-provoking or heart-wrenching. I expected some sort of character development from anyone, or even some plot to happen, but I should’ve lowered my expectations. I think maybe a week went by in the timeline and nothing progressive to the story happened at all. The name “Taylor Swift” was repeated so many times I just ended up skipping those paragraphs. Seven? Seven times it was mentioned? Like...Why.What a disaster this book turned out to be.Yes that sounds harsh, but this story and its characters only succeeded in irritating me. Charlie, live your freaking life. Enjoy having a life. Parker, shut the hell up and be your own person for crying out loud. They had unrealistic personalities that made me feel so disconnected from the story, and the opportunities for some serious, deep writing were boiled down to a paragraph, and then promptly skipped over onto something else entirely. This story was all over the place and yet it felt like it’d gone nowhere. Maybe someone somewhere will appreciate this book, but not me. In fact, I’m truly disappointed. I even recommended it to my mom and one of my best friends. Shame. (That was before I read it, because remember: This book hit so damn close to home for me.)There simply wasn’t a single time I felt connected to what was going on. I tried. I pushed the last 10% of my 1/3 and I gave up. There are other books calling my name, enticing me, and I shouldn’t waste my time reading a book I can’t enjoy.
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED IT.
  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted at: bickeringbooks.wordpress.com/2018/07/...Summary: Charlie and Parker are twins that are complete opposites. Charlie is carefree while Parker is anxious. Charlie is the popular life of the party while Parker is the studious valedictorian. Charlie had leukemia and Parker was healthy. Charlie’s illness shaped Parker’s childhood and helped her decide on a future. Parker was going to get into Harvard and become a doctor to save sick kids just like her brother. But now that is Cha Originally posted at: bickeringbooks.wordpress.com/2018/07/...Summary: Charlie and Parker are twins that are complete opposites. Charlie is carefree while Parker is anxious. Charlie is the popular life of the party while Parker is the studious valedictorian. Charlie had leukemia and Parker was healthy. Charlie’s illness shaped Parker’s childhood and helped her decide on a future. Parker was going to get into Harvard and become a doctor to save sick kids just like her brother. But now that is Charlie’s healthy Parker is no longer sure she can follow the path she designed as a fearful second grader. Complicating Parker’s life is the reappearance of Finn a boy that had once been her best friend but who now may be much more. Parker has just one summer to over come her anxiety and discover her real destiny.Review: I have a soft spot for summer after high school books so I was very excited when I found this book on Edelweiss. The story is simple and familiar. Parker has spent her life following a pre-designed path that no longer feels right so she will spend the last real summer of her childhood trying to figure everything out. There is nothing really groundbreaking about “Letting Go of Gravity” but it’s still surprisingly readable. Parker and Charlie’s childhood traumas and their lasting effects easier draw the reader into their story as does Parker’s history with the mysteries Finn. The book is a story of growing up that feels relatable to anyone who ever misstepped while trying to plan their future. Parker’s anxiety and confusion is something with which most readers will be able to relate as are clashes in the sibling relationship between Parker and Charlie. The book is emotional and believable and is sure to please fans of Sarah Dessen and Morgan Matson.I received an eARC of this book through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Parker McCullough has just graduated as valedictorian of her class, but the moment is bittersweet. Instead of her twin brother, Charlie, sitting with the rest of their graduating class he is nowhere to be seen. It is a bittersweet day for him as well, as all of his friends and his sister are moving on with their lives, but he will remain in high school after having to skip his senior year to fight leukemia once more. The twin’s relationship has struggled for quite some time, never fully recoveri Parker McCullough has just graduated as valedictorian of her class, but the moment is bittersweet. Instead of her twin brother, Charlie, sitting with the rest of their graduating class he is nowhere to be seen. It is a bittersweet day for him as well, as all of his friends and his sister are moving on with their lives, but he will remain in high school after having to skip his senior year to fight leukemia once more. The twin’s relationship has struggled for quite some time, never fully recovering from his first bout with cancer, but only went downhill when it finally came back right before Senior year. Parker has always been the overachiever, always been the tightly-wound anxiety type trying to please her parents, to make them happy. Mostly, since Charlie’s first bout of Leukemia when they were 9. One day she told her parents that she wanted to be a doctor so that she could save Charlie, and ever since that day her life had become about saving her brother. Charlie isn’t sure how to handle life after remission, and Parker isn’t sure how to handle living a life she doesn’t really want. Sure, she worked her butt off to get into Harvard, earned those scholarships as well as that prestigious internship at Children’s Hospital Cincinnati, but being at the internship makes her sick, as does the thought of being a doctor. But she can’t tell her folks because they are so proud of her. To most people, all of her dreams are coming true. But it is only her best friend, Emerson, and her brother Charlie, who truly see her pain and anxiety as she presents her “I want to be a doctor” façade to the world. Em is going away this summer though, backpacking around Europe with her cousin, Matty, who is Charlie’s best friend. Em brings up the internship, the whole doctor thing, when she has to pick Parker up from her internship on the first day because she had a panic attack (though she doesn’t call it this yet. They are just “her nerves”) and was too ill to stay. Parker doesn’t want to hear that it’s the wrong call. Besides, what would it do to her parents? They are so proud of her, particularly her father who has already begun calling her Dr. McCullough, a nickname she hates, but she knows he loves it more than she hates it. So it stays, just like everything else in her life. She doesn’t yet see that she is living her life for other people. One day she meets Ruby Collie, a soon to be junior in high school and person of color, who wants to be Parker when she grows up. She truly wants to be a doctor and, like everyone in town, is aware of how well Parker has done and is looking for some tips on how to be awesome. Parker doesn’t know what to say as she genuinely hates her life right now and isn’t in a great headspace. But in this encounter comes a blast from the past: Finn Casper. Finn was a childhood friend and boy from the wrong side of the tracks. Talking to Finn makes her brave enough to do what she wants, so she leaves the internship and starts working at the pottery studio where she gets interested in art therapy from the elderly outreach program the studio has. Over the course of the summer Parker soon finds out who she is and what she wants, and soon, so does everyone else.So, what’s great about this book? The answer: so much. Leder makes lifelike characters who are perfectly imperfect and who each face their own challenges. These is never an impression of one person’s challenge being of greater importance/value than anyone else’s whether it is physical abuse, fighting cancer, or fighting yourself. As this book illustrates it can be hard to let go, especially when you have been hanging on for dear life for so long. But sometimes the bravest and best thing you can do for everyone, is to let go and see what happens. This book is perfect for readers who love and appreciate a good coming-of-age story, a romance that doesn’t have a perfect happy ending because the story is too lifelike, and when one character isn’t saved by another, but that they all end up saving each other.
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  • Brooke
    January 1, 1970
    There are some books that are fun. Then, there are some books you need.I needed this book.I got the ARC at YALLWest in the hurried frenzy that is "idk that cover looks nice" and "I don't know what I'm in line for except that it's a book," which means I went into this with no preconceived notions except for a love of the title and the knowledge it was about twins and cancer and I hoped it wasn't another TFIOS. It's not. This isn't a cancer story. It's not even a "this isn't a cancer story it's my There are some books that are fun. Then, there are some books you need.I needed this book.I got the ARC at YALLWest in the hurried frenzy that is "idk that cover looks nice" and "I don't know what I'm in line for except that it's a book," which means I went into this with no preconceived notions except for a love of the title and the knowledge it was about twins and cancer and I hoped it wasn't another TFIOS. It's not. This isn't a cancer story. It's not even a "this isn't a cancer story it's my story and I have cancer" story. It's a story about finding what you want to be, when the world keeps trying to tell you the answer. Charlie and Parker are twins. Charlie got cancer, Parker did not. Charlie's had to take a year off of school, so he's missed graduating with his class. Parker is valedictorian and set to leave for Harvard in the fall, to become a doctor.I'm five years older than Parker and finally reaching the same crossroads. Do you continue with what's expected of you, or do you follow what you're heart's telling you? What is conventional success if it isn't what will make you happy? Without giving anything away, this book is the perfect book for anyone looking for their place in the world.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was a fast yet meh read. I don't think I wanted to read this in the first place but I did and I don't regret it, I just didn't enjoy it.
  • Rayna
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Simon & Schuster Canada for sending me this ARC, which I won in a Goodreads giveaway!So so good. I finished this in two late nights of reading because I just couldn't put it down. There were so many life issues and feelings packed into this book, and they were all written in such a lovely way. The plot chugged along so smoothly and it seemed like I was living alongside these amazing characters. I felt like I was punched in the gut multiple times and was definitely hit in the chest Thanks to Simon & Schuster Canada for sending me this ARC, which I won in a Goodreads giveaway!So so good. I finished this in two late nights of reading because I just couldn't put it down. There were so many life issues and feelings packed into this book, and they were all written in such a lovely way. The plot chugged along so smoothly and it seemed like I was living alongside these amazing characters. I felt like I was punched in the gut multiple times and was definitely hit in the chest with a cannonball of feels at one point. I was at times mad, sympathetic, regretful, sad, furious, empathetic, and very happy. (A sure sign that this book means something.) This book was truly a sum of its parts - it was a story of a young woman who had to find herself and learn to accept who she really was, but it was also so much more.Parker was confused for so long, even if she appeared to have everything in her life perfectly together from the outside. I could really have used Parker's story a few years ago when I was doubting who I wanted to be. My whole life had been dedicated to achieving one goal, and once it got closer to being obtainable, I wasn't so sure anymore. Reading about Parker's struggles made me realize how right I was to stick with my plan, but man, I sure could have used this reassurance back then. Parker felt so real: she made some really bad decisions, was uncertain and lost, was both a good and a bad friend, hid important news from her parents, found something she was passionate about, and (best of all) started to discover herself and live the life she truly wanted.Charlie, her twin, was described as her polar opposite, but they had more in common than they would like to admit. This seemed to be the cause of some of their fighting and what distanced them so much. The pain and anger of both Parker and Charlie was super well done and jumped off the page. Finn's emotions were spot on as well - he was the character I felt for the most because his situation straight up sucked and he seemed like such a genuine guy. He was such a complex character who had to make some really difficult decisions while trying to make the best out of life. This book made me tear up multiple times, but it was Finn near the end that made me truly cry...Ruby also had her own battles to fight, even if they weren't as significant or life-changing as those of the other three main characters. This was a great reminder that everyone has struggles and demons to fight. She was a great friend to Parker and provided some great comic relief.The old ladies were a hoot, and the struggles of aging were handled in such a cool way through them. They were also used to show Parker what a meaningful life could look like, as these ladies liked to reminisce about what they did when they were younger. They added a lot to the plot and to the direction that Parker chose to take her life.Difficult decision making, self-doubt, trying to understand relationships, inner and outer turmoil, anxiety - these were all things that Parker had to deal with and overcome. She was never truly alone (even if she felt like it sometimes) and she had the support of many great people who cared about her in the end. Her journey to who she wanted to be was like a crazy roller coaster ride - but wow, it sure did make for a great read.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 "What would it be like to do something not because you had to, but just because you wanted to?"Letting Go of Gravity starts with a story of a gravity girl and a helium girl that grandma used to tell twins Charlie McCullough and Parker McCullough. This story represented Charlie who wants to fly and Parker who won't let go.Parker is Harvard bound and she's the valedictorian of her class. After learning Charlie has Leukemia, Parker wants to be a pediatric oncologist. She has a prestigious inter 4.5 "What would it be like to do something not because you had to, but just because you wanted to?"Letting Go of Gravity starts with a story of a gravity girl and a helium girl that grandma used to tell twins Charlie McCullough and Parker McCullough. This story represented Charlie who wants to fly and Parker who won't let go.Parker is Harvard bound and she's the valedictorian of her class. After learning Charlie has Leukemia, Parker wants to be a pediatric oncologist. She has a prestigious internship for the summer at a local hospital. Charlie, on the other hand, has to repeat senior year again due to missing school when he was in the hospital for Leukemia. He is currently in remission. However, the sibling relationship between Charlie and Parker has been strained ever since the twins started arguing over everything.Meg Leder gives a glimpse how a serious illness can impact loved ones. Parker is scared bout Charlie getting sick again and possibly dying. There are a couple of scenes in the book where Parker has a panic attack about whether she can handle what life throws at her. Fortunately, her best friend Em always supports here and is always there for her. When Em moves to college, Parker befriends Ruby Collie from Float and reconnects former childhood classmate Finn Casper.I found it refreshing when Parker decides not to attend her internship. Just because she is the valedictorian, she is far from perfect. She can make mistakes or change her mind about stuff and her anxiety takes a form of its own. When she doesn't want to be a doctor anymore, it wasn't until she talks to Finn that she decides she needs to follow her heart. She decides to take Finn's suggestion and applies to a job at Trina's Ceramics. Parker can finally breathe and it feels like a weight is lifted off her shoulders at her new job. Creativity runs in Parker's veins even if she doesn't know it. Finn finds solace in street art as he paints amazing messages around the city. Parker and Finn starts to connect with what makes them happy.Leder writes with sincerity. Her book is realistic and she knows how teens think to how they act to what they say. The pressure that society has on them can be unbearable and sometimes it's hard to convey what they think and feel to adults. Parker finds meaningful friendships with Ruby and Finn. She needs friends who knows what she was going through. By the end of the book, Parker finds her wings to fly!Although the novel is fairly long for a contemporary, Letting Go of Gravity is emotionally gripping and relatable. The novel addresses how someone copes with a loved one being ill, how to manage anxiety and how one gains the strength to be honest not only with themselves but with the world. If you enjoy reading books such as The Museum of Heartbreak, The Start of Me and You and Emmy & Oliver, you will love Letting Go of Gravity.
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  • Jenni Frencham
    January 1, 1970
    Leder, Meg. Letting Go of Gravity. Simon Pulse, 2018.Charlie and Parker are twins, but that's where their similarities end. Charlie has had leukemia twice and is now in remission, although he has one more year of high school to finish. Parker has just graduated first in her class, has an elite internship at the local hospital, and is headed to Harvard where she will be studying to be a pediatric oncologist. As Charlie and Parker clash throughout one summer, each must confront what others expect Leder, Meg. Letting Go of Gravity. Simon Pulse, 2018.Charlie and Parker are twins, but that's where their similarities end. Charlie has had leukemia twice and is now in remission, although he has one more year of high school to finish. Parker has just graduated first in her class, has an elite internship at the local hospital, and is headed to Harvard where she will be studying to be a pediatric oncologist. As Charlie and Parker clash throughout one summer, each must confront what others expect of them and what they actually want.Even though Parker is really the main character of this story, she is not the only well-rounded character. Many of the characters are fully three-dimensional, flawed, and real. This isn't a book that is action-packed or compelling reading, but it is a thoughtful character study of what happens to the siblings of people who have serious illnesses. Parker and Charlie's entire family had to make sacrifices for Charlie, but it takes a summer of lying to her parents for Parker to realize the truth about herself and what she really wants. Recommended.Recommended for: teensRed Flags: language, underage drinking and drug use, domestic violenceOverall Rating: 4/5 starsRead-Alikes: You'll Miss Me When I'm Gone, All the Bright Places, My Sister's KeeperI received a complimentary copy of this book through Netgalley for the purpose of review.
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  • Teenreadsdotcom
    January 1, 1970
    When Parker graduates, she should be celebrating. As the Valedictorian who is heading to Harvard, her cautious, hardworking attitude seems to have paid off. More important than all that, however, is the fact that her twin brother, Charlie, is finally in remission after suffering from leukemia twice in the last 18 years. But even though Charlie’s cancer is gone, he’s still struggling to reconnect with his family and himself, severing the ties between him and Parker that she used to rely on. While When Parker graduates, she should be celebrating. As the Valedictorian who is heading to Harvard, her cautious, hardworking attitude seems to have paid off. More important than all that, however, is the fact that her twin brother, Charlie, is finally in remission after suffering from leukemia twice in the last 18 years. But even though Charlie’s cancer is gone, he’s still struggling to reconnect with his family and himself, severing the ties between him and Parker that she used to rely on. While their differences seemed to complement each other when they were younger, two halves of a whole, now they seem to create an insurmountable divide between Parker and Charlie --- a divide that seems to be growing. As Parker becomes more cautious, Charlie finds more ways to push himself to the limit and break the rules. Navigating the summer before college while fighting her own internal struggles and clashing with her brother, Parker meets new individuals who help her to reexamine herself, and her choices, before they have real consequences.In LETTING GO OF GRAVITY, Meg Leder tackles serious and relatable issues from the perspective of a teenager on the brink of adulthood. One of the most applicable struggles that Parker faces is the feeling of pressure to succeed, to live up to unstated expectations. Although she thinks she knows where she wants her life to go, she starts to question the decisions she’s made, a conflict that will resonate with many teens, and one that conveys powerful and important themes to the reader --- plans aren’t carved in marble like they’re often expected to be, and they don’t have to be treated like they are. Additionally, Leder’s novel also highlights the struggles of battling a serious illness, including the emotional baggage that lingers even after the disease subsides, and the story also expands to focus on the aftermath for a family as well, examining the problems that still remain after the temporary celebration subsides.Layered among these serious topics, however, Leder includes thoroughly enjoyable secondary characters that distinguish the novel from similar stories. Parker’s interactions with some of the elderly individuals in her community add a lighthearted note to the story --- and plenty of humorous drama! The other teens in Leder’s novel surrounding Parker and Charlie are also entertaining and sincere, and provide openings for Leder to discuss additional issues including mental health and dysfunctional families. The minor characters of the story may be more appealing to readers than the main characters; although Parker deals with relatable issues, her character lacks the nuance that would make her more compelling and realistic. Sometimes her growth as a character feels forced, enhanced by strong symbolism and metaphors, lacking the subtlety of the maturation of the minor characters.For all of its focus on important issues, however, LETTING GO OF GRAVITY struggles in its pacing at times, particularly the ending --- the resolution happens too quickly in comparison to the rest of the book and still leaves some issues unresolved. This makes the ending of the story less satisfying than if the conflicts had been settled more slowly and fully. As a whole, LETTING GO OF GRAVITY explores relevant, important issues, punctuated by lighthearted moments that elevate the mood of the story. The novel will resonate with teens who enjoy stories with imperfect protagonists, family relationships, and a touch of romance. For anyone looking for a story of self-discovery, Meg Leder’s LETTING GO OF GRAVITY provides a look at a vulnerable teen on the brink of adulthood.Reviewed by Rachel R., Teen Board Member
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Simon Pulse for sending me a finished copy of Letting Go of Gravity to review.Parker and Charlie are twins but they aren't as close as they use to be. Parker is graduating high school as valedictorian and has been accepted into Harvard where she will attend and become a doctor. Charlie got cancer and won't be graduating with Parker and that's why they aren't as close. But while he is now in remission and doing his own thing, Parker has an internship this summer at the hospital but on h Thank you Simon Pulse for sending me a finished copy of Letting Go of Gravity to review.Parker and Charlie are twins but they aren't as close as they use to be. Parker is graduating high school as valedictorian and has been accepted into Harvard where she will attend and become a doctor. Charlie got cancer and won't be graduating with Parker and that's why they aren't as close. But while he is now in remission and doing his own thing, Parker has an internship this summer at the hospital but on her first day she has a panic attack. Now Parker must fight her own demons and determine if being a doctor is really what she wants.I read Meg Leder's book The Museum of Heartbreak about two years ago and I loved it. It had a great story and a cute romance and that's why I was excited to read another one of her books. And while I did enjoy this one, it wasn't my favorite. First of all, it's 420 pages and I feel that it is way too long to tell the story that it tells. A lot of the time, nothing was happening. Or at least, nothing significant. I think this book could have been a lot shorter and still got its point across. Parker is a really smart girl who is so certain of what she wants but others can see that it's not what she wants. But she won't admit it. I can't really relate to Parker at all but I think she was a really great character to read from. She is a high school graduate and yet she runs to her parents to tattle-tale on her brother Charlie, all the time. I was really annoyed that she kept doing that and I could see why Charlie was always so upset with her even though Parker acted like she had no idea why he was mad. Charlie is very outgoing but he says some pretty awful things to Parker. About 3/4 through the book, he completely changes though and I have no idea where it came from. He went from absolutely wanting nothing to do with Parker to hanging out with her all the time. While it was nice to see them reconnect and still don't really understand what changed his mind.I found it a little unbelievable that while Parker was having panic attacks, she had no idea what was happening to her body. She wants to become a doctor and she knows a lot already and it's just hard to believe she didn't know what her own body was doing. The message of the story which is actually the title, Letting Go of Gravity, was so interesting and I loved the metaphor that Leder used with the gravity and helium people. It was really creative and different and I enjoyed that a lot.This book is out today, so if it sounds like something you might enjoy, make sure to pick up a copy. I would recommend it because I did enjoy it but just be prepared for a long book with some slow chapters.
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  • Shannon Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    This book is like a warm hug for your heart. I was lucky enough to get my hands on an advance reader's copy and I am so glad I did.Letting Go of Gravity is a sweet, emotional read about a high-achieving but anxious girl named Parker and her twin brother Charlie, who has been battling cancer on and off throughout their childhoods and into high school. Now, because of his illness, Charlie is graduating a year late and Parker is heading off to college without him. But the pressure of Harvard, a hig This book is like a warm hug for your heart. I was lucky enough to get my hands on an advance reader's copy and I am so glad I did.Letting Go of Gravity is a sweet, emotional read about a high-achieving but anxious girl named Parker and her twin brother Charlie, who has been battling cancer on and off throughout their childhoods and into high school. Now, because of his illness, Charlie is graduating a year late and Parker is heading off to college without him. But the pressure of Harvard, a high-stakes internship, and her parents' expectations is weighing on Parker, and Charlie's illness has created strain between them that's starting to boil over. Meanwhile, Parker makes new friends, reunites with an old crush, and starts a new summer job, and she discovers a lot about herself, Charlie, family, and growing up along the way.I loved this book. Letting Go of Gravity paints an all-too-relatable portrait of a girl who's taking on too much and losing sight of what she really wants, something I think a lot of high-achieving high schoolers can relate to. It also has a ton of awesome and incredibly accurate Midwest atmosphere, a sweet love story that feels very real, and a great family dynamic.What I loved most, though, was the incredibly heart-wrenching and insightful way this book explored sibling relationships and especially brother-sister relationships. I have two brothers myself, and that bond is so unique - a blend of fierce loyalty and teamwork and best-friendship, but also rivalry and tension and growing pains. It's a complicated and singular thing, and the relationship between Parker and Charlie in this book is one of the best examples I've read of just how horrible and completely wonderful having a brother and and being a sister can be.I recommend this book to fans of John Green, Becky Albertalli, and Rainbow Rowell, as well as anyone looking for a sweet story about discovering yourself and setting aside your fears.
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  • Holly Brumback
    January 1, 1970
    I liked Letting Go of Gravity right from the start. I was definitely hooked with the story that Parker was told by her grandmother.It's true while you want Parker to realize who she is on her own, at the same time, you kind of want to sit down with her and have a heart-to-heart talk to push her in the right direction. Luckily, the supporting cast (Ruby, Trina, retirement home ladies, and Finn) really make the book. They each serve a purpose in Parker's life to get her to where she needs to be. I I liked Letting Go of Gravity right from the start. I was definitely hooked with the story that Parker was told by her grandmother.It's true while you want Parker to realize who she is on her own, at the same time, you kind of want to sit down with her and have a heart-to-heart talk to push her in the right direction. Luckily, the supporting cast (Ruby, Trina, retirement home ladies, and Finn) really make the book. They each serve a purpose in Parker's life to get her to where she needs to be. It's a great story about realizing who you actually are and not who you think you should be.You should definitely pick up this book up!Thank you to Netgalley & Simon and Schuster Children's Publishing for a copy of this book!
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    Rounded up from 3.5.Having grown up as a twin, I was fascinated by the description of this book. There is a point when you find that your twin cannot be your everything. Parker and Charlie get an extra nudge from the cancer diagnosis Charlie has to deal with. The whole struggle with the twin separation and the aftermath of cancer treatment make this a very heavy book. There were moments I loved in the book, but so much distress and angst -- some of which drag the story down unnecessarily. I espe Rounded up from 3.5.Having grown up as a twin, I was fascinated by the description of this book. There is a point when you find that your twin cannot be your everything. Parker and Charlie get an extra nudge from the cancer diagnosis Charlie has to deal with. The whole struggle with the twin separation and the aftermath of cancer treatment make this a very heavy book. There were moments I loved in the book, but so much distress and angst -- some of which drag the story down unnecessarily. I especially enjoyed the moments with the elderly women in the pottery store and Finn's graffiti.I received a digital ARC of this book from Simon Pulse and Edelweiss.
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  • Ema
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC at Y’allfest 2017!I spent most of this book very frustrated. Parker, to me, was an idiot who was so determined to see things her way that I found it hard to care about her. Ruby is my favorite character, in fact. But by the end, I liked Parker a lot better. She grew, and that’s what we want out of our stories, isn’t it?I caught a few typos when reading, but as the version I have is so early it doesn’t have a cover, that’s not surprising. I’d recommend it, for sure!
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Grade: CAn e-galley was provided by Simon & Schuster in exchange for an honest review.The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: I love a good quiet contemporary, but unfortunately, Letting Go of Gravity was missing that extra oomph.Almost everything about Letting Go of Gravity was a formula for excellence, but I found myself not connecting with the characters or narrative as the story progressed. Parker's ambition was explored wonderfully, and I appreciated the facets to her personality (that ambitio Grade: CAn e-galley was provided by Simon & Schuster in exchange for an honest review.The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: I love a good quiet contemporary, but unfortunately, Letting Go of Gravity was missing that extra oomph.Almost everything about Letting Go of Gravity was a formula for excellence, but I found myself not connecting with the characters or narrative as the story progressed. Parker's ambition was explored wonderfully, and I appreciated the facets to her personality (that ambitious people can also be kind and creative and don't always get things right the first time). Side character-wise, Em and Matty worked well, but I really loved Ruby. She's so earnest and sweet and teenagery in the best way. The scenes at the ceramics shop were great and brought out plenty of color.I wasn't into Finn, though. He felt too much like the typical YA bad boy love interest (plus, so many YA boys are into graffiti and I'm over it). There's this whole scene where Parker brings him home, and he sleeps on the couch, and when her parents find him in the morning, the writing felt so cliched and forced. It felt like something out of a fanfic, not an actual novel. One more little note - I loved Parker's constant references to Taylor Swift. She is a girl after my own heart, in that respect.Content warning: Plenty of foul language. Also some violence (boxing and fights outside of that) and underage drinking. There's also talk of cancer and death.The Verdict: Eh, it was okay. I think this was too long for the story it was trying to tell, though.
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  • Tammy T
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. There is so much about who we think we should be to please others, and who we are. Figuring it out is half the story. The other half is figuring out how we deal with others and redefining what we mean to one another. It's a beautiful story.
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  • Jessica Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon!
  • Chayse Sundt
    January 1, 1970
    DNF'd
  • Lori Inness
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book very much. A real heartwarming page turner.
  • mays fk
    January 1, 1970
    I want to read this 💔
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