The Hollow of Fear (Lady Sherlock, #3)
Charlotte Holmes, Lady Sherlock, returns in the Victorian-set mystery series from the USA Today bestselling author of A Conspiracy in Belgravia and A Study in Scarlet Women, an NPR Best Book of 2016.Under the cover of “Sherlock Holmes, consulting detective,” Charlotte Holmes puts her extraordinary powers of deduction to good use. Aided by the capable Mrs. Watson, Charlotte draws those in need to her and makes it her business to know what other people don’t.Moriarty’s shadow looms large. First, Charlotte’s half brother disappears. Then, Lady Ingram, the estranged wife of Charlotte’s close friend Lord Ingram, turns up dead on his estate. And all signs point to Lord Ingram as the murderer.With Scotland Yard closing in, Charlotte goes under disguise to seek out the truth. But uncovering the truth could mean getting too close to Lord Ingram—and a number of malevolent forces…

The Hollow of Fear (Lady Sherlock, #3) Details

TitleThe Hollow of Fear (Lady Sherlock, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139780425281420
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery, Fiction, Adult, Romance

The Hollow of Fear (Lady Sherlock, #3) Review

  • Navessa
    January 1, 1970
    I would literally give my first born up for an early copy of this book. I don't even like kids that much anyway.
  • Holly B
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third in The Lady Sherlock series. We don't have a Sherlock Holmes, but we have Charlotte Holmes - the female sleuth who heads up the investigations. She also has a female sidekick, Mrs. Watson. The gender switch from Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson worked well and made this one even more fun. Go girls!I'm sure that I should have started with the first in the series because I missed out on some of the background on many of the characters. It also opens with a scene from book two that This is the third in The Lady Sherlock series. We don't have a Sherlock Holmes, but we have Charlotte Holmes - the female sleuth who heads up the investigations. She also has a female sidekick, Mrs. Watson. The gender switch from Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson worked well and made this one even more fun. Go girls!I'm sure that I should have started with the first in the series because I missed out on some of the background on many of the characters. It also opens with a scene from book two that I would have liked to been "in on". I was able to catch on to the mystery and add up the clues. The setting was atmospheric with a Victorian flair that I really enjoyed. It was like peeking in on the country estate of Lord Ingram and listening in on their conversations as the mystery unfolds. A body is found in the ice cellar and the "gossip ladies" start spreading their tales.I just loved the chemistry between the characters and there is even a bit of steamy romance that sneaks in. I would definitely recommend reading these in order so you don't miss the background stories.Thanks Berkley for my Arc to read/review.
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    I've given this a straight A at AAR.It seems that my reaction, whenever I finish one of Sherry Thomas’ Lady Sherlock books, is forever destined to be one of complete awe as I sit stunned, with my brain trying to catch up while I’m also trying to scrape my jaw up off the floor. I’m not sure I’m capable of forming whole sentences just yet, because DAY-UM, but the woman has a devious mind!The Hollow of Fear is the third in the series, and it opens exactly where book two – A Conspiracy in Belgravi I've given this a straight A at AAR.It seems that my reaction, whenever I finish one of Sherry Thomas’ Lady Sherlock books, is forever destined to be one of complete awe as I sit stunned, with my brain trying to catch up while I’m also trying to scrape my jaw up off the floor. I’m not sure I’m capable of forming whole sentences just yet, because DAY-UM, but the woman has a devious mind!The Hollow of Fear is the third in the series, and it opens exactly where book two – A Conspiracy in Belgravia – left off. So be aware that what I’m going to say next is a spoiler for that book, and that there are most likely to be spoilers for the other books in this review. Readers should also know that while there is information dotted throughout that supplies some of the backstory, I’d strongly recommend reading all the books in order so as to gain a greater understanding of all the relevant events.The plotline of Conspiracy concerned the search for one Myron Finch, who is Charlotte Holmes’ illegitimate half-brother. In a surprise twist tight at the end of the book, we learned that Finch has actually been hiding in plain sight all this time, working as the Holmes family’s coachman, and this conversation continues at the beginning of Hollow. Finch explains that he’s in hiding from Moriarty because he – Finch – has something belonging to his former master and knows that death will be his punishment should Moriarty ever find him. After a daring escape – made with the aid of Stephen Marbleton (whose mother was married to Moriarty at one time) – Charlotte is making her way back to the house she shares with Mrs. Watson when a carriage draws up beside her, the door opens – and the gentleman inside gives his name as Moriarty.You can read the rest of this review at All About Romance .
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    The Lady Sherlock series has become a favorite one for me since I read book two, A CONSPIRACY IN BELGRAVIA last year. Since then have I devoured the first book A STUDY IN SCARLET WOMEN and now the latest in the series, THE HOLLOW OF FEAR. It may be prudent to start with the first book to get the backstory of the characters and events, as well as because this book is connected to the story in A CONSPIRACY IN BELGRAVIA.READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW OVER AT FRESH FICTION!
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  • Mlpmom (Book Reviewer)
    January 1, 1970
    My most favorite Holmes book to date! Full review to come.*EDITED TO ADD REVIEW*I know I've said this before but it bares saying again, this series is truly outstanding. So well written, engaging and completely addicting. With a heroine unlike any 19th century heroine I've meet, not to mention a whole cast of characters that are every bit as irresistible as the main character. Truly a series I adore reading and am on the edge of my seat waiting for the next book, they can never get here soon eno My most favorite Holmes book to date! Full review to come.*EDITED TO ADD REVIEW*I know I've said this before but it bares saying again, this series is truly outstanding. So well written, engaging and completely addicting. With a heroine unlike any 19th century heroine I've meet, not to mention a whole cast of characters that are every bit as irresistible as the main character. Truly a series I adore reading and am on the edge of my seat waiting for the next book, they can never get here soon enough.I would love to say I relish them and take them slow but I can't help myself and more often than not, devour them in a single sitting. I just can't get enough and The Hollow of Fear has to be my absolutely favorite to date.To the slow burn romance and sexual tension, to the riveting mysteries, it truly stands out not only in the sub-genre it's in, but the genre as a whole. Charlotte as a character should be unlikable with her aloofness and almost cold like appearance and actions and yet, she isn't. In fact, she is down right lovable when it comes to her feisty-ness and her unwillingness to let men rule the world. She skirts modern society and laughs in the faces of those that tell her a women isn't able to do something. She is fierce and strong and you can't help but feel for her, her station in life and her pure guts and determination to make it on her own without a man's help or guidance. In short, I adore her and after reading this, I adore Ash every more. *swoon*This truly went above and beyond my expectations for the series, as a mystery, as a romance, as a whole. I truly am on edge for more.*ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Blackjack
    January 1, 1970
    Another phenomenal addition to Thomas’s Lady Sherlock series. I did not want this book to end. Though in all honestly, I may have enjoyed the sprawling mystery in A Conspiracy in Belgravia just slightly better, The Hollow of Fear is nonetheless tightly constructed and complex enough that the big revelations when they come are shocking, somewhat sad, and well worth the wait. The last thirty pages has some truly surprising disclosures. Part of me wants to go back now to the first two immediately f Another phenomenal addition to Thomas’s Lady Sherlock series. I did not want this book to end. Though in all honestly, I may have enjoyed the sprawling mystery in A Conspiracy in Belgravia just slightly better, The Hollow of Fear is nonetheless tightly constructed and complex enough that the big revelations when they come are shocking, somewhat sad, and well worth the wait. The last thirty pages has some truly surprising disclosures. Part of me wants to go back now to the first two immediately for the clues that must be there to explain where we’re at by the end of this book. Not only has this addition to the series done a great job all on its own, but kudos to Thomas for bringing the entire series together so cleverly. I knew in advance that this book would put the romance between Charlotte and Ingram front and center, but still, I was surprised by how much the romance is developed and how brutally honest both characters are with each other about their feelings and expectations. The romance is not resolved by the end and their relationship is left on a bit of a cliffhanger, but I have no doubt that the best is yet to come.Many times, this book feels like an Agatha Christie murder mystery. The vast majority of the novel takes place at Lord Ingram’s lovely estate during a house party where Lady Ingram’s body is discovered frozen in the ice house. As evidence mounts and points increasingly to Lord Ingram as the culprit, all eyes turn to “Sherrinford” Holmes, Sherlock’s portly younger brother, to solve the case. I do so hope that Sherrinford reemerges in future books, as he is a hilarious addition to the cast. Of course, only a few select people know that Charlotte is actually Sherrinford under guise, and so much of the fun of this new character is watching how well Charlotte can perform the role of a man, and a congenial and even coarse talking one at that. Gender performativity is quite significant in this book, and in the entire series. Up until now, Charlotte’s hyper feminine appearance allows her to look like the conventional Victorian woman. Those who know her best though know that underneath the frilly clothing, bountiful breasts, and curly blond hair, is a woman disconnected from femininity or even beliefs in binary gender. I don’t believe that Sherry Thomas is insinuating that Charlotte is transgender either though for Charlotte is just as disinclined to identify as a man. She performs gender because she is forced to be compliant with social norms, but also because performance is the essence of Charlotte. Social rules are more mysterious to her than her most challenging cases as Sherlock Holmes. But she knows how to adjust and fake it in every way. I find this concept, as it is represented in this series, best understood through Ingram’s eyes. Charlotte is always somewhat unknowable. It is telling that Ingram thinks of her primarily as “Holmes,” and as frustrating as Charlotte is to him, he knows that his rule-abiding behavior and acceptance of social conventions, creates enormous obstacles for a comfortable relationship with Charlotte. It is likely that she might always be a bit out of his reach. I have faith in Sherry Thomas though that she will be able to pull off a world where Charlotte/Sherlock/Sherrinford and Ingram can construct a happy ending, eventually. I don’t know how she’ll get us there, but I feel strongly she will. Incidentally, I love too in this book that Stephen Marbleton is a quite convincing cross-dresser. Suffice to say that Charlotte, Myron, and Stephen’s cross dressing alike threw even the most devious of villains off their game.I love the complications of characters like Charlotte who test everyone’s understanding of what it means to be a woman or “womanly,” or even what it means to be neurotypical. One of the underlying assumptions is that Charlotte is on the autism spectrum. That may or may not be true, and I think Thomas points to a problem with how we imagine “normal” when it intersects with gender. Charlotte does not want what most women, claim to want, or are told to want. Therefore, we see Charlotte through the eyes of frustrated people who cannot understand her. Is autism a metaphor for “unnatural” women in this series? I don’t know yet, but I have never felt as fascinated by Charlotte than I have from reading this third book.
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  • OLT
    January 1, 1970
    The fact that I buy Sherry Thomas's historical novels automatically and ignore the price says a lot about my admiration for her writing. Her new Lady Sherlock series costs much more than the arbitrary limit I've set myself for escape reading, but what's a fan to do except buy them anyway? This third entry in Thomas's gender-bending take on Sherlock Holmes begins approximately where #2 left off, with half brother Myron Finch, once associated with Moriarty and now on the outs, needing to escape. H The fact that I buy Sherry Thomas's historical novels automatically and ignore the price says a lot about my admiration for her writing. Her new Lady Sherlock series costs much more than the arbitrary limit I've set myself for escape reading, but what's a fan to do except buy them anyway? This third entry in Thomas's gender-bending take on Sherlock Holmes begins approximately where #2 left off, with half brother Myron Finch, once associated with Moriarty and now on the outs, needing to escape. However, that's not really the main thrust of this new chapter in Charlotte's life. Instead, we have her lifelong friend (and love interest, in thought, not deed) Lord Ingram suspected of the murder of his estranged wife. While she is supposedly in Switzerland for health reasons, her body is found at Stern Hollow, Ingram's estate.Nothing to be done for it but to get Charlotte on the case to prove his innocence. But she does so in the guise of "Sherrinford Holmes", brother to the fictional Sherlock she had invented to allow herself the freedom to solve mysteries. Sherrinford, a rather paunchy young man with a thick beard and a handlebar moustache, is a snappy dresser and a bit of a dandy. He put me in mind of a young Hercules Poirot with a more extravagant taste in clothing.Disguised as Sherrinford, Charlotte is able to successfully interact with police inspectors and suspects alike as she investigates the murder. Successful, we should say, with the exception of a couple of people who see through her disguise.There's many a recurring character here. Sister Olivia (Livvy) continues to claim more and more pages in these books, as she worries about sister Bernadine, writes her Sherlock adventure stories, and pines for Stephen Marbleton (who is possibly Moriarty's son). Mrs. Watson continues to give Charlotte companionship and support. Inspector Treadle is here again (with his boss Chief Inspector Fowler) to investigate Lady Ingram's murder. He is in a quandary because of his friendship with Lord Ingram and, in addition, has an unrelated marital problem which is unsettling him.And then there's Charlotte. She's almost at Maximum Tolerable Chins as the story begins, still enjoying her baked goods, cakes, tarts, etc., going about solving puzzles and mysteries with little emotional investment in their outcome. Then Lord Ingram is accused of murder and it's up to Charlotte to save him. And what happens? "Miss Holmes, with her otherwise constant and unfailing adoration of baked goods, had lost her appetite." Mrs. Watson and Lord Ingram look on with terror and worry, respectively. Charlotte's chins are disappearing by the day. And we get more insight into Charlotte and the way she handles emotions. Yes, she does feel them. She just processes things differently from the rest of the cast of characters here.There's really only one mystery to solve in this Book 3, as opposed to the first two books, which had several cases within their pages, some connected to the main mystery of the book, some not. But the mystery of this one is of major importance in Charlotte's life. It's Lord Ingram's freedom and life hanging in the balance. And at the same time, this serious threat to Lord Ingram's reputation and future causes him and Charlotte to take a closer look at their personal relationship.There is always a feminist theme and tone to much of what occurs in these Lady Sherlock stories. It is not as exaggerated and anachronistically annoying as in several other HRs by a few other authors I've read recently, such as Kelly Bowen's new series, and not preachy like Courtney Milan's writing. It worked for me. BTW, don't expect everything to be tied up with a bow in this story. We still have unresolved issues with Moriarty, Myron Finch and Stephen Marbleton, for example. To be continued...
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  • Giedre
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5... don’t forget, sir, that I am a queen upon this board—and I do not play to lose.Fabulous. I find Sherry Thomas's characters fascinating. Not only Charlotte Holmes (aka Lady Sherlock), but all of them. I love the female relationships. I like that these books aren't straightforward mysteries. Kind of angry at myself for not savouring this instalment, though. Oh well. It's not like I won't be re-reading before book four comes out.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    What a clever, thoroughly delightful book! At the outset, though, I wasn't so enthusiastic; set in Victorian England, with language and customs to match, I realized I wouldn't be able to breeze through this one as I'm accustomed to doing with other mysteries and thrillers. But a couple of chapters into it, I realized I didn't want to.This is, for the record, the third in the author's "Lady Sherlock" series (and the first, but definitely not the last, for me). The star of the show, Charlotte Holm What a clever, thoroughly delightful book! At the outset, though, I wasn't so enthusiastic; set in Victorian England, with language and customs to match, I realized I wouldn't be able to breeze through this one as I'm accustomed to doing with other mysteries and thrillers. But a couple of chapters into it, I realized I didn't want to.This is, for the record, the third in the author's "Lady Sherlock" series (and the first, but definitely not the last, for me). The star of the show, Charlotte Holmes, is a consulting detective in Sherlock Holmes fashion - operating a business at 18 Baker Street - with a Mrs. Watson as a helper when needed. Lacking the standard social graces of the times, she and her sister, Olivia, are estranged from the parents they "disgraced" and on their own (a third sister, Bernadine, is disabled and still lives at home but plays a role in this story as well). The Sherlock nemesis, Moriarty, gets frequent mention as an archenemy.When a home construction disaster forces participants at a party there (Charlotte included) to relocate to the mansion of her friend and love interest, the handsome Lord Ingram, things don't quite go as planned. Early on, a young servant who's sent to fetch ice from the ice house makes a gruesome discovery: The body of Ingram's estranged wife, who's been missing for a time but thought to have run away of her own accord. Scotland Yard comes running, and the subsequent investigation points to Lord Ingram as the perpetrator. Charlotte, of course, is certain that he's innocent and, mostly disguised as "Sherrinford" Holmes, Sherlock's brother, puts her powers of deduction to work to unearth the real killer (even as she loses her usual "power" to chow down, especially sweets).Along the way, there are too many twists, turns and sleights of hand and mind to mention, and everything is resolved in the end including Charlotte's appetite (well, almost everything; this is, after all, a series). Thus, I'm already yearning to read the next installment. Many thanks to the publisher, via NetGalley, for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this one and introduce me to a wonderful series.
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  • Katie Reus
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic historical mystery! Complicated characters, smart writing and an end I didn't see coming! I thought I knew who the villain would be but Thomas surprised me. I can't wait to see what else she comes up with. (Note: This series needs to be read in order & it's not a romance).
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  • Sheila Melo
    January 1, 1970
    FINAL DECISION: Cementing this series as one of the most original and intriguing historical mystery series around, Thomas allows readers to delve into the relationship between Charlotte Holmes and Lord Ingram in ways that are unexpected and clever.THE STORY: Charlotte Holmes, who uses her intelligence and reasoning to solve crimes, is confronted with the most serious case of her career. Lady Ingram, the wife of her friend, Lord Ingram is found dead and Lord Ingram is the prime suspect. Beginning FINAL DECISION: Cementing this series as one of the most original and intriguing historical mystery series around, Thomas allows readers to delve into the relationship between Charlotte Holmes and Lord Ingram in ways that are unexpected and clever.THE STORY: Charlotte Holmes, who uses her intelligence and reasoning to solve crimes, is confronted with the most serious case of her career. Lady Ingram, the wife of her friend, Lord Ingram is found dead and Lord Ingram is the prime suspect. Beginning on the heals of the event of A CONSPIRACY IN BELGRAVIA, Lord Ingram's estranged wife has been running from Moriarty and Charlotte has to go undercover to save Lord Ingram.OPINION: I loved this book. I enjoy a story that surprises me and this one had me twisted around until the very end. Unfortunately the nature of the book precludes much discussion of the plot beyond the blurb, but I very much enjoyed the mystery in this book. It was complex and intriguing and by the end I was surprised but also satisfied by the resolution.Charlotte and Ingram are the focus of this book and readers who may have wondered about the chance of a romance between them will get some interesting time between these two. Yet Charlotte still remains her own person with a strong sense of self and her own agency. I loved how the story progressed and the book feels satisfying while pushing some of the overarching storylines forward for future books.Original and compelling, the seriousness of the events can be impressed upon readers that Charlotte, loses her appetite -- which basically makes this a serious crisis.WORTH MENTIONING: This book follows directly from the events in A CONSPIRACY IN BELGRAVIA and I recommend refreshing the memory of what happened in that book.CONNECTED BOOKS: THE HOLLOW OF FEAR is the third book in the Lady Sherlock series. This book especially should be read after the second book in the series. I think it assumes knowledge about the characters and situation that one can only really gleam from having read the prior book.STAR RATING: I give this book 5 stars.This review was originally posted on Top10RomanceBooks.com
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This is easily my favorite book of the series thus far. Charlotte's character has continued to develop. In addition to her intelligence, we finally get to see how compassionate and caring she is. Her interactions with Livia and Ash are heartwarming. While I loved the personal moments, the mystery aspect is a little weaker than I anticipated. Things seemed to be too tidy and clean at the end. However, I am optimistic my mystery issues will addressed in future books. I am more excited than ever to This is easily my favorite book of the series thus far. Charlotte's character has continued to develop. In addition to her intelligence, we finally get to see how compassionate and caring she is. Her interactions with Livia and Ash are heartwarming. While I loved the personal moments, the mystery aspect is a little weaker than I anticipated. Things seemed to be too tidy and clean at the end. However, I am optimistic my mystery issues will addressed in future books. I am more excited than ever to have the next installment. This is turning out to be a fantastic series. Thank you to Penguin's First to Read for my advanced review copy!
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third installment in Thomas's Lady Sherlock series and the first that I've read.  I've always been that person who has to read a series in order from the very beginning, so when I cracked this book open I asked myself, "Who are you?  I don't even know you right now."Despite the fear that I'd be totally lost, the story is suprisingly easy to follow!  Thomas does an excellent job of including character back story and plot information from the previous novels so that readers get either This is the third installment in Thomas's Lady Sherlock series and the first that I've read.  I've always been that person who has to read a series in order from the very beginning, so when I cracked this book open I asked myself, "Who are you?  I don't even know you right now."Despite the fear that I'd be totally lost, the story is suprisingly easy to follow!  Thomas does an excellent job of including character back story and plot information from the previous novels so that readers get either a refresher course or the ability to jump right in.Charlotte Holmes is a scandalous young woman.  After running away from home, she is an outcast in polite society.  She now lives under the guise of being a companion to the older Mrs. Watson, a former actress unimpressed by the gossip surrounding Holmes.  Aided by the intelligent and charming Mrs. Watson, Charlotte is actually a successful consulting detective working under the mysterious identity of Sherlock Holmes.The story picks up exactly where book two apparently left off:  Charlotte has learned she has an illegitimate half brother who has been working for a dangerous man, Moriarty, and is now on the run after stealing something of great value to him.  Moriarty had recently infiltrated the home of Charlotte's dear friend (and married love interest) Lord Ingram through his wife, a cold and calculating woman only interested in her husband's money.  Lady Ingram disappeared after her birthday celebration at their estate, Stern Hollow.Charlotte's sister Olivia is invited to stay at a friend's home but when the cisterns cause flooding, the guests must call on the closest neighbor, Lord Ingram, for his hospitality.Tongues are wagging over the abrupt disappearance of Lady Ingram after her party and the unexpected guests are in for a shock when Olivia and the two biggest gossips in town discover the body of Lady Ingram in the ice house at Stern Hollow.When Olivia notifies Charlotte of the grim discovery she's quick to come to the aid of Lord Ingram, the most obvious suspect, by disguising herself as Sherrinford Holmes, brother to Sherlock. Evidence is mounting against Lord Ingram but Charlotte's powers of deduction tell her that Moriarty is behind the murder.  Was Lady Ingram the real target or only a warning?  Is Moriarty using Charlotte as a pawn in a dangerous game to uncover the information her brother holds against him?Though she lacks conversational skills and social charm, the awkward Charlotte Holmes is a surprising flirt who can make you blush.  While society has labeled her for actions that they know nothing about and cast her out, she uses her superior intelligence to make a decent living for herself and gain the independence she has most desired.  Charlotte is definitely a fierce female ahead of her time in Victorian England.The Hollow of Fear is a mystery full of betrayal, espionage, passion, and scandal.  No one understands better than Charlotte Holmes that everyone has secrets ...and she knows them all.I'm excited to go back and read the Lady Sherlock series from the beginning now.  Thomas has created a wonderful cast of characters that I immediately felt at home with and I'm looking forward to more adventures with Charlotte Holmes!Thanks to Berkley Publishing and the Penguin First to Read program for an ARC in exchange for my honest review.  The Hollow of Fear is scheduled for release on October 2, 2018.For more full reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Hackmops
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning. This series has been one of my favourite discoveries of the year and this instalment was brilliant, building on the events that had been set into motion during the previous novel, A Conspiracy in Belgravia. The author is brilliant at plotting all the twists and turns but Sherry Thomas has a singular talent for POV changes, elevating so many of the side-characters by providing them with an own, distinct voice. There are so many more things that I loved about this book but I feel like I Stunning. This series has been one of my favourite discoveries of the year and this instalment was brilliant, building on the events that had been set into motion during the previous novel, A Conspiracy in Belgravia. The author is brilliant at plotting all the twists and turns but Sherry Thomas has a singular talent for POV changes, elevating so many of the side-characters by providing them with an own, distinct voice. There are so many more things that I loved about this book but I feel like I need to catch my breath for a bit - I pretty much read this in one go because Charlotte Holmes is just that captivating and fantastic to watch.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    This was my favorite of the series so far. I was immediately grabbed by the personal nature of the story and how the characters have developed over each book. The way Charlotte and Lord Ingram complement each other is one of my favorite things. Their interaction in this was fabulous.I would say 90% of this book was a five star read for me. Some of the stuff at the end felt convoluted and silly, and it sort of ruined the amazing parts that came before. But it wasn’t enough to ruin the overall enj This was my favorite of the series so far. I was immediately grabbed by the personal nature of the story and how the characters have developed over each book. The way Charlotte and Lord Ingram complement each other is one of my favorite things. Their interaction in this was fabulous.I would say 90% of this book was a five star read for me. Some of the stuff at the end felt convoluted and silly, and it sort of ruined the amazing parts that came before. But it wasn’t enough to ruin the overall enjoyment of the book. I still cannot wait for the next installment!
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  • Lady Wesley
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous, as expected.
  • Beau North
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book at RWA and let me tell you, it was 100% worth fighting the crowd. Charlotte Holmes is not what I’d call a relatable character, so it’s always endearing when she finds herself in unfamiliar waters. In the first book, her anxiety over her choice and her mounting fear over the repercussions put us in her shoes in a way that peering inside her head could never accomplish. Her mind just works differently. Here we get to see what happens when her greatest ally i I received an advance copy of this book at RWA and let me tell you, it was 100% worth fighting the crowd. Charlotte Holmes is not what I’d call a relatable character, so it’s always endearing when she finds herself in unfamiliar waters. In the first book, her anxiety over her choice and her mounting fear over the repercussions put us in her shoes in a way that peering inside her head could never accomplish. Her mind just works differently. Here we get to see what happens when her greatest ally is threatened, and I can honestly say she has never been more wonderfully human than she is here. The scenes between Holmes and Lord Ingram crackle with electricity, to the point where I felt sympathy for Mrs. Watson, giddy from merely being in the vicinity of such powerful attraction. This book also gives dear, poor Livia a chance to shine, and I always like it when Livia gets to be the heroine of her own adventure, rather than a sidekick in Charlotte’s.
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  • Cardyn Brooks
    January 1, 1970
    Having never read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories (my English degree is probably bursting into flames right now), it's the Robert Downey, Jr. movies, Benedict Cumberbatch series, and the recently finished Elementary television show with Lucy Lu and Johnny Lee Miller that embody the Sherlock Holmes oeuvre for me. With that confession made, S.T.'s Lady Sherlock series now jumps to the top of my list. There are too many delightful elements to itemize what makes this third entry suc Having never read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories (my English degree is probably bursting into flames right now), it's the Robert Downey, Jr. movies, Benedict Cumberbatch series, and the recently finished Elementary television show with Lucy Lu and Johnny Lee Miller that embody the Sherlock Holmes oeuvre for me. With that confession made, S.T.'s Lady Sherlock series now jumps to the top of my list. There are too many delightful elements to itemize what makes this third entry such a satisfying read, but this passage from page 181 encapsulates the overall joy in reading The Hollow of Fear: "Despite the direness of his situation, Lord Ingram had to suppress the urge to smile." Charlotte and Ash's friendship, the complexity of their emotional intimacy is revealed and explored. They're so charming in their affectionate friction. The depth of their friendship in the context of the limits imposed by society magnifies themes of personal agency and gendered expectations. Despite these restrictions their camaraderie and poignant devotion endure. On page 314 Charlotte thinks, "...he's always made it plain when he disagreed with her. But disapproval was not the same as obstruction and he would never stand in Charlotte's way." The intricate mystery is appealing even as the timeline gets a little disjointed in the last 50 or so pages, but the interpersonal relationships and overall lightheartedness are the stars of this deeply satisfying story.
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  • Madeleine (Top Shelf Text)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Berkley for my free copy of this book. All opinions are my own!I just adore this series and this was one of my most anticipated reads for the fall. This third installment continues to follow Charlotte Holmes as she navigates the perils of Moriarty's threats and proper society's scorn. I loved diving back into this world and thought this was the best of the three so far! I cannot wait to see where Sherry Thomas takes this story next.Overall, I'd highly recommend this series for fans Thank you to Berkley for my free copy of this book. All opinions are my own!I just adore this series and this was one of my most anticipated reads for the fall. This third installment continues to follow Charlotte Holmes as she navigates the perils of Moriarty's threats and proper society's scorn. I loved diving back into this world and thought this was the best of the three so far! I cannot wait to see where Sherry Thomas takes this story next.Overall, I'd highly recommend this series for fans of Deanna Raybourn and Anna Lee Huber.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    *Source* Publisher*Genre* Historical FIction*Rating* 3.5-4*Thoughts*The Hollow of Fear, by author Sherry Thomas, is the third installment in the author's Lady Sherlock series. Charlotte Holmes is the main protagonist of this series. Since her intentional fall from grace, she has taken the mantel of Sherlock Holmes, the only consulting detective around. Her partner in crime is Mrs. John Watson who was good enough to take Charlotte in when everyone turned against her. Since her reputation is presu *Source* Publisher*Genre* Historical FIction*Rating* 3.5-4*Thoughts*The Hollow of Fear, by author Sherry Thomas, is the third installment in the author's Lady Sherlock series. Charlotte Holmes is the main protagonist of this series. Since her intentional fall from grace, she has taken the mantel of Sherlock Holmes, the only consulting detective around. Her partner in crime is Mrs. John Watson who was good enough to take Charlotte in when everyone turned against her. Since her reputation is presumably ruined for good, Charlotte can't actually do any investigations as her self.*Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews*http://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/201...
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  • Diane Bowden
    January 1, 1970
    This is a review of an e-ARC of The Hollow of Fear.I was stunned by this book and haven't yet come to my senses. The Hollow of Fear is the third in the Charlotte Holmes series by Sherry Thomas and I loved the first two titles. This book is even better than the first two. I did not see the end coming and when it arrived, I was shocked silent. The palpable fear running through the book, as manifest by Charlotte's inability to eat even a thin slice of Madeira cake, is echoed in the location of much This is a review of an e-ARC of The Hollow of Fear.I was stunned by this book and haven't yet come to my senses. The Hollow of Fear is the third in the Charlotte Holmes series by Sherry Thomas and I loved the first two titles. This book is even better than the first two. I did not see the end coming and when it arrived, I was shocked silent. The palpable fear running through the book, as manifest by Charlotte's inability to eat even a thin slice of Madeira cake, is echoed in the location of much of the story, Stern Hollow, the home of Lord Ingram. The reason for the fear is layered by love and fear of loss, treachery and betrayal, and ruthless egos run mad that may destroy the world.Thomas weaves this story with flashbacks that illumine the details and gently direct one to the traps set for Charlotte and Lord Ingram and Inspector Treadles of Scotland Yard. "What you read is not what it seems" is the theme of this complicated and deep plot. Charlotte Holmes and Mrs. Watson pull together everything and everyone needed to unravel the motives behind murder, conspiracy, and disguise. The relationship between Ash (Lord Ingram) and Charlotte deepens as they work together to save him from a murder charge, and, by the way, save the British empire.But there are so many thoughts that I have after reading the novel. For example, when did eccentricity become oddness become a diagnosis? Is Charlotte a brilliant woman on the autism spectrum or a genius, or both? Does it matter? Another thought, when Charlotte tells Inspector Treadles about the motivation behind her scandal and the challenges of being a Victorian woman, she turns his life and marriage upside down. Until that moment, I was concerned about him, his marriage with Alice and his inability to change his perspective. Then, Charlotte politely and mildly relates her thoughts to and about him, and lives are changed after he mulls her words over on the train to London. Brilliant!Thank you, Ms. Thomas, for sharing more of Charlotte Holmes with us. I am so looking forward to her further adventures.
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  • nick
    January 1, 1970
    That's it. I'm dead. Sherry Thomas has destroyed me in every possible way. The Lady Sherlock books have consumed me and somehow, this series only seems to be getting better and better with every book. The Hollow Of Fear is my favorite installment of the series so far and I'm not sure how I am ever going to recover from the emotional whiplash this book put me through - but trust me guys, it is so worth it. The stakes were much much higher in The Hollow of Fear. Lady Ingram has turned up dead on L That's it. I'm dead. Sherry Thomas has destroyed me in every possible way. The Lady Sherlock books have consumed me and somehow, this series only seems to be getting better and better with every book. The Hollow Of Fear is my favorite installment of the series so far and I'm not sure how I am ever going to recover from the emotional whiplash this book put me through - but trust me guys, it is so worth it. The stakes were much much higher in The Hollow of Fear. Lady Ingram has turned up dead on Lord Ingram's estate and all evidence points to Lord Ingram being the culprit. It's up to Charlotte to solve the case and to help prove her friend's innocence so of course, she cross-dresses as Sherringford Holmes, brother to Sherlock, to navigate the case. Charlotte continued to awe me with her deductive skills even though I already knew just how smart she was. We not only get to see a more compassionate side to her in this book as the case was deeply personal to her but also a more playful side to her. I am just loving how thoroughly we are getting to know Charlotte's character because every part of her is amazing. I was thrilled that her friend, Lord Ingram, had a stronger presence in The Hollow of Fear. I've loved him from the first book, but I've also felt like we didn't know much about him in the previous two books. In this book, as a result of the death of his wife, his every emotion and thought was at the center of the story. I have to admit to having a bit of a fictional crush on Lord Ingram, but how could I not? He was passionate, charming and stubborn as hell in a completely endearing way. I was also happy that we got to see more of Livia in this installment. I've always enjoyed her strong bond with Charlotte. She was dealing with her own journey and I'm quite excited to see how her character is going to evolve in the future books - if that ending is any indication, it's going to be quite the uphill adventure for her.The romance FINALLY moved forward in The Hollow of Fear and guys, I just about died of happiness!!! I was ecstatic at the progress and may have screamed a teensy bit when Charlotte and her potential beau gave in to their attraction to each other. The moments were lovely, innocent and just so sweet. I have butterflies in my stomach just thinking about their interactions. I particularly loved the flashbacks to how their kinship bloomed! The Hollow of Fear was just as brilliant in the mystery department as the previous books. Lady Ingram's murder was so convoluted and shocking. I honestly couldn't foresee a thing, but when it was all revealed by Charlotte, everything clicked into place for me. Sherry Thomas is an ingenious author as every aspect of this case and how it tied to the over-arching storyline of Moriarty was executed brilliantly - she pretty much left me gaping!With The Hollow of Fear, the Lady Sherlock series has officially settled in my favorite series list. Now that I'm all caught up, I'm a little sad because I'm going to have patiently wait for the next book to release. Boo!
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    Characters I’m addicted to at the center of a riveting mystery! Sparkling entertainment! This story was over far too soon. Do I really have to wait a year for further adventures of Charlotte & Lord Ingram?!
  • Lesa
    January 1, 1970
    I've read the second, and now the third Lady Sherlock mystery by Sherry Thomas. I'm afraid I'm just not the right audience for these books, although I'm a big fan of the original Sherlock Holmes stories and some of the pastiches. I found The Hollow of Fear difficult to follow at times, and I'm not as in love with Charlotte Holmes as many readers are. As I said, though, I think I'm not the right audience.When Charlotte Holmes helps her half-brother escape from men who are after him, she senses th I've read the second, and now the third Lady Sherlock mystery by Sherry Thomas. I'm afraid I'm just not the right audience for these books, although I'm a big fan of the original Sherlock Holmes stories and some of the pastiches. I found The Hollow of Fear difficult to follow at times, and I'm not as in love with Charlotte Holmes as many readers are. As I said, though, I think I'm not the right audience.When Charlotte Holmes helps her half-brother escape from men who are after him, she senses there is a plot in motion. Her sister, Livia, is an unwitting pawn. Livia annually visits Mrs. Newell, a distant relative. When the cisterns fail at Mrs. Newell's house, all her guests move to Lord Ingram's estate, Stern Hollow. Livia is aware that all society speculates about Charlotte's friendship with Lord Ingram, guessing that it's more than friendship. Then Livia, along with two of the worst gossips in London, find Lady Ingram's body in the estate's icehouse.The Chief Inspector sent from Scotland Yard does everything in his power to prove Lord Ingram killed his wife. At the same time, Charlotte goes undercover as Sherlock Holmes' brother to discover the truth about the murder.This third in the series picks up exactly where A Conspiracy in Belgravia ended. That may be confusing to readers who have not read the books. It's leisurely paced, with careful development of the elaborate storyline. While it's an atmospheric story, it's also a thought-provoking view of the expectations and roles of women in Victorian England.Fans of the series, and readers of Doyle's canon, especially The Valley of Fear, will appreciate the intricately plotted mystery. Others may find it difficult to follow. I'm not a fan of slow-moving novels that take a while to unfold. As I said before, that's my problem, not an issue with The Hollow of Fear.
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    Penguin First-to-Read ARC.**squee!!** (view spoiler)[What I've been waiting for for 3 books happens in this book!!! Oh man, I wanted all the details! haha. It was adorably innocent even though it wasn't innocent at all! Sherry Thomas did a fabulous job of not giving too much detail but giving enough swoonworthy-ness! (hide spoiler)] Oh, the mystery? Yeah, that was good. Very intricate, I had no idea what was going on! Some of it was hard to follow because there was SO MUCH happening! And Charlot Penguin First-to-Read ARC.**squee!!** (view spoiler)[What I've been waiting for for 3 books happens in this book!!! Oh man, I wanted all the details! haha. It was adorably innocent even though it wasn't innocent at all! Sherry Thomas did a fabulous job of not giving too much detail but giving enough swoonworthy-ness! (hide spoiler)] Oh, the mystery? Yeah, that was good. Very intricate, I had no idea what was going on! Some of it was hard to follow because there was SO MUCH happening! And Charlotte was how many people?! She's so fun and quirky and ODD. I love that Charlotte loves her desserts and counts her chins, makes her more real! I really liked Inspector Treadles' personal growth in this book, wasn't something I was expecting to happen. Lord Ingram, *sigh*, the stiff, starchy gentleman!
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  • Carina Olsen
    January 1, 1970
    This book murdered me. And I fear I may never recover. This was the most perfect third book. And I loved every moment of it. My poor heart, though. I stayed up half the night to finish it. And I do not regret it. Once I started reading, I just could not stop. Five stars for this very perfect book. Truly loved every single moment.Writing down my thoughts and feelings may not be easy, though. As I am feeling way too much. This book was all kinds of thrilling and exciting and surprising. Everything This book murdered me. And I fear I may never recover. This was the most perfect third book. And I loved every moment of it. My poor heart, though. I stayed up half the night to finish it. And I do not regret it. Once I started reading, I just could not stop. Five stars for this very perfect book. Truly loved every single moment.Writing down my thoughts and feelings may not be easy, though. As I am feeling way too much. This book was all kinds of thrilling and exciting and surprising. Everything I had wanted it to be and so much more. Can't begin to describe how happy I am with this book. Once again, the writing was perfection. All written so well.This book takes place about three months after the end of book two. At first I was a bit unsure about this time jump, but I ended up being glad for it. It did not change anything, which I'm happy about. In this one, most of the book is from Charlotte's point of view. And Lord Ingram. Eee. And a little of Livia too. They are all amazing and I love reading about them so very much. I shall not be mentioning too much about what happens in this book, no big spoilers, except for what is already revealed in the summary. What made me the very happiest about this book is how much time Charlotte and Lord Ingram spends together. They are together just about all the time. And it killed me with happiness. The best friendship. The most awesome tension. Sigh. Adore them.All of this book takes place at Lord Ingram's house. Which is all kinds of huge and perfect. I loved reading about it. I loved reading about Charlotte being there, and Mrs. Watson too. Still adore her so. This book is about a murder. Lady Ingram turns up dead somewhere on the property. With Lord Ingram being the only suspect. Things are not looking good for him. Even Charlotte is scared for him. She stops eating. Which was pretty scary, haha. But gosh, this mystery plot was good. So exciting and oh. Loved it. Amazing plot.I adored reading more about Livia. She is such a stunning character and I adore her to pieces. I have such high hopes for her future romance. Eee. It shall be so awesome, I hope. I want the best for Livia. I love that she is writing a book. I love how she cares about Charlotte. And their other sister, whom is not well. I loved how they both took care of her. Not much about their parents in this one, but they were still awful, haha. But gosh, how I adore reading about all of these characters. I can't say it enough. So good.I must talk a little of Inspector Treadles. I liked him in book one. Disliked him a lot in book two. And in the beginning of this one I did not like him either. But towards the end of the book, he finally got better. And I cannot help but feel so happy about that. I wanted this man to turn out a better person, haha. His wife is still adorable. And he did a good job as an police inspector. He was a pretty good friend too. Well, mostly. I'm glad he managed to change a little. I hope he'll continue to change for the better. He was interesting.This may sound weird, but the only thing I would complain about is that I wish some certain scenes had more details. And very much complaining about having to wait at least a year for the next book. Hmph. I want more. Right now. I love these characters so much. I love this setting. I need more of Charlotte and Lord Ingram. I need more of everything. I am so happy there will be at least two more books. But gosh, how I wish they will never end. And how I wish none of my favorites will end up dead. Fingers crossed.The Hollow of Fear was every kind of perfection. The most well written characters, whom I loved beyond words. Such a stunning and exciting mystery. Full of secrets and surprises. Every part of this book killed me with perfection. Getting to read more about Charlotte and Lord Ingram was the very best. Getting to know them better. Getting to see more of their friendship. And how that friendship was finally turning into something more. Gosh. It was so good. And I loved every part of this book so much. Too much, maybe.There was so much mystery and suspense in this book. It was impossible to know what had happened. Who the murderer was. And getting to know all the answers at the end of the book pretty much killed me. I mean. What. It was all stunning. And so very perfect. A little bit sad, but then not, and gosh, how I loved this ending. And the ending of the mystery. It was very exciting and surprising and I loved learning every moment of it. Was simply perfect. And I could not be happier with this book. Sigh. Makes my heart happy.Huge thank you to Penguin Random House International / Berkley for sending me the free ARC copy of this book to read and review. I am beyond thrilled that I was able to read this book early. I shall treasure my copy, always. Can't wait to get the finished edition too in a couple of months. This is a series that you cannot miss. Such amazing historical mystery books with a hint of romance. And with the most amazing characters. And I very much adore Sherry too. And I simply cannot wait to read even more books by her.---This review was first posted on my blog, Carina's Books, here: http://carinabooks.blogspot.com/2018/...
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  • Gaufre
    January 1, 1970
    Read as a standalone, it is probably great. Read as part 3 of a series, it is disappointing. Much of the first 100 pages is a rehashing of what happens in book 2. The relationship between Charlotte Holmes and Lord Ingram seemed to have taken two step forward only to have gone nowhere (better reset everything for book #4, right?). The murder plot kept me interested and I was really looking forward to learning how Holmes would show Scotland Yard wrong, only to be resolved in such an outrageous way Read as a standalone, it is probably great. Read as part 3 of a series, it is disappointing. Much of the first 100 pages is a rehashing of what happens in book 2. The relationship between Charlotte Holmes and Lord Ingram seemed to have taken two step forward only to have gone nowhere (better reset everything for book #4, right?). The murder plot kept me interested and I was really looking forward to learning how Holmes would show Scotland Yard wrong, only to be resolved in such an outrageous way. It is a good example of how to kill a book in the last 25 pages. Yes, part of it is my anticipation. I still like the writing and the humour. I found that inspector Treadles was very well done and I am trying not to slam the book too hard on its rating. Also, why is sex so weird in most of Ms. Thomas' books? It seems to be a means to an end and that's just... wrong.
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  • (Tori-Smexybooks) smexys_sidekick
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come
  • Stephanie Flinchbaugh
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to try to compose a review for this book that is not just high-pitched squeals that only whales can hear. Because, seriously, how is this series so amazingly good. I adore it so much. Charlotte Holmes herself is obviously a fascinating character, but all of the other characters are so very interesting in their own right. Sherry Thomas also does a stellar job of constructing a story, hopping backward and forward in the timeline and always leaving the reader guessing. Oh, and ever scene I'm going to try to compose a review for this book that is not just high-pitched squeals that only whales can hear. Because, seriously, how is this series so amazingly good. I adore it so much. Charlotte Holmes herself is obviously a fascinating character, but all of the other characters are so very interesting in their own right. Sherry Thomas also does a stellar job of constructing a story, hopping backward and forward in the timeline and always leaving the reader guessing. Oh, and ever scene with Charlotte and Lord Ingram is absolutely delicious.
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  • Elena
    January 1, 1970
    The latest installment in the witty and fun Lady Sherlock series has sleuth Charlotte Holmes on the hunt for a killer when her best friend, Lord Ingram, is accused of his wife's murder. The brilliant and fully realized characters, who all have their own schemes and secrets that will need to be unraveled, make this gender-bending Sherlock Holmes tale a delightful read.Thanks to Berkley and NetGalley for providing a digital advance review copy.
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