The Restless Wave
In this candid new political memoir from Senator John McCain, an American hero reflects on his life—and what matters most.“I don’t know how much longer I’ll be here. Maybe I’ll have another five years. Maybe, with the advances in oncology, they’ll find new treatments for my cancer that will extend my life. Maybe I’ll be gone before you read this. My predicament is, well, rather unpredictable. But I’m prepared for either contingency, or at least I’m getting prepared. I have some things I’d like to take care of first, some work that needs finishing, and some people I need to see. And I want to talk to my fellow Americans a little more if I may.” So writes John McCain in this inspiring, moving, frank, and deeply personal memoir. Written while confronting a mortal illness, McCain looks back with appreciation on his years in the Senate, his historic 2008 campaign for the presidency against Barack Obama, and his crusades on behalf of democracy and human rights in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Always the fighter, McCain attacks the “spurious nationalism” and political polarization afflicting American policy. He makes an impassioned case for democratic internationalism and bi-partisanship. He tells stories of his most satisfying moments of public service, including his work with another giant of the Senate, Edward M. Kennedy. Senator McCain recalls his disagreements with several presidents, and minces no words in his objections to some of President Trump’s statements and policies. At the same time, he offers a positive vision of America that looks beyond the Trump presidency.The Restless Wave is John McCain at his best.

The Restless Wave Details

TitleThe Restless Wave
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 22nd, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster
ISBN-139781501178009
Rating
GenreBiography, Politics, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, History, Biography Memoir

The Restless Wave Review

  • Peter Tillman
    January 1, 1970
    Here's an edited excerpt, published as an essay by the WSJ: ‘Vladimir Putin Is an Evil Man’https://www.wsj.com/articles/john-mcc..."Three months later, in Putin’s first weeks as prime minister [1999], bomb explosions destroyed apartment buildings in three Russian cities, including Moscow. Putin used the incident as grounds for starting a second Chechen war and ordered the bombing of Grozny, Chechnya’s capital. The inhumanity of the Russian assault was stunning. No caution, no discrimination, no Here's an edited excerpt, published as an essay by the WSJ: ‘Vladimir Putin Is an Evil Man’https://www.wsj.com/articles/john-mcc..."Three months later, in Putin’s first weeks as prime minister [1999], bomb explosions destroyed apartment buildings in three Russian cities, including Moscow. Putin used the incident as grounds for starting a second Chechen war and ordered the bombing of Grozny, Chechnya’s capital. The inhumanity of the Russian assault was stunning. No caution, no discrimination, no trials, brutal and merciless: Just kill people, fighters and civilians, and don’t worry about the difference.""Vladimir Putin is an evil man, and he is intent on evil deeds, which include the destruction of the liberal world order that the United States has led and that has brought more stability, prosperity and freedom to humankind than has ever existed in history. He is exploiting the openness of our society and the increasingly acrimonious political divisions consuming us. He wants to widen those divides and paralyze us from responding to his aggression. He meddled in one election, and he will do it again because it worked and because he has not been made to stop.Putin’s goal isn’t to defeat a candidate or a party. He means to defeat the West."
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    It was a memoir. He didn't shit on anyone and he didn't do a tell all. He wrote about his experiences around the world, he had nice things to say about Sarah Palin, he had not very nice things to say about Obama's decisions (understandable), and not very much to say about Trump (surprising). If you were a fan of John McCain then you will enjoy this book. I was a Republican since the 1970's until 2000 (then I became a Democrat) and I loved McCain until he made Palin his VP pick in 2007, but after It was a memoir. He didn't shit on anyone and he didn't do a tell all. He wrote about his experiences around the world, he had nice things to say about Sarah Palin, he had not very nice things to say about Obama's decisions (understandable), and not very much to say about Trump (surprising). If you were a fan of John McCain then you will enjoy this book. I was a Republican since the 1970's until 2000 (then I became a Democrat) and I loved McCain until he made Palin his VP pick in 2007, but after reading this book I am back to having a fondness for him again. He is a good man, he has done so many good things and I wish all Republicans and some Democrats were more like him.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading his personal thoughts and statements and reading about his experiences. However, it was way too much detailed information for me on each battle in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    John McCain implies throughout this book that he is not a gifted orator like Ted Kennedy, Barack Obama or other colleagues. If this is so, the talent must lie with his co-author, Mark Salter, because every chapter soars with passionate, evocative, eye-wetting prose. One small caveat is that it appears several turns of phrase were just too good, as variations of the same pull-quote appear repeatedly, becoming more embellished with each re-telling. This is probably by design.Although McCain allows John McCain implies throughout this book that he is not a gifted orator like Ted Kennedy, Barack Obama or other colleagues. If this is so, the talent must lie with his co-author, Mark Salter, because every chapter soars with passionate, evocative, eye-wetting prose. One small caveat is that it appears several turns of phrase were just too good, as variations of the same pull-quote appear repeatedly, becoming more embellished with each re-telling. This is probably by design.Although McCain allows that he might last a few more years, this book is his swan song. It is tightly focused on stories and issues from the last two decades, and it frames his positions on those issues in a way that only a Senator with nothing left to lose could frame them.He begins with his campaign against Barack Obama in 2008, but unlike Hillary Clinton in her book, _What Happened_, he does not use very many words to express frustration or disappointment that he did not win the election. On the contrary, he notes the historical significance of Obama's nomination and election, compliments his running mate, Sarah Palin, and moves on to spend a long time discussing--and defending--the political position that he felt was most likely to cost him votes: the war in Iraq.If American voters were ever concerned that John McCain was focused on foreign policy, to the detriment of all else, this book offers substantial confirmation. McCain notes that he spends every 4th of July with the troops in Afghanistan. He repeatedly describes himself as a proponent of "Democratic Internationalism," and provides examples of what America should and should not do, using stories from Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Uzbekistan, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Russia, Vietnam, China, Myanmar, etc. etc. He has met with freedom fighters and politicians in all the most difficult theaters, encouraging democratic movements in any way a US Senator can.McCain also offers an impassioned defense of immigrants and a spirited defense of (failed) legislation that would have given many a path to US Citizenship. This is not surprising. If we understand, as McCain does, that people around the world all seek liberty and self determination, if we understand that people around the world deserve to be treated with dignity, and if we understand that America has a unique ability and obligation to defend the principles of liberty and dignity, then compassionate immigration policy and Democratic Internationalism go hand-in-hand.
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  • Roger Smitter
    January 1, 1970
    If only if all politicians would write and think they way John McCain does in his bio. He tells us that his rhetorical strategy was “...my country saved me ...and I can’t forget it” (p. 59). He takles several pages to explain what he said on election night when Obama had won the presidency (p. 67). He spoke bluntly about that about many issues, including the killing of Bin Laden (p. 98). Perhaps the most powerful example of his insights and values come in the middle of the book. He talks about h If only if all politicians would write and think they way John McCain does in his bio. He tells us that his rhetorical strategy was “...my country saved me ...and I can’t forget it” (p. 59). He takles several pages to explain what he said on election night when Obama had won the presidency (p. 67). He spoke bluntly about that about many issues, including the killing of Bin Laden (p. 98). Perhaps the most powerful example of his insights and values come in the middle of the book. He talks about his imprisionment in a Viet Namese war prison. We know outside the book that his experience as a POW left him with injuries that still make life difficult for him. The passage of his experience comes well into the book, after he has laid out his values and his politics. It is a stirring passage about understanding war and forgiveness. He tells us near the end of the book that “I had many disagreements with President Obama’s policies [not the man]” (p. 324). In contrast, he adds “I’m not sure what to make of President Trump’s convictions.” I hope that the book will be used in many college courses about leadership and politicos. It pushes us to embrace differences and disputes without losing our values as human beings. I recommend this bio for every college class focused on the presidency.
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  • Linda Shepherd
    January 1, 1970
    "I believe the United States has a special responsibility to champion human rights in all places, for all peoples, and at all times." John McCain has been a champion for human rights. What he and the United States stand for is one of the many messages is this book. There are warnings, too. Putin and Xi are not to be trusted.Americans need to vote for people who are willing to work across the aisle. Nothing gets done when both sides adopt a no-way or the highway attitude. Compromise is how politi "I believe the United States has a special responsibility to champion human rights in all places, for all peoples, and at all times." John McCain has been a champion for human rights. What he and the United States stand for is one of the many messages is this book. There are warnings, too. Putin and Xi are not to be trusted.Americans need to vote for people who are willing to work across the aisle. Nothing gets done when both sides adopt a no-way or the highway attitude. Compromise is how politics works. I am a Democrat. John McCain will be missed in the Senate. We need more people like him.
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  • Carolyn Harper
    January 1, 1970
    Poignant, passionate, and unfailingly patriotic, McCain recalls the causes he’s dedicated his life to and appeals—both directly and indirectly—for his readers to take up the standard. I don’t agree with all of his positions, but I admire and respect McCain’s fervor, sincerity, fidelity to his causes, and, most of all, his love for his country and his fellow Americans. I found it a little disjointed at times with a few errors the editors missed.
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  • George Stoddard
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to this book on Audible. It was a moving and meaningful experience. Senator McCain is a politician with whom I disagree on occasion, but he is a man I have deep respect for particularly during this time when our politics have become so distressing. It was refreshing to listen to the reading by Beau Bridges and to be able to recall the times past when our political system functioned, imperfectly, but with the interests of the nation and its residents in mind.
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  • Jeanne
    January 1, 1970
    I find John McCain an admirable person and wanted to know more. I have read a previous biography of his and wanted to read this biography that is told in his own voice about his later years. I did find a couple of chapters cumbersome (due to subject matter) but still informative. He clarified numerous situations I had read and/or heard about. This book leaves you inspired to be a moral person and more involved in government.
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  • Daniel Mount
    January 1, 1970
    The book is not focused. Most of it feels scattered and random. Even the largely unrelated chapters are not especially focused on their topics; they will contain rambling ten-plus-page asides. But the concluding two chapters are personal, focused, and moving.
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  • Deborah Cleaves
    January 1, 1970
    A struggle to read.A conglomeration of minutiae relating irrelevancies that are not of interest to this reader. Interspersed are occasional interesting reveals that show us McCain. I just wish the reader had less chaff to sift through.
  • JoAnn
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading Sen. McCain's analysis of issues he has faced during his long career of public service as he faces a grave illness. I have disagreed with many of his political stands over the years, but I have never doubted his love of this country. An interesting read for fans of politics.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    There were way more details about all his foreign travels and foreign affairs experience than I can possibly digest. Still I appreciate his candor without being nasty and his obvious love for our country.
  • Keith
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn’t put this book down. Totally riveted by Senator McCain’s recollections and his foreign policy expertise. The Senator is an American hero.
  • Lee Adams
    January 1, 1970
    This lacked any 'aha' stories/narratives. Quite a bit of retelling of commonly reported stories. the Magnitsky Act was interesting having heard the story in Browder's Red Notice.
  • Foggygirl
    January 1, 1970
    great read about this well known political figure.
  • Jonathan Decarlo
    January 1, 1970
    A true American hero reflects on his life in service of the country he so clearly loves. A great memoir.
  • James Schiada
    January 1, 1970
    Lessons for our country by a real American
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