Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil, Vol. 1
This mystery set in the world of superheroes follows a reporter investigating what happened to her father: The Black Hammer, from New York Times bestselling author Jeff Lemire (Descender, Underwater Welder, Old Man Logan).All answers seem to lie in Spiral City's infamous insane asylum where some of its dangerous super-villain tenants reside. As she gets closer and closer to the truth she uncovers the dark origin stories of some of Black Hammer's greatest foes and how they tie into the puzzle of what happened to Spiral City's greatest hero.Collects issues 1-4 of the Sherlock Frankenstein series.

Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil, Vol. 1 Details

TitleSherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 22nd, 2018
PublisherDark Horse Books
ISBN-139781506705262
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Graphic Novels Comics, Superheroes

Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil, Vol. 1 Review

  • Red Panda
    January 1, 1970
    This Black Hammer spin-off stays true to the spirit of the main book and, I suspect, contains plot elements that are going to be crucial to future issues of the core book.It really doesn't feel like 'additional reading'. The quality is just as good as the main book and the art, while stylistically individual, is in a similar vein, so the change isn't jarring.If you're a fan of Black Hammer, don't make the mistake of skipping this spin-off; you'll kick yourself.
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    *Read in single issuesI really like the universe that Jeff Lemire is creating with his Black Hammer books. Sherlock Frankenstein is no exception.This basically feels like a rogue gallery. Lucy Weber, Black Hammer's daughter, doesn't believe that her father and his teammates are dead. This is a story of her investigation into the matter and her search for one of Black Hammer's greatest foes...Sherlock Frankenstein.Maybe he will have the answers she seeks.Also, for once, this is a Lemire book that *Read in single issuesI really like the universe that Jeff Lemire is creating with his Black Hammer books. Sherlock Frankenstein is no exception.This basically feels like a rogue gallery. Lucy Weber, Black Hammer's daughter, doesn't believe that her father and his teammates are dead. This is a story of her investigation into the matter and her search for one of Black Hammer's greatest foes...Sherlock Frankenstein.Maybe he will have the answers she seeks.Also, for once, this is a Lemire book that didn't rip my heart out and stomp on it. Which, for me, is an unusual experience when reading a Lemire story.I definitely recommend this one for fans of Black Hammer. The world and the mythos are expanded upon and it is a great set up for what Lemire has coming in this universe next!
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]Set prior to Lucy Weber's adventure into the town of Black Hammer, this four issue series (plus lead-in issue from Black Hammer proper) explores the origins of some of Black Hammer's (the character) villains while reaffirming Lucy's resolve to go and find out the truth about her father's disappearance.Lemire proves here that he can turn his magnifying glass on the villains of the DC universe as much as he can the heroes, with fun takes on familiar faces reimagined for the [Read as single issues]Set prior to Lucy Weber's adventure into the town of Black Hammer, this four issue series (plus lead-in issue from Black Hammer proper) explores the origins of some of Black Hammer's (the character) villains while reaffirming Lucy's resolve to go and find out the truth about her father's disappearance.Lemire proves here that he can turn his magnifying glass on the villains of the DC universe as much as he can the heroes, with fun takes on familiar faces reimagined for the universe of Black Hammer. Lucy ties it all together with a good connecting thread of investigation, although the concluding issue misses the mark just a tad for taking us full circle right back where we started with a bit of a leap of logic.Artwise, Lemire pairs with David Rubin for a similar visual aesthetic to the main book but just different enough to differentiate it, which works very well with the real-world setting compared to Dean Ormston's take on the town of Black Hammer.If you're reading the main Black Hammer book, this (and the barrage of other minis that Lemire seems to be doing) expands on the world of Black Hammer extremely well, and makes it feel a lot more cohesive. It does stand well on its own though, and deserves to be judged on its own merits, which are just as high as the main book.
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  • Astaldo
    January 1, 1970
    Black Hammer is one the best comic books out there. Lemire is writing is own interesting story while at the same time he is building a parallel vintage comic book hero universe filled with rips off versions of some well-known DC or Marvel characters, and somehow he makes this work so well. In this first spin-off we get to know a bit of the background for the great villain Sherlock Frankenstein, and a few other (now retired) super villains from the Black Hammer Universe. That includes my personal Black Hammer is one the best comic books out there. Lemire is writing is own interesting story while at the same time he is building a parallel vintage comic book hero universe filled with rips off versions of some well-known DC or Marvel characters, and somehow he makes this work so well. In this first spin-off we get to know a bit of the background for the great villain Sherlock Frankenstein, and a few other (now retired) super villains from the Black Hammer Universe. That includes my personal favorite Cthu-lou, a guy called Lou who is the avatar of the unspeakable ancient one. It also has a good connection with the main Black Hammer series. And yes Sherlock Frankenstein is a sort of mix with Sherlock Holmes, Victor Frankenstein and Frankenstein’s Monster all in one, and yes what should his sidekick be named? You are right, he is called Igor Watson. If you don’t know this, start with Black Hammer vol 1, it really is a must read.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    While the story of Sherlock Frankenstein does supplement and expand the world of Black Hammer, it is also a fully developed story on its own--though familiarity with Black Hammer does benefit the reading.I wasn't always as big a fan of the artwork this time around--though there are some excellent stylistic choices, and the change in style does fit the shift in focus. Mostly though, I enjoyed the opportunity to see more of Lemire's growing Spiral City universe. He blends classic superhero tropes While the story of Sherlock Frankenstein does supplement and expand the world of Black Hammer, it is also a fully developed story on its own--though familiarity with Black Hammer does benefit the reading.I wasn't always as big a fan of the artwork this time around--though there are some excellent stylistic choices, and the change in style does fit the shift in focus. Mostly though, I enjoyed the opportunity to see more of Lemire's growing Spiral City universe. He blends classic superhero tropes with a little grittiness and a flair for the comically absurd--and the result is a world that feels both familiar and fresh in equal measure. And within all the flash and drama of a complex world of heroes and villains, Lemire continues to display his ability to convey rich emotion and sincere, flawed, dynamic characters. "Sherlock Frankenstein" provides a look into a new part of Black Hammer's world, and I was not disappointed by what I found there.
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  • The Lost Dreamer
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge fan of Black Hammer, and I love the idea of exploring some of its characters through their personal journeys. I liked Black Hammer's daughter in the regular series and I think she's going to be the greatest character of them all. But this issues felt a little bit too long and irrelevant. The art if beautiful, full of colors and complex pannels, but it doesn't feel as thrilling as the original Black Hammer. Everything in this volume feels OK, but not as wonderful as the original comic. I'm a huge fan of Black Hammer, and I love the idea of exploring some of its characters through their personal journeys. I liked Black Hammer's daughter in the regular series and I think she's going to be the greatest character of them all. But this issues felt a little bit too long and irrelevant. The art if beautiful, full of colors and complex pannels, but it doesn't feel as thrilling as the original Black Hammer. Everything in this volume feels OK, but not as wonderful as the original comic. I miss the strange situation described in the original storyline. I love the complex characters and their twisted relationships. I don't think there's any of that in these numbers. But it's fine while we wait for the next Black Hammer issue. Just, don't do too much of this, because I will eventually stop reading them.
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  • Václav
    January 1, 1970
    This is what I waited for trough whole first arc of Black Hammer. This. This four-issue arc full of my favourite David Rubín under direction of Lemire's fantasy, feeling for emotions and empathy (for made up characters). Story, following the events set in Black Hammer, is perfect, not too complicated and not too shallow, untangling in decent manner and you can be one step ahead, but you'll be always keen for what comes next. I can express how the Rubín's art complement Lemire's story. It fits to This is what I waited for trough whole first arc of Black Hammer. This. This four-issue arc full of my favourite David Rubín under direction of Lemire's fantasy, feeling for emotions and empathy (for made up characters). Story, following the events set in Black Hammer, is perfect, not too complicated and not too shallow, untangling in decent manner and you can be one step ahead, but you'll be always keen for what comes next. I can express how the Rubín's art complement Lemire's story. It fits together so well. I wasn't much excited form Black Hammer, but this brings me a joy.
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  • Nate
    January 1, 1970
    Great start to this spin-off series. There is enough new information about the Black Hammer universe that it is worth reading, but for those that want to stick to the main plot they'd probably survive. However, I anticipate this series will eventually play a large role in the main plot.Jeff Lemire's writing is fabulous. I don't love Rubin's art style, but I'm getting used to it. I don't like the way he draws faces and there were a few too many double pages (those really mess with the continuity Great start to this spin-off series. There is enough new information about the Black Hammer universe that it is worth reading, but for those that want to stick to the main plot they'd probably survive. However, I anticipate this series will eventually play a large role in the main plot.Jeff Lemire's writing is fabulous. I don't love Rubin's art style, but I'm getting used to it. I don't like the way he draws faces and there were a few too many double pages (those really mess with the continuity when reading a digital comic, as I did).
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  • Jamie Connolly
    January 1, 1970
    I read in single issue. Basically, the daughter of missing and presumed dead super hero Black Hammer begins investigating the disappearance and winds up on the trail of Sherlock Frankenstein. I love Jeff Lemire's work, especially his own creations. I'm doubtful I'll be giving anything from the world of Black Hammer less than 4 stars.
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  • Christoph
    January 1, 1970
    Mehr als ein Spin-Off - eine perfekt inszenierte Ergänzung zur Geschichte in Black Hammer. Erinnert nun mehr als nur leicht an Alan Moore's Top Ten. Die Spannung auf die kommenden Hefte ist groß!!
  • Jelly
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Hector
    January 1, 1970
    Un complemento casi perfecto a Black Hammer.
  • Paul Mirek
    January 1, 1970
    If (like me) you're getting bored of the glutted genre of "literary takes on superhero archetypes," this mini-series probably won't do anything to change your mind. This title is a spin-off of Lemire's Black Hammer, which largely avoids many of the genre's pitfalls by interspersing cosmic weirdness with small-scale slice-of-life vignettes. Here, though, he and Rubin are basically just telling a C-list DC Comics story without the hassle of licensing any of the IP. That's not to say that Rubin's l If (like me) you're getting bored of the glutted genre of "literary takes on superhero archetypes," this mini-series probably won't do anything to change your mind. This title is a spin-off of Lemire's Black Hammer, which largely avoids many of the genre's pitfalls by interspersing cosmic weirdness with small-scale slice-of-life vignettes. Here, though, he and Rubin are basically just telling a C-list DC Comics story without the hassle of licensing any of the IP. That's not to say that Rubin's layouts aren't eye-catching or that there aren't moments of greatness (looking at you, Cthu-Lou) ... but I'm just getting so, so tired of this sort of thing.
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