Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win
From Jo Piazza, the bestselling author of The Knock Off, How to Be Married, and Fitness Junkie, comes an exciting, insightful novel about what happens when a woman wants it all—political power, a happy marriage, and happiness—but isn’t sure just how much she’s willing to sacrifice to get it.Charlotte Walsh is running for Senate in the most important race in the country during a midterm election that will decide the balance of power in Congress. Still reeling from a presidential election that shocked and divided the country and inspired by the chance to make a difference, she’s left behind her high-powered job in Silicon Valley and returned, with her husband Max and their three young daughters, to her downtrodden Pennsylvania hometown to run in the Rust Belt state. Once the campaign gets underway, Charlotte is blindsided by just how dirty her opponent is willing to fight, how harshly she is judged by the press and her peers, and how exhausting it becomes to navigate a marriage with an increasingly ambivalent and often resentful husband. When the opposition uncovers a secret that could threaten not just her campaign but everything Charlotte holds dear, she has to decide just how badly she wants to win and at what cost. A searing, suspenseful story of political ambition, marriage, class, sexual politics, and infidelity, Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win is an insightful portrait of what it takes for a woman to run for national office in America today. In a dramatic political moment like no other with more women running for office than ever before, Jo Piazza’s novel is timely, engrossing, and perfect for readers on both sides of the aisle.

Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win Details

TitleCharlotte Walsh Likes To Win
Author
ReleaseJul 24th, 2018
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781501179419
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Contemporary

Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win Review

  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    I'm between 4 and 4.5 stars."Only let the world see half of your ambition. Half of the world can't handle seeing it all."That was a piece of advice given to Charlotte Walsh by her mentor, a former governor, U.S. Senator, and Ambassador to the United Nations, when she encouraged Charlotte to run for the U.S. Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania.It doesn't matter that Charlotte got out of her hometown—and away from the East Coast—as quickly as she could, and that she hasn't been home for years I'm between 4 and 4.5 stars."Only let the world see half of your ambition. Half of the world can't handle seeing it all."That was a piece of advice given to Charlotte Walsh by her mentor, a former governor, U.S. Senator, and Ambassador to the United Nations, when she encouraged Charlotte to run for the U.S. Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania.It doesn't matter that Charlotte got out of her hometown—and away from the East Coast—as quickly as she could, and that she hasn't been home for years. Charlotte and her mentor believe she has what it takes to make a difference in the lives of Pennsylvanians, not to mention shake up politics as usual in the Keystone State.So Charlotte, who in the meantime had become a high-powered Silicon Valley executive, moves back to her downtrodden hometown with her husband Max (who graduated from high school a few years before her) and their three young daughters. It's quite a shift for all of them—it reopens old family wounds and causes some strain in Charlotte and Max's marriage, as he has to put his own career ambitions on hold in order to become the girls' primary caregiver. But it will all be worth it once Charlotte is elected to the Senate.Charlotte has great ideas, and truly desires to make a difference in the lives of her fellow Pennsylvanians, especially women, who have been particularly mistreated and disillusioned following the last presidential election. The Democrats rarely even run anyone against Charlotte's challenger, a long-time incumbent who represents the type of dirty, old-school politics that she doesn't want to get mired in."Charlotte was sick to death of being told to feel sorry for the working-class white man. Being a mediocre white guy doesn't mean you deserve to be crowned a king, get a job, or get laid. The cavalry is not coming for you. Of course, she could never utter these thoughts out loud to anyone."It doesn't take long for her to realize the challenges a female political candidate faces, even in this day and age, especially when she is running against a man. Charlotte has to get accustomed to her clothing and shoe choices to be documented, has to remember to come across as strong but not threatening, forceful but not angry. Although she vowed to run an honest, clean campaign, she finds herself having to tailor her message to whatever group she is speaking, even if that strikes her as pandering and opportunistic.When she is given information about a secret involving her opponent's family, one which might allow her to take a comfortable lead, she has to decide whether her principles are more important than potential victory. And when her opponent's campaign uncovers a secret which has potential not only to affect the race but her marriage, Charlotte has to remember why she decided to run for the Senate in the first place, and how much she is willing to sacrifice. Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win couldn't be any more timely for the world we're living in right now. Even after the 2016 election, Charlotte had to lose her idealism relative to politics, particularly female political candidates, and the inequities they face versus their male counterparts. Why is it okay for her opponent to have been married multiple times but her marriage has to be perfect? Why does it matter what shoes she wears to a campaign appearance, or even just a trip to the grocery store? These are questions which may seem all too familiar for some.I thought this was a terrific, utterly compelling book. It's not necessarily surprising, especially if you pay attention to the political world, but it doesn't matter, because Jo Piazza is a great storyteller. The characters and the scenarios they find themselves in may seem familiar, but Piazza adds her own twists and turns, and she makes you wonder exactly what will happen come Election Day. (This is a question many in the U.S. are asking themselves about now.)While Charlotte's character is a Democrat, the story is more about her campaign and her life as it is affected by the campaign, and it doesn't spend a ton of time getting too political. So if you've been trying to avoid that subject for a while, this is still a fun book you won't be able to put down. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com, or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2017.html.
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    4 brave stars to Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win! ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I noticed this book when a blogger friend, Rachel at In Between Book Pages, was reading it. Her thoughts on Charlotte’s story enticed me to pick it up. Winning? Is it something we all love, at least at one time or another? What messages do we receive about having it all and winning at life? Are we told that we can’t have it all? There is much to admire about Charlotte Walsh. She is a go-getter who wants and believes she can absolutely have i 4 brave stars to Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win! ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ I noticed this book when a blogger friend, Rachel at In Between Book Pages, was reading it. Her thoughts on Charlotte’s story enticed me to pick it up. Winning? Is it something we all love, at least at one time or another? What messages do we receive about having it all and winning at life? Are we told that we can’t have it all? There is much to admire about Charlotte Walsh. She is a go-getter who wants and believes she can absolutely have it all, including a political position, a loving marriage, three young daughters, and total happiness. Charlotte is running for office in a most important Senate race, one that will determine which party controls Congress. She is determined to win and inspired to make change happen, so she leaves her high-powered job and returns to her hometown in Pennsylvania to run for office. Charlotte is quickly shocked by the treatment she receives from her political opponent, the press, and even her peers. Her personal life also becomes overbearing because she is so focused on work, she does not see her husband’s growing resentment. Next comes a scandal that puts Charlotte in the crosshairs threatening to not only lose her campaign, but her marriage and family, too. The suspense builds as Charlotte is on the trail to victory, and important issues including political ambition, specifically related to women, as well as the differentiated treatment of women and men in politics, and the sacrifices a wife and mother has to make to truly have it all. Overall, I found Charlotte’s story to be consuming, timely, and provocative. While it is a fictionalized account, I left this book with a deeper understanding of what it potentially requires for a woman to take on the challenge of running for office. Thank you to Simon Schuster for the complimentary copy to review. All opinions are my own. Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win is available now! My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Janelle
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much Simon and Schuster for providing my free copy of CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN by Jo Piazza - all opinions are my own.I love reading books based on politics but I’m mighty picky so I was elated when I able to devour this one in less than a day! There are so many current, relevant topics touched on in this story that my brain kept connecting the dots to events that have happened over the past year in our current political climate. But it’s so much more than politics as it also co Thank you so much Simon and Schuster for providing my free copy of CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN by Jo Piazza - all opinions are my own.I love reading books based on politics but I’m mighty picky so I was elated when I able to devour this one in less than a day! There are so many current, relevant topics touched on in this story that my brain kept connecting the dots to events that have happened over the past year in our current political climate. But it’s so much more than politics as it also covers marriage, motherhood, and of course, women in the workforce. Charlotte Walsh worked in an elite job in California, but decided to move her family of five back to their hometown of Elk Hollow, Pennsylvania to run as the first female for senate. And as you’d expect, this is not an easy task for Charlotte or her family, but she is strong and determined.What I love most about this book is the intelligent way it was written, the attention to detail, and the unflinching courage of a smart female character in a male dominant field. The construction of the novel is perfect for the plot. For example, the countdown to Election Day at the head of each chapter, fragments of text messages, Twitter threads, the unfounded criticism and backlash, and a news interview transcript, all contribute to the realism. I especially enjoyed the parts that examined marriage as Charlotte’s husband had to become the mainstay to her career. This is an incredibly fast paced book and there are a few secrets and reveals towards the end that make it interesting, so needless to say, I HEART THIS BOOK.
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    I had the absolute pleasure of reading a VERY early manuscript of this book on request of the author. And OH MY GOODNESS!!! What an honor! It is fierce, feminist and completely nails my feelings on politics, marriage and parenting. Especially marriage. This may be a political book (and GO JO for writing such a timely and unflinching narrative of today's political climate), but it's so so much more than that. Anyone who has been in a long-lasting marriage will appreciate this, as will anyone who I had the absolute pleasure of reading a VERY early manuscript of this book on request of the author. And OH MY GOODNESS!!! What an honor! It is fierce, feminist and completely nails my feelings on politics, marriage and parenting. Especially marriage. This may be a political book (and GO JO for writing such a timely and unflinching narrative of today's political climate), but it's so so much more than that. Anyone who has been in a long-lasting marriage will appreciate this, as will anyone who is fed up with the way women are treated in business, politics and the world in general. I am THRILLED that this book will be out in the world in July 2018 just in time for mid-terms!
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  • Liz Fenton
    January 1, 1970
    I tore through this one in two days. It’s a timely and insightful glance into the world of politics, and one woman’s rise to the top, for better or worse. An extremely entertaining read!
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Check out all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends!CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN BY JO PIAZZA BOOK REVIEWI am a huge fan of The Knockoff & Fitness Junkie which are both co-authored by Jo Piazza. When I heard she had a stand-alone book coming out this summer, I rushed at the chance to read it. I will say this is a book anyone can enjoy, regardless of your own political ideology.A TIMELY POLITICAL NOVEL THAT RESONATES WITH ALL WOMENThe timeline for Charlotte Walsh Check out all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends!CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN BY JO PIAZZA BOOK REVIEWI am a huge fan of The Knockoff & Fitness Junkie which are both co-authored by Jo Piazza. When I heard she had a stand-alone book coming out this summer, I rushed at the chance to read it. I will say this is a book anyone can enjoy, regardless of your own political ideology.A TIMELY POLITICAL NOVEL THAT RESONATES WITH ALL WOMENThe timeline for Charlotte Walsh is right now. Jo Piazza accurately captures our political climate at this very moment. There’s the writer from Teen Vogue asking insightful & meaningful questions, Twitter trolls, Instagram experts, a run in with a guy who has a Swastika tattoo on his neck & pundits criticizing Charlotte’s choice of shoes.As Charlotte returns to her roots in Pennsylvania, it’s a bit reminiscent of Hillbilly Elegy. Jo writes about the opioid crisis, failing schools, the high cost of healthcare & the lost factory jobs in the Rust Belt. Readers learn more about Charlotte. She comes from humble beginnings yet fought her way to an Ivy League education. We also meet her brother Paul & the juxtaposition between Paul & Charlotte couldn’t be more clear.RUN LIKE A MOTHERCharlotte Walsh is a powerful female; no doubt about it. Charlotte Walsh is also a woman with secrets. Let’s be honest; our country is not set up for mothers who work outside of the home. If you so wish, feel free to argue with me directly on this statement. Jo Piazza delves into how challenging this political race is for Charlotte. There are missed dinners at home, long drives in the minivan, uprooting her children & judgment for running in this race. Charlotte’s spouse changes his job & schedule to accomodate her run. Instead of being met with praise & understanding, the media ridicules him.I connected with Charlotte. Our ideals closely match & l like that Charlotte is flawed. Aren’t we all? There are some pretty heavy & salacious secrets that come out during the campaign. Readers see Charlotte’s marriage struggle to survive, old friendships breakdown & yet, Charlotte persists.THE VERDICTI am Really Into This book! Charlotte is someone I can & will root for in every sense of the word. This book left me feeling inspired, strong & proud to continue to fight for what I believe in. I want to vote for Charlotte & I can’t wait to get a chance to vote for my state, county, city, country’s version of her!Special thanks to Jo Piazza, Simon & Schuster & NetGalley for providing our copy in exchange for an honest & fair review.
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  • Jamie Rosenblit
    January 1, 1970
    I never thought a political focused book (even a fictional one) could be this enjoyable given the tumultuous political climate in the US right now. However, because I’ve enjoyed so much of Jo Piazza’s work, I had to check it out. Charlotte is a high powered Silicon Valley exec who gives it up and moves her family (with her now stay at home husband and three young daughters) to her hometown in Pennsylvania where she wants to run for Senate and make a difference! As the campaign heats up, Charlott I never thought a political focused book (even a fictional one) could be this enjoyable given the tumultuous political climate in the US right now. However, because I’ve enjoyed so much of Jo Piazza’s work, I had to check it out. Charlotte is a high powered Silicon Valley exec who gives it up and moves her family (with her now stay at home husband and three young daughters) to her hometown in Pennsylvania where she wants to run for Senate and make a difference! As the campaign heats up, Charlottes values and relationships are tested over and over again. This is definitely one to add to your list! Thank you to Simon & Schuster for an advanced copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Mandie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was an ok read. I really wanted to like it, but I couldn’t get into it. Unfortunately, I didn’t finish it about halfway through.I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
  • Dana Blazsek
    January 1, 1970
    4.5⭐— Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win by Jo Piazza•Thank you to Netgalley, Simon and Schuster and the author for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.•Charlotte Walsh is running for political office in her home state of Pennsylvania. To do this she uproots her husband and three daughters from Cali to Pennsylvania. Between this, her husband becoming Mr. Mom, and the stress of a campaign, Charlotte’s already fragile marriage trembled under the pressure. Can Charlotte win? Ca 4.5⭐️— Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win by Jo Piazza•Thank you to Netgalley, Simon and Schuster and the author for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.•Charlotte Walsh is running for political office in her home state of Pennsylvania. To do this she uproots her husband and three daughters from Cali to Pennsylvania. Between this, her husband becoming Mr. Mom, and the stress of a campaign, Charlotte’s already fragile marriage trembled under the pressure. Can Charlotte win? Can woman have it all?•I have previously read Fitness Junkie and The Knockoff coauthored by Piazza (and Lucy Sykes) and enjoyed them both. This book was much different in a good way. It took me longer to get through, a mixture of busy nights and work stress made me not want to read a serious topic, but I really enjoyed this book. I gave it a 4.5 Bc I think some of the pacing could have been faster, but it wasn’t so slow that I lost interest. And when Charlotte’s secret comes out, it’s a doozy. And the ending! Ahhh that ending. Piazza left me shrieking and messaging a fellow bookstagrammer to make sure I wasn’t crazy! •With likable characters and a topic that is hot in our political climate and life in general, Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win is a must read!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    *4 - 4.5 stars*Charlotte Walsh is an intelligent, strong woman and CEO of Humanity a large corporation, who is running for Congress. I really enjoyed this book and it was a fast paced enjoyable read for me. I really liked Charlotte as a character and I felt that I could really relate to her. As a female, recently moving overseas and living abroad and starting a new job, Charlotte gave me strength and I was rooting for her throughout. She struggles to maintain her relationship with his husband, r *4 - 4.5 stars*Charlotte Walsh is an intelligent, strong woman and CEO of Humanity a large corporation, who is running for Congress. I really enjoyed this book and it was a fast paced enjoyable read for me. I really liked Charlotte as a character and I felt that I could really relate to her. As a female, recently moving overseas and living abroad and starting a new job, Charlotte gave me strength and I was rooting for her throughout. She struggles to maintain her relationship with his husband, raise 3 girls, run for Congress, and deal with the media. I really enjoyed the author’s writing style and I will be looking up more books written by her. I highly recommend this book! *Special thanks to NetGalley and Simon Schuster for allowing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review. *
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    THIS is the book I wished I had in my hands the morning after the 2016 election, friends. I inhaled this book in just over 36 hours and GAH. I’ve read one Jo Piazza before (Fitness Junkie), and thought this was nothing like it– in the best way possible. Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win is a fierce & insightful look into women in politics in our day and age– from all angles. And Charlotte herself is the perfect example of a character that I root for without necessarily finding her a likeable char THIS is the book I wished I had in my hands the morning after the 2016 election, friends. I inhaled this book in just over 36 hours and GAH. I’ve read one Jo Piazza before (Fitness Junkie), and thought this was nothing like it– in the best way possible. Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win is a fierce & insightful look into women in politics in our day and age– from all angles. And Charlotte herself is the perfect example of a character that I root for without necessarily finding her a likeable character (because I don’t). Without giving spoilers, I kind of loved the ending– Piazza’s author’s note at the end said it perfectly– this book is about the campaign, a moment in time, nothing more or less. Thanks to Simon & Schuster for the chance to read an advanced copy!
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  • Tara - Running 'n' Reading
    January 1, 1970
    “‘Never stop smiling,’ Josh had warned. ‘Smile until you feel like your lips will fall off. A woman who doesn’t smile is an angry woman. You cannot be an angry woman, even for a second.’”I’ve always been a fan of Jo Piazza, but CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN is definitely a stand out. A very timely story about the experience of a female candidate running for political office and the challenges she endures that are never experienced by her male counterparts. There are plenty of laugh-out-loud momen “‘Never stop smiling,’ Josh had warned. ‘Smile until you feel like your lips will fall off. A woman who doesn’t smile is an angry woman. You cannot be an angry woman, even for a second.’”I’ve always been a fan of Jo Piazza, but CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN is definitely a stand out. A very timely story about the experience of a female candidate running for political office and the challenges she endures that are never experienced by her male counterparts. There are plenty of laugh-out-loud moments, fantastic characters and thought provoking statements; most of all, I think the author has done a remarkable job of illuminating this topic in a very accessible way. I felt like I was cheering Charlotte on throughout the entire book! Highly recommend!
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  • Susie | Novel Visits
    January 1, 1970
    {My Thoughts}Original Source: https://novelvisits.com/charlotte-wal...What Worked For MeAn Author’s Courageous Timeline – Before anything else, I have to applaud Jo Piazza for setting her story right NOW in the middle of one of the most hotly contested set of mid-term elections that we’ve ever experienced. Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win begins in mid-2017 and ends with the November 2018 elections. You can’t get timelier than that. When you think about the time to write a book, submit it, do all th {My Thoughts}Original Source: https://novelvisits.com/charlotte-wal...What Worked For MeAn Author’s Courageous Timeline – Before anything else, I have to applaud Jo Piazza for setting her story right NOW in the middle of one of the most hotly contested set of mid-term elections that we’ve ever experienced. Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win begins in mid-2017 and ends with the November 2018 elections. You can’t get timelier than that. When you think about the time to write a book, submit it, do all the editing, and then go through the entire publication process, it’s truly amazing that Piazza was able to pull this book off. I’d love to know when she started writing it. I suspect it was shortly after the 2016 elections. Piazza’s amazing foresight proves her to be a very wise woman!An Insider’s Glimpse of Running for Office – Charlotte Walsh wants to be Pennsylvania’s next senator for all the right reasons. The man she hopes to replace has been in office for over 30 years and has done little for the state. She’s appalled at the direction the country has taken. And, she has terrific qualifications as a woman who has successfully run a cutting edge-company, written a book about empowering women, and has been called by many to run for office. Charlotte knows to hire a tough, experienced campaign manager. She knows to surround herself with powerful advisors and she makes sure her family is on board. But none of that is enough.The rigors of running are overwhelming, for anyone, but as a woman Charlotte has to also endure the indignity of being scrutinized for her hairstyle, her clothing, her shoes, and her mothering. Things no one even considers for a man. And then there’s the dirt, real and fabricated, on both sides. Time after time it nearly breaks Charlotte.Two voices competed in Charlotte’s head, “The work you will do in office once you win this race will be more important than the humiliation you feel in this moment.” The other said, “Quit now! This will only get worse.”Charlotte’s Personal Life – Throughout the book Charlotte struggled to maintain a family life with her husband, Max, and her three young daughters. Occasionally she had success, but mostly she didn’t because in reality running for office is a nasty, nasty business. It put everyone she loved under a microscope. Still, I enjoyed Charlotte’s family and her complicated loved story with Max. Of course, they all suffered, they all sacrificed to help Charlotte succeed, as all family’s must when one member chooses to run for office.A Balance of Funny and Sad – Piazza’s book was not a light summer read and it was not a gloomy tragedy. Instead it was a perfect balance between the two. You had to laugh about Charlotte’s daily shoe choices getting their own Instagram account, just as you felt her frustration that her shoes were getting more press coverage than her message.Narration – Tavia Gilbert did a marvelous job reading Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win. She really brought Charlotte to life and both her pacing and inflections were great. Gilbert is one of those readers who makes you want to get right back to listening!What Didn’tUnnecessary Parts – There were a few short parts of the story that I felt were unneeded or out of character for Charlotte. For example, just days before the election after some bad news, she goes to a bar and has a few drinks. It just didn’t seem like something Charlotte would have done with so much on the line. The story needed no distractors.{The Final Assessment}I really enjoyed this timely novel and admire Jo Piazza for taking it on. The ending of Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win didn’t surprise me, and I liked it a lot. Be sure to read Piazza’s explanation of why she chose to end the book the way she did. That was VERY impressive! In addition to the pleasure I got from this book, it left me with one big question: Why would anyone ever WANT to run for office? It’s so awful, no matter how clean you are. So, for all the brave folks who take on the task, the least the rest of us can do is stay informed and vote! Grade: B+
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  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    Charlotte Walsh is in her late forties and has a very comfortable life. She's worked her way up the corporate ladder at Humanity, a successful tech company in Silicon Valley. Her husband, Max, is incredibly supportive of her career and doesn't mind that his wife is his boss. Together, they have three beautiful young daughters, a gorgeous house, good friends, and an all-around enviable life.So when Charlotte finds out that Max has cheated on her, she's devastated---but also determined to work thr Charlotte Walsh is in her late forties and has a very comfortable life. She's worked her way up the corporate ladder at Humanity, a successful tech company in Silicon Valley. Her husband, Max, is incredibly supportive of her career and doesn't mind that his wife is his boss. Together, they have three beautiful young daughters, a gorgeous house, good friends, and an all-around enviable life.So when Charlotte finds out that Max has cheated on her, she's devastated---but also determined to work through it. She realizes she's ready for a change anyway, for herself and for her family. She decides to move everyone back home to Pennsylvania (contrite husband in tow...) to run for state senator. Max isn't happy with the arrangement---he hates Pennsylvania and doesn't particularly feel like becoming a stay-at-home dad---but he's prepared to do whatever it takes to make up for his infidelity and please his wife. Unfortunately, both Charlotte and Max aren't quite prepared for the rigors of campaign life. The crazy travel schedule, the constant barrage of (unkind) public opinions, and the pressure to look perfect no matter what all take a toll on their relationship. In the end, Charlotte must decide how much she's willing to lose in order to win. *   *   *   *   *I finished this book a few days ago, and I'm still thinking about it. I really wish the ending were more concrete, but something about that ambiguous conclusion forces me to keep mulling it all over. I can't help but think about the messiness of relationships, politics, parenthood, friendship, and, yes, ambition. What does it take to get what we want, and is it possible to achieve it all?This book covers controversial topics---very relevant controversial topics, especially given the last presidential election---and there were times for me when it was almost too depressing to read. I thought of Hillary Clinton a lot, thought about how difficult it must have been for her to run against Donald Trump. I'm happy for all the accomplishments women have made over the past 100+ years, and I'm looking forward to women candidates crushing it in the midterms (woot woot), but good grief we have a ways to go.Overall, though, I enjoyed this book. The story moves along swiftly, and the characters are, for the most part, well-developed, endearing, real, and entertaining. There are a few far-fetched plot points where I had to suspend disbelief for a bit, but I still really liked seeing a glimpse of Charlotte Walsh's crazy, ambitious life.See more of my book reviews at www.bugbugbooks.com!Thank you Simon Schuster and Net Galley for the ARC!
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the female driven book we’ve been waiting for. Charlotte is all of us except she’s running for Senate in her home state of PA. She’s driven to change the world but first she has to survive being a candidate and her marriage. Charlotte isn’t perfect, her marriage is in tatters but this is what she’s determined to do. I loved Ms. Piazza’s portrayal of someone who could be anyone of us and that’s what will hook you. You will see yourself in her and all of your close female friends/rela This book is the female driven book we’ve been waiting for. Charlotte is all of us except she’s running for Senate in her home state of PA. She’s driven to change the world but first she has to survive being a candidate and her marriage. Charlotte isn’t perfect, her marriage is in tatters but this is what she’s determined to do. I loved Ms. Piazza’s portrayal of someone who could be anyone of us and that’s what will hook you. You will see yourself in her and all of your close female friends/relatives. Ms. Piazza has quickly become an author I look forward to reading and Charlotte Walsh is her best yet.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Oh how I loved this book about a woman running for senate. The author brilliantly displays the push-pull of marriage and career and family life while giving an inside view of politics. The kids definitely get second (or third, or fourth) billing but I think that's sort of the point. It's the age old adage of you can't have it all, but wrapped up in an engaging tale and not the least bit judgmental or preachy. I loved the cynical campaign advisor and, given the author's journalistic background, I Oh how I loved this book about a woman running for senate. The author brilliantly displays the push-pull of marriage and career and family life while giving an inside view of politics. The kids definitely get second (or third, or fourth) billing but I think that's sort of the point. It's the age old adage of you can't have it all, but wrapped up in an engaging tale and not the least bit judgmental or preachy. I loved the cynical campaign advisor and, given the author's journalistic background, I have to think that much of his tactics are true. I will say that I gasped at the end, and my first reaction was "1 star!" but after thinking about it for 30 seconds, the ending was perfect. Love, love, loved this.
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  • Megan C.
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher for providing this book to me for review. Smart, timely, and well-written - I LOVED this one! I felt like the author handled the topic of women in politics with grace, but without flinching away from the ugly side of it. Not only dealing with women in the political arena, however, this novel is a great exploration of marriage, motherhood, and women in the work force. Highly recommended!
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    If Hillary had run BEFORE Bill and when Chelsea was a baby, this book might be the result! Of course, that doesn't take into account the topical #MeToo movement that gives much of this book its impetus. When Charlotte Walsh decides to run for the Senate, husband Max becomes the primary caregiver for toddler twins and infant Annie. Her opponent (of course) is a thrice-married, misogynistic white male (how did Piazza do that?) who blasts Charlotte and her pro-life organization at every turn. While If Hillary had run BEFORE Bill and when Chelsea was a baby, this book might be the result! Of course, that doesn't take into account the topical #MeToo movement that gives much of this book its impetus. When Charlotte Walsh decides to run for the Senate, husband Max becomes the primary caregiver for toddler twins and infant Annie. Her opponent (of course) is a thrice-married, misogynistic white male (how did Piazza do that?) who blasts Charlotte and her pro-life organization at every turn. While I sometimes found myself bogged down by the minutiae of daily details, the novel certainly captured the difficulties of running a political campaign, being a mother to three youngsters, putting up with family that wants to capitalize on the financial end of political life,dealing with the secrets that can undermine a healthy marriage, and being bashed by social media that criticizes her choice of flats over high heels on the campaign trail! Wow, covers a lot of ground and does it well! That being said, fortunately I will not be running for office anytime soon and deeply admire any woman willing to take on this incredibly thankless and overwhelming job! A good summer beach read that will make you delight you are on the beach and not the campaign trail!Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win is about a female candidate running for office. This book is Women's Fiction.The narrator is 47 year old Charlotte Walsh (3rd person POV).Charlotte has left a very successful job in Silicon Valley to run for the Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania. She wants to win. But she also wants to balance her ambition with her family (husband and 3 young daughters).The start of this book was just okay for me. It was interesting to see a woman running for Senate. But I jus Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win is about a female candidate running for office. This book is Women's Fiction.The narrator is 47 year old Charlotte Walsh (3rd person POV).Charlotte has left a very successful job in Silicon Valley to run for the Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania. She wants to win. But she also wants to balance her ambition with her family (husband and 3 young daughters).The start of this book was just okay for me. It was interesting to see a woman running for Senate. But I just wanted more. And the 3rd person POV made it even more difficult for me to connect with Charlotte.There was nothing really wrong with this book. But not that much happened until the end. The book definitely felt timely and the campaign felt very real. But the very end did not feel right to me. There were a few interesting revelations, but overall this book was just okay.Thanks to netgalley and Simon & Schuster for allowing me to read this book.
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  • ImLisaAnn
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-version of Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win from Simon & Schuster via NetGalley. I’m grateful to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for their generosity in providing a copy for me to review and, because I thoroughly enjoyed Charlotte Walsh, was happy to post this honest review. All opinions are my own.SynopsisCharlotte Walsh likes to win—she’s the Chief Operating Officer of a Silicon Valley technology company, mother of three under six, and best-selling author. She’s set her I received a free e-version of Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win from Simon & Schuster via NetGalley. I’m grateful to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley for their generosity in providing a copy for me to review and, because I thoroughly enjoyed Charlotte Walsh, was happy to post this honest review. All opinions are my own.SynopsisCharlotte Walsh likes to win—she’s the Chief Operating Officer of a Silicon Valley technology company, mother of three under six, and best-selling author. She’s set her sights on replacing her home-state’s incumbent senator—a serial philanderer who still manages to cinch tight his Bible belt every Sunday morning, his latest half-his-age wife shining in pastels and pearls beside him. Charlotte returns to Pennsylvania with her less-than-enthused husband Max, her children, and old dog in tow. Yet, as the race heats up, the attacks turn nastier, leaving Charlotte desperately hiding one last secret and wondering whether she and her family will still be standing come election day.TimingShortly after I finished Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win, I came across an Instagram post that called it “The book I didn’t know I needed to read after the 2016 Election.” That quote sums up in its entirety how I felt about Charlotte Walsh (and if it was you who said that or you know who it was, please comment below so I can credit you). I remember beginning that night in November 2016 texting with a friend who planned to travel to DC with me to see the first woman president be sworn in—we had our inauguration tickets, our lodging in DC worked out. We just needed to buy our plane tickets after Hillary was declared (Thank the universe we waited to buy those tickets). And then the growing feeling of disbelief until, finally, I went to bed shortly after eleven central time feeling shell-shocked and empty. I still question how we have gotten ourselves to this point—to the point where we have a president who aligns himself with David Duke and equates protestors with literal Nazis marching in the street. I realize this shock is the shock of privilege—I knew things were bad. But I thought they were bad in pockets; I thought the arc of history was steadily trucking towards justice. Timing is everything of course—Piazza’s book wouldn’t have had nearly the resonance it did if it weren’t published now—on the even of the midterms when hopes are riding high for a blue wave. Indeed, I don’t think Piazza would have even written this book had it not been for that night in November 2016—in many ways Charlotte Walsh feels like Piazza sharing how she wrote herself out of that shock and disappointment.CharlotteCharlotte is everything I wanted her to be. She is the kind of woman who can pull off this kind of campaign—which is to say she’s already incredibly rich and powerful in her own right. She’s taking names, not excuses. As an attorney, I receive my (un)fair share of side-eye when I’m assertive or, dare I say, bossy. Charlotte is a next-level boss, and yet, because it seems like every woman who dares put a little steel in her backbone gets a side-eye (particularly here in The South), Charlotte feels relatable, even to us little-b bosses. Sexism is, unfortunately, a seemingly universal experience for those of us with two X chromosomes, and the intensity she receives doesn’t make Charlotte less relatable. I also applaud Piazza for making Charlotte not a size two and occasionally a sweaty mess when she has to do things like wear a blazer outside in August while judging a pie-eating contest. I read that particular scene and could practically feel my sweat glands chime in with empathy—I know what it’s like to have to wear a long-sleeved suit in a Texas court in August. You have to wring out your coat just crossing the street to get back to your car.Charlotte’s relationship to her husband Max was a major element of the book and created much of the tension in the plot. Charlotte didn’t marry a house-husband. This is a marriage of two alphas, with the campaign forcing the issue of who gets to be first. In any relationship built on equality, that decision should be made jointly and with equal decision-making power. It isn’t so much that you should “take turns” but rather that the person whose needs are greater in any given moment should take precedence. When all things are equal, “needs” includes choices that would further a career or fulfill a dream. And yet, that’s always easier said than done. Having been the subordinate in an unequal marriage, it chafes to be the person on the bottom. Max becomes the subordinate to Charlotte during the year and a half she runs and that causes the friction you’d imagine. As a reader, Max’s attitude made me feel for Charlotte. I understood that Max didn’t like how the new role felt –neither do we Max when its forced on us—but it was Charlotte’s time. He agreed to this trip, so he needs to keep his hands and feet inside the car at all times until it stops moving.ScandalThere is, of course, a scandal that Charlotte is hiding. The existence of the scandal felt predictable—there had to be some looming threat, something to create the climax in the campaign besides election night itself. Piazza gets a pass there from me for the predictability. You knew it was coming (but not what it was) but there wasn’t really another way to create the tension the book needed. And holy smokes was the scandal bigger than I could have guessed. Charlotte’s inner fretting and sweating told me it was big. But…wow. And yet, here is where Piazza almost lost me. The scandal made Charlotte unlikeable. I get that it had to. It needed to be the kind of scandal that could threaten the election so it had to be the kind that would drive people away from her, make her seem unrelatable. I get it. But gosh darn it, I don’t have to like it. RecommendedThis book fits squarely within the camp of popular-lit, a category in which I don’t often find myself (#UnapologeticBookSnob #ButOnlyInMyChoices #ReadWhatYOULike). Reading the synopses of some of Piazza’s other work, I have no reason to doubt they’re as strongly written as Charlotte Walsh, but they probably aren’t my cup of tea. Charlotte Walsh had that hook, though. Piazza told a story I wanted and needed to hear. It was engaging without being fluffy. It was easy to read while still being tightly-written and well edited. It’s a book I recommend for readers wanting a book that feels immediately relevant, with flawed but relatable characters. It’s a book I recommend for any woman who went to bed on that night in November 2016 feeling empty and sick. There is a way forward and it starts with you getting your butt to the polls in November. And maybe it continues with you running. If Charlotte Walsh can do it, so can you.VoteTo confirm you are registered to vote and find your poling place, you can check https://www.nass.org/can-i-vote. With all of the voter suppression happening, please confirm now that you are still registered to vote—even if you voted in the last election. And then get your butt to the polls in November. <3Let us vote in such overwhelming numbers that we show everyone who much we love our country, how much we love our people, how much we love peace, how much we love life itself. -Nelson MandelaNotesPublished: July 24, 2018 by Simon & Schuster (@simonandschuster)Author: Jo Piazza (@jopiazzaauthor)Date read: July 19, 2018Rating: 4 starsIf you enjoyed this review, you can find more at http://lisaannreads.com <3
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  • Rachel SV (nerdlyy)
    January 1, 1970
    CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN follows the title character as she runs for Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania. Charlotte is an ambitious, accomplished woman who wants to make a difference in the world and is tired of the way politicians operate. We see the good, the bad, and the ugly of being a woman in the political arena – there’s a lot of sacrifice and subterfuge in politics, but obviously we know women are judged on a whole different level.This book is such a timely, realistic portrayal CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN follows the title character as she runs for Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania. Charlotte is an ambitious, accomplished woman who wants to make a difference in the world and is tired of the way politicians operate. We see the good, the bad, and the ugly of being a woman in the political arena – there’s a lot of sacrifice and subterfuge in politics, but obviously we know women are judged on a whole different level.This book is such a timely, realistic portrayal of what it means to be a woman running for office and what it means for her family to sacrifice so much of their own lives for a goal that’s not their own. The characters are all interesting and relatable, and it’s such a quick read because of Piazza’s skilled writing. And there’s some serious drama I didn’t expect, which is always fun for me as a reader.I will say this: the ending had me feeling some kind of way, and I’ve been thinking about it since I finished it a few days ago. I wouldn’t call it disappointing, but it was a bit maddening at the time. I’ve since grappled with it and understand why the book needed to end this way.--I’ll update with a more thought out review in the next few days, but this was so good! Stayed up until midnight to finish it, which is becoming a terrible habit for me 😴
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4/5I don’t normally read politically-focused novels, not because I don’t care but hearing about it on the news is enough for me. But the summary of this book just intrigued me and it was a ‘read now’ on NetGalley so I decided to give it a try.And, goodness, did it deliver the goods.Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win tackles the costs of being a woman in the limelight, specifically one running for office. At the heart of this novel is Charlotte Walsh, a big shot Silicon Valley exec who decides Rating: 4/5I don’t normally read politically-focused novels, not because I don’t care but hearing about it on the news is enough for me. But the summary of this book just intrigued me and it was a ‘read now’ on NetGalley so I decided to give it a try.And, goodness, did it deliver the goods.Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win tackles the costs of being a woman in the limelight, specifically one running for office. At the heart of this novel is Charlotte Walsh, a big shot Silicon Valley exec who decides to return to her home state of Pennsylvania to be its first-ever female senatorial candidate. She starts on her campaign not fully realizing just how much of herself would be exposed to a public who is all too glad to pick apart her every word and action. Assisted by her savvy campaign manager Josh Pratt, her fiercely loyal executive assistant Leila Kelly, and her team, Charlotte weathers on, but as election day nears a secret she’s been keeping threatens to ruin her bid for office and her marriage.From the plot to its pace to the writing and down to its characters, Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win is a solid book.I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I loved the writing. Jo Piazza’s humorous and witty spin on otherwise serious matters such as class, gender, healthcare and skills re-training made this page-turner all the more engaging and relatable. I think people will find themselves agreeing with the points she opened up in this story.That said, what I loved the most about this book are its characters. They are flawed, nuanced but still likable. Every character in this book is fleshed out and I’m sure readers will feel like they know the whole cast well after they finished reading.Of course, Charlotte was the one who resonated to me the most. She is ambitious, idealistic, resourceful, smart, and confident and insecure at the time. The stuff she had to put up to – double standards that you’d think no longer exist in this day age – disgusted and angered me in equal measures. There was this couple of lines in the first chapter that, I think, perfectly capture this. These lines are from Josh during his and Charlie’s interview just before the start of the campaign.As a woman, you bear the burden of having to appear to be charismatic, smart, well-groomed, nice, but not too nice. If you’re married, you need to look happily married. If you have kids, you should be the mother of the year.The expectations foisted upon her were unrealistically high, something that, sadly, a lot of women the world over still deal with. Both the press and the people she wants to serve dissect her every move so much that even her choice became an issue.But that’s just one part of Charlotte’s story.As important as the political side of her story is, the part that interested me the most was Charlotte’s and Max’s relationship. There was just something raw and real in their exchanges, a sort of power struggle in their dynamic. I was invested in them, wanted them to survive both the campaign and election, and Charlie’s big secret. I think this is why several days after finishing I’m still not sure how and what to think about the way this book ended.That aside, Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win is a timely, funny and honest read. Sneak this in on your beach read list. You’d definitely won’t regret it.(Digital ARC graciously provided by the publisher via NetGalley)(This review is first posted on my blog: In Between Book Pages.
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    I follow politics pretty closely, use reputable (NYT and such) sources and it mostly produced a sort of incredulous disgust in what the world’s becoming. Charlotte Walsh, a 47 year old Silicon Valley exec, a multimillionaire, wife and a mother of three young children, presumably has something of the same reaction, but decides to be proactive about it. So she moves back to her boondock PA birthplace and sets off to win a senate seat. The thing about PA is that it’s a staggeringly backwards state I follow politics pretty closely, use reputable (NYT and such) sources and it mostly produced a sort of incredulous disgust in what the world’s becoming. Charlotte Walsh, a 47 year old Silicon Valley exec, a multimillionaire, wife and a mother of three young children, presumably has something of the same reaction, but decides to be proactive about it. So she moves back to her boondock PA birthplace and sets off to win a senate seat. The thing about PA is that it’s a staggeringly backwards state with two small enclaves of civilization, so it has never produced a female governor or a US senator. Charlotte is on a pretty revolutionary mission and she brings to it the same determination which has led her to success thus far, but at the same time she drags herself and her already struggling marriage though something genuinely heinous…the American public attention. The problem with democracy is that it empowers everyone equally, from a moron who’s never took the time to understand a single political platform to someone well educated on the matter, and of course the former hold the majority. So most of the time is dedicated to Charlotte essentially dumbing herself down to appeal to the voters. It’s a very realistic and all the more for it tragic state of affairs. One that to me is nearly incomprehensible….why wouldn’t you want to be represented by someone smarter than you? Anyway, things being as they are Charlotte is set to win the votes previously almost solely bestowed upon a crusty old misogynistic conservative caricature that’s all too archetypal of the present day powers that be. While her marriage implodes. Frankly, I was afraid this would be chicklit (the author’s previous titles didn’t inspire much confidence), but this was determinedly more serious than that, women fiction, sure, but a quality one. Something that’s timely and compelling, something that eclipses relationship challenges, a clever commentary on the modern society…whether it satirizes the lifestyles of the California’s 1% while juxtaposing them to the PA’s countryfried poverty or discusses the ugliness of politics. I’m not sure I particularly liked most of the main characters or related to them, Charlotte’s drive in particular is a complete mindboggler to me and the self flagellation of her endeavor is horrendous and incomprehensible. It also seemed that she wasn’t so much dedicated to becoming the first PA female senator as she was to feeding her ego, the election nothing but a powertrip to rebound from and also a distraction from being cheated on, so maybe less than noble intentions. But at any rate it made for a pretty good read, producing a lot of the same thoughts as reading the actual news does…disgust and incredulity, but also genuine interest. Plus it was genuinely well written. Of course, a woman of power in the office is too much of an anathema in this country and maybe Charlotte isn’t the one to change the paradigm, but someone’s got to try and (considering all it takes) it really ought to be a woman who likes to win. Thanks Netgalley.
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  • Sarah at Sarah's Book Shelves
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Simon & Schuster and Netgalley for an advanced copy of this book.I’ve been loving books about substantial topics that read easy this summer and I can now add Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win to that list! Though it reads easy enough for the beach, it’s full of astute commentary on women in politics, women in business, managing your image in public life, marriage, motherhood, and gender roles. It makes you feel how truly soul-sucking campaigning and politics can be. But, it also has Thank you to Simon & Schuster and Netgalley for an advanced copy of this book.I’ve been loving books about substantial topics that read easy this summer and I can now add Charlotte Walsh Likes to Win to that list! Though it reads easy enough for the beach, it’s full of astute commentary on women in politics, women in business, managing your image in public life, marriage, motherhood, and gender roles. It makes you feel how truly soul-sucking campaigning and politics can be. But, it also has snappy dialogue, a badass sister-in-law (Kara), and a Friday Night Lights name-check (the easiest way to my heart). Charlotte is a complex character and your sympathy level for her will probably flip-flop throughout the story. The ending will drive some people bonkers and made me say “WTF,” but the more I thought about it, the more it fits with the overall message of the book. An excellent choice for fans of The Hopefuls by Jennifer Close, for book clubs, and for your beach/pool bag!Visit https://www.sarahsbookshelves.com for more reviews.
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adored this book. It's incredibly clever but also unapologetically feminist. I loved Charlotte and her strong desire to make life better for other people. She's not a perfect character---she does at least one thing that is completely awful, and you could make a case that she's done other horrible things, too---but I also completely understood her motivations. She's a character who feels like a real person, like she's a coworker or neighbor, someone you've known forever. It also show I absolutely adored this book. It's incredibly clever but also unapologetically feminist. I loved Charlotte and her strong desire to make life better for other people. She's not a perfect character---she does at least one thing that is completely awful, and you could make a case that she's done other horrible things, too---but I also completely understood her motivations. She's a character who feels like a real person, like she's a coworker or neighbor, someone you've known forever. It also shows the horrible side of campaigning. To be fair, I was pretty sure how awful it would be anyway, but this is even more grueling than I had pictured. Charlotte essentially is on display ALL THE TIME and has to remember to keep smiling because if there is even one second where she isn't, that's the picture that will be in all the newspapers. And while unsmiling pictures of male candidates are totally fine, they make women seem angry. My only complaint is that I can't vote for her because (a) I don't live in Pennsylvania and (b) she's not real.Highly recommended.
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  • Becca Freeman
    January 1, 1970
    This book is excellent. I finished it five minutes ago and immediately fired off texts to 3 of my friends telling them THEY NEED TO READ THIS BOOK. The book follows Charlotte Walsh, a Sheryl Sandburg-esque tech executive, who decides to leave her Silicon Valley job and run for Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania. The book manages to be smart while still being addictively readable — think The West Wing — and illustrates important issues of female representation in politics and the struggle t This book is excellent. I finished it five minutes ago and immediately fired off texts to 3 of my friends telling them THEY NEED TO READ THIS BOOK. The book follows Charlotte Walsh, a Sheryl Sandburg-esque tech executive, who decides to leave her Silicon Valley job and run for Senate in her home state of Pennsylvania. The book manages to be smart while still being addictively readable — think The West Wing — and illustrates important issues of female representation in politics and the struggle to "have it all".Most importantly, I didn't realize until I read the editor's note that this is the first book to depict a woman running for national political office. It's amazing and important that Jo Piazza brought this fictional depiction into existence so we can start to think about and discuss the challenges women face in deciding to run for office, the scrutiny they encounter for doing so, and the hard road, both politically and personally, to election.
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  • Sarah Bohl
    January 1, 1970
    In an undisclosed but post-Trump election cycle, Charlotte Walsh has moved from Silicon Valley to Pennsylvania to run for Senate. Will her struggling marriage, addict brother, or suitcase of emotional baggage ruin her chances of winning? After enjoying Fitness Junkie last summer, I was looking forward to this read but found it very disappointing. It was long winded and limped along with the promise of revealing a big secret....which turned out to be kinda meh. The only reason I finished is to fi In an undisclosed but post-Trump election cycle, Charlotte Walsh has moved from Silicon Valley to Pennsylvania to run for Senate. Will her struggling marriage, addict brother, or suitcase of emotional baggage ruin her chances of winning? After enjoying Fitness Junkie last summer, I was looking forward to this read but found it very disappointing. It was long winded and limped along with the promise of revealing a big secret....which turned out to be kinda meh. The only reason I finished is to find out what happens in the end, and guess what?? The author leaves it purposefully ambiguous. The only reason I gave it 2 stars rather than 1 is because of the portrayal of women running for office, and how the campaign process can change your life overnight. Piazza also plants a few good life lessons, usually from the Roz and Leila characters. That being said, a lot of the character relationships were underdeveloped, and I feel this book might have been rushed to be released for the 2018 midterms. If you are interested in this topic, read Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin instead. **I received a galley if this book in exchange for my honest opinion**
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  • Patty Smith
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Netgalley, Simon and Schuster and Jo Piazza for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Josh, her campaign manager, asks “Charlotte?…Are you still in this race? I can end it now. You can end it now. It still won’t be pretty, but I promise it will be easier.”…Charlotte made her voice equally low. “I want to stay in.”Charlotte Walsh likes to win. Even when her whole life is crumbling around her, she still needs to win. Why did she decide to do this? Why run for Senate in a state that My thanks to Netgalley, Simon and Schuster and Jo Piazza for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Josh, her campaign manager, asks “Charlotte?…Are you still in this race? I can end it now. You can end it now. It still won’t be pretty, but I promise it will be easier.”…Charlotte made her voice equally low. “I want to stay in.”Charlotte Walsh likes to win. Even when her whole life is crumbling around her, she still needs to win. Why did she decide to do this? Why run for Senate in a state that has never elected a woman. Why give up her high paying, successful career at a Silicon Valley job to join the campaign trail that is full of fast food, driving across the state in a minivan and eighteen hour days smiling and shaking hands? Why did she think with three young children and a strained marriage that this was a great next move. Most importantly, why did she decide to do this when she knew that her secret was pretty much guaranteed to come out and ruin not only her chances, but also her family. Charlotte’s struggle is real. Her marriage has suffered an affair but was it really built on a strong foundation? During one of their fights her husband, Max, tells her that he only married her because he felt sorry for her. In her heart, Charlotte always believed it to be true. When a woman is smart, driven and successful, it seems to have a direct effect onto a man’s ego. Max gets a huge boost of respect and admiration for giving up his career to stay at home and look after their three children. Charlotte takes an enormous amount of heat for abandoning her family to pursue her selfish goal. It is still a crime in this country for a woman to want things for herself. I mean if you want to run a marathon or sell home made crafts on Etsy, you should be fine, but you are not allowed to want the same things men want. Charlotte notes that she still gets the kids ready in the morning while Max goes on a run and she looks after them in the evenings when she gets home at dinner time. This is an age old problem. You can work, but you are still responsible for everything pertaining to home life. I felt that issues women face were made relevant in this book without becoming preachy. It wasn’t thrown in your face, you just got to see what Charlotte was going through and as a character, I not only liked her, but I felt for her. All the characters were flushed out, real, complex and multi dimensional which I appreciated.Politics is a rough game and worse if you are a woman. She gets asked what colour of nail polish she is wearing, wearing flats is making a statement, and everything from her femininity to her parenting skills are called into question. You are simultaneously a “little lady” who can’t get anything done and the biggest current threat to democracy. I guess it could be called timely considering the political climate these days, but I feel like this could have been written any time. That’s what I loved. Politics was the perfect back drop for this story. This was a great read. Exciting, fast paced and an authentic story told in a very real, complex and thoughtful way. It was multi layered, I was involved in the journey and I enjoyed the characters. Once again, I wasn’t paying attention to where I was in the book and I was unprepared for and really shocked when the ending came. It is really abrupt so be forewarned. It doesn’t mean I didn’t like the ending, just not what I expected. I think a lot of people will respond to this book and was a really great read.
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  • Really Into This
    January 1, 1970
    Check out all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends!CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN BY JO PIAZZA BOOK REVIEWI am a huge fan of The Knockoff & Fitness Junkie which are both co-authored by Jo Piazza. When I heard she had a stand-alone book coming out this summer, I rushed at the chance to read it. I will say this is a book anyone can enjoy, regardless of your own political ideology.A TIMELY POLITICAL NOVEL THAT RESONATES WITH ALL WOMENThe timeline for Charlotte Walsh Check out all of our reviews at https://reallyintothis.comHappy Reading, friends!CHARLOTTE WALSH LIKES TO WIN BY JO PIAZZA BOOK REVIEWI am a huge fan of The Knockoff & Fitness Junkie which are both co-authored by Jo Piazza. When I heard she had a stand-alone book coming out this summer, I rushed at the chance to read it. I will say this is a book anyone can enjoy, regardless of your own political ideology.A TIMELY POLITICAL NOVEL THAT RESONATES WITH ALL WOMENThe timeline for Charlotte Walsh is right now. Jo Piazza accurately captures our political climate at this very moment. There’s the writer from Teen Vogue asking insightful & meaningful questions, Twitter trolls, Instagram experts, a run in with a guy who has a Swastika tattoo on his neck & pundits criticizing Charlotte’s choice of shoes.As Charlotte returns to her roots in Pennsylvania, it’s a bit reminiscent of Hillbilly Elegy. Jo writes about the opioid crisis, failing schools, the high cost of healthcare & the lost factory jobs in the Rust Belt. Readers learn more about Charlotte. She comes from humble beginnings yet fought her way to an Ivy League education. We also meet her brother Paul & the juxtaposition between Paul & Charlotte couldn’t be more clear.RUN LIKE A MOTHERCharlotte Walsh is a powerful female; no doubt about it. Charlotte Walsh is also a woman with secrets. Let’s be honest; our country is not set up for mothers who work outside of the home. If you so wish, feel free to argue with me directly on this statement. Jo Piazza delves into how challenging this political race is for Charlotte. There are missed dinners at home, long drives in the minivan, uprooting her children & judgment for running in this race. Charlotte’s spouse changes his job & schedule to accomodate her run. Instead of being met with praise & understanding, the media ridicules him.I connected with Charlotte. Our ideals closely match & l like that Charlotte is flawed. Aren’t we all? There are some pretty heavy & salacious secrets that come out during the campaign. Readers see Charlotte’s marriage struggle to survive, old friendships breakdown & yet, Charlotte persists.THE VERDICTI am Really Into This book! Charlotte is someone I can & will root for in every sense of the word. This book left me feeling inspired, strong & proud to continue to fight for what I believe in. I want to vote for Charlotte & I can’t wait to get a chance to vote for my state, county, city, country’s version of her!Special thanks to Jo Piazza, Simon & Schuster & NetGalley for providing our copy in exchange for an honest & fair review.
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  • Axelle Blanpain
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a fantastic read!Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win is the story of Charlotte, a successful business woman in the silicone valley that decides to run for Senate in her home state of Pensylvania. Along with her husband and their three adorable daughters, they move back into Charlotte's childhood home and reconnect with her brother and family.But we all know that politics aren't always fair and square. Will she be able to compete against her opponent, who is clearly determined to reveal al This book was a fantastic read!Charlotte Walsh Likes To Win is the story of Charlotte, a successful business woman in the silicone valley that decides to run for Senate in her home state of Pensylvania. Along with her husband and their three adorable daughters, they move back into Charlotte's childhood home and reconnect with her brother and family.But we all know that politics aren't always fair and square. Will she be able to compete against her opponent, who is clearly determined to reveal all her dirty secrets? Will her marriage survive this race to win? Will her husband be willing to press pause on his own life and career to become a stay-at-home dad?I really loved the characters in this book as they all felt really relatable and human. The story kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time and I was really invested int he story. This fiction was both realist and thrilling at the same time. Since I was born and raised in Belgium, it was a fun insight into the USA politics as it is very different from our own political system over here in Europe. Furthermore, I think that it resonates really well with the current state of the politics all around the world and talks about the issue that women in power often face.I would highly recommend this book to anyone and plan on reading more from Jo Piazza
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