Batwoman, Vol. 2
Batwoman continues her triumphant return with her own series in BATWOMAN VOL. 2: WONDERLAND, as a part of DC Universe Rebirth!Return to the brief flash of the future seen in BATWOMAN: REBIRTH and meet Commander Kane--a battle-hardened version of Batwoman! Hurting from battles unknown, she's taken control of the deadly Colony and declared war on Gotham City! What could possibly cause Kate Kane to bring the battlefront to her home?With writing from Marguerite Bennett (DC COMICS BOMBSHELLS) and James Tynion IV (DETECTIVE COMICS), as well as spectacular art from Steve Epting (CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER) and Ben Oliver (THE MULTIVERSITY), this new series spins directly out of the smash-hit DETECTIVE COMICS series! BATWOMAN VOL. 2: WONDERLAND collects issues #7-11.

Batwoman, Vol. 2 Details

TitleBatwoman, Vol. 2
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 5th, 2018
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401278717
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Lgbt

Batwoman, Vol. 2 Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Kate continues her war on the Many Arms of Death. She's shot down in the Sahara where she eventually falls into the hands of the Scarecrow. Bennett was able to use the Scarecrow as a tool to dive down into Kate Kane's psyche. Scarecrow in the wrong hands can just be random page after page of a hero stumbling through nightmarish landscapes. Luckily for the readers, we're treated instead to Kate's inner turmoil as she processes her relationships with her sister and father and then uses it to her a Kate continues her war on the Many Arms of Death. She's shot down in the Sahara where she eventually falls into the hands of the Scarecrow. Bennett was able to use the Scarecrow as a tool to dive down into Kate Kane's psyche. Scarecrow in the wrong hands can just be random page after page of a hero stumbling through nightmarish landscapes. Luckily for the readers, we're treated instead to Kate's inner turmoil as she processes her relationships with her sister and father and then uses it to her advantage. I also liked the love / hate relationship between Batwomand and Colony Prime as they both seek her father's affection. Fernando Blanco's art fits in very well with the dark, nightmarish look of the book. Also included is a solo story by K. Perkins where Kate goes up against Professor Pyg.
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  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    Better than the horrible first arc, but still pretty meh.World: The art is good, it’s the best thing about this series, its no J.H. Williams III, but there is a magical beauty to this series’ art and how it’s different from all the other Bat books, an ethereal beauty to it. Then there’s the world building which is in fits and spurts, the main thing is of course ‘Many Arms of Death’ and the origin of it and Kate’s lost years, this is story but it’s also foundational to the world building and we a Better than the horrible first arc, but still pretty meh.World: The art is good, it’s the best thing about this series, its no J.H. Williams III, but there is a magical beauty to this series’ art and how it’s different from all the other Bat books, an ethereal beauty to it. Then there’s the world building which is in fits and spurts, the main thing is of course ‘Many Arms of Death’ and the origin of it and Kate’s lost years, this is story but it’s also foundational to the world building and we are still getting bits and pieces. Yes we get a huge piece in the end but the expanse and scope and the pieces for Kate are still scattered. Story: The first story was okay, I am not a big fan of the Arkham games Scarecrow needle Kruger claw but oh well it’s now in canon. The story was solid, it was what a Scarecrow story is so it’s nothing really all that special. The parts of Kate and her past have been recycled again and again and the guilt she’s lived with and had to go through has also been done again and again since her character appeared in the 2000s it’s getting old and tiring, the art was great though. We get a glimpse of character development with Kate and Dad again but it’s short and fleeting, we need more quite time with them to interact. Then there’s the Pyg and the reveal of Safina (I don’t even remember her name so I’ll call her that) which was once again guilt and past trauma related and honestly set on an island I’ve no interest in at all and a relationship that is not earned the care and emotional impact that the creative team things it deserves (we cared about Maggie in the New52 because we saw a lot of her perspective and their interaction, not here). In the end the reveal was meh and the story was meh.Characters: Kate is a good character, I like the trauma and guilt that she had to live through, but it’s been how many years with this same one note to her character that I’m a bit tired of it. I know broken people take a long time to heal but this is a comic book and if this is the only defining characteristic of Batwoman than writers are not trying hard enough. There were glimpses of Her and Dad and that relationship which would be more interesting in dealing with ideals and it could be a continuation of the debate he’s having with her from Detective Comics but with a more intimate angle, but we don’t get that. The creative team just decides to add more trauma to her and more guilt and wallowing. This issue is why I don’t like the lost years story and the relationship with Safina, we’ve had sad Kate with girl problems so many times already. Safina is boring then by extension the island is boring and by extension the ‘Many Arms of Death’ is boring. All the issues I mostly have with this series is character based.Well it was a bit better but not my much, Kate deserves so much more than this. Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Michelle Hart
    January 1, 1970
    check itcan i be real a second?for just a millisecond?let down my guard and tell the people how i feel a second?while i'm glad that marguerite bennett, a queer woman, is writing batwoman, and while i think that she writes the character well, with intelligence and snappy dialogue, batwoman as a character has been irreversibly ruined by the dumb fuck decision to make her father the villain of the series. think about when the 2009 batwoman first started out: expelled from the marines for being gay, check itcan i be real a second?for just a millisecond?let down my guard and tell the people how i feel a second?while i'm glad that marguerite bennett, a queer woman, is writing batwoman, and while i think that she writes the character well, with intelligence and snappy dialogue, batwoman as a character has been irreversibly ruined by the dumb fuck decision to make her father the villain of the series. think about when the 2009 batwoman first started out: expelled from the marines for being gay, she returns home to gotham and to her father, a former marine himself, who, instead of shunning her because of her expulsion, he HELPS her get back on her feet and become a force of good. kate's father is essentially her alfred, a wise and benevolent father figure who knows her better than she knows herself. their relationship was very well-drawn in the beginning, touching and necessary.i understand the impulse to pull the rug out from underneath a character as a means of shaking things up, but the point of kate's father was to show that she wasn't alone--no matter how much she craved solitude and insisted on going it alone, he was always there. the decision to have kate's father be this villainous mastermind hellbent on stopping batman and USING kate as a means of fighting this war is a horrendous decision. until this idiotic idea is reversed, the title, for me, is unreadable.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]Trapped in a remote desert with only a Colony soldier for company, Batwoman thinks she's at her wits end until she finds herself at the mercy of the Many Arms Of Death and their next operative, the Scarecrow!I'm a sucker for Scarecrow. If he's done right, he's a super creepy villain and I just love the whole fear aesthetic since it opens up so many opportunities for storytelling, which Bennett capitalizes on easily here to explore Kate's psyche and her relationships with h [Read as single issues]Trapped in a remote desert with only a Colony soldier for company, Batwoman thinks she's at her wits end until she finds herself at the mercy of the Many Arms Of Death and their next operative, the Scarecrow!I'm a sucker for Scarecrow. If he's done right, he's a super creepy villain and I just love the whole fear aesthetic since it opens up so many opportunities for storytelling, which Bennett capitalizes on easily here to explore Kate's psyche and her relationships with her father and Batman. The bickering between her and the Colony guy are a bit tiresome eventually though, and I do find it a bit odd that an organization like the Many Arms have been in business with Scarecrow for so long and it hasn't come up before, but these are minor quibbles. Bennett knows how to get into Kate's head easily, and she knows how to make the story give her the opportunities she needs for that.Fernando Blanco joins the series here, and his moody artwork fits really well with the book; I've been a fan since he was on Phantom Stranger, and he has some clever linework that makes his art extremely distinctive; it's stretched to the limit when Kate starts hallucinating, but he rises to every challenge.Batwoman's sophmore adventure isn't perfect, but it's got some good character work, one of my favourite villains, and great art. What else do you need?
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  • Kari Trenten
    January 1, 1970
    Batwoman continues to follow the ghost of a woman from her past, which leads her into the Many Arms of Death and a psychedelic landscape, constructed by Johnathan Crane, a.k.a. the Scarecrow. Batwoman traverses this wonderland only to have a family reunion under the most surreal circumstances. If the Scarecrow wasn’t enough, Batwoman has to contend with another costumed crazy known as Professor Pyg, who has the one ally Kate Kane, a.k.a. Batwoman can truly count upon. This volume marks a return Batwoman continues to follow the ghost of a woman from her past, which leads her into the Many Arms of Death and a psychedelic landscape, constructed by Johnathan Crane, a.k.a. the Scarecrow. Batwoman traverses this wonderland only to have a family reunion under the most surreal circumstances. If the Scarecrow wasn’t enough, Batwoman has to contend with another costumed crazy known as Professor Pyg, who has the one ally Kate Kane, a.k.a. Batwoman can truly count upon. This volume marks a return to the psychologically bizarre rather than the outright supernatural, much like what’s appeared in many of Scott Snyder’s Batman graphic novels. It provides a gorgeous visual of colors and darkness, a balance of the emotional and action driven elements of the plot in a style which suits this superhero perfectly. Kate Kane, a.k.a. Batwoman is a marvelous main character; strong, vulnerable, and unabashedly queer, bringing a unique energy into the D.C. universe. For all of these things, I give this book four stars.
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  • Kim Dyer
    January 1, 1970
    This second volume of Batwoman felt a little disconnected and didn't quite capture me like the first did. While the main story is wonderfully surreal and contains some fantastic art, it doesn't really do a lot to advance the overall plot. The only moments of true significance come at its very end, creating an interesting thread for Kate to follow into the next trade.Yet the final issue of this trade felt as though it belonged in a totally different series. It didn't really connect to the previou This second volume of Batwoman felt a little disconnected and didn't quite capture me like the first did. While the main story is wonderfully surreal and contains some fantastic art, it doesn't really do a lot to advance the overall plot. The only moments of true significance come at its very end, creating an interesting thread for Kate to follow into the next trade.Yet the final issue of this trade felt as though it belonged in a totally different series. It didn't really connect to the previous issue and was particularly nasty, marking the darkest that Batwoman has gotten since Rebirth began. This issue was not written by Bennett and it showed, containing none of the character depth or surrealism that we have enjoyed in the series to date.Still, based on the cliffhanger, I am willing to hang in for at least one more volume to see if things pick up. Hopefully the next instalment will be stronger than this one.
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  • Emilie Zink-Wright
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, I was completely pulled in and captivated by the writing of Marguerite Bennet and James Tynion IV. The dialogue is witty and fresh, and Kane's character continues to intrigue me. The illustrations by Steve Epting and Ben Oliver are beautiful, and they keep the story flowing smoothly while setting the background of Kane's world. In this volume, Batwoman continues hunting the Many Hands of Death and chasing the elusive ghosts of her past. She becomes trapped in the desert with a Colony Once again, I was completely pulled in and captivated by the writing of Marguerite Bennet and James Tynion IV. The dialogue is witty and fresh, and Kane's character continues to intrigue me. The illustrations by Steve Epting and Ben Oliver are beautiful, and they keep the story flowing smoothly while setting the background of Kane's world. In this volume, Batwoman continues hunting the Many Hands of Death and chasing the elusive ghosts of her past. She becomes trapped in the desert with a Colony soldier. The unlikely pair has to work together to withstand the psychedelic weapon of one of Batman's most twisted supervillains. Kane then has to switch gears immediately to solve a mystery involving missing tourists while also performing a mission to rescue one of her few remaining friends. Throughout her journey in this volume, Kane remains the strong, aloof, vulnerable, and damaged Batwoman that strikes fear into the hearts of the DC supervillains and love into the hearts of the readers.
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  • Scott Lee
    January 1, 1970
    off topic for just a moment--this bizarre summary doesn't fit what happens in this volume at all...really weird. Kate is hunting the many arms of death, one of which turns out to be the scarecrow. She handles Dr. Crane pretty darned effectively and it makes for fun reading. The Professor Pygg single-issue that follows feels a bit bizarre and detached from the rest of the book, but Pygg has never quite worked for me. The mental toughness on dispaly in the Scarecrow arc is impressive. Kate essenti off topic for just a moment--this bizarre summary doesn't fit what happens in this volume at all...really weird. Kate is hunting the many arms of death, one of which turns out to be the scarecrow. She handles Dr. Crane pretty darned effectively and it makes for fun reading. The Professor Pygg single-issue that follows feels a bit bizarre and detached from the rest of the book, but Pygg has never quite worked for me. The mental toughness on dispaly in the Scarecrow arc is impressive. Kate essentially "muscles" through Crane's formula not only for herself, but while draggin Colony Prime along behind her. When dad shows up at the end, he's really too late to rescue her as she's already rescued her self and his man.
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  • Jenny Clark
    January 1, 1970
    Great story and art.Batwoman rules Batman drools.No not really, but Batwoman is much darker and gritter and her villains seam more realistic than Batmans.This has a misleading summary on here. It says "returning to the future glimpsed in vol 1" but this does not follow that at all. This is set in the here and now, continuing the story of Kate chasing The Many Arms Of Death started in volume 1. I do wish some of the other Bat family would come in. Red Hood would be the best choice, as he is the o Great story and art.Batwoman rules Batman drools.No not really, but Batwoman is much darker and gritter and her villains seam more realistic than Batmans.This has a misleading summary on here. It says "returning to the future glimpsed in vol 1" but this does not follow that at all. This is set in the here and now, continuing the story of Kate chasing The Many Arms Of Death started in volume 1. I do wish some of the other Bat family would come in. Red Hood would be the best choice, as he is the other black (or rather red) sheep of the family.The fight with Scarecrow was terrifying and very well written and illustrated. Overall a great series that I cant wait for more of.Also really excited for the CW show to kick off!
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  • Jamie Revell
    January 1, 1970
    While it fits into a broader arc, the main story of this collection sees Batwoman facing off against the Scarecrow. As a result, much of the story takes place in a hallucinatory landscape, which worked well for me (perhaps because I haven't read too many Scarecrow stories before...) and allows Bennett to play around with Batwoman's psyche and emphasise her differences from Batman. Yes, the villain behind Scarecrow isn't a great way to twist the background, and the one-episode story that rounds o While it fits into a broader arc, the main story of this collection sees Batwoman facing off against the Scarecrow. As a result, much of the story takes place in a hallucinatory landscape, which worked well for me (perhaps because I haven't read too many Scarecrow stories before...) and allows Bennett to play around with Batwoman's psyche and emphasise her differences from Batman. Yes, the villain behind Scarecrow isn't a great way to twist the background, and the one-episode story that rounds out the collection is nothing much to get excited about, but I felt this was a decent examination of the character.
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  • The Lost Dreamer
    January 1, 1970
    I still can't say I love this series, but this second volume gets definitely better. The foe, Scarecrow, feels quite more interesting than in the previous issues. I still don't get the narrative, which feels erratic at some points, but the plots is starting to catch me. Also, I'm finally beginning to understand Batwoman and her conflicts. I really like that romance is so left aside in this stories: she has much greater things to worry about. It definitely makes the storytelling better. The art, I still can't say I love this series, but this second volume gets definitely better. The foe, Scarecrow, feels quite more interesting than in the previous issues. I still don't get the narrative, which feels erratic at some points, but the plots is starting to catch me. Also, I'm finally beginning to understand Batwoman and her conflicts. I really like that romance is so left aside in this stories: she has much greater things to worry about. It definitely makes the storytelling better. The art, as any bat-thing, is outstanding. I love the use of blacks and reds. I love the roses and the constant references to Alice and Wonderland. I'll keep reading: I've really enjoyed this volume
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  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    When you put Wonderland and Kate Kane in the same sentence, the first thing that should come to mind is her sister, who thinks she's Alice. Unfortunately, there's barely any mention of her. All we really get is an angsty Kate who, for some reason, hates her dad. Jacob Kane, who was essentially her Alfred in the previous runs of this title. Jacob Kane, who helped Kate get through the hardest times of her life after being kicked out of the army for being queer. I don't understand what the motivati When you put Wonderland and Kate Kane in the same sentence, the first thing that should come to mind is her sister, who thinks she's Alice. Unfortunately, there's barely any mention of her. All we really get is an angsty Kate who, for some reason, hates her dad. Jacob Kane, who was essentially her Alfred in the previous runs of this title. Jacob Kane, who helped Kate get through the hardest times of her life after being kicked out of the army for being queer. I don't understand what the motivation behind turning her father into a villain, and I really don't like it.
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  • Adam Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    Continuing her battle against the Many Arms of Death, Batwoman comes into direct contact and battle with another of their agents, The Needle, which we know better as Scarecrow. Most of the Volume involves battling him and her own fears. Colony Prime joins her for much of the adventure, but he's a minor character as far as I am concerned.The last issue is about Kate taking down Professor Pyg and it is very good, but the whole Volume overall is very straightforward and semi-dull.I'll continue the Continuing her battle against the Many Arms of Death, Batwoman comes into direct contact and battle with another of their agents, The Needle, which we know better as Scarecrow. Most of the Volume involves battling him and her own fears. Colony Prime joins her for much of the adventure, but he's a minor character as far as I am concerned.The last issue is about Kate taking down Professor Pyg and it is very good, but the whole Volume overall is very straightforward and semi-dull.I'll continue the title, but Batwoman is much better in the pages of Detective Comics.
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  • Cande
    January 1, 1970
    I love personal arcs, characters coming to accept hard truths about themselves, embracing their personalities or deciding to finally change. So yeah, I did like to see Kate conflicted about her past, her fears, her failures. (view spoiler)[I especially liked how she embraces her darkness, but towards the end realizes it's time to change her idea about justice. Because yes, you should change it, Kate. (hide spoiler)]Anyway, Safiyah is such a queen and I wished we had had more about her story with I love personal arcs, characters coming to accept hard truths about themselves, embracing their personalities or deciding to finally change. So yeah, I did like to see Kate conflicted about her past, her fears, her failures. (view spoiler)[I especially liked how she embraces her darkness, but towards the end realizes it's time to change her idea about justice. Because yes, you should change it, Kate. (hide spoiler)]Anyway, Safiyah is such a queen and I wished we had had more about her story with Kate.
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  • Sarospice
    January 1, 1970
    Still live the BATWOMAN character but nothing will compare to the JH Williams era. So the building of villians and story for Kate is always gonna be awkward, but this sidenote with Scarecrow and Pyg is interesting.
  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    3.5Way WAY into the art. The story is decent enough that I want to keep following the characters. But man...there are so many spreads that I could look at for a really long time without getting bored.
  • José Luis
    January 1, 1970
    Esto va cuesta arriba.
  • John H
    January 1, 1970
    Goodreads still doesn't have the name correct on this volume. WTH?
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I love the artwork and the story is interesting.
  • Andy Zell
    January 1, 1970
    Builds more backstory during confrontations with Scarecrow and Professor Pyg. I'm still intrigued with this series and the character so I'll continue reading when my library gets the next volume.
  • Daniel Butcher
    January 1, 1970
    Trippy look into Kate's mind while we go on an adventure!
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    2.5/5
  • Rachel Redhead
    January 1, 1970
    the Pyg stuff was very icky
  • Gareth Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Better than the previous volume, improved artwork but get Kate back to Gotham.
  • Stephen Hamilton
    January 1, 1970
    Not wowed by this one. I like Scarecrow as a character but I’ve always found TV/cinema a better medium for depicting the effects of his fear toxin than comics. The arc ended more promisingly though.
  • Donna Snyder
    January 1, 1970
    Meh. Had to remind myself to finish it as I kept putting it down. The basic artwork is black and red. Ho-hum. The story line is jerky. Based on this book, this genre doesn’t work for me.
  • S
    January 1, 1970
    Very trippy. Good art once more.
  • Kb
    January 1, 1970
    I am so confused.
  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe it's because I haven't read all of the Batwoman back issues, but I had a really hard time following this one.
  • Elisabeth Young
    January 1, 1970
    Issue #11 wasn't written by Bennet, felt really out of place in this book, and was just plain awful... but aside from that, I enjoyed it.
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