Winter's Siren
For the last five years, Fawn has been the star soprano of a secluded opera house, forced to sing for her kidnapper.His daughter, Devi, waits patiently in the shadows, hiding a face so horrible that no one who’s seen it will look at it again.As Fawn plots her escape, whispers spread through the shaded corridors of dark sorcery, warning her that she must flee by the next opening night.But when Fawn draws close to the exit, it’s Devi who’s standing in her way, leading Fawn to suspect that Devi has something to gain if she fails.(a dark reimagining of Swan Lake)

Winter's Siren Details

TitleWinter's Siren
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2017
PublisherThe Narcissistic Rose
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Romance, Dark Fantasy

Winter's Siren Review

  • Tonja Drecker
    January 1, 1970
    Dark, eerie, beautiful and with a touch of magic—this tale draws into a creepily lovely world, pulls at the heartstrings and leaves a biting trail of goose bumps behind.Kidnapped from an orphanage as a small girl, Fawn is held captive in a reclusive opera house, which flaunts the grandness of a castle. And she is the star. Every day, she sings her heart out for her captor, only to be locked away in a tower at night. But that's not the worst of it. She knows that he's waiting for something, somet Dark, eerie, beautiful and with a touch of magic—this tale draws into a creepily lovely world, pulls at the heartstrings and leaves a biting trail of goose bumps behind.Kidnapped from an orphanage as a small girl, Fawn is held captive in a reclusive opera house, which flaunts the grandness of a castle. And she is the star. Every day, she sings her heart out for her captor, only to be locked away in a tower at night. But that's not the worst of it. She knows that he's waiting for something, something to do with his deformed daughter Devi, who hides her face behind a veil—a face to ugly to see.I loved this book. It is dark, creepy and haunting, yet flaunts a touch of beauty in the luxury of a successful opera house. The two girls, Fawn and Devi, each share the story, the plot switching between both points of view in a masterful way, which leaves no room for confusion and lets the intrigue blossom and grow. The longing of both touches the heart, as they each seek their own version of freedom. But both are caught in a very dark scheme. The writing brings the world to life in all of it's senses. The beauty of the opera house offers a lovely contrast to the dark shadows of those dwelling within. And each person's mask plays an enticing role in this deadly game like a well trained ballet. It's hard to determine who's right and who's wrong, each desire hitting the area of gray. The good and evil within both girls adds a terrific tension, making it hard to decide who to love and who to hate. Fans of darker fiction with a touch of fairy tale and musical beauty are sure to get lost in these pages. Especially the end guarantees a perfect finish for such a tale and leaves a bitter-sweet sense of longing lingering behind. I was lucky enough to be a beta reader for this tale, immediately fell in love with it and wanted to share my honest thoughts.
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  • Minx -The Genre Minx Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Winter’s Siren is a dark fantasy that was both captivating and twisted. This story follows the narrative of two characters who are opposite in every way. Devi was born out of a union that was doomed from the start. Her mother met a tragic end at the hands of her father but Devi was spared, just barely, due to her innocence. Her father made it his life’s mission to find a cure for the malformation that affected Devi. One aspect of finding a solution for his daughter involved the abduction of a ch Winter’s Siren is a dark fantasy that was both captivating and twisted. This story follows the narrative of two characters who are opposite in every way. Devi was born out of a union that was doomed from the start. Her mother met a tragic end at the hands of her father but Devi was spared, just barely, due to her innocence. Her father made it his life’s mission to find a cure for the malformation that affected Devi. One aspect of finding a solution for his daughter involved the abduction of a child who came to be known as Fawn.Fawn was kidnapped as a child and after numerous escape attempts became a prisoner who was kept in chains except for when she was performing. Fawn had been blessed with a beautiful singing voice and soon became the star at the Opera House that was run by her captor. A beautiful voice was the one thing that Devi and Fawn had in common. Devi may have had a beautiful singing voice but it was not something that many knew about. Devi’s face and skin were so horrific to look at that it caused most people to either scream in fright or vomit on sight. She hid her face under a curtain of her hair and did not enjoy social situations. When she was forced into one she was painfully shy and barely spoke.Although Devi was a horror to look at she was loved by her father and the staff that he employed. They alone saw that Devi was more than she appeared on the outside and they also knew she was extremely talented. Not only was she an amazing singer but she alone composed the works that were performed at the opera house. For many years it was Devi’s operas that Fawn had been singing, gaining all the fame and adoration that Devi longed for, but Devi never held it against Fawn. She did not understand her Father’s plan, outside of the fact that is included Fawn, but Devi knew that Fawn was just as much a captive as she was.Everything changed when the newest benefactors to the opera house came to visit. This event was too good to be true for Fawn because the benefactor brought his young and gullible son along for the visit. This was an opportunity that Fawn could not pass up because she knew she would be able to manipulate this young man and that he may be the key to her most longed for dream, escape. Fawn felt that something was happening with the upcoming opera and that she needed to be gone before opening night. With things going in a good direction for Fawn she became emboldened and started to plan her escape. For her plan to work though, she needed all the attention to be on her, not Devi, and when she conceived that Devi was a distraction for the men she had her eyes on, Fawn’s true colors came out.There was a love triangle of sorts in this story and that was truly the nail in the coffin between the girls. Devi had never before believed that Fawn was deliberate in her actions that could have been perceived as malicious but after Fawn’s latest actions surrounding the two men in this story, Devi became painfully aware that Fawn was against her. This was hard for Devi to accept as they were both trapped but for different reasons and should have had a comradery of sorts, unfortunately Devi had to realize that Fawn was not a nice person and that she was deliberate in her actions. Although she was not privy to her father’s true plans, whatever was to befall Fawn became something that was easier for Devi to accept and be passively complicit in.Winter’s Siren was a pleasure to read! The story is told from both Devi’s and Fawn’s perspectives so I was able to truly understand their motivations. I didn’t know how to feel about the whole kidnapping of Fawn situation, that was just not right, but it was an important element to the story. I liked that Fawn’s character was conflicted about certain things but her self-preservation quickly overrode her conscience. There were things about both characters that made me like them and have disdain for them, it was just lovely to have my feelings up in the air like that. I was conflicted about the romance element because it was and wasn’t real. You just have to read the story and then you’ll understand 😉. Overall, Winter’s Siren was a wonderful story that plays with your emotions and will enrapture your imagination. I highly recommend!This review is based on a complimentary book I received from Author, Krystal Jane Ruin. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.Find this review and more at The Genre Minx Book Reviews
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  • Donna Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Having read Krystal Jane Ruin's other novel, I knew upon opening this book that I was in for a treat. What I didn't know was how this book would be, since it was in a slightly different genre. As a fan of fairy tales and retellings of classic stories, I can say wholeheartedly that I was not disappointed by this book in any way, shape or form. This author has a smooth, easy-flowing style of writing that immediately pulls you into the story. And what a story it is. Even though is it being marketed Having read Krystal Jane Ruin's other novel, I knew upon opening this book that I was in for a treat. What I didn't know was how this book would be, since it was in a slightly different genre. As a fan of fairy tales and retellings of classic stories, I can say wholeheartedly that I was not disappointed by this book in any way, shape or form. This author has a smooth, easy-flowing style of writing that immediately pulls you into the story. And what a story it is. Even though is it being marketed as a retelling, this story felt totally unique. I couldn't turn the pages fast enough to find out what was going to happen between Devi and Fawn, as well as the other male characters in the book. How will it all end? Will it end in tragedy? This was such a heart-felt book and I hated to see it end. But the author did a beautiful job of tying everything up in such a satisfying way, that I couldn't help but rejoice. This book is a classic, and a masterpiece, on its own merit. Forget the retelling, and indulge yourself in this wonderful, unique and compelling story.**I received an ARC copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review**
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  • Michelle Athy
    January 1, 1970
    When Devi is born with a truly disgusting face, her father will do anything to raise her with the promise of a better life--which means a better face. They live in an opera house in the middle of nowhere and Fawn is the kidnapped opera diva with a beautiful face and beautiful voice. She's kept locked in a tower to prevent her escaping and ruining Devi's father's Viktor's plans. When a new benefactor and his son arrive for a short stay at the opera house, everything begins changing. This novel de When Devi is born with a truly disgusting face, her father will do anything to raise her with the promise of a better life--which means a better face. They live in an opera house in the middle of nowhere and Fawn is the kidnapped opera diva with a beautiful face and beautiful voice. She's kept locked in a tower to prevent her escaping and ruining Devi's father's Viktor's plans. When a new benefactor and his son arrive for a short stay at the opera house, everything begins changing. This novel definitely had a fairytale feel with plenty of elements that reminded me of Wicked and Phantom of the Opera in particular, but the book was definitely its own thing. Both Devi and Fawn narrate the story and you come to understand their points of view; they both have good and bad traits, which makes the story so much more interesting. The writing is fluid and descriptive and effective. You're never confused as to the setting or the characters' surroundings.
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  • Abby Pechin
    January 1, 1970
    Though I am unfamiliar with Swan Lake, I deeply enjoyed this fairy tale-like story. The alternating between the two characters kept me reading it late into the night to find out what happened to both. The ending was excellent!
  • Tania
    January 1, 1970
    I won an arc of this. It was well written and makes you feel for the main character. I really enjoyed this, especially the chemistry between the characters.
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