The Bucket List
From the author of the critically acclaimed “lively and engrossing parable for women of all generations” (Harper’s Bazaar) The Regulars­ comes a deeply funny and thoughtful tale of a young woman who, after discovering she has the breast cancer gene, embarks on an unforgettable bucket list adventure.Twenty-five-old Lacey Whitman is blindsided when she’s diagnosed with the BCRA1 gene mutation: the “breast cancer” gene. Her high hereditary risk forces a decision: increased surveillance or the more radical step of a preventative double mastectomy. Lacey doesn't want to lose her breasts. For one, she’s juggling two career paths; her work with the prestigious New York trend forecaster Hoffman House, and her role on the founding team of a sustainable fashion app with friend/mentor, Vivian Chang. Secondly, small-town Lacey’s not so in touch with her sexuality: she doesn’t want to sacrifice her breasts before she’s had the chance to give them their hey-day. To help her make her choice, she (and her friends) creates a “boob bucket list”: everything she wants do with and for her boobs before a possible surgery.This kicks off a year of sensual exploration and sexual entertainment for the quick-witted Lacey Whitman. Ultimately, this is a story about Lacey’s relationship to her body and her future. Both are things she thought she could control through hard work and sacrifice. Both are things she will change by choosing to have a major surgery that could save her life, and will give her the future she really wants.Featuring the pitch-perfect “compulsively delicious” (Redbook) prose of The Regulars, The Bucket List is perfect for fans of Amy Poeppel and Sophie Kinsella.

The Bucket List Details

TitleThe Bucket List
Author
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherAtria/Emily Bestler Books
ISBN-139781501173028
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Adult

The Bucket List Review

  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free through an ARC giveaway on the author’s Instagram page. Please note, that despite the cute cover, this book does contain a lot of sex talk and sex scenes. Omg this book was amazing. It was serious, yet funny. Sexy but sweet. This was a very unique read. I’ve never read anything like it before. It was like a chick lit book, but less superficial and more deep than they typically get. The book deals with a very serious topic, being BRCA1 positive. The way the author ha I received this book for free through an ARC giveaway on the author’s Instagram page. Please note, that despite the cute cover, this book does contain a lot of sex talk and sex scenes. Omg this book was amazing. It was serious, yet funny. Sexy but sweet. This was a very unique read. I’ve never read anything like it before. It was like a chick lit book, but less superficial and more deep than they typically get. The book deals with a very serious topic, being BRCA1 positive. The way the author handles it is incredibly well done. She did a phenomenal job tapping into the emotions and anxieties that come with the diagnosis. You can tell the author did a tremendous amount of research. I loved how sex positive this entire book was. Like I mentioned before, there is a lot of sex in this book, but it is never seen as a bad thing. It even calls out some double standards. I also loved the diversity. The main character’s two best friends were both POC. One was Asian and the other was British Indian who was also a lesbian. Even many of the love interests/sexual partners were POC too, including an Iranian fashion designer. I’ve read quite a few books set in New York City, but none had this much diversity. The romance aspects felt very real. All the decisions the main character made regarding her love life felt plausible. Sometimes romances can end up being too far fetched, so it was nice to see one that was more grounded. Lastly, the final 30 pages of the book were incredibly heartfelt and I just loved it! There was a lot of emotion and heart. Overall, if you’re looking for a different kind of chick lit book, I really recommend this one!
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  • Georgia Clark
    January 1, 1970
    Spoiler alert: I wrote this. Can't review my own book because weird, but can say I love this story dearly and hope you will to. Thanks for swinging by, and for keeping the love of literature alive!ps. This book has sex scenes. If you don't like 'em, this ain't for you!
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  • Pavlina Read more sleep less blog❤❤
    January 1, 1970
    Yayy <3 <3    
  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    I actually knew someone who decided to go for the double mastectomy after being diagnosed with one of these gene mutations. She had already been married and had kids and decided that life is probably better without natural breasts than eventually getting cancer. After a few weeks of being away from her job, she was right back there working at full steam as if nothing had happened.I'm pretty sure everyone knows this, but sometimes life gives you a set of challenges and your objective is to naviga I actually knew someone who decided to go for the double mastectomy after being diagnosed with one of these gene mutations. She had already been married and had kids and decided that life is probably better without natural breasts than eventually getting cancer. After a few weeks of being away from her job, she was right back there working at full steam as if nothing had happened.I'm pretty sure everyone knows this, but sometimes life gives you a set of challenges and your objective is to navigate through these challenges...or die. This is the kind of decision Lacey needs to make for herself, but like any normal human being it's more than just a decision to have breasts or not. It's a huge lifestyle change and you need to be willing to change.I loved how honest and serious this book was despite the book and Lacey's tone and voice. I found myself really invested in what happens to Lacey and almost wanted to reach into the book and talk to her about what she's going through. Lacey just seems to me like the type of person who would hide what she truly feels to protect her friends, her loved ones, and even herself. However, a big diagnosis like testing positive for the BRCA1 gene mutation is very big to hide on your own.And Georgia Clark really takes the care to make sure the reader understands how difficult and big this decision is. When I first started reading this book, I was already decided that I would get a double mastectomy if that was the case for me. However, as I continued to read this book I had to double guess myself. It would be a huge transition especially when you've been comfortable with your own body for quite some years. Losing your breasts is a big change and similar to that of losing an arm or a leg. But the seriousness of the book is met with a huge amount of brevity in the form of several sexcapades. Lacey's boob bucket list includes many different sexual encounters all of which are attempted to be met throughout the novel. I don't want to give away the list, but it contains such things as nude sun bathing and having sex with a woman (Lacey's character is a straight cis female). It all seems like fun and games, but at the same time you know that this is the last time you'd be able to do these things with the breasts you've had since you were 15. It really felt like an homage to your breasts and how the life after this one will be slightly different.I thought this book was the kind of book that will make you think about real women issues like breast cancer as well as give you a little bit of fun. Not everything in life is serious and even though a double mastectomy isn't a Saturday afternoon in the park, it's also not the end-all of your life. I think that's what I loved about this book. Cancer is scary. Getting preventative surgery can save your life, but it doesn't also mean your life is over. If that makes sense.I will say the only thing that really annoyed me about this book is the words-separated-by-hyphens. I think that Georgia Clark was trying to convey Lacey's personality with this style of verbiage, but after a while it was a little fatiguing to see a lot of descriptive phrasing replaced with this. It's a style choice that bugged me, but really didn't take away from the story as a whole.I received a copy of this book from Atria Books for free in exchange for an honest review. My opinions have not been influenced by the publisher or the author.
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  • Lindsay Williams (Bibbidi Bobbidi Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever read the summary of a book, expected one thing, and then gotten something very much different from what you thought it would be? That was basically my experience with reading The Bucket List by Georgia Clark.But oh, what a wonderful thing that was!I expected straight "chick lit." I expected a bit of drama, a few laughs, some romance, and although I knew the book was about the breast cancer gene, I still expected it to be fairly light reading.The reality is that this book was absolu Have you ever read the summary of a book, expected one thing, and then gotten something very much different from what you thought it would be? That was basically my experience with reading The Bucket List by Georgia Clark.But oh, what a wonderful thing that was!I expected straight "chick lit." I expected a bit of drama, a few laughs, some romance, and although I knew the book was about the breast cancer gene, I still expected it to be fairly light reading.The reality is that this book was absolutely nothing like anything I have ever read before. Yes, it was chick lit. Yes, there was a bit of drama, a few laughs, some romance, and it was still fairly light reading. But there was SO much more. There was also a lot of sex--HOT sex--and far more depth and emotion than I expected. This is not straight-up chick lit. This is one of those rare books that I'm not quite sure how to classify, actually, and I'm not quite sure how to capture, with words, the way The Bucket List made me feel.The Bucket List begins with Lacey Whitman receiving the news that she has tested positive for BCRA1 gene mutation, otherwise known as the "breast cancer gene." She is presented with two options: she can choose a wait-and-see approach and get tested every few months or she can opt for a preventative mastectomy, which would reduce her chances of actually developing breast cancer to a very minimal percentage.Lacey's decision is a struggle for her for many reasons. She's only 25, has a high-pressure job in the fashion industry, and doesn't have any family to lean on for support except for a sister who resents her for having to raise her after their mother died--from breast cancer--and didn't want her to get tested for the gene in the first place. While she weighs her options, Lacey decides to develop a "bucket list" of things she wants to do to celebrate her sexuality that she has never been brave enough to do. She wants to sunbathe topless. Have a threesome. Wear a revealing dress to a public function. Have sex in a public place.The amazing thing about The Bucket List is that it handles a very serious and dramatic topic with truth and honesty, but it still has all the lighthearted and sexy moments that one would expect in its genre. And those sexy moments are definitely sexy--and graphic--but they don't make the book smutty. They don't take away from the heart of it. Instead, they serve as their own powerful moments in Lacey's journey of self-discovery.Meanwhile, Lacey also has to deal with work pressures, romantic problems, family drama, and squabbles with friends. Georgia Clark has done a masterful job of showing that even though life sometimes deals devastating blows, it also keeps moving forward. She portrayed Lacey's struggle with her decision in open and honest terms and didn't gloss over the scary or tragic parts at all.And somehow, in the midst of it all, Clark also managed to craft a book that qualifies as chick lit while still being an intersectional feminist wonder, despite featuring a straight, white female as the lead character. The Bucket List is a powerful statement on friendship, happiness, sexuality, life, and love...all at the same time. Well done, Georgia Clark.
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  • Corinne Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Expertly paced and beautifully told, THE BUCKET LIST delivers a perfect balance of poignancy and hilarity. Georgia Clark has the uncanny ability to create characters that already feel like friends and to explore dark decisions with just the right amount of empathy and verve. An absolute knock(ers) out!
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    This was a surprisingly good book. I only say surprising because I'm not huge on chick lit (as I assumed this was) and I was unsure if the topic would be interesting to me. It was! The main character was very compelling and I kept having to remind myself that she was 25 which excused many of her dumb decisions but also lends a specific outlook and perspective. I loved the subtle feminist/intersectional/progressive/LGBTQ viewpoints; they added to the overall fresh and modern feel of the book.Real This was a surprisingly good book. I only say surprising because I'm not huge on chick lit (as I assumed this was) and I was unsure if the topic would be interesting to me. It was! The main character was very compelling and I kept having to remind myself that she was 25 which excused many of her dumb decisions but also lends a specific outlook and perspective. I loved the subtle feminist/intersectional/progressive/LGBTQ viewpoints; they added to the overall fresh and modern feel of the book.Really unique, I learned a lot, and enjoyed the ride. Well done.
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  • Heather Frimmer
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw "The Bucket List" on NetGalley, the bright, eye catching cover caught my eye (kudos to the cover designer and what a clever image to chose!) and when I read the synopsis I knew this was one for me. Centering on Lacey Whitman, a twenty five year old who has just learned that she is BRCA positive and is in the throes of figuring out what to do with that information, this book is right in the center of my wheelhouse. As a breast imager, I often speak with women dealing with similar chall When I saw "The Bucket List" on NetGalley, the bright, eye catching cover caught my eye (kudos to the cover designer and what a clever image to chose!) and when I read the synopsis I knew this was one for me. Centering on Lacey Whitman, a twenty five year old who has just learned that she is BRCA positive and is in the throes of figuring out what to do with that information, this book is right in the center of my wheelhouse. As a breast imager, I often speak with women dealing with similar challenges and Clark takes this emotional situation one step further. Lacey decides that she wants to have a double mastectomy to significantly decrease her risk of developing breast cancer (I could have used a but more exploration about this decision. It seemed to me that she came to this decision without much back and forth but maybe that's just because of what I do on a daily basis). After she reaches this decision, she realizes that there are her breasts have not been used to their full potential and she decides to make a "boob bucket list" and starts checking things off the list as the seconds tick down to the day of surgery.Be forewarned. Clark doesn't shy away from fully exploring the adventures Lacey's boobs go on. There is lots of sex of all types in this book...I won't give details so you can experience it for yourself. For me, there was a bit too much sex and not quite enough emotional exploration of the implications of the BRCA gene for her and for her future children. Also, the ultimate love story was a bit of an afterthought and not as fully developed as I would have liked. Sex takes center stage here. Having said that, I fully enjoyed this book and I definitely was invested in Lacey's story. I look forward to seeing what Clark writes next.
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  • Kelsey (Kelseylovesbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved The Bucket List. While this is a book about a young woman finding out she is BRCA1 positive, it’s also so much more than that. Lacey takes us on her journey as she makes the tough decision of whether or not to get a preventative mastectomy, as well as all the other challenges a 25 year old faces- job woes, maintaining friendship, and finding love...I love the way this book brought awareness to an important topic, while also being so enjoyable to read. I think most of us know som Absolutely loved The Bucket List. While this is a book about a young woman finding out she is BRCA1 positive, it’s also so much more than that. Lacey takes us on her journey as she makes the tough decision of whether or not to get a preventative mastectomy, as well as all the other challenges a 25 year old faces- job woes, maintaining friendship, and finding love...I love the way this book brought awareness to an important topic, while also being so enjoyable to read. I think most of us know someone who has had breast cancer, and that makes this book a good read for anyone. I received an ARC of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. The Bucket List is out August 7!
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  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so, so much fun. Seriously. It deals with a weighty topic (illness, mortality, the trade-offs life inevitably demands of us) head on while maintaining an engaging, funny tone that keeps the pages flying by. It's also packed with steamy sex, piles of tension (sexual and otherwise), and a hell of a lot of heart. While the tone is breezy, the stakes are never underplayed as Lacy grows wiser before our eyes, finding her own worth as well as who and what to value in life. Five shining s This book was so, so much fun. Seriously. It deals with a weighty topic (illness, mortality, the trade-offs life inevitably demands of us) head on while maintaining an engaging, funny tone that keeps the pages flying by. It's also packed with steamy sex, piles of tension (sexual and otherwise), and a hell of a lot of heart. While the tone is breezy, the stakes are never underplayed as Lacy grows wiser before our eyes, finding her own worth as well as who and what to value in life. Five shining stars!
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  • Fiona Davis
    January 1, 1970
    I sped through it and adored it. The scene involving a disastrous attempt at role-playing had me laughing out loud, yet by the last chapter I was in tears. Having had 6 friends get diagnosed with BC in the past 5 years, with treatments ranging from radiation to double mastectomy, this hit close to home. Funny, smart, edgy, and moving. What more could you ask for?
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    #BookSparks #SRC2018
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