It Wasn't Me
The Breakfast Club meets middle school mystery in this story of six very different seventh graders forced together in the aftermath of a vandalism incident.When Theo’s photographs are vandalized and trashed beyond all recognition, there are five kids at the scene: The Nerd, the Princess, the Jock, the Weirdo, and the Screw-Up.All anyone will say is “It wasn’t me.”Theo doesn’t care who it was, he just wants to stop being the victim. The sooner the school forgets the whole humiliating thing, the better. But his favorite teacher is asking the six of them to spend vacation week together “learning to trust” and getting to the truth. She calls it a Justice Circle. He calls it his worst nightmare.Theo knows everything he needs to know about his classmates, and he’s sure this Justice Circle is going to be an epic and totally mortifying waste of time. But after a few days of sock puppets gone wrong, artificial flesh wounds, and dangerous candy reconnaissance missions, he’s not so certain. As they share their secrets, Theo realizes that he doesn’t know anyone as well as he thought, not even himself. And the truths they share might change their lives forever.Hilarious, awkward, surprising, and ultimately heartwarming, IT WASN’T ME is a guessing game that keeps readers wondering: what lies behind the labels we wear?

It Wasn't Me Details

TitleIt Wasn't Me
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 13th, 2018
PublisherDelacorte Books for Young Readers
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Contemporary, Mystery, Young Adult, Realistic Fiction

It Wasn't Me Review

  • Violet Sinclair
    January 1, 1970
    DISCLAIMER: I received a digital review copy of IT WASN’T ME via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review4.5 StarsHOLY FREAKING COWAs mentioned in my RECKLESS CLUB review (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), I love THE BREAKFAST CLUB, so when I heard about this book, I instantly requested it. And once I got the acceptance email, I was super excited and immediately started reading it. Let me tell you, my friend, that I flippin’ loved it.Like THE BREAKFAST CLUB, you have the classic Princ DISCLAIMER: I received a digital review copy of IT WASN’T ME via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review4.5 StarsHOLY FREAKING COWAs mentioned in my RECKLESS CLUB review (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), I love THE BREAKFAST CLUB, so when I heard about this book, I instantly requested it. And once I got the acceptance email, I was super excited and immediately started reading it. Let me tell you, my friend, that I flippin’ loved it.Like THE BREAKFAST CLUB, you have the classic Princess (Molly Claremont), Athlete (Erik Estrale), Brain (Andre Hall), Criminal (Jax Fletcher), and Basket Case (Alice Shu) - this time labeled as the Overachiever, the Jock, the Nerd, the Screw-up, and the Weirdo - and they do excellent justice to their similar counterparts. And the book is complete with some iconic quotes and scenes from the original BREAKFAST CLUB.So, yeah, perfect for fans of THE BREAKFAST CLUB, or even people who want a nice, feel-good middle-grade novel.Purchasing in November? Abso-freakin’-lutelyUPDATE: I have now read it twice, and it just made me love it more (also highly anticipating the audiobook)
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    Fan's of Breakfast Club are going to enjoy this book. Steals quite a bit from the movie, but it's ok, I can handle that nod to a great film. I think middle schoolers through adult fans are going to enjoy this little mystery story Dana Levy nailed it!I received a Kindle ARC from Netgalley in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I read this as a free e-ARC from Netgalley. The description of this book is Breakfast Club middle school mystery and that is right on the mark. Six students are brought together during a school break to hopefully find out who has vandalized one of the student's (Theo) art work. Each of the other five affirms each day they were not involved, but all five admit to being in the area. They participate in an activity called a "justice circle." During the week, each of them realize something piv Note: I read this as a free e-ARC from Netgalley. The description of this book is Breakfast Club middle school mystery and that is right on the mark. Six students are brought together during a school break to hopefully find out who has vandalized one of the student's (Theo) art work. Each of the other five affirms each day they were not involved, but all five admit to being in the area. They participate in an activity called a "justice circle." During the week, each of them realize something pivotal about themselves and each other. I really liked the mystery and their internal conflicts, but the author who readily admits The Breakfast Club is her favorite movie borrows too heavily for her story line. Each student is a stereotype, jock, nerd, art freak, etc. Even some of their antics are right out of the movie. If I had not also loved the movie, these things would not have bothered me. However, knowing the movie, it makes this author appear lazy in her creativity.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from NetgalleyI generally like Levy's work, but I don't know that my students will really get the heavy Breakfast Club references. Also, I couldn't believe that a guidance counselor would be allowed (or want to!) have a group of students in during spring break for a week long justice circle, so it was hard for me to get invested in the concept. I can see this doing well in many libraries, but I think I will pass on purchase for mine.
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  • Alexa Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    Still featuring one of the Fletcher boys—Jax—but told by Theo, whose photos have been vandalized multiple times. One of the teachers at the school decides to do justice circle over spring break to get to the bottom of it. It starts slow, as we have to fully get into the story from six different points of view. Levy does a wonderful job of giving each of these characters a full story. That is the point, that they all learn that even if on the surface you are different, everyone can find something Still featuring one of the Fletcher boys—Jax—but told by Theo, whose photos have been vandalized multiple times. One of the teachers at the school decides to do justice circle over spring break to get to the bottom of it. It starts slow, as we have to fully get into the story from six different points of view. Levy does a wonderful job of giving each of these characters a full story. That is the point, that they all learn that even if on the surface you are different, everyone can find something in common.As an adult, I was able to see through one of the twists but the rest is very earnest, sweet and a little bit unpredictable. The slow start might make it a harder sell to kids, but they have also been in these situations. A nice conclusion, definitely with a message.
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  • Jensen
    January 1, 1970
    I was super excited to read this, as was my twelve-year-old, who has loved all of this author's previous books. It's a very different sort of story - school-based, rather than family-based - from her other books, but with the same humor, heart, and voice. The pitch of "Breakfast Club for MG" is DEAD-ON, so perfect, it made me want to go back and watch The Breakfast Club again. And in addition to the humor and wonderful characters, it brings up a lot of really important tough questions about the I was super excited to read this, as was my twelve-year-old, who has loved all of this author's previous books. It's a very different sort of story - school-based, rather than family-based - from her other books, but with the same humor, heart, and voice. The pitch of "Breakfast Club for MG" is DEAD-ON, so perfect, it made me want to go back and watch The Breakfast Club again. And in addition to the humor and wonderful characters, it brings up a lot of really important tough questions about the boxes we put each other into. I really hope this book does well and gets discussed in a lot of schools.
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  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of The Breakfast Club. My sister and I can recite the entire movie. Just ask my teenager: when I introduced it to her for the first time (a rite of passage, obviously) I ruined it by saying the lines with the characters. So imagine my UTTER EXCITEMENT to see a middle grade book paying homage to the Hughes classic. I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it, and am grateful to the author and publisher for the ARC.I read It Wasn’t Me in a day, loving the mystery parts of it, as well as I am a huge fan of The Breakfast Club. My sister and I can recite the entire movie. Just ask my teenager: when I introduced it to her for the first time (a rite of passage, obviously) I ruined it by saying the lines with the characters. So imagine my UTTER EXCITEMENT to see a middle grade book paying homage to the Hughes classic. I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it, and am grateful to the author and publisher for the ARC.I read It Wasn’t Me in a day, loving the mystery parts of it, as well as the nuances to each character and the subtle ways their lives (that lead to their actions) unfolded. The only thing I wrestled with was that the kids’ voices, while unique, sounded older than 7th graders would sound. But that may be my Breakfast Club obsession clouding my reading. :) I am thrilled to share this book with my students and add it to my classroom library. My mom had a piece of paper taped to her fridge that says, “Be careful because everyone you meet is fighting some sort of battle.” Such an important lesson for my students to understand.
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  • Shoshana
    January 1, 1970
    NEW DANA ALISON LEVY BOOKSeriously, this showed up in the mail at work, I grabbed it, started it, finished it. All in the same day. I won't say too much this far from pub date, but this is another win by Levy who, as usual, handles difficult issues with humor, charm, characters who are relateable and easy to become attached to (as well as coming off as full fleshed out), and a deft touch in general. This is definitely the "heaviest" of her books, facing issues of bullying, family difficulties, a NEW DANA ALISON LEVY BOOKSeriously, this showed up in the mail at work, I grabbed it, started it, finished it. All in the same day. I won't say too much this far from pub date, but this is another win by Levy who, as usual, handles difficult issues with humor, charm, characters who are relateable and easy to become attached to (as well as coming off as full fleshed out), and a deft touch in general. This is definitely the "heaviest" of her books, facing issues of bullying, family difficulties, and general social issues a little more head-on, kind of in the style of John David Anderson or Rob Buyea - and arguably gets a little more "preachy" than her others, but it's also a kind of contemporary, middle school Breakfast Club which is pretty awesome. And I love that it's still in Shipton. Can't wait for November to start selling this!
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  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Dana Alison Levy for providing an ARC to collabookation for review.It Wasn't Me is a Breakfast Club WhoDunIt? And it's amazing. Theo was asked and reluctantly agreed to hang some of his photography in the middle school’s art gallery. Soon after it is hung, it gets cruelly vandalized. Theo may have been able to deal with that, he knows the people he goes to school with, after all. Did he expect any different? But the following day, someone ruins a different piece of work he's set up. Thank you to Dana Alison Levy for providing an ARC to collabookation for review.It Wasn't Me is a Breakfast Club WhoDunIt? And it's amazing. Theo was asked and reluctantly agreed to hang some of his photography in the middle school’s art gallery. Soon after it is hung, it gets cruelly vandalized. Theo may have been able to deal with that, he knows the people he goes to school with, after all. Did he expect any different? But the following day, someone ruins a different piece of work he's set up...and now it's personal. This book is the story of what happens when the five suspects and Theo all agree to spend their weeklong vacation taking part in a Justice Circle. This book is fast-paced and so compelling. Turns out, when you spend several days stuck in a room with five other people, you get to know them. You definitely get past their middle school personas. It starts to get real in that Justice Circle. The entire time, I was simultaneously trying to figure out who did it while (for EVERY character) hoping that person didn't do it! Levy does a wonderful job of showing the reader the different exteriors and interiors for each and every character, and we understand them. I think we all can go back and shudder at who we were in middle school, or things we did. Levy perfectly displays these characters’ hopes and imperfections. Even better, Levy somehow highlights each character's introspection without getting too idealistic. Kids will love this fast-paced and suspenseful read, as will adults. I think my fifths will miss a lot of the social aspects that are touched upon, but will still be thoroughly entertained. I picture my returning seventh and eighth graders being able to identify and connect with all the complex social issues of middle school, and for this reason I'll have two copies! It Wasn’t Me will be published in November, but you can (and should) preorder now!
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    It Wasn't Me by Dana Alison Levy will draw readers in with the nod to The Breakfast Club and keep them interested with the modern take on dealing with school labels. Like Theo I struggled wanting to know and not know what really happened to his vandalized artwork. Great book that will help readers to "Be kind, for all of us are fighting unseen battles."
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars, 5/6th&upSuch a fun (and topical) remake of Breakfast Club! Theo's school photography display has been destroyed in an attack that feels quite personal, and no one is admitting to anything. In order to try and discover what happened and why, a teacher gathers Theo and five student suspects together for a week long justice circle meant to reveal the truth and heal the underlying damage that caused & resulted from the incident. Yeah...Theo and the others aren't buying it either- 4.5 stars, 5/6th&upSuch a fun (and topical) remake of Breakfast Club! Theo's school photography display has been destroyed in an attack that feels quite personal, and no one is admitting to anything. In order to try and discover what happened and why, a teacher gathers Theo and five student suspects together for a week long justice circle meant to reveal the truth and heal the underlying damage that caused & resulted from the incident. Yeah...Theo and the others aren't buying it either- but before long, all the students will find that there might be something to this restorative justice concept. New connections are made, perspectives are changed, surprises abound, and plenty of laughs and high-jinks ensure. It's a darn good time, with a nice underlying message to boot. Highly recommended.This digital ARC was obtained through Netgalley, with thanks to Random House Children's/Delacorte Books for Young Readers, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Shauna Yusko
    January 1, 1970
    What I wanted Harbor Me to actually be.
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Please see my review at Amazon.com under C. Wong. Thank you.
  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this! An overt homage to the Breakfast Club with a middle grade slant, this book centers around 6 kids embroiled in an act of vandalism who have to spend a week in non-really-detention to get to the bottom of who was the perpetrator(s). Not all of the threads are resolved - since it’s first person from the perspective of the kid whose artwork is vandalized, we don’t get enough answers to some of the problems the other kids have at home - but this is a really sweet book about looki I really liked this! An overt homage to the Breakfast Club with a middle grade slant, this book centers around 6 kids embroiled in an act of vandalism who have to spend a week in non-really-detention to get to the bottom of who was the perpetrator(s). Not all of the threads are resolved - since it’s first person from the perspective of the kid whose artwork is vandalized, we don’t get enough answers to some of the problems the other kids have at home - but this is a really sweet book about looking past those easy stereotypes to see the kid underneath the label.
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  • Jenni Frencham
    January 1, 1970
    Levy, Dana Alison. It Wasn't Me. Delacorte Press, 2018.Theo's photography project is vandalized, and no one saw anything. There are five students who were in the vicinity at the time, and they all claim they didn't do it. During a week of school break, the five students and Theo participate in a "justice circle" at school to discover who ruined Theo's work and why; during this time they learn more about each other than they do about the incident.This book has been touted as a remake of The Break Levy, Dana Alison. It Wasn't Me. Delacorte Press, 2018.Theo's photography project is vandalized, and no one saw anything. There are five students who were in the vicinity at the time, and they all claim they didn't do it. During a week of school break, the five students and Theo participate in a "justice circle" at school to discover who ruined Theo's work and why; during this time they learn more about each other than they do about the incident.This book has been touted as a remake of The Breakfast Club, and that's a fairly accurate statement. The accused kids have all been labeled by Theo - the screw-up, the weirdo, the nerd, etc. - and through the justice circle he comes to care more for them than he does for the truth. Unfortunately, this story has the feel of an after-school special, and the focus on the characters rather than on action or plot will possibly bore tween readers. It's an interesting concept; however, this book seems to be aimed more at adults who remember watching The Breakfast Club or who are skeptical of the concept of a justice circle than at tweens who should be the intended audience. Read one of Levy's other books, such as the Family Fletcher Takes Rock Island, instead.Recommended for: tweensRed Flags: noneOverall Rating: 3/5 starsI received a complimentary copy of this book through Netgalley for the purpose of review.
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  • Lisa Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This book is everything. After Theo’s artwork is ruined at school, a counselor decides to use Restorative Justice. I loved how The Breakfast Club helped to inspire this novel. If you teach middle school, this book is a must.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This had me hooked from the start! A teacher holds daily sessions with a group of middle schoolers in order to implement "restorative justice" in hopes that one of them will confess to a bullying incident and that they'll all be able to put this behind them. This would make a good follow-up suggestion for students who like Jackie Woodson's Harbor Me.
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  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Think The Breakfast Club meets middle school. Theo’s self-portrait artwork has been vandalized, and he (along with 5 suspects) have to meet daily over winter break to talk about what happened. Good book for MG readers as it addresses the assumptions and judgements they so often make and fall victim to at this age. Good information about Restorative Justice, too!
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  • Maryann
    January 1, 1970
    Review forthcoming in School Library Journal!
  • Rachel Seigel
    January 1, 1970
    this is such a wonderful book for tweens about looking beyond the labels and realizing that there is always more to the story than meets the eye. I highly recommend this for middle schoolers.
  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine you are the vicim of bullying not once, not twice, but three times. If that were the case, would you want to go and sit in a room with the people suspected of the bullying you, and to top it off, it is during your spring break? This is exactly what is happening to Theo. Theo is a photographer and when his pictures are on display in the high school gallery, they are vandalized with some not so nice words written on them. Next, his negatives were in the dark room and someone went in and ru Imagine you are the vicim of bullying not once, not twice, but three times. If that were the case, would you want to go and sit in a room with the people suspected of the bullying you, and to top it off, it is during your spring break? This is exactly what is happening to Theo. Theo is a photographer and when his pictures are on display in the high school gallery, they are vandalized with some not so nice words written on them. Next, his negatives were in the dark room and someone went in and ruined those. Lastly, he had some homemade cameras set up in a classroom and those are destroyed. You would think that Theo would definitely not want to go and sit in a room with the five suspects, the Nerd, the Princess, the Jock, the Weirdo, and the Screw-up, but his favorite teacher asked him to try an experiment to see if they could find out who did this to Theo. Theo has gone to school with these kids most of his life and has labeled and judged each of these kids, yet as the week goes on he soon learns that everything he thought he knew is completely wrong. As Theo actually starts to become friends with each of these kids, does he really want to find out the truth of who the culprit is. It Wasn't Me is a must read book!! This book will grab you from the start and will not let you put it down until you find out "who-did-it". This book has parts that will make you laugh out loud, will warm your heart, and will shock you. There are times in this book that you want to just go and put your arms around the characters and there are times you just want to go and hang out with them. Do not let this book pass you by. Read It Wasn't Me ​as soon as it comes out!!Follow me:Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra...Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr...Twitter - https://twitter.com/lauriepurser27Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1...Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.weebly.com/
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  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    The best, funniest, most meaningful one yet!
  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    When Theo’s photographs are vandalized at school, he and five other seventh graders spend their spring break doing a Justice Circle. Theo is angry that he has to spend time with the people who may have ruined his photos but also scared that that person targeted him enough to also spoil his pinpoint camera project the next day. But as the Justice Circle works, the five of them discover ways to make new connections: sock puppets, yoga-ball soccer, and lots of candy. Still, as the end of the week n When Theo’s photographs are vandalized at school, he and five other seventh graders spend their spring break doing a Justice Circle. Theo is angry that he has to spend time with the people who may have ruined his photos but also scared that that person targeted him enough to also spoil his pinpoint camera project the next day. But as the Justice Circle works, the five of them discover ways to make new connections: sock puppets, yoga-ball soccer, and lots of candy. Still, as the end of the week nears, no one has confessed to being the vandal and Theo is getting more and more stressed. When one more of his projects is ruined that week, he is convinced he knows the perpetrator. But does he?Levy’s middle-grade novel cleverly mirrors The Breakfast Club and yet also takes the format in a different direction by adding a mystery. Readers will quickly make assumptions about the different teens themselves. Was it the jock? The weirdo? The goody-goody? The invisible kid? The screwup? One of them has to be the culprit. Still, as the week goes on, readers will question those initial opinions and learn that there is more to each of the characters than a single label.Strongly written and compellingly paced, this novel is a fascinating look at how justice can be done in a school setting without the use of detentions or suspensions. It asks readers to look deeply at the characters, to join Theo on his journey of learning about the others. As the characters reveal more about themselves, they become all the more human and interesting, and they might just become friends too.A great novel about the complexities of being a seventh grader and the truths you hide. Appropriate for ages 10-13.
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  • Nannette Demmler
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Random House Children’s via NetGalley for an honest review. This book does start off a little slow, but once you get into it, it becomes quite the delightful read. All of the characters are pretty well fleshed out, have authentic voices and were fun to spend time with. The Breakfast Club references may be missed by many middle schoolers, but this story will still resonate with many. The bulk of the book is told through Theo’s point of view, although we hear from the others throug ARC provided by Random House Children’s via NetGalley for an honest review. This book does start off a little slow, but once you get into it, it becomes quite the delightful read. All of the characters are pretty well fleshed out, have authentic voices and were fun to spend time with. The Breakfast Club references may be missed by many middle schoolers, but this story will still resonate with many. The bulk of the book is told through Theo’s point of view, although we hear from the others through what they write on their daily assessments that ask questions about the incident that brought them there and how they feel about it. All of the kids are different from each other and although they have all known each other for years they discover that they really don’t know each other. Each of these kids have a part of themselves that they have kept hidden from the rest of the school. Most of them are good, like playing in a band, but others are sad and quite meaningful to the story as a whole. I liked all of the kids and saw similarities to the kids I work with so I think kids who read this book will find something of themselves in these kids.The premise of the book is that the students were all in the wrong place at the wrong time, but claim that they didn’t see anything. So they are asked to give up their spring break to participate in a Justice Circle with the school counselor. The principal is also in the building and does make appearances now and then. Now I can see the parents agreeing to let their children participate but not sure that a counselor and principal would be willing to give up their breaks for this. Maybe, but I think kids would even agree that this was a slim possibility. Except for that the rest of the story was great. I loved the concept of the Justice Circle and could totally see that concept working in the school setting. I loved the phrase that kept coming up ” “Be kind, for all of us are fighting unseen battles.” I think that is something that is important for kids to understand. That just because you have known someone for a long time, doesn’t mean you really know them. Over all I thought this was a great book, that kids will be able to relate too on many levels. It also made me want to rewatch the Breakfast Club! https://elnadesbookchat.com/
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I will admit that I approached this book cautiously because the cover reminded me of "One of Us is Lying" (my favourite book of 2017) and I didn't want to read another poor retelling (there are a lot out there, unfortunately). But as soon as I finished the first chapter, I was sucked in and I read the entire thing in one night, when I was supposed to be studying for an accounting exam. Oops.This book was fabulous! I can't tell you how much I loved it. It is the best book I've read in 2018 and I I will admit that I approached this book cautiously because the cover reminded me of "One of Us is Lying" (my favourite book of 2017) and I didn't want to read another poor retelling (there are a lot out there, unfortunately). But as soon as I finished the first chapter, I was sucked in and I read the entire thing in one night, when I was supposed to be studying for an accounting exam. Oops.This book was fabulous! I can't tell you how much I loved it. It is the best book I've read in 2018 and I can't wait to get to work this weekend because I need to order a bunch so I can convince every parent and grandparent that this is the book for Christmas. It's the story of a boy who takes photographs and when his art is destroyed while hanging in school, he and the five main suspects are forced to give up their breaks to participate in a Justice Circle. My problem when I read books like this is that I want to find out who did it so much and the rest of the story doesn't hold my attention so I immediately go to the ending and then stop reading. This story kept my attention all the way through. Each of the six characters has a distinctive voice and narrative is hilarious. There is no crazy twist at the end that defies logic. You just cheer for the six characters and hope that everything works out.Please pick up a copy for the middleschooler in your life!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Mysteries tend to capture my attention, and this book was no different, especially since everyone seemed guilty. The book is about Theo, who's photos were vandalized twice at school. The principal agrees to let a teacher try a Justice Circle over a week-long school break to find out what happened instead of automatically suspending everyone who may have been involved. The book takes place during the time spent in the Justice Circle. Each day of the week little pieces of information are given abo Mysteries tend to capture my attention, and this book was no different, especially since everyone seemed guilty. The book is about Theo, who's photos were vandalized twice at school. The principal agrees to let a teacher try a Justice Circle over a week-long school break to find out what happened instead of automatically suspending everyone who may have been involved. The book takes place during the time spent in the Justice Circle. Each day of the week little pieces of information are given about each of the characters, making it difficult to figure out what really happen. I liked that the characters had some depth to them. None of them were as clear cut as they seemed on the surface. They all had things in their personal lives that they didn't want the others to know about. These secrets created some distrust and confusion as to what really happened. The ending was slightly predictable, but at the same time, I was surprised. There were mixed emotions when I finished the book. All in all, it was a good YA read.I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Author: Dana Alison LevyDelacorte Books for Young ReadersPublication Date: 13 Nov 2018
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  • Lara Giesbers
    January 1, 1970
    This book was worth the wait, and every page was a fun time. Anything that posits itself as a modern re-telling of The Breakfast Club begs to be read. You can't throw "The Breakfast Club" into the face of an 80's raised generation Xer and not expect her to take the bait. The story has a little more humor in it as it deals with seventh graders, but still has its serious moments and made me realize that the world is becoming too sophisticated a place when kids these days at this particular age hav This book was worth the wait, and every page was a fun time. Anything that posits itself as a modern re-telling of The Breakfast Club begs to be read. You can't throw "The Breakfast Club" into the face of an 80's raised generation Xer and not expect her to take the bait. The story has a little more humor in it as it deals with seventh graders, but still has its serious moments and made me realize that the world is becoming too sophisticated a place when kids these days at this particular age have to deal with hate crime and the other issues brought up. I think this book should make a school reading list, as it makes reading fun for the reader, but also enlightens them a little. I can't help but think that many kids reading this book will say to themselves, "finally, someone said it out loud." The humor is great especially in **spoiler alert** chapter 14 (pg. 137). That's the best I can do for spoilers. I can't wait for the movie to come out!
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  • Rachael Bookfairs
    January 1, 1970
    In this middle grade who-dunnit 5 kids are brought together by a school counselor in a week long restorative justice circle. Theo's self portraits were vandalized & covered in graffiti & the school goody two shoes (Molly), the silent geek (Andre), The basketball Jock Bro (Eric), the disengaged screw-up (Jax) and the bizarre artist (Alice) are the kids found at or near the scene - so now they will spend a week getting to know each other & trying to get to the bottom of who would want In this middle grade who-dunnit 5 kids are brought together by a school counselor in a week long restorative justice circle. Theo's self portraits were vandalized & covered in graffiti & the school goody two shoes (Molly), the silent geek (Andre), The basketball Jock Bro (Eric), the disengaged screw-up (Jax) and the bizarre artist (Alice) are the kids found at or near the scene - so now they will spend a week getting to know each other & trying to get to the bottom of who would want to destroy Theo's art not just once but 3 different times. In a story modeled after Breakfast Club Theo discovers that he doesn't really know his classmates at all.
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  • Libriar
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This book about 6 middle school students serving detention for a week during school vacation started out very slow for me. It had received several starred reviews from book review journals and was touted as an updated "Breakfast Club" so I was puzzled why I wasn't liking it. I think the character development at the beginning was slow, at times awkward, and relied on some stereotyping. But about half way through the book the storyline took off and I ultimately really enjoyed it. A grea 3.5 stars. This book about 6 middle school students serving detention for a week during school vacation started out very slow for me. It had received several starred reviews from book review journals and was touted as an updated "Breakfast Club" so I was puzzled why I wasn't liking it. I think the character development at the beginning was slow, at times awkward, and relied on some stereotyping. But about half way through the book the storyline took off and I ultimately really enjoyed it. A great book for book discussions with middle school kids.
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  • Jillian
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t read a lot of middle grade books, but after reading this synopsis while picking titles to book talk I was intrigued. The Breakfast Club has long been a favorite of mine, and while the author borrowed from it a bit too liberally at times, I think most young readers aren’t familiar with the original source and therefore won’t be as critical as someone who has watched the movie at least a dozen times. I’m also very interested in learning more about the restorative justice technique.
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