Adjustment Day
The author of Fight Club takes America beyond our darkest dreams in this timely satire.People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They’ve been reading a mysterious book and memorizing its directives. They are ready for the reckoning.Adjustment Day, the author’s first novel in four years, is an ingeniously comic work in which Chuck Palahniuk does what he does best: skewer the absurdities in our society. Smug, geriatric politicians bring the nation to the brink of a third world war in an effort to control the burgeoning population of young males; working-class men dream of burying the elites; and professors propound theories that offer students only the bleakest future.When Adjustment Day arrives, it fearlessly makes real the logical conclusion of every separatist fantasy, alternative fact, and conspiracy theory lurking in the American psyche.

Adjustment Day Details

TitleAdjustment Day
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2018
PublisherW. W. Norton & Company
ISBN-139780393652598
Rating
GenreFiction, Science Fiction, Contemporary, Dystopia

Adjustment Day Review

  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    On the one hand, it's nice to have Chuck back and doing fiction. Not only that, he's doing fiction that doesn't rely on a gimmick like the last.... decade or so of his output. No disrespect to some of those books, but also some of them were garbage.On the other hand, it was hard to read this and not feel like the man is perhaps past his prime. Conceptually, he's got his finger right on the jackhammer pulse of the present (it was surprisingly gratifying to see him sending up the ways in which his On the one hand, it's nice to have Chuck back and doing fiction. Not only that, he's doing fiction that doesn't rely on a gimmick like the last.... decade or so of his output. No disrespect to some of those books, but also some of them were garbage.On the other hand, it was hard to read this and not feel like the man is perhaps past his prime. Conceptually, he's got his finger right on the jackhammer pulse of the present (it was surprisingly gratifying to see him sending up the ways in which his own oeuvre has been co-opted by alt-right white males who believe that FIGHT CLUB was an instructional guide etc) and the novel has flashes of that sharp, sharp, sharp satirical brilliance that made his early work so special. But it's also a surprisingly LONG novel for only being 300-ish pages. At times, it is a downright drag, man, and while the chronologically jumbled narrative has a purpose (of sorts), it mostly just furthers the novel's sense of discohesion. And maybe it's just all a little too close to home. Or maybe it's that Palahniuk's irreverent "piss 'em all off" attitude towards political correctness feels a little jejune these days. Or maybe I'm not the reader I was when I first found Chuck. Maybe that's for the best.
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  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED Fight Club. Of course, I only saw the movie and didn't read the book. Totally brilliant! So, when I saw this, I thought I would be blown away and that there would be some awesome twisty stuff. But, neither of those things happened. It was disappointing.The set-up is a crazy end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it in the U.S.. There is a take-over and re-shuffling. It is parody of what is going on in our society, but it was a little over the top with silliness. I wished it was grittier, but it is I LOVED Fight Club. Of course, I only saw the movie and didn't read the book. Totally brilliant! So, when I saw this, I thought I would be blown away and that there would be some awesome twisty stuff. But, neither of those things happened. It was disappointing.The set-up is a crazy end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it in the U.S.. There is a take-over and re-shuffling. It is parody of what is going on in our society, but it was a little over the top with silliness. I wished it was grittier, but it is mostly silly.Also, it was long. Like waaaaay too long for what it was. If it was half the length, I think it would have been a strange little parody on American politics and the war between the Boomers and the Millennials. It just missed the mark by going on and on, and having things get so ridiculously out there. Which leads to the next point:This book offends everyone. It is an equal opportunity offender. So politically ridiculously over the top!Everyone is getting raped. Eye-raped, ear-raped, mind-raped, stomach-raped.... I saw the humor in using the term raped the way he did, because it really was timely, but again, offensive as hell.My advice is to stay away. It isn't as clever or funny or even biting as he thinks it is. This guy's funnier.So's this one.
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  • Uriel Perez
    January 1, 1970
    I’m pleased to report a few months ahead of the scheduled publication date that this is classic Chuck; back with enough here to shock, offend and make us laugh all the same. The book follows a plot to completely upend the U.S. government and re-invent the nation into some Libertarian fantasyland, creating separatist ethno-states and violently dispersing wealth and prestige to the most violent and dedicated followers of a radical, new edict. From the far reaches of Caucasia, Blacktopia and Gaysia I’m pleased to report a few months ahead of the scheduled publication date that this is classic Chuck; back with enough here to shock, offend and make us laugh all the same. The book follows a plot to completely upend the U.S. government and re-invent the nation into some Libertarian fantasyland, creating separatist ethno-states and violently dispersing wealth and prestige to the most violent and dedicated followers of a radical, new edict. From the far reaches of Caucasia, Blacktopia and Gaysia, the principal homelands within the formerly United States, we follow a mishmash of displaced persons and leaders with newfound power navigating their “adjusted” positions to disturbing, heroic and often hilarious ends.Adjustment Day is a side-splitting satire that is ripe for this day and age. It holds up a mirror to our own societal decay, casting a spotlight on the faults and ironies of our broken political and ideological systems.Absolutely perfect for Generation Click-Bait.
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  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    "Drugs are popular because they give the user a window of madness or illness that can be scheduled. Unlike sickness, drugs can synchronize the infection, derangement, and recuperation of a group of people."Adjustment Day is a modern reinvention of Project Mayhem that takes over the world. People get brainwashed by what they see on television and what they read in this little blue/black book. They get consumed by what they see and hear. It’s eerie how similar this story is to the world we are liv "Drugs are popular because they give the user a window of madness or illness that can be scheduled. Unlike sickness, drugs can synchronize the infection, derangement, and recuperation of a group of people."Adjustment Day is a modern reinvention of Project Mayhem that takes over the world. People get brainwashed by what they see on television and what they read in this little blue/black book. They get consumed by what they see and hear. It’s eerie how similar this story is to the world we are living in now. The first rule of Adjustment Day is you must talk about Adjustment Day.The second rule of Adjustment Day is you must talk about Adjustment Day.The third rule of Adjustment Day is you must carry the little blue/black book at all times and it must be visible. The fourth rule of Adjustment Day is if you die, that ear is coming off. Chuck Palahniuk is my favorite author and it pains me to say this but this is the first time that I have been fully disappointed by one of his books. There wasn’t anything special about this and I couldn’t even finish it. My heart breaks. If you are just reading Palahniuk for the first time, I would find another one. If you don’t look at it, maybe it will go away!
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  • Peter Derk
    January 1, 1970
    50 pages into this book, I was thinking, "Ah, Christ. So Mr. Palahniuk is weighing in on American politics too? Is fucking EVERYONE an expert now?"But then I read some more, and what he's doing is way more interesting. What I see happening on both sides of the real-world political fence is journalists, interviewers, reviewers and so on amping up the political side of every story. An artist releases a new album, and we're WAY more likely to hear about the artist's politics or projected viewpoint 50 pages into this book, I was thinking, "Ah, Christ. So Mr. Palahniuk is weighing in on American politics too? Is fucking EVERYONE an expert now?"But then I read some more, and what he's doing is way more interesting. What I see happening on both sides of the real-world political fence is journalists, interviewers, reviewers and so on amping up the political side of every story. An artist releases a new album, and we're WAY more likely to hear about the artist's politics or projected viewpoint than we are to hear anything about the musical qualities of the album. A movie comes out, and we're pretty likely to hear where it falls on the pass/fail spectrum of the Bechdel Test, but less likely to hear about its qualities as a movie. A book comes out, and there's a lot of application of "so important in this fraught political moment."This isn't a bad thing. Someone should always be looking at things that way, and someone always has been, but it's tipped towards that being the primary, if not only, method by which so many of us are evaluating art. It feels like we're using everything as a segue to politics. All roads lead to politics. And while art can serve that purpose, it's being railroaded into serving only that purpose. Hence the common phrase: All art is political.Adjustment Day calls bullshit. Instead of using art to talk about politics, Mr. Palahniuk uses politics to talk about art. Politics dominate the book up top, and the path they take leads away, back into art. I love this book for doing that. I love that this book poses the idea that art is bigger than politics, that art doesn't serve politics.I love the idea that art doesn't have to be yoked into service pulling the wagon of politics. Politics can take a turn pulling its own fucking wagon. I never thought I would consider that a radical statement, but here we are. Mr. Palahniuk has done something really interesting here. Something really different. Of all his books, I'm most curious how this will age. I wonder if it will make sense to a generation who comes of age 25 years from now and doesn't really understand the current climate. It might not make sense. It might, like a lot of satire, do well. Jonathan Swift, Kurt Vonnegut, Joseph Heller, Ken Kesey, Miguel de Cervantes, Shakespeare, John Kennedy Toole, all writers who did very "of-the-time" satire that still works years and years later. Probably because satire sticks it to assholes, and it doesn't matter what time or country it is, we all love to see an asshole get what he deserves.Either way. It's a book for fans of Chuck's work. Now, don't get me wrong. The writing style is different. It's calmer, less white-knuckle than his early books, and that's in the service of the story. The writing style presents things less as immediately engaging than it does really, really interesting. It's not a difficult, dense book. It's lulls you into going along with a very crazy story by presenting it in a very plain way. What I mean is, if you like Chuck's work because he's always doing his own thing, writing books that nobody else is writing, then you'll appreciate this one as part of that career.Wait, shit. Not "career." You'll appreciate it as a limb on his body of art.
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  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    Grilled peacock tongues, sweet smelling Shasta earplugs, brown recluse mush dick, buckets of spit, scary unbridled vajayjays, and the start of grouse hunting season.Palahniuk is a strange cat. I dig his work, but he seems to be a wee hit or miss. He can be absolutely brilliant and then turn in something marginally mediocre. Dude definitely has his own unique style and voice. Despite the inconsistencies, he remains one of my “must read” authors.I was lucky enough to meet Mr. Palahniuk in San Fran Grilled peacock tongues, sweet smelling Shasta earplugs, brown recluse mush dick, buckets of spit, scary unbridled vajayjays, and the start of grouse hunting season.Palahniuk is a strange cat. I dig his work, but he seems to be a wee hit or miss. He can be absolutely brilliant and then turn in something marginally mediocre. Dude definitely has his own unique style and voice. Despite the inconsistencies, he remains one of my “must read” authors.I was lucky enough to meet Mr. Palahniuk in San Francisco recently on the Adjustment Day tour and we got to chat for a few minutes before his signing event. It was pretty cool to meet him in person. Turns out to be a very nice and soft-spoken guy. Funny too, as you would expect.Adjustment Day is a mixed bag. Flashes of the brilliant Chuck with periods of wtf. I enjoyed parts of it but thought it could have been a bit more with a little less fluff. It was very political, as well, which I could always do without. Overall, a just better than ok effort set upon a very high bar. I giving this one 2.5 Stars. “A smile is your best bullet proof vest.”
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    God, it's hard to watch the statues of your literary gods crumble. It pains me to say this, as I usually love Chuck, but hell, this was dismal. I can't say enough what a stinking, poorly written, rambling pile of shit this is. It's not because it's satire, nor is it because it's offensive. That's what you're hoping for in a scathing Chuck Palahniuk book, but this was executed poorly. It wasn't transgressive and clever, it was lame. I feel like the victim of a practical joke, where the price of b God, it's hard to watch the statues of your literary gods crumble. It pains me to say this, as I usually love Chuck, but hell, this was dismal. I can't say enough what a stinking, poorly written, rambling pile of shit this is. It's not because it's satire, nor is it because it's offensive. That's what you're hoping for in a scathing Chuck Palahniuk book, but this was executed poorly. It wasn't transgressive and clever, it was lame. I feel like the victim of a practical joke, where the price of buying the hardcover is the punchline. Maybe if it were a short story, it would have worked, but by page 200, you're just praying for this mistake to be over. He mentions Fight Club and himself too much, which destroys the absurd illusion. You shouldn't have to explain a book as you're writing it. This might be my last Chuck. He hasn't produced anything of value since Lullaby.
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  • Supreeth
    January 1, 1970
    I think you need a certain mood to read Palahniuk, I definitely didn't have that whatever mood that is when this book got out. But it's not late anyway, 2018 is still on ! I'd saved Lullaby and Survivor for future days because his later books seemed more of gibberish poppycock than anything like Fight Club. And if you care Fight Club is my favourite postmodern book, more like postmodern bible — I live by it. The best way to read Adjustment Day is - skim through boring parts, don't attempt to rem I think you need a certain mood to read Palahniuk, I definitely didn't have that whatever mood that is when this book got out. But it's not late anyway, 2018 is still on ! I'd saved Lullaby and Survivor for future days because his later books seemed more of gibberish poppycock than anything like Fight Club. And if you care Fight Club is my favourite postmodern book, more like postmodern bible — I live by it. The best way to read Adjustment Day is - skim through boring parts, don't attempt to remember names or characters or events, and laugh out loud when it feels like you're reading Chuck's book. Because it doesn't have regular Palahniuck-esque prose, or transgression or displays unsettling levels of grit. But that's what spoils the fun here. People are more like caricatures and cartoons in this book. But Chuck is back.This is Palahniuk's take on American politics, he doesn't go all political expert here, but brings up his wit a bit more farther. He basically mocks and offends everyone, thus avoiding the trouble. America is divided into three parts, Caucasia, Blacktopia and Gaysia; for whites, blacks and queers respectively — raising a havoc. This is a rare book where Dystopia meets satire and humor; more like Fight club meets 1984.This is Generation Z gone crazy !
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  • Allen Adams
    January 1, 1970
    http://www.themaineedge.com/buzz/the-...America’s master of transgressive literary satire is back at it again.Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel – his first in four years – is “Adjustment Day,” a bleak look at the potential future implied by the logical (and not-so-logical) endpoints of our society’s current extremities. Filled with off-puttingly fascinating imagery, Palahniuk combines a belief in the power of the individual man with a nihilistic lack of faith in the judgment of mankind. It’s an anti-R http://www.themaineedge.com/buzz/the-...America’s master of transgressive literary satire is back at it again.Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel – his first in four years – is “Adjustment Day,” a bleak look at the potential future implied by the logical (and not-so-logical) endpoints of our society’s current extremities. Filled with off-puttingly fascinating imagery, Palahniuk combines a belief in the power of the individual man with a nihilistic lack of faith in the judgment of mankind. It’s an anti-Randian treatise born of an extrapolation of Randian viewpoints, a libertarian fever dream of a dystopia populated by easily led men fueled by hatred and ignorance.“Adjustment Day” also features Palahniuk’s standard well-honed prose and pitch-black humor, along with at least a few moments that’ll turn your stomach even as they force you to consider the heretofore unthinkable.It’s an undefined time in America’s near future. The global community is teetering on the brink of another world war – this one driven by elderly politicians eager to thin the herd of young men and maintain the status quo. The U.S. is on the verge of reinstituting the draft, leaving thousands upon thousands of young men frustrated, angry and afraid. The blue-collared masses dream of turning white collars red. Ivory tower academics spout little more than grim platitudes that offer neither satisfaction nor sympathy.Into this tumult comes the List.The List simply appears one day, a collection of names on the internet. An open-sourced invitation is expressed – add the names of anyone you might consider an enemy of society. From there, people vote. If a name doesn’t receive a certain number of votes within a set timeframe, it disappears from the List. But some names – politicians, academics, figures from old media and new alike – rapidly climb the ranks.Simultaneously, a strange book begins making the rounds. Passed from hand to hand, the book espouses a particular and peculiar philosophy, one whose impassioned militancy captures the imaginations of a certain subset of the disaffected – people who perceive their place in the world to be far less than what they truly deserve. People whose whispers of what’s to come are passed between those so overwhelmed with lies that they’ve chosen to create their own truth by whatever means necessary.People who will welcome the brutal reality of Adjustment Day … and what comes after.What makes Chuck Palahniuk such an effective writer is his ability to strain the bonds of credulity without snapping them. He stretches and shapes the worlds he creates, piling relatively minor alterations atop one another until we’re suddenly existing in an insane place at which we arrived through a seemingly sane series of steps. He never pushes too hard, but he also never stops pushing – the result is a distended and divided dystopia, a nightmarish landscape that still offers a horrifying hint of plausibility.The narrative is a bit disjointed; Palahniuk is unafraid to leap from perspective to perspective, illustrating both the lead-up to and aftermath of Adjustment Day through a wide spectrum of characters. The quick cuts between storylines could have been a distraction, but the shattered-glass quality of the structural choices only serve to mirror the fractures borne out in the society we see play out on the pages.“Adjustment Day” would seem to be Palahniuk’s reaction to the radical alterations to our own societal structures in recent years; while he has always been transgressive in his attitudes, this book is different. Whereas in past works, there’s been a feeling of remove, an observational quality to the stories he tells, this one feels angrier and more personal. Occasionally, it seems that the heat undermines the narrative a bit. More often, however, that rage serves to elevate the proceedings, providing an immediacy and urgency that we haven’t seen from Palahniuk for some time.(There’s also a metatextual quality to the book; Palahniuk uses this new work to reflect (and pass judgment) on his own previous creations. Most of the time, that reflection/judgment is inferred, but he occasionally gets REALLY overt about it, in ways that are both insightful and darkly funny. This seems to serve as almost a satiric whetstone, a way to hone the blade so that it might cut even deeper.)“Adjustment Day” isn’t a complete success. The cast of characters runs a bit too big; they occasionally run together a bit. There are a couple of spots where Palahniuk might be trying a little too hard to shock, but that’s par for the course – the guy is unafraid to take big swings. And when you swing big, well … sometimes you miss.What Palahniuk has created here is a chilling and unsettling vision of our future, an exaggerated Darkest Timeline rendering of where our society’s current path might lead. It is garish and gross, a nihilistic stomach-punch of a book fueled by anger and gallows hilarity. “Adjustment Day” is evocative and provocative in equal measure – a novel very much of its place and time.
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  • Amanda NEVER MANDY
    January 1, 1970
    When I see the words REDUCED SODIUM printed on a label I know the contents are going to be bland and flavorless. The manufacturer might try to supplement the missing ingredient with other spices and whatnot in a pathetic attempt to trick the taste buds into believing this shit is good but we all know it isn’t. The can of goop falls flat and the only happy person is the one who made money off of selling it to my stupid ass.I wish this concept could be applied to books. I would stamp a big fat war When I see the words REDUCED SODIUM printed on a label I know the contents are going to be bland and flavorless. The manufacturer might try to supplement the missing ingredient with other spices and whatnot in a pathetic attempt to trick the taste buds into believing this shit is good but we all know it isn’t. The can of goop falls flat and the only happy person is the one who made money off of selling it to my stupid ass.I wish this concept could be applied to books. I would stamp a big fat warning dead center on the cover of this book. I usually enjoy satire but this one was way too much. It was over the top and extremely disappointing. The characters were generic as hell and I couldn’t tell one from the other. Right now I can’t even recall a specific name or action for any one of them. They weren’t entertaining, they weren’t engaging, they weren’t really anything. As I am writing this I have decided to drop it down another star. The only thing I enjoyed about it was the occasional spot of humor and the limited supply of it was barely worth a star. The plot was all over the place forcing me to reread chapters and I absolutely hate knowing that I wasted time and money on this. I usually enjoy reading books from this author but not this time.
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  • Lydia Ellis
    January 1, 1970
    Invisible Monsters is my favorite Chuck Palahniuk book. I feel as though listing your favorite Chuck P book is the proper way to start a review of one of his other works, so people can understand the lens through which you’re viewing it. Adjustment Day is the perfect rebuttal to any and all of the “anarcho-libertarians” who continually misinterpret Fight Club. It’s as if Project Mayhem grew and was successful - it provides the follow-through, “but what if...” that anarchists are often too afraid Invisible Monsters is my favorite Chuck Palahniuk book. I feel as though listing your favorite Chuck P book is the proper way to start a review of one of his other works, so people can understand the lens through which you’re viewing it. Adjustment Day is the perfect rebuttal to any and all of the “anarcho-libertarians” who continually misinterpret Fight Club. It’s as if Project Mayhem grew and was successful - it provides the follow-through, “but what if...” that anarchists are often too afraid to explore. What if your plan to overthrow the government succeeds? Do you think the people can rule themselves? Will they be satisfied by the limited power they inherit? How will it end? Adjustment Day gives these answers in an immensely satisfying way. Anyone, from the anarcho-libertarians themselves to the progressive “social justice warriors” in the world, can find the bitter humor in the way they’re displayed in this novel. It will leave you ruminating on your role in the millennial generation and society as a whole for a long time after you finish it. I highly - HIGHLY - recommend this book to those who enjoy Chuck Palahniuk’s work and have been waiting for these past four years for new content to devour.
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  • Chris Berko
    January 1, 1970
    After first reading Fight Club in 1998 Chuck P has been one of my favorite authors. I've read all of his first eight books at least twice and most of them three or four times. Unfortunately he has been hit or miss since those, and this one is undoubtedly a miss. It probably would have made a great short story, I liked the first twenty pages and then the last ten or so were alright but everything in between was a mess. No matter how preachy he used to get, no matter how nihilistic or anarchy-indu After first reading Fight Club in 1998 Chuck P has been one of my favorite authors. I've read all of his first eight books at least twice and most of them three or four times. Unfortunately he has been hit or miss since those, and this one is undoubtedly a miss. It probably would have made a great short story, I liked the first twenty pages and then the last ten or so were alright but everything in between was a mess. No matter how preachy he used to get, no matter how nihilistic or anarchy-inducing his writing was it never failed to be entertaining. This stuff was not entertaining. In my real life I am a politics junkie, I scan twitter and news sites for that one morsel that is going to make me feel better, which admittedly never comes. Perhaps if I read this in less crazy times, perhaps in a time when it doesn't seem like the world is on the brink of collapse every minute of every day, but alas I did not. I know it is satire, and I get where he was coming from with the concept behind this book, but at the same time I want to be entertained. This did not. Two stars because I finished it.
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  • Tom Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    [T]hey were tired of being consumers. They wanted to be consumed.Chuck Palahniuk always writes with some gimmick. In this one, he writes with three. First he refuses to use the word "said" or "says." It is noticeable but doesn't especially enhance the text in any way. Later on, he starts this cutesy listing tic where various characters list things of a specific category: belief systems or skin colors, primarily. Then he diverges into three alternating caricatures of regional and historical diale [T]hey were tired of being consumers. They wanted to be consumed.Chuck Palahniuk always writes with some gimmick. In this one, he writes with three. First he refuses to use the word "said" or "says." It is noticeable but doesn't especially enhance the text in any way. Later on, he starts this cutesy listing tic where various characters list things of a specific category: belief systems or skin colors, primarily. Then he diverges into three alternating caricatures of regional and historical dialects. This failure to cohere a single style is unlike him, and it doesn't do Adjustment Day any favors and the whole book similarly fails to cohere into a sensible story worth reading.1.5 stars. Warmed-over Fight Club philosophy with heavy similarities to Survivor and later on some whiffs of Stephen King's The Stand. This isn't Palahniuk at his worst (that honor still belongs to Pygmy) but it certainly isn't his best. The bite isn't there. What's supposed to be incisive seems more petulant. And while the style is assuredly Palaniuk's, the energy is missing. He seems lackluster and tired which makes for middling quality entertainment that has an interesting enough hook at the outset but begins to sputter and falter around a third of the way through, then drags on and on with unnecessary bloat and repetition to an increasingly bizarre conclusion. All but completionists of his novels can safely skip this one.(view spoiler)[Honestly, the book jacket summary does not even hint at the whole premise which is underdeveloped and reductive to the point of being offensive: after staging a violent coup against the de facto ruling class, America's whites, blacks, and gays all go live in separate countries so they won't compete with one another anymore and can develop their own cultures. But there is next to no mention of any other group beyond these three. Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, bisexuals, interracial couples– all of the actual gray areas that exist in America's melting pot get only the barest screen time minimum with unsatisfying explanations of how they "self-deported" and "left things" to the primary groups. Bullshit. It's all overly neat and compartmentalized so the small acts of rebellion that show up amount to silly tokens to throw a bone to questioning readers and move on to the next gory or gratuitous scene our author wants to create. If Palahniuk is supposedly satirizing identity politics in America, he's doing a very weak job because it comes across as his actual understanding of race and gender: very narrow and easy to delineate. The dialects are straight-up antiquated stereotypes and irritatingly one-note. Plus, if we move beyond that and just assume everybody readily accepts one single identity as who they are, how the hell would the world continue to function if all of America disbanded into three separate countries - all of which somehow continue to keep the lights on and the food supply going despite a sudden rejection of US currency. What about international trade and global commerce? Suddenly we don't need markets outside of our borders? Suddenly nobody needs oil from the Middle East or raw materials from Africa or the expertise of other countries' scientists? This book just doesn't hold up to even a nanosecond of scrutiny, and I guess the case could be made that that's the point - but I'd rather see a more mature critique of the culture wars, not an extended straw man argument.Oh and what's more, about halfway through he cites his own book Fight Club (twice!) as an example of a recurring narrative structure in American fiction, which struck me as incredibly self-indulgent. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve not read much of Palahniuk’s work. In fact, I’ve only read Fight Club. So, when I got the chance to get my hands on an ARC of his new book, I didn’t hesitate. He’s a writer I’ve always wanted to explore more. But, man, what a drag this was. I really, REALLY enjoy the premise. The book reads sort of like a tome for an event that’s already happened, and it’s eerie to see the similarities between our real world and the world Palahniuk creates. It was hard not to make comparisons throughout to I’ve not read much of Palahniuk’s work. In fact, I’ve only read Fight Club. So, when I got the chance to get my hands on an ARC of his new book, I didn’t hesitate. He’s a writer I’ve always wanted to explore more. But, man, what a drag this was. I really, REALLY enjoy the premise. The book reads sort of like a tome for an event that’s already happened, and it’s eerie to see the similarities between our real world and the world Palahniuk creates. It was hard not to make comparisons throughout to Project Mayhem, if Project Mayhem went global. Maybe that’s because I’ve only read Fight Club, but maybe it’s something others will see as well. Even though the premise is good, the execution is just not there. The book jumps from character to character so much that I couldn’t grasp who anyone was, or care about anything they were doing. It also seemed to take FOREVER to actually get to Adjustment Day - by my calculations, it started on page 111. For a 330ish page book, that’s a hell of a lot of build up to the event the book is named after. I really wanted to like this. I loved Palahniuk’s writing style and his voice. But the jumbled narrative and lack of a central character to really relate to made the whole thing quite a slog. This might work better as an HBO series than a novel.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a big Chuck P fan for quite some time now. I even caught him live at the Triple Rock for the "Snuff" tour. His last few books haven't grabbed me like "Rant," "Lullaby" or "Survivor" did. "Adjustment Day" is different. An interesting take on dystopia, fueled by the concept that there is a cyclical population bulge of males that is alleviated by war. This time, instead of another war, the young men and blue collar folks of country rise up and decapitate the intelligentsia and the leaders I've been a big Chuck P fan for quite some time now. I even caught him live at the Triple Rock for the "Snuff" tour. His last few books haven't grabbed me like "Rant," "Lullaby" or "Survivor" did. "Adjustment Day" is different. An interesting take on dystopia, fueled by the concept that there is a cyclical population bulge of males that is alleviated by war. This time, instead of another war, the young men and blue collar folks of country rise up and decapitate the intelligentsia and the leadership elites from their positions of power. Then black and white ethno-states and "Gaysia" are created and a new ruling class is created from the young men and blue collar rebel leaders. Hijinks ensue and it takes a while to sort out who is important to the reader but a worthwhile novel..
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  • Derek Wolfgram
    January 1, 1970
    Palahniuk's best book since Lullaby. While the narrative is a bit jumbled, the paranoid libertarian fantasy world in the story is a brilliant extrapolation of today's political environment, and could only have been written by the author of Fight Club. Darkly funny and poignant.
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  • Jason Pettus
    January 1, 1970
    It would perhaps be best to start my review of Chuck Palahniuk's newest novel, Adjustment Day, with a factual recap of the book's premise, since all my complex and hard-to-articulate opinions of the book stem from it. Namely, it posits a day after tomorrow in which the alt-right movement actually gets their shit together enough to pull off a successful armed revolution, after which they split the US up into a series of ethnostates (all whites in the north, all blacks in the south, all LGBTQ peop It would perhaps be best to start my review of Chuck Palahniuk's newest novel, Adjustment Day, with a factual recap of the book's premise, since all my complex and hard-to-articulate opinions of the book stem from it. Namely, it posits a day after tomorrow in which the alt-right movement actually gets their shit together enough to pull off a successful armed revolution, after which they split the US up into a series of ethnostates (all whites in the north, all blacks in the south, all LGBTQ people in California, with Asians and Latinos and Jews shipped back to their respective homelands). And unlike most such tales written by academic liberals like Palahniuk, here he intimates that everything works out happily ever after for the men who pull this off, in large part precisely because the academic liberals who should've opposed them instead battle each other into extinction over the dwindling resources of the now abandoned urban centers of the US; and because all those angry Riot Grrrls and MeTooers promptly turn tail once the male population dwindles, women generally now spending their time competing with each other for the romantic affections of the few eligible men left in society. So yes, in other words, it's The Handmaid's Tale rewritten as a utopian fantasy by the people who won the revolution; yes, in other words, it's The Turner Diaries rewritten by one of our nation's best and most mature novelists, not the usual sloppy amateurish manuscript we expect of these kinds of storylines, but a polished and brilliant book that could easily be eligible for the Pulitzer Prize (that is, in an alternative world where such a thing could even be contemplated), and that makes the extremely persuasive argument that the alt-right have legitimate complaints about society that all of us really should be paying a whole lot more attention to, instead of our current policy of blanket-shunning the entire movement and everything they have to say as worthless drivel.Those are the inarguable facts about the content of Adjustment Day, an easy enough thing to put down on paper; so the much more complicated thing becomes the question, what exactly are we intellectual liberals to make of such a book? As my Twitter followers know, I for one went through a whole range of complex emotions while reading it, which is why this review is so hard for me to pin down: first a surprise sympathy for the revolutionaries, and a budding excitement over the idea that they will actually pull off their militarized coup; then anger at Palahniuk for tricking me into sympathizing with a bunch of backwards "toxic males;" then anger at the far-left academic liberals of the world who came up with terms like "toxic males" in the first place, in order to dismiss any opinion they don't particularly like; then the dawning realization that this book is not so much about supporting the alt-right than it is about profoundly criticizing the progressive left, for thinking that their farts smell like wildflowers and that they can quite naturally do no wrong; and then finally the realization by the end that, no, what Palahniuk is really doing here is simply examining the subject of men and masculinity, and specifically the question of how men are supposed to understand their masculinity better in a world that automatically shuns and vilifies the entire concept as "toxic," no matter how cursory the examination?After all, Palahniuk himself has said many times in interviews that this book is to his early hit Fight Club what Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged is to The Fountainhead; in other words, in both cases the earlier novels are a look at one individual person in the world who lives a sort of theoretically perfect life when it comes to the philosophy being discussed, while the second book in both cases are more sweeping looks at what might happen if an entire society starts thinking and behaving like the hero of the first book. And 23 years later, it's pretty common knowledge by now that Palahniuk's still remarkable debut novel Fight Club is one of the most astute and transgressive looks ever done of masculinity, of the violent and chaos-embracing blood-eating black soul trapped inside the heart of everyone with a penis ever born, and what a man's proper response should be in order to tame this inner demon and put it to productive use in society. It's also a well-known fact by now that the alt-right movement has essentially co-opted Fight Club as a sort of "red pill" introduction to their cause, a gateway drug of sorts that gently introduces many of the main issues that drive the masculinist movement, and especially the fact that mainstream society, as currently dominated by a media friendly to far-left progressive liberalism, doesn't even allow these issues to be discussed as a valid topic of conversation, instead blithely dismissing the entire subject of masculinity as "toxic poison" to be shunned, shamed and ridiculed.Adjustment Day is essentially Palahniuk publicly acknowledging what has happened with Fight Club and the alt-right over the last two decades, and arguing that the alt-right and the election of Trump is exactly what happens if you try to will an entire subset of the population out of existence; that if you don't allow rational and well-reasoned discussions to take place about masculinity, men will instead embrace the most radical and least-reasoned discussions about the subject, will band together under a legitimate and very much earned feeling of threat. If you get angry while reading Adjustment Day, that's good because you should get angry. We should all be angry that we have created a society where the only way to even examine the issue of what makes men men is to angrily embrace the most extreme and violent view of the subject as possible.It's exactly for this reason, of course, that academic liberals have largely been dismissing Adjustment Day; The Guardian, for example, called it "feeble," "vapid" and "incoherent," while the New York Times didn't think it was good enough to even bother reviewing in the first place. That's a big mistake, and exactly the kind of self-fulfilling prophecy the book is warning liberals about in the first place -- that by utterly dismissing every single issue in the world that doesn't personally relate to you as "worthless," you give others who care about these issues no other choice than to force you to confront the issue, precisely by violently embracing the most extreme and cartoonishly terrible aspect of the issue and, say, voting him into the White House. That's why the eventual fates of the ethnostates in Adjustment Day is the most brilliant aspect of the entire book, because it's Palahniuk poking vicious fun of far-left liberals' towering sense of smugness and self-importance; namely, California's "Gaysia" almost immediately becomes a militaristic police state, as the LGBTQ community quickly realize that, for the first time in their history, they now have to start worrying about producing gay babies as fast as possible, and resort to conscripting all lesbians at gunpoint into forced artificial insemination; while once all the African-Americans finally gather together in the Deep South to inaugurate "Blacktopia," it's revealed that the common Hollywood scriptwriting cliche of the "Magical Negro" is in fact quite literal, and that the black community has had the capacity this entire time to bring about a science-fictional Wakanda-like golden age, in which giant pyramids float to the moon and nation-wide communal hymns bring an end to aging and death by natural causes.That's one of the most genius things Palahniuk could've done here, because he's taking every single fantasy progressive liberals have ever expressed about how much better the world would be if straight white males were no longer in charge, and basically throws them all back in their faces as the ridiculous cartoons they are. That will be a tough thing for liberals to swallow, which is mainly why they've been staying away from this fellow liberal, openly gay, Vancouver-residing author's new novel in droves. But you'll be a better human being if you buck this trend yourself and try to embrace what Palahniuk is saying here, and understand that he's not trying to glorify the alt-right in this book but rather point out that some of the things they complain about are legitimate complaints that should be taken seriously, not coldly dismissed in a crassly cynical effort to sell more shaving cream. If you want to be a better human being, read this book and try to understand it for what it is. If you don't, then keep dismissing it like everyone else, and hunker down in your ivory tower waiting for the armed revolution that will undoubtedly come in its wake.
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  • lit.erary.britt
    January 1, 1970
    “If you can slash a tire, you can harvest an ear.”On a large scale the premise is so intriguing, but in execution, it’s a disorganized mess. With no distinct chapters, and a stupid number of characters (none of whom I cared lived, died, lost an ear, whatever), it was easy to get storylines confused. Talbott’s blue-black book of aphorisms is the only thing that kept me going. Glad it’s over.
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  • Bon Tom
    January 1, 1970
    To appreciate this book, you need several things:1. You need to be aware this is satire, not your serious, zombie based dystopia you're accustomed to. You also need to know what satire is.2. You need to be accustomed to 101 of conspiracy theories.3. Incredible though they sound, you also need to suspect that all those crazy conspiracy theories probably have more than quantum of truth in them, certainly more than the version of reality you're being fed via media and public belief, which is, if yo To appreciate this book, you need several things:1. You need to be aware this is satire, not your serious, zombie based dystopia you're accustomed to. You also need to know what satire is.2. You need to be accustomed to 101 of conspiracy theories.3. Incredible though they sound, you also need to suspect that all those crazy conspiracy theories probably have more than quantum of truth in them, certainly more than the version of reality you're being fed via media and public belief, which is, if you dare to thing about it, the craziest version of reality of them all.4. You need something called C.O.N.C.E.N.T.R.A.T.I.O.N. Damn, this sounds like a camp. So, F.O.C.U.S. will also work.Most people lack some or all of these, therefore underrating of this book. Bad for them and Chuck, good for politicians, system and all the junk information the tapestry of world as we know it is woven of. Not because of some crucial info or tip, hidden between the covers of Adjustment Day, no. It's just a sort of, mental state detector, let's say.It's because capacity, or better put, willingness to think is as elusive (for most people), as real reasons for, let's say, so called "glasshouse effect" (it's not your poor old Volvo with some meager unfiltered particles coming out of its metal ass), reason why your country wages wars (it's not because it wants to prevent 9/11 to ever happen again, but you probably know that by now, at least), or why you can't replace battery in your phone any more (it's not because of waterproofing and "sleek" design).They're bullshitting you on every step of your way, sucking the energy from global mass of humanity, that energy being operationalized through money, of course, so much so that it feels normal, cultured. Feels like progress. Bullshit feels sleek, waterproof and tasty. And this will remain so, for a long time.Until Adjustment Day.
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  • Yvette Lavanchy
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day was a big disappointment. I never really got the plot, there was just too many subplots and characters. I also didn’t understand where he referenced his own works “Fight Club” and even his own name in comparison of other books like Dead Poets Society, Gone with the wind, and Great Gatsby. Please Chuck, spare us this narcissism. I have enjoyed many of Palahniuk’s books in the past but this one I could not justify wasting a day to finish after I have wasted 24$ to purchase the book. Adjustment Day was a big disappointment. I never really got the plot, there was just too many subplots and characters. I also didn’t understand where he referenced his own works “Fight Club” and even his own name in comparison of other books like Dead Poets Society, Gone with the wind, and Great Gatsby. Please Chuck, spare us this narcissism. I have enjoyed many of Palahniuk’s books in the past but this one I could not justify wasting a day to finish after I have wasted 24$ to purchase the book.
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  • Dany Salvatierra
    January 1, 1970
    1984 meets The Handmaid's Tale meets Fight Club. Classic Chuck is back. With a vengeance.
  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe I'm just getting older, but it sure feels like Palahniuk gets worse and worse. I can't tell if this is supposed to be self-parody of its own failure to work as any sort of effective social satire. I think he's trying to outdo himself for being gross, offensive, and bizarre, but he's misstepped in just adding more of the same instead of actually upping the game. If you're in the market for a book that makes you uncomfortable, read Roche's Wetlands, Delany's Hogg, or Homes' The End Of Alice. Maybe I'm just getting older, but it sure feels like Palahniuk gets worse and worse. I can't tell if this is supposed to be self-parody of its own failure to work as any sort of effective social satire. I think he's trying to outdo himself for being gross, offensive, and bizarre, but he's misstepped in just adding more of the same instead of actually upping the game. If you're in the market for a book that makes you uncomfortable, read Roche's Wetlands, Delany's Hogg, or Homes' The End Of Alice. They are all also just a lot better written. And maybe the real shame is that there are a couple of interesting ideas in here that could make for a good premise if they were handled completely differently.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    This took me a week to read. I feel like he can be either amazing or pretty average. This dystopian style novel is very close to home ie USA. I felt like its tongue in cheekiness was too silly and over the top. The writing is top notch at times and I give him 2 stars for this. However for some reason we're getting a random explosion of dystopian novels. I think the overload is getting too much. I think diehard fans will eat this one up. People experiencing Chuck for the first time maybe stay awa This took me a week to read. I feel like he can be either amazing or pretty average. This dystopian style novel is very close to home ie USA. I felt like its tongue in cheekiness was too silly and over the top. The writing is top notch at times and I give him 2 stars for this. However for some reason we're getting a random explosion of dystopian novels. I think the overload is getting too much. I think diehard fans will eat this one up. People experiencing Chuck for the first time maybe stay away and start somewhere else.
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  • Jamesboggie
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day is like the idiot child of Fight Club. It is a bigger, stupider, shallower imitation for the Internet age.That might seem unfairly harsh, but is impossible to avoid comparing Adjustment Day to Fight Club. Palahniuk does it himself in book, when he outright asserts the purposes of each book (on page 157 of my copy). As far as I am concerned, that begs for comparisons. In this comparison, Adjustment Day falls short. Adjustment Day is full of social commentary. That's fine; social co Adjustment Day is like the idiot child of Fight Club. It is a bigger, stupider, shallower imitation for the Internet age.That might seem unfairly harsh, but is impossible to avoid comparing Adjustment Day to Fight Club. Palahniuk does it himself in book, when he outright asserts the purposes of each book (on page 157 of my copy). As far as I am concerned, that begs for comparisons. In this comparison, Adjustment Day falls short. Adjustment Day is full of social commentary. That's fine; social commentary was one of the strengths of Fight Club. However, the social commentary in this novel is bad. First, it is unforgivably preachy. It talks down to the reader with whatever random political pronouncements and cultural comments Palahniuk had lying around. Imagine the worst college dropout pontificating on YouTube about how he knows "what's really going on", and you'll have a good idea of the insufferable tone of Adjustment Day.Second, even worse is that Adjustment Day preaches absolute bullshit. Sure, it has some of the message of self-actualization that formed the core of Fight Club. Unfortunately, that message is buried under some of the worst dreck I have ever read. Palahniuk repeats the biggest lies of the modern era, including Holocaust denial, the moon landing conspiracy, and the idea that education prevents critical thought. More fundamentally, the books seems to be anti-intellectual, anti-science, misogynistic, pro-segregation, and pro-violence. Rather than transgressing as did Fight Club, Adjustment Day panders to the lowest common denominator of our current dysfunctional society.The writing itself does the book no favors. It is raw, as you would expect from a successor to Fight Club. It never grabbed me though. It felt more obligatory than challenging. Also, this book is a mix of unlabeled sections of different subplots. The subplots jump around in time and space. I was further annoyed by the number of pop culture and literary references, including several to Palahniuk and his own works. These references will ensure that the book becomes dated in a way Fight Club never has. These authorial decisions added to the feeling that this book is merely fan fiction written on some disreputable web forum.The story was similarly disappointing. The buildup to the eponymous Adjustment Day is a pale imitation of Project Mayhem. The aftermath includes two slow motion dystopian disasters in Caucasia and Gaysia, and a utopia in Blacktopia. The story borrows heavily from other works like 1984 and The Handmaid's Tale and conspiracy theories for a thoroughly unremarkable plot. It really is just a vehicle for the commentary, which as I said is crap.Internet-based fan fiction for Fight Club. I can't think of a better way to describe Adjustment Day. I found the book painful in all the wrong ways. I may try another Palahniuk book, but only because he is my best friend's favorite author. I will never touch this book again.
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  • Rachel Christine
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I am a big fan of Palahniuk's earlier works (Invisible Monsters, Fight Club, Lullaby) and had the opportunity to meet him at a book signing for this release. I had high expectations going into this book, and while I did like it, there were several parts of it that just didn't work for me.This book is clearly a satire on our current socioeconomic and political state. It expands on our dissastifcation and fears with the world, and paints a picture of "what would really happen if we rid ourse ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ I am a big fan of Palahniuk's earlier works (Invisible Monsters, Fight Club, Lullaby) and had the opportunity to meet him at a book signing for this release. I had high expectations going into this book, and while I did like it, there were several parts of it that just didn't work for me.This book is clearly a satire on our current socioeconomic and political state. It expands on our dissastifcation and fears with the world, and paints a picture of "what would really happen if we rid ourselves of the corrupt 'swamp' of policiticians, investment bankers, and real estate moguls and started over?" I enjoy dystopian books and found many parts of it hilairous. However, the structure of the book leaves a lot to be desired. There are so many characters and storylines to keep track of, that I often found myself having to go back through the pages to figure out who that character was and what had been happening to them before. Usually I like books with multiple storylines, but Adjustment Day had way too many (I think 6 or 7?). I feel like a majority of the characters were underdevloped, simply because there were too many for proper development to happen within 300 pages. I would have really liked less storylines and more depth in a select few. The book reads like an anarchist manifesto a la Project Mayhem in many spots and I found some of the "Talbottisms" stated throughout to be very repetitive. There were also way too many pop cultural references smattered across the book. Some I knew, but there were just too many for me to look up while I was reading, and I feel I may have missed something by ot understanding them. As a whole, this book wasn't really for me, but I still love Chuck Palahniuk and hope his next book is more enjoyable!
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  • John Ferrigno
    January 1, 1970
    Adjustment Day feels like the book Chuck Palahniuk's entire career has been leading up to. This novel is very much of the moment, a scathing satire of current American society, our modern climate brought to the extreme and turned on its head.While it is filled with the types of themes that are normally found in a Palahniuk book, this one reads very different than his usual writing style. He normally skewers society through the eyes of a single character. In Adjustment Day, he uses a large ensemb Adjustment Day feels like the book Chuck Palahniuk's entire career has been leading up to. This novel is very much of the moment, a scathing satire of current American society, our modern climate brought to the extreme and turned on its head.While it is filled with the types of themes that are normally found in a Palahniuk book, this one reads very different than his usual writing style. He normally skewers society through the eyes of a single character. In Adjustment Day, he uses a large ensemble, portraying the world through a series of short vignettes rather than a more traditional protagnist's journey. This book is brimming with the type of black comedy and social satire that Palahniuk is famous for. Adjustment Day is a dark reflection of our world, a society seemingly birthed through the twisted fever dreams of our fractured, damaged psyche. Equal parts disturbing and hilarious, this book is never boring. It has so many insane situations, yet each one has a strand of reality keeping it grounded. Violent and ridiculous, it reads like George Orwell, Ayn Rand and Quentin Tarantino were locked in a room and forced to collaborate on a dark satire of today's America.While it is very different from his usual writing style, this book is still purely Palahniuk. It has his warped sense of humor on every page. Adjustment Day may very well be his masterpiece.
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  • Chaunceton Bird
    January 1, 1970
    The style and substance of this book are unquestionably the work of Chuck Palahniuk, but the delivery isn't quite there. In this sardonic critic of identity politics, the author imagines a grim America divided along arbitrary lines of race and sexuality. Although intriguing, it didn't pull me along; not a page turner. For much of the book I felt like I was slogging through one of the author's good ideas, but developed ad nauseum. I'd recommend this to fans of Chuck Palahniuk, but not to anybody The style and substance of this book are unquestionably the work of Chuck Palahniuk, but the delivery isn't quite there. In this sardonic critic of identity politics, the author imagines a grim America divided along arbitrary lines of race and sexuality. Although intriguing, it didn't pull me along; not a page turner. For much of the book I felt like I was slogging through one of the author's good ideas, but developed ad nauseum. I'd recommend this to fans of Chuck Palahniuk, but not to anybody else.
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  • Ben Arzate
    January 1, 1970
    Full ReviewAdjustment Day is an entertaining satire of modern American politics, but a flawed one. Palahniuk throws some clever barbs at the zeitgeist and there are flashes of what made Fight Club such a beloved phenomenon. However, while I think this is a book worth reading, all its problems make it seem like an earlier draft of a much better one.
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  • Brendan
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 It's nice to have another Chuck Palahniuk novel on the shelf and a book that has a lot of ideas like Fight Club all those years ago. The problem I have with the book is that it simply went nowhere. Fight Club 2 was another missed opportunity, that I felt was rushed and just didn't work and Adjustment Day is another book that doesn't know what it wants to be. The none chapter format was a nice change, I tend to enjoy how Chuck Palahniuk presents each book, I recently picked up the new version 3.5 It's nice to have another Chuck Palahniuk novel on the shelf and a book that has a lot of ideas like Fight Club all those years ago. The problem I have with the book is that it simply went nowhere. Fight Club 2 was another missed opportunity, that I felt was rushed and just didn't work and Adjustment Day is another book that doesn't know what it wants to be. The none chapter format was a nice change, I tend to enjoy how Chuck Palahniuk presents each book, I recently picked up the new version of Invisible Monsters and must say it looks more in line with his style. The biggest issue with the none chapter style is the shifting character focus, I just never connected with anyone or the story elements. The quotes from the fictitious book in the novel reminded me so much of Fight Club and I will revisit that book in the coming month, such a brilliant book and movie. One of the biggest issues I have with Chuck Palahniuk is the self awareness, something that was all through Fight Club 2. I didn't care for it then and I don't care for it now. Stephen King tends to have connections throughout his work but this fourth wall breaking style feels heavily forced. I think a way around it would be to copy Charlie Kaufman with Adaptation, where he was the central character but one hundred precent fictional. This way you can explore your ideas with a character that is somewhat real but never yourself. I mentioned the characters before and I really didn't connect with them or the depth was quite shallow or none existent. This weakened the central ideas of the novel and when they were explored you could never really grab onto them or how they effected the character. The novel goes crazy quickly, which isn't a bad thing but I think not having a central figure was a mistake. Why the 3.5?Interesting question. The rating is not out of pity or a cop out to Palahniuk. I simply did not hate it. I think after a four year break, Palahniuk would've delivered a solid return to form after a string of not so brilliant books. I mentioned the book went crazy and I mean it goes crazy with all sense of the word. I just don't feel it was the book it promised to be. Palahniuk obviously had good intentions and some of the book works very well but was it worth a four year break? No. Passages where on par with Fight Club, I honestly thought he was going to nail this book at times. The ending was probably some of the better sections but I felt some ideas lingered and went unexplored. I enjoyed the tone of the book, very similar to Fight Club. I think the four year break has probably done well for the creative flow and maybe it will flow into the next book. Obviously the book isn't without its flaws but there is a lot of positive work here. It was a book unlike any other I have read this year, a huge positive in my eyes. I missed having a Chuck Palahniuk book on my shelf so it was nice reading the ideas that have been floating around in his head. I have some of the older books that I have never added to my Goodreads sitting on shelf so I will reread and offer them up down the track. My next book is Only Human by Sylvain Neuvel which is the third in the series which I have read last year. I still have The Dark Dark which I hope to finish next week, it is well overdue from the library.
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  • Kenneth Wade
    January 1, 1970
    Unique, interesting dystopian with well-written characters. This book really makes you think (and also laugh, as it is a satire), but it’s definitely not for the faint of heart. It also probably could have stood a bit of trimming because it feels overly long at times.3.75 out of 5 stars
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