Adjustment Day
The author of Fight Club takes America beyond our darkest dreams in this timely satire.People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They’ve been reading a mysterious book and memorizing its directives. They are ready for the reckoning.Adjustment Day, the author’s first novel in four years, is an ingeniously comic work in which Chuck Palahniuk does what he does best: skewer the absurdities in our society. Smug, geriatric politicians bring the nation to the brink of a third world war in an effort to control the burgeoning population of young males; working-class men dream of burying the elites; and professors propound theories that offer students only the bleakest future.When Adjustment Day arrives, it fearlessly makes real the logical conclusion of every separatist fantasy, alternative fact, and conspiracy theory lurking in the American psyche.

Adjustment Day Details

TitleAdjustment Day
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2018
PublisherW. W. Norton & Company
ISBN-139780393652598
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Science Fiction, Dystopia

Adjustment Day Review

  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED Fight Club. Of course, I only saw the movie and didn't read the book. Totally brilliant! So, when I saw this, I thought I would be blown away and that there would be some awesome twisty stuff. But, neither of those things happened. It was disappointing.The set-up is a crazy end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it in the U.S.. There is a take-over and re-shuffling. It is parody of what is going on in our society, but it was a little over the top with silliness. I wished it was grittier, but it is I LOVED Fight Club. Of course, I only saw the movie and didn't read the book. Totally brilliant! So, when I saw this, I thought I would be blown away and that there would be some awesome twisty stuff. But, neither of those things happened. It was disappointing.The set-up is a crazy end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it in the U.S.. There is a take-over and re-shuffling. It is parody of what is going on in our society, but it was a little over the top with silliness. I wished it was grittier, but it is mostly silly.Also, it was long. Like waaaaay too long for what it was. If it was half the length, I think it would have been a strange little parody on American politics and the war between the Boomers and the Millennials. It just missed the mark by going on and on, and having things get so ridiculously out there. Which leads to the next point:This book offends everyone. It is an equal opportunity offender. So politically ridiculously over the top!Everyone is getting raped. Eye-raped, ear-raped, mind-raped, stomach-raped.... I saw the humor in using the term raped the way he did, because it really was timely, but again, offensive as hell.My advice is to stay away. It isn't as clever or funny or even biting as he thinks it is. This guy's funnier.So's this one.
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  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    Rounding up from a 3.5On the one hand, it's nice to have Chuck back and doing fiction. Not only that, he's doing fiction that doesn't rely on a gimmick like the last.... decade or so of his output. No disrespect to some of those books, but also some of them were garbage.On the other hand, it was hard to read this and not feel like the man is perhaps past his prime. Conceptually, he's got his finger right on the jackhammer pulse of the present (it was surprisingly gratifying to see him sending up Rounding up from a 3.5On the one hand, it's nice to have Chuck back and doing fiction. Not only that, he's doing fiction that doesn't rely on a gimmick like the last.... decade or so of his output. No disrespect to some of those books, but also some of them were garbage.On the other hand, it was hard to read this and not feel like the man is perhaps past his prime. Conceptually, he's got his finger right on the jackhammer pulse of the present (it was surprisingly gratifying to see him sending up the ways in which his own oeuvre has been co-opted by alt-right white males who believe that FIGHT CLUB was an instructional guide etc) and the novel has flashes of that sharp, sharp, sharp satirical brilliance that made his early work so special. But it's also a surprisingly LONG novel for only being 300-ish pages. At times, it is a downright drag, man, and while the chronologically jumbled narrative has a purpose (of sorts), it mostly just furthers the novel's sense of discohesion. And maybe it's just all a little too close to home. Or maybe it's that Palahniuk's irreverent "piss 'em all off" attitude towards political correctness feels a little jejune these days. Or maybe I'm not the reader I was when I first found Chuck. Maybe that's for the best.
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  • Uriel Perez
    January 1, 1970
    I’m pleased to report a few months ahead of the scheduled publication date that this is classic Chuck; back with enough here to shock, offend and make us laugh all the same. The book follows a plot to completely upend the U.S. government and re-invent the nation into some Libertarian fantasyland, creating separatist ethno-states and violently dispersing wealth and prestige to the most violent and dedicated followers of a radical, new edict. From the far reaches of Caucasia, Blacktopia and Gaysia I’m pleased to report a few months ahead of the scheduled publication date that this is classic Chuck; back with enough here to shock, offend and make us laugh all the same. The book follows a plot to completely upend the U.S. government and re-invent the nation into some Libertarian fantasyland, creating separatist ethno-states and violently dispersing wealth and prestige to the most violent and dedicated followers of a radical, new edict. From the far reaches of Caucasia, Blacktopia and Gaysia, the principal homelands within the formerly United States, we follow a mishmash of displaced persons and leaders with newfound power navigating their “adjusted” positions to disturbing, heroic and often hilarious ends.Adjustment Day is a side-splitting satire that is ripe for this day and age. It holds up a mirror to our own societal decay, casting a spotlight on the faults and ironies of our broken political and ideological systems.Absolutely perfect for Generation Click-Bait.
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  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    "Drugs are popular because they give the user a window of madness or illness that can be scheduled. Unlike sickness, drugs can synchronize the infection, derangement, and recuperation of a group of people."Adjustment Day is a modern reinvention of Project Mayhem that takes over the world. People get brainwashed by what they see on television and what they read in this little blue/black book. They get consumed by what they see and hear. It’s eerie how similar this story is to the world we are liv "Drugs are popular because they give the user a window of madness or illness that can be scheduled. Unlike sickness, drugs can synchronize the infection, derangement, and recuperation of a group of people."Adjustment Day is a modern reinvention of Project Mayhem that takes over the world. People get brainwashed by what they see on television and what they read in this little blue/black book. They get consumed by what they see and hear. It’s eerie how similar this story is to the world we are living in now. The first rule of Adjustment Day is you must talk about Adjustment Day.The second rule of Adjustment Day is you must talk about Adjustment Day.The third rule of Adjustment Day is you must carry the little blue/black book at all times and it must be visible. The fourth rule of Adjustment Day is if you die, that ear is coming off. Chuck Palahniuk is my favorite author and it pains me to say this but this is the first time that I have been fully disappointed by one of his books. There wasn’t anything special about this and I couldn’t even finish it. My heart breaks. If you are just reading Palahniuk for the first time, I would find another one. If you don’t look at it, maybe it will go away!
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  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    Grilled peacock tongues, sweet smelling Shasta earplugs, brown recluse mush dick, buckets of spit, scary unbridled vajayjays, and the start of grouse hunting season.Palahniuk is a strange cat. I dig his work, but he seems to be a wee hit or miss. He can be absolutely brilliant and then turn in something marginally mediocre. Dude definitely has his own unique style and voice. Despite the inconsistencies, he remains one of my “must read” authors.I was lucky enough to meet Mr. Palahniuk in San Fran Grilled peacock tongues, sweet smelling Shasta earplugs, brown recluse mush dick, buckets of spit, scary unbridled vajayjays, and the start of grouse hunting season.Palahniuk is a strange cat. I dig his work, but he seems to be a wee hit or miss. He can be absolutely brilliant and then turn in something marginally mediocre. Dude definitely has his own unique style and voice. Despite the inconsistencies, he remains one of my “must read” authors.I was lucky enough to meet Mr. Palahniuk in San Francisco recently on the Adjustment Day tour and we got to chat for a few minutes before his signing event. It was pretty cool to meet him in person. Turns out to be a very nice and soft-spoken guy. Funny too, as you would expect.Adjustment Day is a mixed bag. Flashes of the brilliant Chuck with periods of wtf. I enjoyed parts of it but thought it could have been a bit more with a little less fluff. It was very political, as well, which I could always do without. Overall, a just better than ok effort set upon a very high bar. I giving this one 2.5 Stars. “A smile is your best bullet proof vest.”
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  • Chris Berko
    January 1, 1970
    After first reading Fight Club in 1998 Chuck P has been one of my favorite authors. I've read all of his first eight books at least twice and most of them three or four times. Unfortunately he has been hit or miss since those, and this one is undoubtedly a miss. It probably would have made a great short story, I liked the first twenty pages and then the last ten or so were alright but everything in between was a mess. No matter how preachy he used to get, no matter how nihilistic or anarchy-indu After first reading Fight Club in 1998 Chuck P has been one of my favorite authors. I've read all of his first eight books at least twice and most of them three or four times. Unfortunately he has been hit or miss since those, and this one is undoubtedly a miss. It probably would have made a great short story, I liked the first twenty pages and then the last ten or so were alright but everything in between was a mess. No matter how preachy he used to get, no matter how nihilistic or anarchy-inducing his writing was it never failed to be entertaining. This stuff was not entertaining. In my real life I am a politics junkie, I scan twitter and news sites for that one morsel that is going to make me feel better, which admittedly never comes. Perhaps if I read this in less crazy times, perhaps in a time when it doesn't seem like the world is on the brink of collapse every minute of every day, but alas I did not. I know it is satire, and I get where he was coming from with the concept behind this book, but at the same time I want to be entertained. This did not. Two stars because I finished it.
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  • Peter Derk
    January 1, 1970
    50 pages into this book, I was thinking, "Ah, Christ. So Mr. Palahniuk is weighing in on American politics too? Is fucking EVERYONE an expert now?"But then I read some more, and what he's doing is way more interesting. What I see happening on both sides of the real-world political fence is journalists, interviewers, reviewers and so on amping up the political side of every story. An artist releases a new album, and we're WAY more likely to hear about the artist's politics or projected viewpoint 50 pages into this book, I was thinking, "Ah, Christ. So Mr. Palahniuk is weighing in on American politics too? Is fucking EVERYONE an expert now?"But then I read some more, and what he's doing is way more interesting. What I see happening on both sides of the real-world political fence is journalists, interviewers, reviewers and so on amping up the political side of every story. An artist releases a new album, and we're WAY more likely to hear about the artist's politics or projected viewpoint than we are to hear anything about the musical qualities of the album. A movie comes out, and we're pretty likely to hear where it falls on the pass/fail spectrum of the Bechdel Test, but less likely to hear about its qualities as a movie. A book comes out, and there's a lot of application of "so important in this fraught political moment."This isn't a bad thing. Someone should always be looking at things that way, and someone always has been, but it's tipped towards that being the primary, if not only, method by which so many of us are evaluating art. It feels like we're using everything as a segue to politics. All roads lead to politics. And while art can serve that purpose, it's being railroaded into serving only that purpose. Hence the common phrase: All art is political.Adjustment Day calls bullshit. Instead of using art to talk about politics, Mr. Palahniuk uses politics to talk about art. Politics dominate the book up top, and the path they take leads away, back into art. I love this book for doing that. I love that this book poses the idea that art is bigger than politics, that art doesn't serve politics.I love the idea that art doesn't have to be yoked into service pulling the wagon of politics. Politics can take a turn pulling its own fucking wagon. I never thought I would consider that a radical statement, but here we are. Mr. Palahniuk has done something really interesting here. Something really different. Of all his books, I'm most curious how this will age. I wonder if it will make sense to a generation who comes of age 25 years from now and doesn't really understand the current climate. It might not make sense. It might, like a lot of satire, do well. Jonathan Swift, Kurt Vonnegut, Joseph Heller, Ken Kesey, Miguel de Cervantes, Shakespeare, John Kennedy Toole, all writers who did very "of-the-time" satire that still works years and years later. Probably because satire sticks it to assholes, and it doesn't matter what time or country it is, we all love to see an asshole get what he deserves.Either way. It's a book for fans of Chuck's work. Now, don't get me wrong. The writing style is different. It's calmer, less white-knuckle than his early books, and that's in the service of the story. The writing style presents things less as immediately engaging than it does really, really interesting. It's not a difficult, dense book. It's lulls you into going along with a very crazy story by presenting it in a very plain way. What I mean is, if you like Chuck's work because he's always doing his own thing, writing books that nobody else is writing, then you'll appreciate this one as part of that career.Wait, shit. Not "career." You'll appreciate it as a limb on his body of art.
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  • Allen Adams
    January 1, 1970
    http://www.themaineedge.com/buzz/the-...America’s master of transgressive literary satire is back at it again.Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel – his first in four years – is “Adjustment Day,” a bleak look at the potential future implied by the logical (and not-so-logical) endpoints of our society’s current extremities. Filled with off-puttingly fascinating imagery, Palahniuk combines a belief in the power of the individual man with a nihilistic lack of faith in the judgment of mankind. It’s an anti-R http://www.themaineedge.com/buzz/the-...America’s master of transgressive literary satire is back at it again.Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel – his first in four years – is “Adjustment Day,” a bleak look at the potential future implied by the logical (and not-so-logical) endpoints of our society’s current extremities. Filled with off-puttingly fascinating imagery, Palahniuk combines a belief in the power of the individual man with a nihilistic lack of faith in the judgment of mankind. It’s an anti-Randian treatise born of an extrapolation of Randian viewpoints, a libertarian fever dream of a dystopia populated by easily led men fueled by hatred and ignorance.“Adjustment Day” also features Palahniuk’s standard well-honed prose and pitch-black humor, along with at least a few moments that’ll turn your stomach even as they force you to consider the heretofore unthinkable.It’s an undefined time in America’s near future. The global community is teetering on the brink of another world war – this one driven by elderly politicians eager to thin the herd of young men and maintain the status quo. The U.S. is on the verge of reinstituting the draft, leaving thousands upon thousands of young men frustrated, angry and afraid. The blue-collared masses dream of turning white collars red. Ivory tower academics spout little more than grim platitudes that offer neither satisfaction nor sympathy.Into this tumult comes the List.The List simply appears one day, a collection of names on the internet. An open-sourced invitation is expressed – add the names of anyone you might consider an enemy of society. From there, people vote. If a name doesn’t receive a certain number of votes within a set timeframe, it disappears from the List. But some names – politicians, academics, figures from old media and new alike – rapidly climb the ranks.Simultaneously, a strange book begins making the rounds. Passed from hand to hand, the book espouses a particular and peculiar philosophy, one whose impassioned militancy captures the imaginations of a certain subset of the disaffected – people who perceive their place in the world to be far less than what they truly deserve. People whose whispers of what’s to come are passed between those so overwhelmed with lies that they’ve chosen to create their own truth by whatever means necessary.People who will welcome the brutal reality of Adjustment Day … and what comes after.What makes Chuck Palahniuk such an effective writer is his ability to strain the bonds of credulity without snapping them. He stretches and shapes the worlds he creates, piling relatively minor alterations atop one another until we’re suddenly existing in an insane place at which we arrived through a seemingly sane series of steps. He never pushes too hard, but he also never stops pushing – the result is a distended and divided dystopia, a nightmarish landscape that still offers a horrifying hint of plausibility.The narrative is a bit disjointed; Palahniuk is unafraid to leap from perspective to perspective, illustrating both the lead-up to and aftermath of Adjustment Day through a wide spectrum of characters. The quick cuts between storylines could have been a distraction, but the shattered-glass quality of the structural choices only serve to mirror the fractures borne out in the society we see play out on the pages.“Adjustment Day” would seem to be Palahniuk’s reaction to the radical alterations to our own societal structures in recent years; while he has always been transgressive in his attitudes, this book is different. Whereas in past works, there’s been a feeling of remove, an observational quality to the stories he tells, this one feels angrier and more personal. Occasionally, it seems that the heat undermines the narrative a bit. More often, however, that rage serves to elevate the proceedings, providing an immediacy and urgency that we haven’t seen from Palahniuk for some time.(There’s also a metatextual quality to the book; Palahniuk uses this new work to reflect (and pass judgment) on his own previous creations. Most of the time, that reflection/judgment is inferred, but he occasionally gets REALLY overt about it, in ways that are both insightful and darkly funny. This seems to serve as almost a satiric whetstone, a way to hone the blade so that it might cut even deeper.)“Adjustment Day” isn’t a complete success. The cast of characters runs a bit too big; they occasionally run together a bit. There are a couple of spots where Palahniuk might be trying a little too hard to shock, but that’s par for the course – the guy is unafraid to take big swings. And when you swing big, well … sometimes you miss.What Palahniuk has created here is a chilling and unsettling vision of our future, an exaggerated Darkest Timeline rendering of where our society’s current path might lead. It is garish and gross, a nihilistic stomach-punch of a book fueled by anger and gallows hilarity. “Adjustment Day” is evocative and provocative in equal measure – a novel very much of its place and time.
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve not read much of Palahniuk’s work. In fact, I’ve only read Fight Club. So, when I got the chance to get my hands on an ARC of his new book, I didn’t hesitate. He’s a writer I’ve always wanted to explore more. But, man, what a drag this was. I really, REALLY enjoy the premise. The book reads sort of like a tome for an event that’s already happened, and it’s eerie to see the similarities between our real world and the world Palahniuk creates. It was hard not to make comparisons throughout to I’ve not read much of Palahniuk’s work. In fact, I’ve only read Fight Club. So, when I got the chance to get my hands on an ARC of his new book, I didn’t hesitate. He’s a writer I’ve always wanted to explore more. But, man, what a drag this was. I really, REALLY enjoy the premise. The book reads sort of like a tome for an event that’s already happened, and it’s eerie to see the similarities between our real world and the world Palahniuk creates. It was hard not to make comparisons throughout to Project Mayhem, if Project Mayhem went global. Maybe that’s because I’ve only read Fight Club, but maybe it’s something others will see as well. Even though the premise is good, the execution is just not there. The book jumps from character to character so much that I couldn’t grasp who anyone was, or care about anything they were doing. It also seemed to take FOREVER to actually get to Adjustment Day - by my calculations, it started on page 111. For a 330ish page book, that’s a hell of a lot of build up to the event the book is named after. I really wanted to like this. I loved Palahniuk’s writing style and his voice. But the jumbled narrative and lack of a central character to really relate to made the whole thing quite a slog. This might work better as an HBO series than a novel.
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  • Amanda NEVER MANDY
    January 1, 1970
    When I see the words REDUCED SODIUM printed on a label I know the contents are going to be bland and flavorless. The manufacturer might try to supplement the missing ingredient with other spices and whatnot in a pathetic attempt to trick the taste buds into believing this shit is good but we all know it isn’t. The can of goop falls flat and the only happy person is the one who made money off of selling it to my stupid ass.I wish this concept could be applied to books. I would stamp a big fat war When I see the words REDUCED SODIUM printed on a label I know the contents are going to be bland and flavorless. The manufacturer might try to supplement the missing ingredient with other spices and whatnot in a pathetic attempt to trick the taste buds into believing this shit is good but we all know it isn’t. The can of goop falls flat and the only happy person is the one who made money off of selling it to my stupid ass.I wish this concept could be applied to books. I would stamp a big fat warning dead center on the cover of this book. I usually enjoy satire but this one was way too much. It was over the top and extremely disappointing. The characters were generic as hell and I couldn’t tell one from the other. Right now I can’t even recall a specific name or action for any one of them. They weren’t entertaining, they weren’t engaging, they weren’t really anything. As I am writing this I have decided to drop it down another star. The only thing I enjoyed about it was the occasional spot of humor and the limited supply of it was barely worth a star. The plot was all over the place forcing me to reread chapters and I absolutely hate knowing that I wasted time and money on this. I usually enjoy reading books from this author but not this time.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a big Chuck P fan for quite some time now. I even caught him live at the Triple Rock for the "Snuff" tour. His last few books haven't grabbed me like "Rant," "Lullaby" or "Survivor" did. "Adjustment Day" is different. An interesting take on dystopia, fueled by the concept that there is a cyclical population bulge of males that is alleviated by war. This time, instead of another war, the young men and blue collar folks of country rise up and decapitate the intelligentsia and the leaders I've been a big Chuck P fan for quite some time now. I even caught him live at the Triple Rock for the "Snuff" tour. His last few books haven't grabbed me like "Rant," "Lullaby" or "Survivor" did. "Adjustment Day" is different. An interesting take on dystopia, fueled by the concept that there is a cyclical population bulge of males that is alleviated by war. This time, instead of another war, the young men and blue collar folks of country rise up and decapitate the intelligentsia and the leadership elites from their positions of power. Then black and white ethno-states and "Gaysia" are created and a new ruling class is created from the young men and blue collar rebel leaders. Hijinks ensue and it takes a while to sort out who is important to the reader but a worthwhile novel..
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  • Lydia
    January 1, 1970
    Invisible Monsters is my favorite Chuck Palahniuk book. I feel as though listing your favorite Chuck P book is the proper way to start a review of one of his other works, so people can understand the lens through which you’re viewing it. Adjustment Day is the perfect rebuttal to any and all of the “anarcho-libertarians” who continually misinterpret Fight Club. It’s as if Project Mayhem grew and was successful - it provides the follow-through, “but what if...” that anarchists are often too afraid Invisible Monsters is my favorite Chuck Palahniuk book. I feel as though listing your favorite Chuck P book is the proper way to start a review of one of his other works, so people can understand the lens through which you’re viewing it. Adjustment Day is the perfect rebuttal to any and all of the “anarcho-libertarians” who continually misinterpret Fight Club. It’s as if Project Mayhem grew and was successful - it provides the follow-through, “but what if...” that anarchists are often too afraid to explore. What if your plan to overthrow the government succeeds? Do you think the people can rule themselves? Will they be satisfied by the limited power they inherit? How will it end? Adjustment Day gives these answers in an immensely satisfying way. Anyone, from the anarcho-libertarians themselves to the progressive “social justice warriors” in the world, can find the bitter humor in the way they’re displayed in this novel. It will leave you ruminating on your role in the millennial generation and society as a whole for a long time after you finish it. I highly - HIGHLY - recommend this book to those who enjoy Chuck Palahniuk’s work and have been waiting for these past four years for new content to devour.
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  • Derek Wolfgram
    January 1, 1970
    Palahniuk's best book since Lullaby. While the narrative is a bit jumbled, the paranoid libertarian fantasy world in the story is a brilliant extrapolation of today's political environment, and could only have been written by the author of Fight Club. Darkly funny and poignant.
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  • britt_brooke
    January 1, 1970
    “If you can slash a tire, you can harvest an ear.”On a large scale the premise is so intriguing, but in execution, it’s a disorganized mess. With no distinct chapters, and a stupid number of characters (none of whom I cared lived, died, lost an ear, whatever), it was easy to get storylines confused. Talbott’s blue-black book of aphorisms is the only thing that kept me going. Glad it’s over.
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  • John Ferrigno
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day feels like the book Chuck Palahniuk's entire career has been leading up to. This novel is very much of the moment, a scathing satire of current American society, our modern climate brought to the extreme and turned on its head.While it is filled with the types of themes that are normally found in a Palahniuk book, this one reads very different than his usual writing style. He normally skewers society through the eyes of a single character. In Adjustment Day, he uses a large ensemb Adjustment Day feels like the book Chuck Palahniuk's entire career has been leading up to. This novel is very much of the moment, a scathing satire of current American society, our modern climate brought to the extreme and turned on its head.While it is filled with the types of themes that are normally found in a Palahniuk book, this one reads very different than his usual writing style. He normally skewers society through the eyes of a single character. In Adjustment Day, he uses a large ensemble, portraying the world through a series of short vignettes rather than a more traditional protagnist's journey. This book is brimming with the type of black comedy and social satire that Palahniuk is famous for. Adjustment Day is a dark reflection of our world, a society seemingly birthed through the twisted fever dreams of our fractured, damaged psyche. Equal parts disturbing and hilarious, this book is never boring. It has so many insane situations, yet each one has a strand of reality keeping it grounded. Violent and ridiculous, it reads like George Orwell, Ayn Rand and Quentin Tarantino were locked in a room and forced to collaborate on a dark satire of today's America.While it is very different from his usual writing style, this book is still purely Palahniuk. It has his warped sense of humor on every page. Adjustment Day may very well be his masterpiece.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    God, it's hard to watch the statues of your literary gods crumble. It pains me to say this, as I usually love Chuck, but god this was dismal. I can't say enough what a stinking, poorly written, rambling pile of shit this is. It's not because it's satire, nor is it because it's offensive. That's what you're hoping for in a scathing Chuck Palahniuk book, but this was executed poorly. It wasn't transgressive and clever, it was lame. I feel like the victim of a practical joke, where the price of buy God, it's hard to watch the statues of your literary gods crumble. It pains me to say this, as I usually love Chuck, but god this was dismal. I can't say enough what a stinking, poorly written, rambling pile of shit this is. It's not because it's satire, nor is it because it's offensive. That's what you're hoping for in a scathing Chuck Palahniuk book, but this was executed poorly. It wasn't transgressive and clever, it was lame. I feel like the victim of a practical joke, where the price of buying the hardcover is the punchline. Maybe if it were a short story, it would have worked, but by page 200, you're just praying for this mistake to be over. He mentions Fight Club and himself too much, which destroys the absurd illusion. You shouldn't have to explain a book as you're writing it. This might be my last Chuck. He hasn't produced anything of value since Lullaby.
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  • Dany Salvatierra
    January 1, 1970
    1984 meets The Handmaid's Tale meets Fight Club. Classic Chuck is back. With a vengeance.
  • Rachel Christine
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I am a big fan of Palahniuk's earlier works (Invisible Monsters, Fight Club, Lullaby) and had the opportunity to meet him at a book signing for this release. I had high expectations going into this book, and while I did like it, there were several parts of it that just didn't work for me.This book is clearly a satire on our current socioeconomic and political state. It expands on our dissastifcation and fears with the world, and paints a picture of "what would really happen if we rid ourse ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ I am a big fan of Palahniuk's earlier works (Invisible Monsters, Fight Club, Lullaby) and had the opportunity to meet him at a book signing for this release. I had high expectations going into this book, and while I did like it, there were several parts of it that just didn't work for me.This book is clearly a satire on our current socioeconomic and political state. It expands on our dissastifcation and fears with the world, and paints a picture of "what would really happen if we rid ourselves of the corrupt 'swamp' of policiticians, investment bankers, and real estate moguls and started over?" I enjoy dystopian books and found many parts of it hilairous. However, the structure of the book leaves a lot to be desired. There are so many characters and storylines to keep track of, that I often found myself having to go back through the pages to figure out who that character was and what had been happening to them before. Usually I like books with multiple storylines, but Adjustment Day had way too many (I think 6 or 7?). I feel like a majority of the characters were underdevloped, simply because there were too many for proper development to happen within 300 pages. I would have really liked less storylines and more depth in a select few. The book reads like an anarchist manifesto a la Project Mayhem in many spots and I found some of the "Talbottisms" stated throughout to be very repetitive. There were also way too many pop cultural references smattered across the book. Some I knew, but there were just too many for me to look up while I was reading, and I feel I may have missed something by ot understanding them. As a whole, this book wasn't really for me, but I still love Chuck Palahniuk and hope his next book is more enjoyable!
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe I'm just getting older, but it sure feels like Palahniuk gets worse and worse. I can't tell if this is supposed to be self-parody of its own failure to work as any sort of effective social satire. I think he's trying to outdo himself for being gross, offensive, and bizarre, but he's misstepped in just adding more of the same instead of actually upping the game. If you're in the market for a book that makes you uncomfortable, read Roche's Wetlands, Delany's Hogg, or Homes' The End Of Alice. Maybe I'm just getting older, but it sure feels like Palahniuk gets worse and worse. I can't tell if this is supposed to be self-parody of its own failure to work as any sort of effective social satire. I think he's trying to outdo himself for being gross, offensive, and bizarre, but he's misstepped in just adding more of the same instead of actually upping the game. If you're in the market for a book that makes you uncomfortable, read Roche's Wetlands, Delany's Hogg, or Homes' The End Of Alice. They are all also just a lot better written. And maybe the real shame is that there are a couple of interesting ideas in here that could make for a good premise if they were handled completely differently.
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  • Yvette Lavanchy
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day was a big disappointment. I never really got the plot, there was just too many subplots and characters. I also didn’t understand where he referenced his own works “Fight Club” and even his own name in comparison of other books like Dead Poets Society, Gone with the wind, and Great Gatsby. Please Chuck, spare us this narcissism. I have enjoyed many of Palahniuk’s books in the past but this one I could not justify wasting a day to finish after I have wasted 24$ to purchase the book. Adjustment Day was a big disappointment. I never really got the plot, there was just too many subplots and characters. I also didn’t understand where he referenced his own works “Fight Club” and even his own name in comparison of other books like Dead Poets Society, Gone with the wind, and Great Gatsby. Please Chuck, spare us this narcissism. I have enjoyed many of Palahniuk’s books in the past but this one I could not justify wasting a day to finish after I have wasted 24$ to purchase the book.
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  • Charity
    January 1, 1970
    This book is over-the-top, unstructured, outrageous, graphic, vulgar, offensive, and pure Chuck Palahniuk. If you have read his books, then you know what to expect and this book has it in spades. I really want to give this Four Stars, but I felt that the choppy and all-over-the-place narrative, coupled with numerous characters and timelines, was difficult to follow and that detoured some of my enjoyment of the book.
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  • Vivek Tejuja
    January 1, 1970
    Let me very honest and tell you that I wasn’t all that excited when I heard of the new Palahniuk being released. I haven’t enjoyed his last couple of books and yet I was in a strange way looking forward to reading this one.At the same time, Palahniuk is not every reader’s cup of tea. “Adjustment Day” is his first novel in four years and might I add here that I was more than floored reading it. It is a book that is about the times we live in, the times that are dark and gloomy and no one else to Let me very honest and tell you that I wasn’t all that excited when I heard of the new Palahniuk being released. I haven’t enjoyed his last couple of books and yet I was in a strange way looking forward to reading this one.At the same time, Palahniuk is not every reader’s cup of tea. “Adjustment Day” is his first novel in four years and might I add here that I was more than floored reading it. It is a book that is about the times we live in, the times that are dark and gloomy and no one else to bring it to light, the way Palahniuk does. He wrings the absurdities of society, class and political structure like no one else, almost brandishing each farce and each conspiracy theory lurking in the American psyche, bit by bit.So, what is Adjustment Day all about?Adjustment Day is about the rabbit hole of our times – the deep, dark abyss that sucks everything right in, with no chance of redemption. Sounds bleak? That’s exactly what the book is with a dash of humour. At the same time, I think one Chuck Palahniuk novel has the potential to derive five more from it. The plot isn’t linear at all (if you have experienced his writing, then you know that by now) and with every turn of the page you are stunned by the satire, that is so on point.The book is about people passing the word only to the ones whom they trust the most: Adjustment Day is coming. They are also reading a book for the reckoning. These people are also memorizing the directives. What is this book all about? What is Adjustment Day? In short, this is the plot of the book. But like I said, there is nothing easy about Palahniuk’s writing, till you are about twenty pages in and then it is a breeze.Adjustment Day is also very relevant to the times we live in – the sound-bite politics, the social media hullabaloo, and the “everything is alright” propaganda we are fed with, basically the media and its culture. Every word is in place and nothing is what is not needed. I may not have enjoyed his earlier books, but this one, I most certainly loved. Palahniuk has done it again and hit it right out of the park!
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  • Michael Ferguson
    January 1, 1970
    Chuck’s best writing days are behind him! His last decent book was Snuff! 10 years ago
  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first Palahniuk book I read (he's been on my wish list for years), so I can't compare it to the others. But I enjoyed it. The Adjustment Day of the title is a day of revolution in which the masses rise up against authority figures of all sorts: politicians, media, and academics. The whole thing is instigated by a book of cryptic sayings. A series of vignettes follow several characters in the lead-up to the big day and the social transformation that follows. It's odd that he doesn't f This is the first Palahniuk book I read (he's been on my wish list for years), so I can't compare it to the others. But I enjoyed it. The Adjustment Day of the title is a day of revolution in which the masses rise up against authority figures of all sorts: politicians, media, and academics. The whole thing is instigated by a book of cryptic sayings. A series of vignettes follow several characters in the lead-up to the big day and the social transformation that follows. It's odd that he doesn't fully reveal how Adjustment Day happened until the very end. It would have been less confusing to have shown more earlier (not to mention the fact that the flashbacks are not identified as such: that takes a while to figure out). Some of the renderings of the imagined nations are a bit over the top, even given the satiric intent. I'm thinking especially of the courtly language adopted by the residents of Caucasia. But it does all come together, and I think the discontinuities in the story telling are intentional ways to keep the reader off balance. I liked the book enough to finally get around to exploring some of the others.I received an advance Kindle copy of the book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this latest offering of Palahniuk's as I used to be a huge fan. I liked parts of this work, like the list of the least wanted that is posted on line, and if you receive enough votes your life is in jeopardy. Most of the top vote receivers seemed to be politicians, media personnel, and the inteligisia, which would probably be an accurate portrayal of the world we currently live in. He did make some excellent references to Fight Club and numerous other literary works which I really wanted to like this latest offering of Palahniuk's as I used to be a huge fan. I liked parts of this work, like the list of the least wanted that is posted on line, and if you receive enough votes your life is in jeopardy. Most of the top vote receivers seemed to be politicians, media personnel, and the inteligisia, which would probably be an accurate portrayal of the world we currently live in. He did make some excellent references to Fight Club and numerous other literary works which I also enjoyed. I didn't enjoy the way he went about showing the disunited states that turned into three separate countries (caucasia, blacktopia, and gaysia), nor how and when he reveals where the individuals who are not part of any of those groups reside.Overall I would recommend this to hardcore fans, but not to someone who is new. He's done better before.Thank you to the publisher for providing me with this arc available through netgalley.
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  • Joel Shoemaker
    January 1, 1970
    Unless I missed something, Palahniuk doesn’t explain what happens to the non-white/non-black/non-gay until about 250 pages in. For some reason that was ALL I could think about until it was explained. I’m glad it did eventually come out but I would have enjoyed the book more had we known sooner. Still, I LOVE THE FIGHT CLUB REFERENCES and this is a joy to read. Scary, like others have mentioned, how relevant the subject matter is today.
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  • Brendan Nicholls
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 It's nice to have another Chuck Palahniuk novel on the shelf and a book that has a lot of ideas like Fight Club all those years ago. The problem I have with the book is that it simply went nowhere. Fight Club 2 was another missed opportunity, that I felt was rushed and just didn't work and Adjustment Day is another book that doesn't know what it wants to be. The none chapter format was a nice change, I tend to enjoy how Chuck Palahniuk presents each book, I recently picked up the new version 3.5 It's nice to have another Chuck Palahniuk novel on the shelf and a book that has a lot of ideas like Fight Club all those years ago. The problem I have with the book is that it simply went nowhere. Fight Club 2 was another missed opportunity, that I felt was rushed and just didn't work and Adjustment Day is another book that doesn't know what it wants to be. The none chapter format was a nice change, I tend to enjoy how Chuck Palahniuk presents each book, I recently picked up the new version of Invisible Monsters and must say it looks more in line with his style. The biggest issue with the none chapter style is the shifting character focus, I just never connected with anyone or the story elements. The quotes from the fictitious book in the novel reminded me so much of Fight Club and I will revisit that book in the coming month, such a brilliant book and movie. One of the biggest issues I have with Chuck Palahniuk is the self awareness, something that was all through Fight Club 2. I didn't care for it then and I don't care for it now. Stephen King tends to have connections throughout his work but this fourth wall breaking style feels heavily forced. I think a way around it would be to copy Charlie Kaufman with Adaptation, where he was the central character but one hundred precent fictional. This way you can explore your ideas with a character that is somewhat real but never yourself. I mentioned the characters before and I really didn't connect with them or the depth was quite shallow or none existent. This weakened the central ideas of the novel and when they were explored you could never really grab onto them or how they effected the character. The novel goes crazy quickly, which isn't a bad thing but I think not having a central figure was a mistake. Why the 3.5?Interesting question. The rating is not out of pity or a cop out to Palahniuk. I simply did not hate it. I think after a four year break, Palahniuk would've delivered a solid return to form after a string of not so brilliant books. I mentioned the book went crazy and I mean it goes crazy with all sense of the word. I just don't feel it was the book it promised to be. Palahniuk obviously had good intentions and some of the book works very well but was it worth a four year break? No. Passages where on par with Fight Club, I honestly thought he was going to nail this book at times. The ending was probably some of the better sections but I felt some ideas lingered and went unexplored. I enjoyed the tone of the book, very similar to Fight Club. I think the four year break has probably done well for the creative flow and maybe it will flow into the next book. Obviously the book isn't without its flaws but there is a lot of positive work here. It was a book unlike any other I have read this year, a huge positive in my eyes. I missed having a Chuck Palahniuk book on my shelf so it was nice reading the ideas that have been floating around in his head. I have some of the older books that I have never added to my Goodreads sitting on shelf so I will reread and offer them up down the track. My next book is Only Human by Sylvain Neuvel which is the third in the series which I have read last year. I still have The Dark Dark which I hope to finish next week, it is well overdue from the library.
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  • Jamesboggie
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day is like the idiot child of Fight Club. It is a bigger, stupider, shallower imitation for the Internet age.That might seem unfairly harsh, but is impossible to avoid comparing Adjustment Day to Fight Club. Palahniuk does it himself in book, when he outright asserts the purposes of each book (on page 157 of my copy). As far as I am concerned, that begs for comparisons. In this comparison, Adjustment Day falls short. Adjustment Day is full of social commentary. That's fine; social co Adjustment Day is like the idiot child of Fight Club. It is a bigger, stupider, shallower imitation for the Internet age.That might seem unfairly harsh, but is impossible to avoid comparing Adjustment Day to Fight Club. Palahniuk does it himself in book, when he outright asserts the purposes of each book (on page 157 of my copy). As far as I am concerned, that begs for comparisons. In this comparison, Adjustment Day falls short. Adjustment Day is full of social commentary. That's fine; social commentary was one of the strengths of Fight Club. However, the social commentary in this novel is bad. First, it is unforgivably preachy. It talks down to the reader with whatever random political pronouncements and cultural comments Palahniuk had lying around. Imagine the worst college dropout pontificating on YouTube about how he knows "what's really going on", and you'll have a good idea of the insufferable tone of Adjustment Day.Second, even worse is that Adjustment Day preaches absolute bullshit. Sure, it has some of the message of self-actualization that formed the core of Fight Club. Unfortunately, that message is buried under some of the worst dreck I have ever read. Palahniuk repeats the biggest lies of the modern era, including Holocaust denial, the moon landing conspiracy, and the idea that education prevents critical thought. More fundamentally, the books seems to be anti-intellectual, anti-science, misogynistic, pro-segregation, and pro-violence. Rather than transgressing as did Fight Club, Adjustment Day panders to the lowest common denominator of our current dysfunctional society.The writing itself does the book no favors. It is raw, as you would expect from a successor to Fight Club. It never grabbed me though. It felt more obligatory than challenging. Also, this book is a mix of unlabeled sections of different subplots. The subplots jump around in time and space. I was further annoyed by the number of pop culture and literary references, including several to Palahniuk and his own works. These references will ensure that the book becomes dated in a way Fight Club never has. These authorial decisions added to the feeling that this book is merely fan fiction written on some disreputable web forum.The story was similarly disappointing. The buildup to the eponymous Adjustment Day is a pale imitation of Project Mayhem. The aftermath includes two slow motion dystopian disasters in Caucasia and Gaysia, and a utopia in Blacktopia. The story borrows heavily from other works like 1984 and The Handmaid's Tale and conspiracy theories for a thoroughly unremarkable plot. It really is just a vehicle for the commentary, which as I said is crap.Internet-based fan fiction for Fight Club. I can't think of a better way to describe Adjustment Day. I found the book painful in all the wrong ways. I may try another Palahniuk book, but only because he is my best friend's favorite author. I will never touch this book again.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day was Fight Club, but worse. Or more precisely, it was Fight Club, modernized and made ridiculous. I'm still trying to work out how I feel about this book. It was good, absolutely. I devoured it. It made itself easy to devour. But I've seen these ideas before. I've seen these superfluous men before, praising different leaders and fighting different wars, but these men are all very familiar to me. It's hard, when Chuck Palahniuk writes a novel that feels familiar. What makes the whol Adjustment Day was Fight Club, but worse. Or more precisely, it was Fight Club, modernized and made ridiculous. I'm still trying to work out how I feel about this book. It was good, absolutely. I devoured it. It made itself easy to devour. But I've seen these ideas before. I've seen these superfluous men before, praising different leaders and fighting different wars, but these men are all very familiar to me. It's hard, when Chuck Palahniuk writes a novel that feels familiar. What makes the whole experience even stranger is that the novel takes us to an increasingly unfamiliar landscape. It's a novel I know, packaged in a world gone mad. It's what might have happened if Project Mayhem had actually overthrown civilization. But... in a very, very unexpected way. It's a modern book, a self-aware book, built knowingly on a culture that's probably as difficult to navigate for many of us as for the characters in the novel. It's in a weird place between gruesome fascination and terrible recognition, in the overlap between what we can't look away from and what we can't stand to see. A confusing, unsettling, and unflinching book. Excellent, but I would only recommend it under duress.
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  • Chuck Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day wants to be a commentary on modern society, the influence of literature and belief, gender and race politics, and the nature of power and government. However, it fails to fully elucidate on any of its points, and the ideas presented are often half-baked. A bigoted new world order (that believes the homosexual community is destroying both themselves and the straight community) is completely mum on the trans community and ambivalent about races that aren't African or Caucasian? Okay Adjustment Day wants to be a commentary on modern society, the influence of literature and belief, gender and race politics, and the nature of power and government. However, it fails to fully elucidate on any of its points, and the ideas presented are often half-baked. A bigoted new world order (that believes the homosexual community is destroying both themselves and the straight community) is completely mum on the trans community and ambivalent about races that aren't African or Caucasian? Okay.... But even if you accept the logistical shortcomings of the ideas, there's no gravitas to care about what is there. Chuck ALMOST makes you care about straight mixed-race couples forced to pretend to be gay to stay together in their new nation, but then the plight of women in essentially the role of the protagonists of The Handmaid's Take is nearly ignored. And trust me, the ideas and aims of the book are far more interesting than their execution. This is exacerbated by the fact that there is barely any plot. The book functions as a half-baked OpEd wrapped in a what-if scenario with little to no rising action, anticipation, character development, or resolution. Sure, there are some glimmers of vintage Chuck: a handful of laugh-out-loud moments, a few poignant quotes, and a couple of great ideas. Sadly, the poor execution and development names for a very disappointing effort from Chuck.
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