The Broken Vow (Spill Zone, #2)
Only the very brave or the very desperate dare enter the Spill Zone—Addison Merritt is a little of both. In exchange for a suitcase full of cash, she made one last to the Zone. She survived the encounter, but came back changed.Addison is not alone. In a remote village in North Korea, a young man named Jae was touched by the unholy fire of the Spill Zone. He made it out alive—alive, but also changed.Now bestowed with uncanny powers, Addison and Jae may be the only ones strong enough to face a new threat that has risen in the Spill Zone. This deadly entity is searching for his runaway bride—and his hunt is bringing him closer and closer to Addison and her little sister.

The Broken Vow (Spill Zone, #2) Details

TitleThe Broken Vow (Spill Zone, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 10th, 2018
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626721500
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Young Adult, Comics, Science Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics

The Broken Vow (Spill Zone, #2) Review

  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not typically the sort of person who picks up a book the day it comes out, but while running errands yesterday, I stopped by the comic shop to clear out my box after at least a month or so, and found out that Spill Zone #2 was out. (But that they couldn't actually sell it to me yet, because it wasn't released until Wednesday.)And I got pretty excited, because I remember reading the first one and really enjoying it. So today I actually made a special trip to pick this up, and I read both of t I'm not typically the sort of person who picks up a book the day it comes out, but while running errands yesterday, I stopped by the comic shop to clear out my box after at least a month or so, and found out that Spill Zone #2 was out. (But that they couldn't actually sell it to me yet, because it wasn't released until Wednesday.)And I got pretty excited, because I remember reading the first one and really enjoying it. So today I actually made a special trip to pick this up, and I read both of them back to back over lunch.I was kind of surprised that this seems to be the end of the arc. Surprised but pleased, as the story rounds out well. I just I was expecting more of a slow play revealing the mysteries established in the first book, and instead what we got was a action-packed resolution.I'm curious to see if the story will continue. There's obvious a door left open for more, and if they write it, I'll be there to pick it up....
    more
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Do you like sleep? No, you don’t, if you’re reading Spill Zone.There is literally not one component of this story that is not creepy. The premise, the voice, the art…It’s the most uneasy feeling reading it. Which is why I couldn’t wait for Broken Vow.Book one left us on a huge cliffhanger, desperate for answers. Broken Vow delivered that and more. When you thought the creatures and zombie-like bodies couldn’t get any creepier, they do! Two sisters, one creepy doll, and a boy across the world hol Do you like sleep? No, you don’t, if you’re reading Spill Zone.There is literally not one component of this story that is not creepy. The premise, the voice, the art…It’s the most uneasy feeling reading it. Which is why I couldn’t wait for Broken Vow.Book one left us on a huge cliffhanger, desperate for answers. Broken Vow delivered that and more. When you thought the creatures and zombie-like bodies couldn’t get any creepier, they do! Two sisters, one creepy doll, and a boy across the world hold our attention in this one. What’s the tie between the spill in America and the one in North Korea? More than you can imagine, I promise.There’s not much I can say about the story other than the art is as much a storyteller as the words are. Pay attention to the use of colors and how the panels are laid out to attract your attention. Scott and Alex work well as a creative pair!
    more
  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    The second volume in this series lives up to all the promise of the first, and expands on it to bring us an even better book this time around.The art isn't what I usually like but it's effectively used - drawing the completely other, non-euclidean creatures of the Spill can't be easy but it's fantastically done here. The story itself offers more answers and less drawn-out frustration than this kind of story and it's much appreciated!Free to read online: http://www.thespillzone.com/ - but the phy The second volume in this series lives up to all the promise of the first, and expands on it to bring us an even better book this time around.The art isn't what I usually like but it's effectively used - drawing the completely other, non-euclidean creatures of the Spill can't be easy but it's fantastically done here. The story itself offers more answers and less drawn-out frustration than this kind of story and it's much appreciated!Free to read online: http://www.thespillzone.com/ - but the physical copy really is worth it.
    more
  • Stacee
    January 1, 1970
    This was deliciously creepy and had such a good ending. I'm curious to see if there will be more because there definitely could be. **Huge thanks to First Second for providing a finished copy free of charge**
  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    What the hell?You know when an author is building up this exciting suspense around a topic or certain aspect of a story, like a location, character, or any other element?And so you read on, really interested and making up your own theories in your mind. But then we the time comes to reveal what has been concealed in the past, it just… doesn’t blow you away. Or maybe it doesn’t even add up.I thought this was supposed to be a young adult story. I even praised how serious it was in the past, and ho What the hell?You know when an author is building up this exciting suspense around a topic or certain aspect of a story, like a location, character, or any other element?And so you read on, really interested and making up your own theories in your mind. But then we the time comes to reveal what has been concealed in the past, it just… doesn’t blow you away. Or maybe it doesn’t even add up.I thought this was supposed to be a young adult story. I even praised how serious it was in the past, and how it made me believe in the direness of the situation. But the revelation is so… juvenile. And dull. Were we really expected to fall off our chairs?Well, I didn’t… It’s a joke. It’s ridiculous. If I, a girl, reacted this way (and I usually don’t mind romance stuff), I wonder how a boy reading this will. He’d probably be like, ‘‘WTH,’’ like I was.The rest is fine. The story is interesting and the characters as well. I especially enjoyed the interactions between Addie and Jae – it was about time they met! The pacing is still fast and we did, fortunately, get answers. It’s just that those answers weren’t worth being excited about.I thought this would be the last volume – a duology – but the ending (aka cliff-hanger) proved otherwise. I’m not yet sure if I’ll be checking out the next book, because I’ve lost my excitement about the otherworldly elements, but it’s not a definitive no either.
    more
  • Emma (Miss Print)
    January 1, 1970
    Three years ago something happened in Poughkeepsie, New York that left the town changed. Inside the Spill Zone nothing is quite right anymore. Dead bodies stand motionless, caught where they fell; strange creatures wander the zone; no one who goes into the zone comes out the same.Addison thought she was done with the zone when she took one last job to retrieve something from inside. Except she got close enough to touch the spill and now she's changed--just like Jae, a mysterious boy from North K Three years ago something happened in Poughkeepsie, New York that left the town changed. Inside the Spill Zone nothing is quite right anymore. Dead bodies stand motionless, caught where they fell; strange creatures wander the zone; no one who goes into the zone comes out the same.Addison thought she was done with the zone when she took one last job to retrieve something from inside. Except she got close enough to touch the spill and now she's changed--just like Jae, a mysterious boy from North Korea's own spill zone.Addison's little sister, Lexa, was changed the night of the spill herself. And now her doll, Vespertine tells them that something worse is trying to get out in Spill Zone: The Broken Vow (2018) by Scott Westerfeld, illustrated by Alex Puvilland with color by Hilary Sycamore.Spill Zone: The Broken Vow is the conclusion to Westerfeld's latest graphic novel duology which began with Spill Zone. You can find a copy at your local library, buy a copy, or you can read the entire comic online with neat blog posts from Scott and Alex talking about their process at thespillzone.com.This concluding volume is even creepier than the first with higher stakes, scarier creatures, and a lot more suspense. While Addison tries to make sense of what happened the last time she went into the spill she also has to figure out how to protect her sister and her town from whatever is trying to get out.The Broken Vow expands the world of the comics as readers learn more about Don Jae and North Korea's own spill. The eerie illustrations and psychedelic colors from the first volume return in this installment and continue to evoke a world gone subtly (and sometimes not-so-subtly) wrong. The use of different speak bubbles for each character also adds another dimension to the story.Spill Zone: The Broken Vow is fast-paced action and nail-biting suspense. A satisfying conclusion to a truly original duology.
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Continuing the awesome series debut, the second installment has the action, the oddness, the intrigue, and the next-level artwork that the first one had. And includes the crazy talking doll who takes possession and others get drunk on the power that might lie within the spill zone.
    more
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    The second volume of Spill Zone really doesn't disappoint - the art is still fantastic and there is still a lot to be discovered about the world these characters inhabit.
  • Take Me Away To A Great Read
    January 1, 1970
    REVIEW TO COME
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great graphic novel. The first, Spill Zone, was weird yet fascinating. Broken View had big shoes to fill and did so wonderfully. With the disproportionate creatures and mysterious. More insight was given to the night of the spill, yet I still want more. I hope this is not the end of Addison and Lexia. I want to read more!Thank you to Net Galley and First Second for access to the digital ARC.
    more
  • Elisa The-Bookie-Monster
    January 1, 1970
    When I read the first book, I was completely hooked. In the sequel we finally get much needed answers, like who really is Vespertine. I would recommend this for fans of Stranger Things
  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    SPILL ZONE: THE BROKEN VOW was even more strange and creepy than the first novel. I have very similar feelings about this book to the first, especially about the art. I am not entirely used to graphic novels and find myself missing the fantastic artwork to get to the words faster. I could definitely reread these books and notice much more of the art. I found myself not being able to put this book down and reading each chapter super fast. I actually had to slow myself down when reading this book SPILL ZONE: THE BROKEN VOW was even more strange and creepy than the first novel. I have very similar feelings about this book to the first, especially about the art. I am not entirely used to graphic novels and find myself missing the fantastic artwork to get to the words faster. I could definitely reread these books and notice much more of the art. I found myself not being able to put this book down and reading each chapter super fast. I actually had to slow myself down when reading this book so that it would no be over so quickly. This book picked up quite literally right where the last book left off. Both SPILL ZONE books switch points of view fluidly and without warning, which initially I was skeptical about but got used to and even began to enjoy.I appreciated the character development in this book that was hardly elaborated on in book one. A lot of questions were answered that I was initially unsure could even be explained. Jae, Lexa, and Wiley were all much more present in this sequel, and Addison was hardly ever doing something without any of them. I am a big fan of multiple villains in the story, and they made the story even more terrifying and fast-paced. Overall, THE BROKEN VOW wrapped up the story well, leaving it at an end --- for now. The door is definitely open for more. The duology itself is very easy and quick to read and ultimately full of entertainment value.I recommend SPILL ZONE: THE BROKEN VOW to all who read SPILL ZONE and were even on the fence about continuing with the next book. The second novel elaborated on everything the first did not and so many more interesting facts emerge from this world. The art is just as enthralling, and this installment is just as easy to read as the first. With even more complications and dangers, THE BROKEN VOW is bound to hold your attention the entire time.
    more
  • Keith Chawgo
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is an interesting young adult story that is able to cross audiences to include an adult audience who should be able to be complete immerse in this world. This is the second in the series and unfortunately, I have not read the first in the series which I will soon remedy. The story tells the story around a young cast in the near future. With an involving premise and a dark twisted sense and intrigue that pushes the story forward. Having not read the first in the series, it didn This graphic novel is an interesting young adult story that is able to cross audiences to include an adult audience who should be able to be complete immerse in this world. This is the second in the series and unfortunately, I have not read the first in the series which I will soon remedy. The story tells the story around a young cast in the near future. With an involving premise and a dark twisted sense and intrigue that pushes the story forward. Having not read the first in the series, it didn’t take me long to be able to pick up the thread.The story does have some strange twists dealing with demonic dolls and such but with the added graphics, the reader is able to be thrusted in this world with an abandoned enjoyment. The text does have some loose threads which I am assuming there will be another instalment at some point but Westerfeld’s vision does have some closure. If you are a graphic novel fan or like an interesting dark tale, this should be able to award you to no end. With intriguing storylines, a science fiction thread that runs throughout and well developed characters, this should make a fan of the series. I would suggest reading the first book in the series, which I have now ordered to give the story more depth but it can work as a stand alone.
    more
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come but this is just as weird and wonderful as the first book
  • Amy Lou
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI just love the art style in these books, and the creepy stylistic feeling it gives off. The story is intriguing and odd in a good way, but I’m still confused? I’m not sure whether there will be more to the series, and I don’t know whether I’ll continue on if there is.
    more
  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    So good. Addison and Lexa still struggling with the after effects of the spill zone, but there’s help on the way. They have more adventures and close calls, but with an ending that leaves us hanging. Also really great art work conveying the story nicely.
    more
  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance digital copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars. Events begin immediately after the first Spill Zone – e.g., visitors from North Korea (as well as the mysterious, levitating Don Jae) are under surveillance by the government, National Guard member Wiley is now wise to Addison’s photography trips, and Lexa is still sugarcoating her conversations with Vespertine, the entity inside her doll. Addie feels different, but the ramifications of having “touc I received an advance digital copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars. Events begin immediately after the first Spill Zone – e.g., visitors from North Korea (as well as the mysterious, levitating Don Jae) are under surveillance by the government, National Guard member Wiley is now wise to Addison’s photography trips, and Lexa is still sugarcoating her conversations with Vespertine, the entity inside her doll. Addie feels different, but the ramifications of having “touched the bad stuff” are unknown. After (view spoiler)[a successful rendez-vous to deliver the Zone item (the “dust”) to the art curator (and a less successful attempt on behalf of Addison’s former agent to extort her), Addison is roughly one million dollars richer and ready to beat it out of Poughkeepsie. Lexa, however, is a tough sell, scared of what moving will mean for Vespertine (who needs to “charge” periodically by visiting the Zone). Addison burns her Zone photography and throws the doll into the fire. Addison’s Vespertine problem increases exponentially as the displaced entity finds a new vessel in Lexa. Creatures from the Zone – including Vespertine’s betrothed – demand Vespertine return and be wed . . . which means that, if they get their way, Lexa is along for the ride as well. (hide spoiler)]To his credit, Westerfield does reveal many things readers of the first Spill Zone have probably been chomping at the bit to see: (view spoiler)[Don Jae’s origin. The secrets of the mysterious Korean Spill. The fate of Addison’s parents. The catalyst for Vespertine crossing into this world. (hide spoiler)] No stone is left unturned, and, per usual, Addison’s neverending reservoir of intrepidness, quick-thinking, and general badassery propel the story along to a satisfying conclusion. There is a lot of story here – and it goes by so quickly that you may not truly appreciate how much is packed into this volume at first glance. As soon as you’re introduced to a new scene, appreciate it: you only have a few panels before we jump to the next. I like the tension dialed up a little more throughout, but true to comic format, the true cliffhanger turns-of-the-screw are saved for the end of each segment, and are true back-against-the-wall, Oh, shit! NOW what are they going to do? moments. Part of why the Zone is so deliciously creepy in the first Spill Zone is because its elements are mixed with elements we recognize: floating people, rats, distorted wolf-looking creatures with impossible joints. When (view spoiler)[Don Jae and the curator interact with the dust and view the origin place of the Spill, color is well-used to demonstrate two factions, but the forms created by the lines and shapes are a little too vague, leaving the supposed turmoil and insurrection a challenge to visualize. (hide spoiler)]I generally don’t wish for something to be more slowly paced, but the Spill Zone is something I want to savor, and it felt like the content of a trilogy was crammed into a duology. Critical moments weren’t foreshadowed (c’mon . . . gimme a through-the-bushes stalker POV view of Addison, cut to a zoom-in on sinister eyes, then reveal (view spoiler)[ that her former agent is coming for her . . . don’t just have him appear casually coming down the street against a backdrop of sunshine (hide spoiler)]). Similar for when (view spoiler)[Addison sees her parents: I loved the panel work of that moment, but I would’ve rather seen more internal conflict from Addison as she weighed her decision, not just a simple point-and-shoot. She also never seems at odds with her Zone powers, which would’ve given a little more depth to her journey. Toward the end, when the gigantic, ominous white wolf-creature speaks with Vespertine, the “your parents killed mine” seems more like an aside than a climactic reveal. (hide spoiler)]Overall, a worthy sequel, although not quite as ominous as the first.
    more
  • Teenreadsdotcom
    January 1, 1970
    Scott Westerfield is the New York Times bestselling author of the Uglies series, the Leviathan Trilogy, and the Zeroes Trilogy. He also wrote the standalones EVOLUTION’S DARLING, SO YESTERDAY and AFTERWORLDS. His works have won the Philip K. Dick Special Citation, the Aurealis Award and the Victorian Premier’s Award. His first solo-written comic is SPILL ZONE.Alex Puvilland is the New York Times Bestselling illustrator from France. He moved to California to work for Dreamworks Animation and curr Scott Westerfield is the New York Times bestselling author of the Uglies series, the Leviathan Trilogy, and the Zeroes Trilogy. He also wrote the standalones EVOLUTION’S DARLING, SO YESTERDAY and AFTERWORLDS. His works have won the Philip K. Dick Special Citation, the Aurealis Award and the Victorian Premier’s Award. His first solo-written comic is SPILL ZONE.Alex Puvilland is the New York Times Bestselling illustrator from France. He moved to California to work for Dreamworks Animation and currently creates comics on the side. His first solo-illustrated comic is SPILL ZONE, which is followed by a second volume, SPILL ZONE: The Broken Vow.After the first book, SPILL ZONE, ended with much uncertainty, Addison said she was done with the Zone for good, but she cannot seem to rid herself of the effects it had on her. She is not the only one who has been given strange powers by the Zone, and a North Korean named Jae also gained powers when he was touched by the unholy fire of his own village’s Spill. As a new threat emerges from Addison’s Spill, only she and Jae can help contain it together.SPILL ZONE: The Broken Vow was even more strange and creepy than the first novel. I have very similar feelings about this book to the first, especially about the art. I am not entirely used to graphic novels and find myself missing the fantastic artwork to get to the words faster. I could definitely reread these books and notice much more of the art. I found myself not being able to put this book down and reading each chapter super quickly. I actually had to slow myself down when reading this book so that it would not be over so quickly. This book picked up quite literally right where the last book left off. Both Spill Zone books switch points of view fluidly and without warning, which initially I was skeptical about but got used to and even began to enjoy.I appreciated the character development in this book that was hardly elaborated on in book one. A lot of questions were answered that I was initially unsure could even be explained. Jae, Lexa and Wiley were all much more present in this sequel, and Addison was hardly ever doing something without any of them. I am a big fan of multiple villains in the story, and they made the story even more terrifying and fast-paced. Overall, THE BROKEN VOW wrapped up the story well, leaving it at an end --- for now. The door is definitely open for more. The duology itself is very easy and quick to read and ultimately full of entertainment value.I recommend SPILL ZONE: The Broken Vow to all who read SPILL ZONE and were even on the fence about continuing with the next book. The second novel elaborated on everything the first did not and so many more interesting facts emerge from this world. The art is just as enthralling, and this installment is just as easy to read as the first. With even more complications and dangers, THE BROKEN VOW is bound to hold your attention the entire time.Reviewed by Grace P., Teen Board Member
    more
  • Lady Jayme,
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC to review! This is a YA graphic novel, the second in a series. In the first book we met Addison (Addi), a young woman who is raising her younger sister, Lexa, after her parents are killed the night of "the incident" that creates the Spill Zone. Was it a nuclear plant accident? Was it an alien invasion? No one knows. None of the children who survived that night can speak anymore, including Lexa.To earn money Addi sneaks past government blockades into the Spill Zo Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC to review! This is a YA graphic novel, the second in a series. In the first book we met Addison (Addi), a young woman who is raising her younger sister, Lexa, after her parents are killed the night of "the incident" that creates the Spill Zone. Was it a nuclear plant accident? Was it an alien invasion? No one knows. None of the children who survived that night can speak anymore, including Lexa.To earn money Addi sneaks past government blockades into the Spill Zone, and takes photographs of the mysterious creatures and nightmarish madness that lives there now. Swings always swinging with no one in them; an area where everything flattens, including people; bodies floating in the air, dead but still watching...I ate the weirdness up with a spoon! The Broken Vow starts up right where the first book left off. Don Jae, a survivor of a different Spill Zone in North Korea, has developed strange powers after the night of his "incident." (The way Don Jae was drawn looked like The Scream painting to me sometimes.) Addi, who stayed safe during so many visits to the zone, messed up her last trip in and is now experiencing weird side effects herself. Weird side effects like levitation. The zone is changing her. And Addi and Don Jae aren't the only ones with odd reactions - Lexa's bizarre connection to her doll, Vespertine, intensifies.When Don Jae and Addi eventually meet up, everything goes sideways and the Spill Zone spills again. In this book we get explanations about the cause of the Spill Zone and the identity of Vespertine. I think I enjoyed the first book a bit more because it was mysterious and unknown, more interesting not to know why. I really liked the bizarre, colorful imagery and insanity of the Spill Zone, and I wish more of the story had taken place in that world. I think if you like the novel Annihilation and its Area X, you'll enjoy elements of The Spill Zone. I ordered a copy of the first one for my library and can't wait to share it with my teens later this month. A bit sad this is a duology because I could definitely spend more time in this world(s). 3.5 stars, rounded up.
    more
  • Bruce
    January 1, 1970
    After completing her deal with her New York City buyer by delivering a specific bit of dust from the toxically psychedelic Poughkeepsie Spill Zone, young photographer Addison Merritt thinks she’s got it made. With her enormous payoff she and her sister Lexa can get away from Poughkeepsie and its evil effects for good. But there are a few problems she hasn’t anticipated. The first is Vespertine, Lexa’s doll, who talks only to Lexa. She doesn’t want to go; she needs the Zone to get recharged. The After completing her deal with her New York City buyer by delivering a specific bit of dust from the toxically psychedelic Poughkeepsie Spill Zone, young photographer Addison Merritt thinks she’s got it made. With her enormous payoff she and her sister Lexa can get away from Poughkeepsie and its evil effects for good. But there are a few problems she hasn’t anticipated. The first is Vespertine, Lexa’s doll, who talks only to Lexa. She doesn’t want to go; she needs the Zone to get recharged. The second are the spies from North Korea. Addison’s buyer was their go-between. North Korea has its own spill zone, but unlike the American one, it’s inactive. A survivor of that disaster, Don Jae, is with the other North Korean agents in New York. The spill zones have potential as weapons, and they want to know more about them. (view spoiler)[The plot thickens when Vespertine starts talking to Addison. Vespertine has very nasty sarcastic things to say. She knows what caused the zone, and she tells Addison she doesn’t really want to know the truth. In angry desperation, Addison throws the doll into a fire, to free Lexa. Unfortunately, with the doll destroyed, Vespertine takes possession of Lexa directly. Then Don Jae shows up in Poughkeepsie, meets with Addison, and teaches her an ability that comes with exposure to the zone. Now they both can fly. And they head right into the churning inter-dimensional turmoil in Poughkeepsie. (hide spoiler)]It’s fast paced, colorful action as Addison and Don Jae attempt to head off the monstrosities rushing out of the zone and avert disaster before the military blows everything to hell and gone. And like all good horror stories, just when you think everything is safely back to normal, a door is opened to invite the horror back in. I can hardly wait for the next volume.
    more
  • Kimberlee
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free digital copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.Wooooo Boy! I've been waiting for this graphic novel to become available. During an ALA midwinter conference a couple years back, I met Scott Westerfeld and got an ARC of Spill Zone #1. Creepy lit generally isn't my thing, but I really enjoy the Spill Zone story. The Broken Vow begins just where Spill Zone left off. Addie has discovered that Lexa's doll has been possessed by something that came from the I received a free digital copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.Wooooo Boy! I've been waiting for this graphic novel to become available. During an ALA midwinter conference a couple years back, I met Scott Westerfeld and got an ARC of Spill Zone #1. Creepy lit generally isn't my thing, but I really enjoy the Spill Zone story. The Broken Vow begins just where Spill Zone left off. Addie has discovered that Lexa's doll has been possessed by something that came from the Spill Zone and her name is Vespertine. In an effort to save her sister, who has been utterly silent for three years, Addie destroys Vespertine's doll body only for her to possess Alexa instead. But forces from inside and out of the Spill Zone are soon about to collide. Addie must find a way to save her sister and herself from both.While I could forgive Spill Zone for what it lacked in exposition, I can't extend the same courtesy to The Broken Vow I really think more set up about what the Spill Zone is should have been added. As it is, these two GN novels are very character driven. I like Addie, but she and Don Jae, are the only half fleshed out characters. Most everyone else is forgettable. I think a third part in the series would have been great.I'm glad they toned down the brighter colors from the last completed volume. The shades in The Broken Vow make more sense with the atmosphere. Though I think it would have been really interesting if the author, illustrator, and color professional had stayed with the monochrome motif of the first ARC with only inside the Spill Zone being colored.Very solid 4/5 from me.
    more
  • Krys
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher who allowed me to read an e-arc in exchange for an honest review.So it’s been awhile since I read the first volume in this story and I wasn’t sure how much I’d remember. Thankfully the story picks up in such a way that all the important things came back at least and I didn’t feel lost in returning.Addie has returned from the Spill Zone and finally gets some answers to questions she and we as readers have had. She makes a new... friend? Can we call Don Jae a Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher who allowed me to read an e-arc in exchange for an honest review.So it’s been awhile since I read the first volume in this story and I wasn’t sure how much I’d remember. Thankfully the story picks up in such a way that all the important things came back at least and I didn’t feel lost in returning.Addie has returned from the Spill Zone and finally gets some answers to questions she and we as readers have had. She makes a new... friend? Can we call Don Jae a friend? They have a vested interest in each other at least, someone like themselves.We get a little more on Vespertine and her connection to Lexa, though I still have so many questions about that and with that ending? Yeah, answers are still needed. Addie claims her contact with the Spill Zone is over after her last trip there and she’ll never go back but I have a feeling the Spill Zone isn’t done with her... also the ending told me as much. Can’t wait for the next volume.Also, kudos to the artist doing the colors, Hilary Sycamore. They have a great eye and the use of color, especially pertaining to the Spill Zone does a great job showing how wild and unnatural everything about it is. Fantastic and beautiful.
    more
  • Soobie can't sleep at night
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I'm not sure I liked the big explanation and it seems there's room for one more volume. Which I'll buy for sure, even if this second book was a tad weaker than the first.There's North Korea, CIA, the US National Guard, some rich art collector and a mediator who likes to take more than his share. All together revolve around the Spill Zone and Addison. She went to get the dust and the dust changed her. Fortunately, Don Jae comes and helps her. I didn't remember what I thought could be the ex Well, I'm not sure I liked the big explanation and it seems there's room for one more volume. Which I'll buy for sure, even if this second book was a tad weaker than the first.There's North Korea, CIA, the US National Guard, some rich art collector and a mediator who likes to take more than his share. All together revolve around the Spill Zone and Addison. She went to get the dust and the dust changed her. Fortunately, Don Jae comes and helps her. I didn't remember what I thought could be the explanation but the one given by the authors seems a bit unsatisfying. (view spoiler)[Vespertine is in reality a princess from another dimension and she escaped to Addison and Lexa's one to escape from a betrothed she didn't like. In doing that, she killed everyone - including Addison's parents. And she convinced Lexa not to talk for three long years not to reveal what really happened the night of the Spill (hide spoiler)].At the end there's room for a third volume: (view spoiler)[Vespertine isn't dead and the art collector has a little speck of dust... (hide spoiler)]. I did hope the story would wrap up in just two volumes, but I'll buy the third one as well.
    more
  • Geoffrey
    January 1, 1970
    (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)I admittedly came into this story blind. I hadn't read the first Spill Zone, but curiosity got the best of me, and I'm glad that it did. Thanks to Westerfeld's storytelling, I wasn't lost for long at all. I not only quickly understood the world he crafted, but quickly became immersed inside of it. There is much to enjoy here, but I was a fan of two things. First, the artwork for everything related to the "spill" is (Note: I received an advanced electronic copy of this book courtesy of NetGalley)I admittedly came into this story blind. I hadn't read the first Spill Zone, but curiosity got the best of me, and I'm glad that it did. Thanks to Westerfeld's storytelling, I wasn't lost for long at all. I not only quickly understood the world he crafted, but quickly became immersed inside of it. There is much to enjoy here, but I was a fan of two things. First, the artwork for everything related to the "spill" is excellent, and gives a very clear sense of forces, and creatures that clearly are not of our earth, yet are also try adapt to existence in this plant as two very, very different worlds clash. Second, the ending very successfully manages to hit that hard-to-reach spot where the Spill Zone series could satisfactorily end here just as easily as it could journey into further volumes. Consider this a strong recommend from me. I will definitely see if I can add this and its predecessor into my library's graphic novel collection.
    more
  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC to review!*This follow-up to Spill Zone had a lot to live up to. I absolutely loved the mystery and creepiness of the first volume, and I thought that this one sort of lost that. I almost felt as if too much information about the Zone was explained and the reveal wasn't as intriguing as I would have hoped. I also would have liked a little more on Addie and Don Jae's powers in general, because I found myself hoping there would be negative consequences for Addie *Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC to review!*This follow-up to Spill Zone had a lot to live up to. I absolutely loved the mystery and creepiness of the first volume, and I thought that this one sort of lost that. I almost felt as if too much information about the Zone was explained and the reveal wasn't as intriguing as I would have hoped. I also would have liked a little more on Addie and Don Jae's powers in general, because I found myself hoping there would be negative consequences for Addie touching the "dust" but none ever came about. That being said, I really enjoyed getting to meet Don Jae and having his backstory explained, and I did like the twist involving Lexa. I thought the art within the Zone was wonderful and creepy but wasn't a huge fan of the way it depicted the regular world. The lettering with Vespertine's dialogue was also cool, but a bit hard to read at times. Overall a fun and action-packed closing to the duology, if less ominous and intriguing than the first book. Rating: 3.5/5
    more
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    You can see a slightly more complete review here. I absolutely loved Spill Zone! Scott Westerfeld is one of my favorite writers ever and I was immediately addicted to the story of Spill Zone - how Poughkeepsie was mysteriously destroyed/overrun with strange phenomenon after an event known only as a "spill." The problem with graphic novels, though, is that they tend to be short, and volume 1 of Spill Zone was no exception. Waiting for Volume 2 was agonizing, even though I got to read ARCs of both You can see a slightly more complete review here. I absolutely loved Spill Zone! Scott Westerfeld is one of my favorite writers ever and I was immediately addicted to the story of Spill Zone - how Poughkeepsie was mysteriously destroyed/overrun with strange phenomenon after an event known only as a "spill." The problem with graphic novels, though, is that they tend to be short, and volume 1 of Spill Zone was no exception. Waiting for Volume 2 was agonizing, even though I got to read ARCs of both volumes. I need a volume 3. I have so many questions: what will the "spill" be like in New York City? How are Addison and Don Jae effected? Also, why on Earth is Addison allowed to live quietly after the military saw her fly? She flew. In front of witnesses. What kind of deal did she strike after that? And Vespertine: are we ever going to get a complete backstory on her? Is she good? Is she evil? Is she still connected to Lexa somehow? I NEED TO KNOW!Wait...duology? DUOLOGY?? Ackg, nooo!
    more
  • Mrs. Kenyon
    January 1, 1970
    Addison was changed after getting too involved in the Spill Zone. She soon finds out that she is not the only one. Don Jae also was changed, but he is from North Korea. There are people who are interested in Addison and Don Jae, because they want the same powers that they seem to have gained. Will Addison and Don Jae be able to keep the secret of their change from these people? Why has this happened twice in different parts of the world? The Broken Vow is the second book in the Spill Zone graphi Addison was changed after getting too involved in the Spill Zone. She soon finds out that she is not the only one. Don Jae also was changed, but he is from North Korea. There are people who are interested in Addison and Don Jae, because they want the same powers that they seem to have gained. Will Addison and Don Jae be able to keep the secret of their change from these people? Why has this happened twice in different parts of the world? The Broken Vow is the second book in the Spill Zone graphic novel series. Although the primary story has been wrapped up nicely, Westerfeld has also left an opening for additional stories in this fantastic world. I was really looking forward to this book, since I gave the first book five stars, but I finished it feeling deflated. It is still a good book, but not as wonderful as the original. The Broken Vow should only be read by those who have read The Spill Zone already.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I received this through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. After Addison was able to make enough money off the zone, she planned to leave it behind forever. She attempts to live a semi-normal life with her younger sister and her not-so-inanimate doll. The zone changed Addison and she was not the only one. Now, three years later, another changed person from North Korea is seeking out Addison, who is quickly learning that her sister and her sister’s doll may have a bigger role in the zone I received this through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. After Addison was able to make enough money off the zone, she planned to leave it behind forever. She attempts to live a semi-normal life with her younger sister and her not-so-inanimate doll. The zone changed Addison and she was not the only one. Now, three years later, another changed person from North Korea is seeking out Addison, who is quickly learning that her sister and her sister’s doll may have a bigger role in the zone than she ever even thought to consider.The colors and graphic representation of the story continues in this novel. I just always find myself wanting more from the story and characters. I think it is an interesting concept that is almost great, but just misses the mark.
    more
  • BB
    January 1, 1970
    Received an advanced copy via Netgalley.The Broken Vow picks up right where the first novel left off and answers questions left over from the previous novel; the reader learns with Addison about the true nature of the Zone, Vespertine, and what really happened the night of the Spill. This volume is less about exploring the Zone and more focused on Addison's relationships with her sister Lexa and North Korean Spill survivor Don Jae. The writing and the art are both at the same level as the previo Received an advanced copy via Netgalley.The Broken Vow picks up right where the first novel left off and answers questions left over from the previous novel; the reader learns with Addison about the true nature of the Zone, Vespertine, and what really happened the night of the Spill. This volume is less about exploring the Zone and more focused on Addison's relationships with her sister Lexa and North Korean Spill survivor Don Jae. The writing and the art are both at the same level as the previous volume, and the ending wraps things up nicely while leaving enough room for a potential sequel.
    more
  • Katrina
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*I'm still kind of surprised by how much I love this series!!! I haven't liked Westerfeld's other works but this series is quick-paced and attention grabbing! I loved the character development in the second book, and all answers we got to the questions brought up in the first book.But also, if creepy dolls haunt your nightmares, this might be one you should skip because dang, the artwork in this is vivid and haunting.
    more
Write a review