The Myth of Perpetual Summer
From the national bestselling author of Whistling Past the Graveyard comes a moving coming-of-age tale set in the tumultuous sixties that harkens to both Ordinary Grace and The Secret Life of Bees.Tallulah James’s parents’ volatile relationship, erratic behavior, and hands-off approach to child rearing set tongues to wagging in their staid Mississippi town, complicating her already uncertain life. She takes the responsibility of shielding her family’s reputation and raising her younger twin siblings onto her youthful shoulders. If not for the emotional constants of her older brother, Griff, and her old guard Southern grandmother, she would be lost. When betrayal and death arrive hand in hand, she takes to the road, headed to what turns out to be the not-so-promised land of Southern California. The dysfunction of her childhood still echoes throughout her scattered family, sending her brother on a disastrous path and drawing her home again. There she uncovers the secrets and lies that set her family on the road to destruction.

The Myth of Perpetual Summer Details

TitleThe Myth of Perpetual Summer
Author
ReleaseJun 19th, 2018
PublisherGallery Books
ISBN-139781501172014
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

The Myth of Perpetual Summer Review

  • Karen White
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love, LOVE this book! Susan Crandall is a master at delving into family dysfunction and the human psyche. Highly recommend.
  • Sharlene
    January 1, 1970
    Truly could not put this one down. A deep look into the lives of a troubled family with past secrets keep coming back to haunt them. Memorable characters and a setting so realistically described that I could feel the heat of the summer days. The perfect book for the beach, pool, or comfortable chair at home.
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Susan Crandall's latest novel is a coming of age story set in the sixties, following the James family through small town gossip and dangerous accusations.  Tallulah James's parents have a passionate but unpredictable relationship that often takes precedence over their children.  Her father suffers from erratic behavior and whispers around town suggests he inherited this trait from his uncle George who disappeared years ago and has since been erased from the family.  Her mother's parenting could Susan Crandall's latest novel is a coming of age story set in the sixties, following the James family through small town gossip and dangerous accusations.  Tallulah James's parents have a passionate but unpredictable relationship that often takes precedence over their children.  Her father suffers from erratic behavior and whispers around town suggests he inherited this trait from his uncle George who disappeared years ago and has since been erased from the family.  Her mother's parenting could be construed as raising "free range" children but her obvious lack of apathy leaves Tallulah responsible for her younger siblings, twins Dharma and Walden.  The only stability in her life seems to come from her grandmother and older brother Griffin.When Griffin is accused of a violent crime, the family begins to crumble under the weight of rumors and soon another tragedy breaks the tenuous bond that held them together.Tallulah leaves behind the wake of tragedy in Lamoyne, Mississippi for sunny California and its myth of perpetual summer.  The emotional scars from her parent's dysfunctional relationship carries in to her own relationships in the years that she's gone but she manages to create a life for herself without any contact with her family who has no idea where she is.  Several years after she left them behind, she's called home when younger brother Walden is accused of murder.After arriving back in Lamoyne, Tallulah realizes the lives she imagined for the people she left behind didn't follow the courses she expected.  She relies on her brother Griffin's best friend Ross to fill in the parts of the story she's missed in an attempt to figure out what has gone wrong and to save Walden from a certain fate in a culture still reeling from the Manson cult.The Myth of Perpetual Summer is the tale of a young woman carrying a burden of memories of her dysfunctional family and the mental illness that was never allowed to be discussed or confronted.  Major events of the time, including civil rights most notably, provide an undercurrent of emotion and affect Tallulah in several ways throughout the novel.Thanks to Gallery Books and NetGalley for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review.  The Myth of Perpetual Summer is scheduled for release on June 19, 2018.For full reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Paul Pessolano
    January 1, 1970
    “The Myth of Perpetual Summer” by Susan Crandall, published by Gallery Books.Category – Fiction/Literature Publication Date – June 19, 2018.I fell in love with Susan Crandall’s writing when I read “Whistling Past the Graveyard” and she certainly doesn’t disappoint one in her newest novel, in fact, I thought it was even better.The story is based in the tumultuous 1960’s when everything seemed to be changing. Life styles, beliefs, Vietnam, and the family were going through an upheaval.In rural Mis “The Myth of Perpetual Summer” by Susan Crandall, published by Gallery Books.Category – Fiction/Literature Publication Date – June 19, 2018.I fell in love with Susan Crandall’s writing when I read “Whistling Past the Graveyard” and she certainly doesn’t disappoint one in her newest novel, in fact, I thought it was even better.The story is based in the tumultuous 1960’s when everything seemed to be changing. Life styles, beliefs, Vietnam, and the family were going through an upheaval.In rural Mississippi, Tallulah James is growing up. She is faced with the problems of youth, parents that don’t parent, and dark secrets in the family that are held tight by her grandmother.The story follows Tallulah through her informative years until she can stand her family and their secrets any longer and hitch-hikes to California to start a new life. She gets involved in a relationship that goes sour and finds herself heading back home when one of her brothers becomes involved in a cult and has been imprisoned.It is these circumstances that the family secrets are revealed and she finds true love right under her feet.A wonderful piece that incorporates not only a great story, but a microcosm of a time that many would like to forget. A must read for anyone who enjoys stories about the South, family, and secrets.
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  • Authentikate
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoy Crandall’s previous work but struggled to find as much passion in this work. The Myth Of Perpetual Summer follows a young woman named Tallulah as she comes of age during a tumultuous time in history (civil rights) and an even more difficult time for her personally. As she grows she has to come to terms with her past, specifically, her highly dysfunctional family history, a violent crime that touches her family, and abuse. The book had all the ingredients but for this reader it jus I really enjoy Crandall’s previous work but struggled to find as much passion in this work. The Myth Of Perpetual Summer follows a young woman named Tallulah as she comes of age during a tumultuous time in history (civil rights) and an even more difficult time for her personally. As she grows she has to come to terms with her past, specifically, her highly dysfunctional family history, a violent crime that touches her family, and abuse. The book had all the ingredients but for this reader it just fell short. Thanks to netgalley and publisher for arc in exchange for my honest take.
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  • Wendy Wax
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book! Susan Crandall had me on page one and never let go. A complex, beautifully written journey of survival and self discovery.
  • Michelle Arredondo
    January 1, 1970
    I am always in pure bliss when I come across great Historical Fiction. The Myth of Perpetual Summer by author Susan Crandall has been such a delight to read. So many feels for everything about this book...historical fiction, a coming of age tale, topics touching on family dysfunction, dark secrets that keep resurfacing, the choices we make and the effects of those choices, heart break and scandal....it's such an expansive story of the James family and all the drama that surrounds them and their I am always in pure bliss when I come across great Historical Fiction. The Myth of Perpetual Summer by author Susan Crandall has been such a delight to read. So many feels for everything about this book...historical fiction, a coming of age tale, topics touching on family dysfunction, dark secrets that keep resurfacing, the choices we make and the effects of those choices, heart break and scandal....it's such an expansive story of the James family and all the drama that surrounds them and their lives. Set in the 60's in a small southern town....Mississippi. Atmospheric...the writing style is so elegant...so rich...so full of striking facets of the time and the people. I can feel it...feel every moment of every part of that story. Drawn into the characters and their lives. So much detail...but not so much that the writing style is bogged down in any way. I read...and enjoyed it so much that I didn't realize that the story was coming to an end. Where did the time go??!!It's a quick read to get through but not to say that it was an easy read. It's quick because it has a wonderful flow...because it is so interesting...it's hard to put the book down. Grab a glass of iced tea...sit in air conditioning....enjoy a well crafted read. I received this book for free thanks to the publishers. I read this book enjoyably. I am voluntarily reviewing this book as honestly as I can.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy nothing more than a good book about the south and this was one of those books. It was about the south, about dysfunctional families, took place in the 60s. There was a little mystery, a little romance and wonderful characters to love so it was a perfect book to curl up with on a long summer evening.Tallulah left home at 16 to try to find a more stable life. She hitchhiked to California to start over and never let anyone at home know where she was. When she heard that her brother was in j I enjoy nothing more than a good book about the south and this was one of those books. It was about the south, about dysfunctional families, took place in the 60s. There was a little mystery, a little romance and wonderful characters to love so it was a perfect book to curl up with on a long summer evening.Tallulah left home at 16 to try to find a more stable life. She hitchhiked to California to start over and never let anyone at home know where she was. When she heard that her brother was in jail for murder, she immediately returned to Mississippi to try to help him. What she finds after 9 years away is that her family is torn apart and the town is still holding a grudge against them. The story is told during Tallulah's growing up years, when her parents basically ignored their children and left them to take care of themselves, to her grown up years when she tries to find out the real truth about her family and how the secrets and lies destroyed her family.This was a wonderful book about family and the secrets that keep them apart. It asks the question whether love can stop the destruction of the family and bring them all together again.Thanks to Bookish Firsts for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    I was disappointed with this novel after reading Whistling Past the Graveyard. The James family has a history in the south during the 1960’s. The James family parents are so focused on themselves that they leave their children to fend for themselves. I just could never like any of the characters, and did not care what happened to them. I appreciate the publisher and NetGalley for allowing me to be an early reader in exchange for my fair and honest review.
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  • David V.
    January 1, 1970
    Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 4-6-18. Finished 4-9-18. Excellent story of a Southern family; their dysfunctions; their secrets and their triumphs. Ms. Crandall has again produced a book that you can't put down. Characters galore--ones you admire, some you intensely dislike, ones you feel sorry for, and others you cheer for---all tied up in a compelling story that you don't want to end. The coming-of age of the storyteller is truly amazing!
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  • Julie Failla Earhart
    January 1, 1970
    Not long ago I wrote a review for Joanne Bischof’s Sons of Blackbird Mountain. I call it the first “must read” of 2018. Well, I just found the second “must read” of the year, The Myth of Perpetual Summer, and probably the best beach read I’ve ever come across. To quote the back cover, “A struggling girl uncovers her family’s history and sees how the lies of the past echo throughout their dysfunctional lives today.”It sounds cliché to say that this novel about family and the secrets they harbor i Not long ago I wrote a review for Joanne Bischof’s Sons of Blackbird Mountain. I call it the first “must read” of 2018. Well, I just found the second “must read” of the year, The Myth of Perpetual Summer, and probably the best beach read I’ve ever come across. To quote the back cover, “A struggling girl uncovers her family’s history and sees how the lies of the past echo throughout their dysfunctional lives today.”It sounds cliché to say that this novel about family and the secrets they harbor is haunting, powerful and beautifully writer, but those are the best words to describe this story. It’s Southern gothic at it’s finest.The story starts in August 1972 in San Francisco. Tallulah James has just learned that her brother, Walden, had been arrested for murder in New Orleans. Readers may think this is going to be about Walden, but it’s really about Tallulah. All she knows is that she must get home to him, a home that she left nine years ago and has not been in contact with her family since. The story revolves around Tallaluah’s growing up in Lamoyne, Mississippi with her two brothers, sister, parents, and grandmother. Chapter Two shifts back to 1958 Lamoyne. Her parents are largely absent, and she feels the weight of raising her twin younger siblings, not to mention making sure the family’s reputation doesn’t get any more smeared than it already is. Her dad is a professor at the local college, and her mother is more interested in “causes” than in child-rearing. Their explosive relationship plays havoc on the entire family. The matriarch of the family, is the Southern-to-the-bone grandmother, who does her best to guard the family’s secrets and. There is some beautiful writing in this novel, and here are a few lines that I just adored: “…everyone knows that is brains were leather, Grayson wouldn’t have enough to saddle a June bug.)” “He knows more hiding places in this town than a stray cat.” “I will the storm to take is time as the grumbling sky argues for a faster arrival.” “The anew quickly spread to Margo, a forest fire hopping from tree to tree.”But then betrayal and death shake Tallaluah to the core. I have never read Crandall before, but I’m sure gonna get some of her books. The Myth of Perpetual Summer receives 6 out of 5 stars in Julie’s world.
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  • PacaLipstick Gramma
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC through a Goodreads Giveaway.As I enjoyed Ms Crandall's previous book, I looked forward to reading this. I was not disappointed.The first third of the book dragged at bit for me, but soon I was caught up, and anxious to see how things turned out. The characters were well developed, personalities believable, and i developed a great empathy for our main character, Tallulah. A tenacious young girl with a heavy burden.There were a few prochronisms that I hope are corrected, because I received an ARC through a Goodreads Giveaway.As I enjoyed Ms Crandall's previous book, I looked forward to reading this. I was not disappointed.The first third of the book dragged at bit for me, but soon I was caught up, and anxious to see how things turned out. The characters were well developed, personalities believable, and i developed a great empathy for our main character, Tallulah. A tenacious young girl with a heavy burden.There were a few prochronisms that I hope are corrected, because I find it extremely distracting. Thus my rating of 4 stars.I liked how the ending of the book was not tied up with a pretty bow. Sometimes that perfect ending is just that... a little too perfect. The book could very well have a sequel as there is enough drama and unanswered questions that leaves you hoping for more. And if not? One can always speculate as to what may have happened! I like when an author leaves you wanting more. I have only read a few books that has me wanting a sequel. And this is one. For me, that is a good author.Kudos to Ms Crandall for another outstanding book.As always, my book will be gifted to a "little lending library", with a notation that this was a Goodreads win, and a request for a review.
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  • Laurie's Lit Picks
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars Susan Crandall is a master of tales of the south, dysfunctional families, heroic children, and satisfying endings. Her previous two books, Whistling Past the Graveyard and The Flying Circus, were some of my favorites, and her latest is a worthy member of her collection of Southern stories. This time around we are introduced to the James family, living in Mississippi in the 1960's: the father, a history professor who suffers from bi-polar disorder; the mother, completely uninterested in 3.5 Stars Susan Crandall is a master of tales of the south, dysfunctional families, heroic children, and satisfying endings. Her previous two books, Whistling Past the Graveyard and The Flying Circus, were some of my favorites, and her latest is a worthy member of her collection of Southern stories. This time around we are introduced to the James family, living in Mississippi in the 1960's: the father, a history professor who suffers from bi-polar disorder; the mother, completely uninterested in being a mother; Gran, who wants to believe in the old elegance of the south and her aristocratic family; Griff, the oldest boy trying hard to outrun his embarrassing family; the twins, Dharma who is desperate for attention, and Warner, who just wants to be loved; and Tallulah, the narrator, a smart, compassionate, courageous, independent young cuss of a girl. The story moves from California in the hippie era, back in time to Tallulah as she tries to repair the broken threads of her family, and forward to 1972 as the family tries to save one of its own. My one complaint is the ending is a bit saccharine, but then again, we all need hope, especially in the face of tragedy. This book will make you cringe, remind us of hard times past, and eventually warm your heart. Thanks to Net Galley for a free book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Stephanie Lee
    January 1, 1970
    While reading through the beginning, sample pages, the reader is given hints of the scandals to come. The start of the book begins a slow, well written meander through Southern landscape and lifestyle. Being from a Southern family myself, I relate to the grandmother and her attempt to hold onto the older ways (not that I do, but I have been exposed to elderly Southern ladies when I was young).Questions begin to develop in the reader's mind early.......what could possibly cause the complete sepa While reading through the beginning, sample pages, the reader is given hints of the scandals to come. The start of the book begins a slow, well written meander through Southern landscape and lifestyle. Being from a Southern family myself, I relate to the grandmother and her attempt to hold onto the older ways (not that I do, but I have been exposed to elderly Southern ladies when I was young).Questions begin to develop in the reader's mind early.......what could possibly cause the complete separation of an entire family? Though flawed, there does seem to be love between the family members. Due to this separation, our narrator has become a lonely, career oriented adult who has had nothing do with her family for years. She doesn't realize that there are huge holes in her life due to past occurrences and her decisions. Will her family become more unified in adulthood by the end? Will she find a bit of romance (sorely lacking in her current life) in a big, Southern mansion? I can't wait to finish reading this novel to find out.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Evocative. The Myth of Perpetual Summer drips with the sweat of a Mississippi summer, wrapped up in family mysteries and regrets, set against the backdrop of the late 60s, early 70s. Susan Crandall is a truly gifted storyteller, painting images with prose. A murder draws Tallulah back to her childhood home in the South to deal with the secrets that drove her to progressive California to begin with; to beg for help after years of no communication for a brother of which she still feels great respo Evocative. The Myth of Perpetual Summer drips with the sweat of a Mississippi summer, wrapped up in family mysteries and regrets, set against the backdrop of the late 60s, early 70s. Susan Crandall is a truly gifted storyteller, painting images with prose. A murder draws Tallulah back to her childhood home in the South to deal with the secrets that drove her to progressive California to begin with; to beg for help after years of no communication for a brother of which she still feels great responsibility. A dual storyline pulls us from Tallulah's past and the lead up to her escape to California, to the present day and her return to Lamoyne. The book didn't deal with her brother Walden's trial as much as I thought it would, it was much more focused on Tallulah and the James family history, including a time period that treated mental illness like an embarrassment instead of the medical diagnosis it is. Steeped in the oppression of the South, and hiding family secrets at the cost of everything, this book is on my list of all time favorites!
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  • Kaci joiner
    January 1, 1970
    The Myth of Perpetual Summer is a coming of age story set in the 60's about the James family. It takes place in Mississippi and has everything that comes along with a small southern town. Tallulah James grew up in a very volatile family where the parents put thethemselves before their children. Tallulah is forced to grow up at a very young age in order to fend for her younger twinbrothers. This eventually leads to her basically running away and disappearing until a family emergency involving her The Myth of Perpetual Summer is a coming of age story set in the 60's about the James family. It takes place in Mississippi and has everything that comes along with a small southern town. Tallulah James grew up in a very volatile family where the parents put thethemselves before their children. Tallulah is forced to grow up at a very young age in order to fend for her younger twinbrothers. This eventually leads to her basically running away and disappearing until a family emergency involving her brother drags her back home to Mississippi and forces her to confront the past she has been running from. Through the gossip, heart break and sweltering humid Mississippi air Tahululla confronts her past to better her present and future. Its amazing paced, the writing is top notch. The plot and character development is absolutely amazing. You begin to empathize with Tahululla from the first page because you see a part of yourself and your life in her.
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  • Alice Teets
    January 1, 1970
    I was given this book through bookishfirst and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book. I had never read a Susan Crandall book, although Whistlin' Past the Graveyard has been on my TBR list for a long time. Tallulah James had a nightmarish childhood, but thought she had escaped to reinvent herself in California until she sees that her younger brother has been arrested for murder. Returning home to Mississippi is not what she planned on ever doing, but she must face her I was given this book through bookishfirst and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book. I had never read a Susan Crandall book, although Whistlin' Past the Graveyard has been on my TBR list for a long time. Tallulah James had a nightmarish childhood, but thought she had escaped to reinvent herself in California until she sees that her younger brother has been arrested for murder. Returning home to Mississippi is not what she planned on ever doing, but she must face her past and the guilt she feels for leaving. I usually am not a fan of stories that jump between periods, but I enjoyed the technique in this book. Seeing what formed the woman that Tallulah is today was best told from seeing her past. I also think that this is the first book I have ever read set in the 70's (at least partially), and it was fascinating to see the societal issues faced during that turbulent time.
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  • Suzie
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first Susan Crandall novel but it won't be my last. This story drew me in and I quickly came to love the characters and their struggles. She writes beautifully and creates a scene that made this book feel like a movie. I could feel the heat of the Mississippi summer and smell the fear of a young girl running from a bully. The main character, Tallulah is easy to connect to and I love how she was developed during the story. This novel is about family and the deep connection they have to This is my first Susan Crandall novel but it won't be my last. This story drew me in and I quickly came to love the characters and their struggles. She writes beautifully and creates a scene that made this book feel like a movie. I could feel the heat of the Mississippi summer and smell the fear of a young girl running from a bully. The main character, Tallulah is easy to connect to and I love how she was developed during the story. This novel is about family and the deep connection they have to our soul. It is a great story with interesting characters and I would recommend it to anyone that likes to see into the window of a family that has real struggles and challenges. I can't wait to buy her other novels!A special thank you to Bookish and Gallery Books for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Greer
    January 1, 1970
    I should have been reading this on my front porch swing with an ice cold cola and my dog at my feet but I wasn’t but that is the exact type of feeling this book does give you. It's enjoyable how this book goes through its telling of the story by jumping through the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s you get a little insight of each decade. Tallulah is growing up in a small southern Mississippi town and is actually having to raise her younger siblings with a bit of help from her Gran and no help from her ment I should have been reading this on my front porch swing with an ice cold cola and my dog at my feet but I wasn’t but that is the exact type of feeling this book does give you. It's enjoyable how this book goes through its telling of the story by jumping through the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s you get a little insight of each decade. Tallulah is growing up in a small southern Mississippi town and is actually having to raise her younger siblings with a bit of help from her Gran and no help from her mentally unstable father.We have a perfect setup of a southern gothic story of a dysfunctional family, murder, family secrets, juicy gossip and a touch of mental disturbance of family members. What else do you need in a deep southern book?
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  • Sabrina Fox
    January 1, 1970
    I've never heard of Susan Crandall before joining Bookishfirst. I'm so thankful I was able to receive an ARC of this book because now I want to read more of her books. I think I've found a new auto-buy author!I may be weird saying this but I love reading books about troubled families and past secrets within said families. There's something so suspenseful about it.A very good cast of characters is included within the book. They all have their very own personalities so I could easily tell who was I've never heard of Susan Crandall before joining Bookishfirst. I'm so thankful I was able to receive an ARC of this book because now I want to read more of her books. I think I've found a new auto-buy author!I may be weird saying this but I love reading books about troubled families and past secrets within said families. There's something so suspenseful about it.A very good cast of characters is included within the book. They all have their very own personalities so I could easily tell who was who and keep them together in my head.I also adore the 60s setting and the whole coming-of-age thing in a time where things are drastically changing definitely made the whole book for me.Will be picking up her past books as soon as I get the chance. Truly a master storyteller.
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  • Julieth
    January 1, 1970
    I give this book a 5/5 stars. I think the author did a really good job! I enjoyed the writing in this book, how it went from one time in the main character's life to another. We get to see what happened in her childhood that drove her to make choices such as leaving her hometown at a young age and leaving everyone behind. The characters were really well written, as well as the experiences that they went through. Tallulah's childhood experience was a rough one, and being so young and having to ta I give this book a 5/5 stars. I think the author did a really good job! I enjoyed the writing in this book, how it went from one time in the main character's life to another. We get to see what happened in her childhood that drove her to make choices such as leaving her hometown at a young age and leaving everyone behind. The characters were really well written, as well as the experiences that they went through. Tallulah's childhood experience was a rough one, and being so young and having to take care of her siblings at that age is not something that should happen. As I read chapter after chapter I found myself not wanting to put the book down.This book reminded me of how nice it is to read other genres than just YA and fantasy.
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  • Jen Juenke
    January 1, 1970
    I was really looking forward to reading this book. I was waiting so patiently to find the meat of the story. There really was NO big shocking details. What a let down. From the synopsis of the book, I expected the main character Tallulah bringing the family together, providing for the family, and taking charge. Yet, this did not happen. The first sign of trouble, she splits for her own life. I understand wanting to get away from a crazy family, but the book was not true to the synopsis. I felt t I was really looking forward to reading this book. I was waiting so patiently to find the meat of the story. There really was NO big shocking details. What a let down. From the synopsis of the book, I expected the main character Tallulah bringing the family together, providing for the family, and taking charge. Yet, this did not happen. The first sign of trouble, she splits for her own life. I understand wanting to get away from a crazy family, but the book was not true to the synopsis. I felt that the mental illness of her family was degraded to just a passing thought. Overall the book was a slog to get through and there was no reward for completing it. I didn't care about the characters and the scenery was boring.
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  • Carole Knoles
    January 1, 1970
    The Myth of Perpetual Summer, although seasoned with a southern flavor, is essentially a story about the long lasting consequences to the children in a family where the parents have assumed the characteristics of human wrecking balls to the lives of their offspring. One, long absent, sister is forced to return home when another of these adult children reaches a crisis in his life and many unspoken family secrets begin to see the light of day. As the novel unfolds, the story of how the siblings ( The Myth of Perpetual Summer, although seasoned with a southern flavor, is essentially a story about the long lasting consequences to the children in a family where the parents have assumed the characteristics of human wrecking balls to the lives of their offspring. One, long absent, sister is forced to return home when another of these adult children reaches a crisis in his life and many unspoken family secrets begin to see the light of day. As the novel unfolds, the story of how the siblings (there are four) have each coped with the upheaval in their childhood home is told as all four have escaped in one way or another.Susan Crandall's book will be satisfying to those who enjoy a story of family tinged with a bit of southern gothic.
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  • Ramona
    January 1, 1970
    What a great book! It takes us back and forth from1958 to 1974. What life was like in Mississippi to California. With the civil rights movement and the Vietnam was. It is about a family with mental Illness, unstable child rearing and the love that bonds a family. Horrific effects that happen and how they change your life. And that everyone wants to belong to someone, weather a cult, a movement or just a family. It shows how the generations in a family change from grandparents, parents, and there What a great book! It takes us back and forth from1958 to 1974. What life was like in Mississippi to California. With the civil rights movement and the Vietnam was. It is about a family with mental Illness, unstable child rearing and the love that bonds a family. Horrific effects that happen and how they change your life. And that everyone wants to belong to someone, weather a cult, a movement or just a family. It shows how the generations in a family change from grandparents, parents, and there children. Small towns talk about other people and how those people survive what is being said about them. What family secrets are kept and then found out can either destroy you or make you stronger.
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  • Benjamin Bookman
    January 1, 1970
    I was much more invested in this book by the end than I would have predicted when I started. I was not a fan of the time jumps and the length of time it took before I had any idea what was going on, so the first few chapters really tested my patience. By midway through, I had come to care about the characters/family, and wanted to learn how everything connected. There were still some bumps along the way (definitely lost my interest with the Cody section) but I don't regret finishing. If I could I was much more invested in this book by the end than I would have predicted when I started. I was not a fan of the time jumps and the length of time it took before I had any idea what was going on, so the first few chapters really tested my patience. By midway through, I had come to care about the characters/family, and wanted to learn how everything connected. There were still some bumps along the way (definitely lost my interest with the Cody section) but I don't regret finishing. If I could give 3.5 stars, that is probably a more fair assessment.
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  • Readerskeeter
    January 1, 1970
    This book is an interesting view of the various concepts of family; the good and bad and the secrets. Partly a child’s view, with her limitied understanding of adult choices, their weaknesses and faults, and partly from a later perspective. Susan Crandall always tells a good story and it’s tempting to consume her work in one long sitting but it’s always better to savor a good book. Take your time and enjoy this one.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Starting a book and feeling like it's a slight reflection of your family, it's definitely an interesting thing. Growing up fearing that you're going to inherit the mental issues of family is a scary thing. Reading about the protagonist overcoming her family issues and coming out the other end even stronger is very heartwarming and inspiring
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  • Donna Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    Tallulah grew up in Mississippi in a small town where her family was not respected. At a young age, she knew there were secrets and no one would talk about them or answer her questions. She left everyone and moved to California when she was old enough. Seven years later, she was needed back in Mississippi. She learned the secrets and the healing began for her and the family.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book!! Beautifully written story of a dysfunctional family. Loved the strengths of some of the characters and the challenges they all faced. Honestly, one of the best books I've read in years! Right up there with Little Fires Everywhere. Thank you to the publisher and Goodreads for this giveway.
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  • Judith
    January 1, 1970
    This southern gothic story is a well-crafted tale of contrasts: old South v. new; bohemian lifestyle v. old Mississippi values; and lies v. truths. It’s a deeply satisfying story that will have you reaching for a soothing glass of sweet tea. Book groups take note. This is a must read. Look forward to a spirited discussion.
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