In His Image
After first teaching women to go deeper in their study of the Bible in Women of the Word, and then unpacking why our limits are a good thing in light of God’s limitlessness in None Like Him, best-selling author and Bible teacher Jen Wilkin helps readers see what human beings are to be like as they reflect the image of their Creator. In His Image explores 10 attributes of God that Christians are called to reflect—they are called to be holy, loving, just, good, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, and wise. This book calls readers to discover the freedom and purpose in becoming all that God made them to be.

In His Image Details

TitleIn His Image
Author
ReleaseMay 31st, 2018
PublisherCrossway
ISBN-139781433549878
Rating
GenreChristian, Religion, Faith, Christian Living, Theology, Nonfiction

In His Image Review

  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    This was my non-fiction for the month of May. It was so good. I have loved everything Jen Wilkin has written and I can't recommend her enough
  • Stefanie
    January 1, 1970
    "What good is it for me to choose the right home or spouse if I'm still eaten up with covetousness? What does it profit me to make the right choice if I'm still the wrong person? A lost person can make 'good choices'. But only a person indwelt by the Holy Spirit can make a good choice for the purpose of glorifying God."In His Image tries to help those who are always questioning about what is God's will in their life. The author states that instead of asking "What should I do next?", we need to s "What good is it for me to choose the right home or spouse if I'm still eaten up with covetousness? What does it profit me to make the right choice if I'm still the wrong person? A lost person can make 'good choices'. But only a person indwelt by the Holy Spirit can make a good choice for the purpose of glorifying God."In His Image tries to help those who are always questioning about what is God's will in their life. The author states that instead of asking "What should I do next?", we need to start asking "Who should I be?". This book will help us learn to transform our lives into who we should have been according to God's will. First and foremost, there's a difference between God's incommunicable and communicable attributes. Incommunicable attributes are those that belong to God alone, such as: omnipresence, omniscience, etc. In this book, Jen Wilkin focused on describing 10 of God's communicable attributes that we can exhibit through our lives: that God is holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, and wise."God is holy, loving, just, good, merciful, gracious, faithful, truthful, patient, and wise. When we talk about being 'Conformed to the image of Christ,' this is the list we are describing. It is this list I intend to explore, ten attributes that show us how to reflect who God is as Christ did."I absolutely love this book because it has certainly made me reflect upon my life, pondered about whether my life has reflect God's character or not. I personally think the author was able to interpret God's character in a relatable way, using examples from our daily life and also her experiences, while at the same time quoting the Bible for references. Even though this is quite a short book to read, I find myself reading it a slower pace so that I'll be able to take it all in. I especially love the fact that each chapter ends with a reflection page filled with Bible verses to meditate on, some questions for us to answer and reflect upon, and also a prayer prompt. These pages will help us in remembering what we have understand and guide us in finding practical ways to reflect God's characters in our lives. "The Word of God gives us discernment into what is arguably the area we need it most: the thoughts and intentions of our own hearts." "Worldly wisdom trusts in earthly possessions. Godly wisdom trusts in treasures in heaven.Worldly wisdom boasts. Godly wisdom is slow to speak.Worldly wisdom says trials will crush you. Godly wisdom says trials will mature you." One of my most favorite chapters in this book is the one about Wisdom. In this chapter, the author describes Godly wisdom and uses the example of Solomon from the Old Testament. And then she makes the comparison between wisdom and knowledge. This part really opened my mind because there are many times when I asked God to tell me what to do, and Jen Wilkin categorizes that as asking for knowledge instead of asking for wisdom. She uses a very good and relatable parable to illustrates the difference. Rather than constantly asking for knowledge, wisdom is having an internal framework for making decisions that will be able to discern what is the will of God, what is good, acceptable, and perfect.Another chapter that I really like is Patience. I certainly know for sure that God is most patient, because He's been constantly patient with me through my failures. In this chapter, the author encourages us to be patient as God is patient—which obviously is not an easy thing to do. Impatience is closely related to an easily kindled, unrighteous anger, thus we need to be able to prevent ourselves from losing patience. This chapter encourages us that every time we are about to lose our patience, we need to remind ourselves of God's perfect patience and follow His example."When we grow frustrated with a friend or family member who persists in sin, we can remember that Christ bears patiently with us. When we begin to think that a circumstance is stretching longer than we can take, we can remember the patience of Christ to wait on the Father’s timing in all things. When we are weighed down by suffering, we can remember that in Christ’s greatest moment of suffering he set his face like flint and even prayed for the forgiveness of his adversaries. And when we feel discouraged with ourselves for continuing to give in to sin, we can remind ourselves—and I can’t believe I’m saying this—to be patient, because God isn’t finished with us yet."After reading this book, I'm really interested to read Jen Wilkin's previous book: None Like Him: 10 Ways God is Different from Us , which talks about God's incommunicable characters. I really enjoyed her writing in this one, so I think I'll be able to love her previous work as well. In His Image is definitely a book that I would want to reread again some time in the future, to remind and help me reflect upon my life as time goes by. I highly recommend this book because it has encouraged me a lot to strive to be transformed into the likeness of God.Read the full review here:http://www.thebookielooker.com/2018/0...
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  • Cara Putman
    January 1, 1970
    This book is fantastic. Highly recommend!
  • Jillian Vincent
    January 1, 1970
    I continue to be amazed at Jen Wilkin’s concise and down to earth way of presenting theology. She unpacks the will of God simply, and with such hope that we can truly reflect God’s image. Big takeaway: the will of God is more about who we become than what we do. Answer the question: who will I be? Over the question: what shall I do? Her chapter on patience and holiness convicted me the most, and I will continue to chew on them for years to come.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    First sentence: If you’ve ever said, “I just want to know God’s will for my life,” this book is for you.Premise/plot: In His Image isn't your typical what-is-God's-will-for-my-life 'self-help' book. I'm tempted to put in the exclamation: far from it! Wilkin writes:God is always more concerned with the decision-maker than he is with the decision itself... For the believer wanting to know God’s will for her life, the first question to pose is not “What should I do?” but “Who should I be?” The Bibl First sentence: If you’ve ever said, “I just want to know God’s will for my life,” this book is for you.Premise/plot: In His Image isn't your typical what-is-God's-will-for-my-life 'self-help' book. I'm tempted to put in the exclamation: far from it! Wilkin writes:God is always more concerned with the decision-maker than he is with the decision itself... For the believer wanting to know God’s will for her life, the first question to pose is not “What should I do?” but “Who should I be?” The Bible plainly answers the question “Who should I be?” with “Be like Jesus Christ, who perfectly images God in human form.”We were created in the image of God, and we are called to reflect that image. Wilkin has selected ten characteristics of God that we are called--commanded--to reflect in our lives.God is holy. We are called to be holy. God is love. We are called to love. God is good. We are called to be good. God is just. We are called to be just--to love justice, to hate injustice. God is merciful. We are called to show mercy. God is gracious. We are called to be gracious. God is faithful. We are called to be faithful. God is patient. We are called to be patient. God is truthful. In fact he is the way, the TRUTH, and the life. We are called to be truthful as well. We are to love truth--treasure it--and hate lies. We are to remember who is incapable of lying and who is the father of lies. God is wise. We are called to be wise. We are called to live with discernment.The first chapter is of the utmost importance. She writes, "the Bible wants our first thought about God to be that he is holy." She warns, "If we emphasize any of his attributes above or apart from his holiness, we fashion him after our own imagining or for our own ends."Holiness permeates the entire Christian profession. It lies at the very center of the gospel. We are not merely saved from depravity; we are saved to holiness. Conversion entails consecration. Growing in holiness means growing in our hatred of sin. But reflecting the character of God involves more than just casting off the garment of our old ways. It entails putting on the garment of our new inheritance. Growing in holiness means growing into being loving, just, good, merciful, gracious, faithful, truthful, patient, and wise.My thoughts: I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED this one. It's a GREAT book on the character of God. It's a great book on how to live the Christian life. Or if you want to get fancy--it is a great book about sanctification.This book may appear to be just for women--especially for women. It is a book EVERY believer would benefit from reading. This book wisely keeps the Word of God front and center. Sin can cause us to love a version of God that is not accurate. This is the basic definition of idolatry, a disordered love. Ironically, one of the most common forms our idolatry takes is the disordered love of the love of God. The overemphasis of God’s love is even evident in non-Christians. They may know very little of the Bible, yet many know and are quick to quote the truism that “God is love” (1 John 4:8). The statement “My God is a God of love” often has as its subtext the idea that his love precludes him ever acting in wrath or justice, or in any way that does not fit our human conceptions of love.The Bible is our great Ebenezer, a memorial stone to the faithfulness of God, carefully recorded and preserved for his children. When we grow forgetful of God, or when we question whether God has forgotten us, we can turn there to gaze on his steadfast love to all generations. Unlike generations before us, we have unprecedented access to this priceless reminder. Bibles by the billions, literally. And every copy, from the dog-eared to the disregarded, is whispering, “Remember.” Remember the God who remembers you. Believers whose Bibles are worn have known their need of its message. To them, reading its pages is not just a dutiful practice but a delightful privilege. They know that between its covers a glorious truth is repeated for their great benefit: God is worthy of our trust. When we spend time in the Bible, our lives begin to bear witness to its faithful message. We ourselves become stones of remembrance for those around us, giving faithful testimony that God is worthy of our trust, no matter what.To be human is to do battle daily with impatience. And battle it we must, because of the close connection between impatience and anger. In my experience, these two states are usually separated by about a nanosecond.We simply cannot get away from the patience of God portrayed in the Bible. God is patient with his children with regard to their sin. He is patient to bear with us as we progress along the path of sanctification, forgiving our sins again and again. He is patient to work out our deliverance in good time. He is patient to await a harvest, and patient to bring in the sheaves in the fullness of time. Our God is “not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance” (2 Pet. 3:9).God is truth. He is its origin and its determiner. What he defines as true is eternally true, unchangingly true. Because he is truth, all of his actions reveal truth and all of his words declare it. As the fullness of truth itself, God is incapable of lying, though sometimes our limited perception may cause us to doubt that this is the case. Satan knows this, and tempts us just as he tempted Eve. He suggests that if we sin, we will not surely die, as God has said. Like Eve, we cross the line into sin, only to find ourselves still breathing in and out—not dead—and we mistakenly assume that the Serpent is the bearer of truth.We need our gathering times to remind us that the truth we are staking our lives on is a truth we share with every believer in our congregation. Moreover, it is a truth we share with every believer who has ever lived. It is an ancient truth that suffers no loss of integrity with the passage of time. In fact, the longer it endures, the more its witness is confirmed.It is not personal truths we need, but rather shared truth preserved and passed down from one believing generation to the next, personalized to us in our current day. That shared truth is available within the pages of God’s Word to me and to all who believe.We can’t discern what’s false if we don’t train our eyes on what is true. The best weapon we have for discerning true teaching from false teaching and sin from righteousness is “the sword of the spirit, the Word of God” (Eph. 6:17). The Word of God is a weapon, forged to combat forgery. We must know how to handle the Bible rightly, and we must know it as comprehensibly as possible in our lifetime. If spiritual warfare is the purview of the Father of Lies, we must arm ourselves with truth. Truth is a book, and that book is a weapon.
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  • Jeanie
    January 1, 1970
    A better question for the Christian wanting to know God's will for his/her life, is not what should I do but who should I be? We are bombarded with what should we do. From our anxieties and fears to our hopes and dreams, we can get our hearts and minds in tizzy when it comes to knowing what God's will is for our life. Knowing God's will comes to not what we can do but who we are. Our example is of Christ on who we can be. Jen Wilkin is one of my favorite teachers in bible study. She directs her A better question for the Christian wanting to know God's will for his/her life, is not what should I do but who should I be? We are bombarded with what should we do. From our anxieties and fears to our hopes and dreams, we can get our hearts and minds in tizzy when it comes to knowing what God's will is for our life. Knowing God's will comes to not what we can do but who we are. Our example is of Christ on who we can be. Jen Wilkin is one of my favorite teachers in bible study. She directs her readers to the root of the problem and redirects them to the solution. It does seem like pie in the sky to say Jesus is the solution, but it is more than just saying it, it is directing our hearts to Jesus. We cannot focus our actions without dealing with our hearts. If we are dealing with anger, we must deal with the root of our anger. If we are dealing with addiction, we must deal with the root of addiction. Not dealing with the root, will always lead us in circles and in despair. The 10 Ways God Calls Us is a call to God's attributions. Starting with his holiness It is from his holiness that all of his attribution are rooted in. His faithfulness his rooted in holiness. Wilkin gives scriptural definitions of God's attributions and how we can emulate them. It is vital that we know his word to know him. I was reminded of what agape love really means. It is unconditional because it is not met with a need. We can love with an agape love when we do not have the expectations of others meeting our needs. We can love freely. I can love my children but they do not meet my need of food, clothes and intimacy. We do need those to survive, however, it is important to see what the root of love really is. Is it a love based on need or meeting the needs of others. That is what makes love so complex. Loving others and God is part of the will of God and for our joy.There is so much in this study and I highly recommend Jen Wilkin in general. She is solid bible teacher. She teaches with compassion and truth.A Special Thank You to Crossway Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    We are to be Christlike but what does that mean? Wilkin helps readers understand that this goes beyond the “What should I do?” to “Who should I be?” She reminds us that we can know God's will for our character and godly character will produce godly action. I like that Wilkin distinguishes the character traits God alone can have, such as his omnipresence and omniscience. What she writes about in this book are the traits we are to exhibit. We are to bear the image of God, not become God. (Loc 139/ We are to be Christlike but what does that mean? Wilkin helps readers understand that this goes beyond the “What should I do?” to “Who should I be?” She reminds us that we can know God's will for our character and godly character will produce godly action. I like that Wilkin distinguishes the character traits God alone can have, such as his omnipresence and omniscience. What she writes about in this book are the traits we are to exhibit. We are to bear the image of God, not become God. (Loc 139/1557) She explores that God is holy, loving, just, good, merciful, gracious, faithful, truthful, patient, and wise. My favorite chapter was on justice and on how we are to secure justice for the oppressed. Or maybe it was the chapter on patience. I like how Wilkin related patience and anger. After all, we are to wait upon the Lord. That helped me understand why some people are so angry with God. I also liked her teaching on the abundant life as a life lived in humility.The chapter that challenged me the most was the one on truth. “Truth is anything that conforms to reality,” she writes. (Loc 1217/1557) Acknowledging that God is truthful is affirming that God defines all objective reality, she says. I am still thinking about all of that.Included at the end of each chapter are Scripture verses for further meditation, questions for discussion or journaling, and a prayer prompt.I recommend this book to any Christian desiring to understand what it means to become more Christlike. You'll find good teaching and additional material to help you on your way.I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.
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  • Nay Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Received an early copy for review.Jen Wilkin is an author I'm starting to love. I love her writing style, her thoughts and how much scripture she includes in her books. In His Image is all about how we can reflect the character of God and not by just one example, but she gives us 10 different ways to do so. This is not a book you want to fly through. This is a book you want to pace yourself with and use a Bible with to take in-depth notes and really grasp the points that Jen shares. I love that Received an early copy for review.Jen Wilkin is an author I'm starting to love. I love her writing style, her thoughts and how much scripture she includes in her books. In His Image is all about how we can reflect the character of God and not by just one example, but she gives us 10 different ways to do so. This is not a book you want to fly through. This is a book you want to pace yourself with and use a Bible with to take in-depth notes and really grasp the points that Jen shares. I love that this is an interactive one in which she gives the reader verses to read and meditate on, questions to reflect on and a place to write out a personal prayer based on the chapter read. Jen talks about things we should all know, but don't really put too much thought into. This is a book that would be perfect in a book club setting, but I think this even better as a personal read to really reflect on your personal relationship with God. I totally recommend this gem!
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  • Rachel Menke
    January 1, 1970
    “In His Image” is a study of 10 of God’s communicable attributes and how we should strive to reflect His character in these ways. It is a follow-up to her 2016 book “None Like Him” which does the same with 10 incommunicable attributes. This books starts with the attribute of holiness and that everything we do either illuminated or obscures the character of God therefore we must strive to become more like Him and therefore grow in Holiness! My very favorite chapters were those on justice (God’s J “In His Image” is a study of 10 of God’s communicable attributes and how we should strive to reflect His character in these ways. It is a follow-up to her 2016 book “None Like Him” which does the same with 10 incommunicable attributes. This books starts with the attribute of holiness and that everything we do either illuminated or obscures the character of God therefore we must strive to become more like Him and therefore grow in Holiness! My very favorite chapters were those on justice (God’s Justice is His love of His law on display (so good!!!)) and wisdom (any thought, word, or deed that compromises our ability to love God is folly). I also found the chapter on patience to be particularly convicting. The book gets an A- (as opposed to an A) because the chapters on love, goodness, grace, and mercy seemed to not really land. In Wilkin’s defense those are really hard attributes and topics to nail down and apply in a bite-sized chapter - they were still good but just not as clear and helpful as the others. I’d highly recommend this book to anyone (male or female) for better understanding of God’s character and better motivation for sanctification. Each chapter has Scriptures and questions for reflection which make it an excellent devotional companion or reading group resource!
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  • Claire Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Solid theology, Great outline, Awesome premise...So I gave it 4 stars. But not super memorable for me and nothing necessarily new or mind-blowing. I think I would’ve gleaned more had I read it with a group (there are discussion questions at the end of each chapter).
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  • christina
    January 1, 1970
    In His ImageJen Wilkin's newest book, In His Image, continues the consideration of God's attributes which she began in her book None Like Him:10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That's a Good Thing). The earlier book focused on characteristics of God which are unique to Him and not transferred ("communicated") to believers in Christ; attributes like omniscience, omnipresence, and self-existence fall in that category. In His Image, on the other hand, examines God's communicable attributes, In His ImageJen Wilkin's newest book, In His Image, continues the consideration of God's attributes which she began in her book None Like Him:10 Ways God Is Different from Us (and Why That's a Good Thing). The earlier book focused on characteristics of God which are unique to Him and not transferred ("communicated") to believers in Christ; attributes like omniscience, omnipresence, and self-existence fall in that category. In His Image, on the other hand, examines God's communicable attributes, characteristics like kindness and holiness which God does work into Christians through the sanctification process as we are conformed to the image of Christ (Rom. 8:29).Many books already exist on the attributes of God. A. W. Tozer's The Knowledge of the Holy and Arthur Pink's Attributes of God are notable among them, and Wilkin acknowledges her debt to previous writers. What sets Wilkin's book apart? First, her engaging, clear, contemporary writing style and knack for apt illustrations mean that here the cookies are most definitely on the bottom shelf. She communicates rich, challenging content without lofty, hard-to-understand style. Second, her decision to place the incommunicable and communicable attributes of God in separate volumes adds clarity and, I suspect, has a teaching benefit in keeping the categories clearer for readers. Third, each chapter closes with Scripture references and reflection questions. This book and its companion volume are excellently suited for use as small-group or one-on-one discipleship materials, or in a book club focused on Christian books. The general index, Scripture index, and blank pages for notes and reflection also suit such a purpose.Perhaps most distinctive, however, is Wilkin's thesis.The first chapter explains in her own words:My explicitly stated intention for this book is that we learn to identify God’s will for our lives. Our inclination is to discern God’s will by asking, “What should I do?” But God’s will concerns itself primarily with who we are, and only secondarily with what we do. By changing the question and asking, “Who should I be?” we see that God’s will is not concealed from us in his Word, but is plainly revealed.The Bible plainly answers the question “Who should I be?” with “Be like Jesus Christ, who perfectly images God in human form.” God’s will for our lives is that we conform to the image of Christ, whose incarnation shows us humanity perfectly conformed to the image of God. In this book, we will consider how we can demonstrate a resemblance to our Maker. But since the Bible’s answer to “Who should I be?” is “Be like the very image of God,” we must ask, “Who is God?” (pp. 21-22).If I have ever encountered God's attributes or the question of finding God's will expressed and organized in quite this way before, I don't recall it. The way Wilkin lays it out here, however, is so clear and consistent with Scripture that I wonder why I didn't see it before. Christians are called and enabled to be holy, loving, good, just, merciful, faithful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, and wise because the triune God is, and the Spirit of God dwells in us.Here are a few more quotes to whet your appetite and nourish your soul:"God’s discipline is his justice without wrath, for the purpose of training us in godliness" (64)."Abundance. Initially, grace is unasked for and undesired. God in his sovereignty extends grace to us before we can even contemplate its possibility or its worth. Eternally, grace is unearned and undeserved. We grow to recognize it for what it is, and we even become increasingly bold to ask for it in greater measure. But the moment we begin to ask out of a sense of entitlement, we contaminate grace. To demand it is to defile it." (87)."The Bible is our great Ebenezer, a memorial stone to the faithfulness of God, carefully recorded and preserved for his children. When we grow forgetful of God, or when we question whether God has forgotten us, we can turn there to gaze on his steadfast love to all generations" (100)."Every entertainment of temptation questions the goodness of God" (103)."Becoming better people is the process of reflecting with increasing clarity and fidelity the very face of God. God’s will for our lives is that we be restored to mint condition. God’s will for our lives is that we become living proof. Everything we say or do will either illuminate or obscure the character of God. Sanctification is the process of joyfully growing luminous. Through Christ and by the Spirit, we have regained access to God’s presence. And the result is the glorious reclamation of the image of God in man" (153).To sum up, I thoroughly enjoyed and highly recommend In His Image to anyone wanting to know God more, searching for God's will for her life, or looking for a substantial but not overwhelming discipleship resource. Readers already familiar with older classics on God's character will also benefit from Wilkin's clarity and emphasis on application, which is to say, the call to grow more like Christ.*******************Crossway provided me a complimentary PDF copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The links in this post are Amazon affiliate links.
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review! I'm very happy to have been given this book and I'm very thankful as well.Disclaimer: This book is about Christianity, God, and religion so if that isn't your cup of tea then this book isn't for you.I could normally fly through this book, but after reading the first chapter I decided I wanted to take things slow and really let things sink in. I actually preferred reading a chapter a day either in the mornin I received a free e-copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review! I'm very happy to have been given this book and I'm very thankful as well.Disclaimer: This book is about Christianity, God, and religion so if that isn't your cup of tea then this book isn't for you.I could normally fly through this book, but after reading the first chapter I decided I wanted to take things slow and really let things sink in. I actually preferred reading a chapter a day either in the morning or at night because it really helped me understand what I was reading.I really loved that this book had verses at the end of each chapter along with some questions to help you reflect on what you just read. I decided to write down the questions and answer them in a journal of mine. I think it definitely made me think more about myself and my own actions.A lot of the stuff talked about isn't even things I put too much thought into. It was definitely eye opening. It's definitely inspired me to make some changes in my life and within myself."The first thing that comes to our minds when we think about God can sometimes be more heavily influenced by our background than by the Bible itself."As humans we aren't perfect and I like that this book recognizes that, but encourages us to live more in the way God intended. For example being honest. This book talks about how we are kind of born into lying in a sense and that it's not easy to be truthful and everyone slips up, but we need to make sure we put in the effort at least to make sure we follow God's will for our lives.This book, in my opinion, makes sure to show that despite how we need to live a more Godly life as Christians that God loves us even when we do mess up. Jen does a good job at letting the reader know that it won't be easy and it's not meant to be easy just because you're a believer. I think that's the biggest thing we forget. It's very reassuring to know that it's going to be hard, but you won't be resented by God even when you do stumble and mess up. Jen also does a good job at making sure you look to God but also look deeper into yourself as you try to better your life. You need to be willing to make the serious effort as a believer.It's nice to be able to hear that it's okay to not be perfect as a Christian, but still try to follow God's will. For me this book was everything I needed to hear and I know for others it's not what they want to hear, but I really liked this book and recommend it."Ultimately, every act of faithfulness toward others is an act of faithfulness toward God himself."I think Jen did a really good job with this book. It's short but powerful. It's also a very inspiring book for any Christians out there. I also thought Jen's writing was very good. :) She made it easy to understand and I also loved that she included some personal stories to help further explain some of her points.This book made me look at some things in a different light and I found it to be very helpful. It made me realize how I do things or act and how I can change for the better. Even if I do certain things right it showed me that it can't be an act and that it needs to be a lifestyle. If that makes sense haha.I don't want to say too much because I think others should read this book and see what they take away from it. So, just a short review today. :)Overall, I recommend this book to any Christian. I also recommend this book to anyone who may struggle with their faith or get confused about what's right and what's wrong. This book also is good fr anyone who's just curious haha.I would definitely read more of Jen's books. I love reading more about my faith and I really enjoyed this book of hers. 
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  • Becca-Rae
    January 1, 1970
    In His Image digs deep into some of the major the characteristics of God and how we can and should be reflections of Him to the world. The book looks at God Most Holy, Loving, Good, Just, Merciful, Gracious, Faithful, Patient, Truthful, and Wise. Hopefully this doesn’t come as a shock to you, that even though we are created in His image, we are not (nor will we be) perfectly like Him. As sinners, we are in need of a Savior. While Jesus comes in and changes our hearts, we will still wrestle with In His Image digs deep into some of the major the characteristics of God and how we can and should be reflections of Him to the world. The book looks at God Most Holy, Loving, Good, Just, Merciful, Gracious, Faithful, Patient, Truthful, and Wise. Hopefully this doesn’t come as a shock to you, that even though we are created in His image, we are not (nor will we be) perfectly like Him. As sinners, we are in need of a Savior. While Jesus comes in and changes our hearts, we will still wrestle with sin in our life. That doesn’t mean we should embrace it or brush it under the rug as nothing, but it should be active in our minds to turn from our sins and strive to be more Christ-like.Jen uses practical, real-life stories to explain deep, theological principles. Just as Jesus spoke in parables, we can begin to understand complex truths we don’t fully understand, when they are explained using stories we do. She also used plenty of scriptures to back up what she was saying. She gave God’s Word the ultimate authority and not merely our life understandings.One piece that stuck out to me in the book was when Jen talked about our desire for God’s will in our life. How often do we go to God and ask Him “What should I do?” Not saying we should never pray that, but she poses that we should ask the question “Who should I be?” Our desire for God’s will in our lives should be more than just knowing what to physically do in this life, but about transforming our hearts to be more like Christ. She says “without meaning to, we can begin to regard our relationship with God primarily as a means toward decision making.”I appreciate how the book was written to not only teach, but encourage and correct. First she shares about how God is each of the characteristics for the chapters. Then she shares both how we should and how we shouldn’t live, to be a better image-bearer of Him. She doesn’t pretend to be perfect herself, but instead shares her own flaws and need for Jesus. She also doesn’t shy away from sharing things we probably need to be actively convicted on to change in our lives (ex: patience). God doesn’t expect us to be perfect, but if Jesus has truly changed our hearts, it should change how we act and think in this life. Instead of living for ourselves, our eyes should be focused on God.I highly recommend this study, and hope that it can be a blessing and encouragement to you as well 🙂*I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley and the author in hopes of an honest review. I was not obligated to give a positive review. Thoughts and opinions expressed are mine alone.
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  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed at my blog: Babbling Books "God's truth is communal, given not merely so that the individual can live in right relationship to God, but so that the individual can live in right relationship with others." I had never heard of or read anything from Jen Wilkin before I decided to request this book, but I'm glad I went ahead with it as this has been an interesting read.This book was surprisingly short. I managed to blaze through it in half a day and I don't even scan read. Honestly I thin Reviewed at my blog: Babbling Books "God's truth is communal, given not merely so that the individual can live in right relationship to God, but so that the individual can live in right relationship with others." I had never heard of or read anything from Jen Wilkin before I decided to request this book, but I'm glad I went ahead with it as this has been an interesting read.This book was surprisingly short. I managed to blaze through it in half a day and I don't even scan read. Honestly I think my mind is still trying to catch up with everything that Wilkin has packed in. This book contains many bites of scriptural knowledge that can easily grow into a solid foundation of biblical understanding.The pace of this book is fast, broken down into 10 easy sections, all on the different attributes of God and how we as His image bearers should be more concerned with "Who should I be?", than "What should I do?" There's also sections at the end of each chapter to answer questions and individual prayer prompts. I can admit that I often don't use these, or I might if I purchase the book but when I'm reading in advance I don't slow down enough to do devotional-type material, but from reading the questions and prompts I can see this being a useful tool for individual or group study.I will say that I did disagree with some of her points, hence the three star instead of 4 or 5. This is mostly a case of perspective I think. Sometimes Wilkin presents things as very cut and dry, almost in a "why aren't you doing it like this" sort of way. But we all know life is not like that, not even life lived through Christ. Sometimes decisions just aren't a simple matter, despite obedient faithfulness. So while I do believe there are some important biblical truths folded in the pages of this book, I would caution anyone who reads it to remember that God deals with us all individually and relationally.Overall I did enjoy this book. The style was engaging, the teaching relevant and filled with scriptural insight that will help many learn what it really means to bear the image of their Creator.– I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book I received through NetGalley from Crossway. All thoughts and opinions are my own. –
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  • NinaB
    January 1, 1970
    In His Image is the companion/sequel book to Jen Wilkin’s None Like Him, one of my favorite reads last year. While None Like Him covered the attributes of God that are solely His (and applying them to ourselves results in sin), In His Image is all about His communicable characteristics: holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful and wise. These are the traits we are to pursue after.As expected, Ms. Wilkin did not disappoint. From the beginning, she engages both my In His Image is the companion/sequel book to Jen Wilkin’s None Like Him, one of my favorite reads last year. While None Like Him covered the attributes of God that are solely His (and applying them to ourselves results in sin), In His Image is all about His communicable characteristics: holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful and wise. These are the traits we are to pursue after.As expected, Ms. Wilkin did not disappoint. From the beginning, she engages both my mind and heart as she lays out why we need to study who God is. Yes, because He is God and desires us to know Him. But even more precise, He formed us in His image and the more we are like Him, the more we glorify Him. But how are we to become more like Him if we don’t know what He’s like?Ms. Wilkin presents both the biblical/theological basis and practical applications from knowing God’s character. From the beginning, the author gives an insightful application to the pursuit of these godly characters. Theology, or the study of God, is not just a heady topic, but as explained by this book, could be and should be manifested in our everyday life. One example is through our decision-making, something even the seasoned believers often struggle with. We have all been guilty of treating God’s will as something elusive and a mystery to be solved. Ms Wlkins has a clearer solution (which is also Dr. John MacArthur’s point in his book, Found: God’s Will), “For the believer wanting to know God’s will for her life, the first question to pose is not ‘What should I do?’ but ‘Who should I be?’...What does it profit me to make the right choice if I’m still the wrong person?...The hope of the Gospel in our sanctification is not simply that we would make better choices, but that we would become better people....What is God’s will for your life? Put simply, that you would be like Christ.”Each chapter covers an attribute and comes with a list of Bible verses for mediation, questions to ponder and a prayer suggestion. My favorite chapter is perhaps the one on God being truthful. It’s a great resource for both personal and group study. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher to review, but will buy copies of it to give away to my friends and family. I plan to study the book with my daughters, who enjoyed going through None Like Him with me. *I received an advanced copy from the publisher through #netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I had the joy of reading "In His Image" by Jen Wilkin (available in paperback May 31st, available on Kindle now). Just a short commendation on the author: I would describe her writing as rich, simple, straight-forward, appropriately fun, relevant, relatable, not fluffy, and not watered-down. She has the gift of getting heavy, deep, important truths across in a way that won't make your brain explode. She organizes her thoughts and communicates in a way that makes her books very readable. This boo I had the joy of reading "In His Image" by Jen Wilkin (available in paperback May 31st, available on Kindle now). Just a short commendation on the author: I would describe her writing as rich, simple, straight-forward, appropriately fun, relevant, relatable, not fluffy, and not watered-down. She has the gift of getting heavy, deep, important truths across in a way that won't make your brain explode. She organizes her thoughts and communicates in a way that makes her books very readable. This book is great for individuals, small-groups, as well as one-on-one discipleship. Each chapter is followed up by verses for meditation, self-examination questions and some direction for praying through the truths presented in chapter. "In His Image" is a follow-up to her previous book "None Like Him" which was about God's incommunicable attributes, which we cannot possess and should not try to possess (e.g. omniscience, omnipotence). This book is about those characteristics of God that believers in Christ can and should reflect. Each chapter goes through a communicable attribute of God (holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, wise) and expounds it using Scripture. She then examines how we as fallen humans lack those things and shows how we can endeavor to reflect those qualities. As Wilkin says, this book is about what the will of God is in our life, so if you've ever asked that uniquely Christian question, this book is for you! This book certainly is not geared at moms, but I highly recommend it to you based on the richness, simplicity and shorter chapters.."When we apprehend his holiness, we are changed by the revelation. The knowledge of God and the knowledge of self always go hand in hand. We see ourselves differently because we have seen God as he is... Simply put, God's will for your life is that you be holy. That you live a life of set-apartness... Every story of every figure in every corner of every book of the Bible is chanting this call. Be holy, for he is holy." .I received a free copy of this book from Crossway in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kelli
    January 1, 1970
    4 StarsI really appreciate Jen Wilkin and her approach to scripture. I enjoy that this book is not of the typical self-help variety that is so often found in the Christian Non-Fiction world. Rather, it is one that constantly points us back to Christ. While Wilkin and I have a few different beliefs, she was extremely capable of helping me to see more of my sinful nature. The books opens by asserting that instead of asking God what His will is in our lives (What should I do?), we should be asking 4 StarsI really appreciate Jen Wilkin and her approach to scripture. I enjoy that this book is not of the typical self-help variety that is so often found in the Christian Non-Fiction world. Rather, it is one that constantly points us back to Christ. While Wilkin and I have a few different beliefs, she was extremely capable of helping me to see more of my sinful nature. The books opens by asserting that instead of asking God what His will is in our lives (What should I do?), we should be asking how we can become more like Christ (Who should I be?). This assertion opened my eyes to see the error in our human thinking.Throughout the book Wilkin points to 10 characteristics of God that we should be constantly trying to emulate in our lives, which we cannot do with the grace of God and the Holy Spirit. Through looking into these 10 characteristics, we can see that in by becoming more like Christ, we are shown what His will is in our lives; to reflect His image to the world.The truths that were shown in this book really resonated with me, both in Wilkin's own thoughts as well as in the scripture she provided throughout each chapter. I also found the additional scripture verses, questions, and prayers at the end of each chapter to be extremely fruitful in my own walk. It gave me a good time to reflect on what I just read, see the truth played out in the Bible, and to continuously seek God's help in transforming my heart.I would definitely recommend this book to others, as it was extremely helpful for me in determining God's will in my life as in the life of every Christian.**Many thanks to Jen Wilkin, Crossway and NetGalley for an advanced e-book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Courtney Huskisson
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the companion book and the natural next step to Jen Wilkin's provious book "None Like Him." "None Like Him" explored 10 traits of God that are only unique to him, his incommunicable traits, and likewise caused the reader to take a look at the ways we are not like God and why that's a good thing. This companion book then looks at the communicable traits, things that God is wholly and perfectly, but we are able to reflect even if dimly. What I like about this book was the set-up at th This book is the companion book and the natural next step to Jen Wilkin's provious book "None Like Him." "None Like Him" explored 10 traits of God that are only unique to him, his incommunicable traits, and likewise caused the reader to take a look at the ways we are not like God and why that's a good thing. This companion book then looks at the communicable traits, things that God is wholly and perfectly, but we are able to reflect even if dimly. What I like about this book was the set-up at the premise. She frames this book as a book about God's will for our lives, in that God is far more concerned about the person we are becoming than the decision we make. In the chapters to follow she lays out 10 traits that God is working in us as we become more like him and image him more and more. I will say that on a personal experience level, I absolutely loved the first book 'None Like Him;' I am more apt to be one who tries to be like God and require humbling myself and learning my limits. This book was less 'punch in the gut' for me, though it is still important to take a look at these traits and ask myself, 'Am I imaging my creator?' As with the previous book, this is a great book to read together and for small groups, as each chapter ends with further Bible passages to explore, prompting questions, and a direction for prayer. For those who read "None Like Him," this, again, is a natural next step.
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  • Tessa
    January 1, 1970
    Wilken's book came at such a needed time in my life, when I was questioning His will for various aspects of my life. Wilken rightly points out the way to know this is by knowing Him and pursing God's communicable attributes in our lives. "Without meaning to, we can begin to regard our relationship with God primarily as a means toward better decision-making. We can slip into a conception of God as a Dear Abby, a benevolent advice columnist who fields our toughest questions about relationships and Wilken's book came at such a needed time in my life, when I was questioning His will for various aspects of my life. Wilken rightly points out the way to know this is by knowing Him and pursing God's communicable attributes in our lives. "Without meaning to, we can begin to regard our relationship with God primarily as a means toward better decision-making. We can slip into a conception of God as a Dear Abby, a benevolent advice columnist who fields our toughest questions about relationships and circumstances. Because we do not trust our judgment, we ask him who we should marry or which job we should take. We ask him where to spend our money or which neighborhood to move into." "For the believer wanting to know God's will for her life, the first question to pose is not "What should I do?" but "Who should I be?" I highlighted so much of this book, because there were so many gems that pointed me to Scripture. I treated Wilken's book as a daily devotional. At the end of each chapter, she has Scripture for consideration and questions and guided prayer prompts. I've been convicted of areas of my life that need to be committed to Christ. It's given me perspective on avenues that help me answer the question she poses, "Who should I be?" I've also been able to use what I've learned to encourage a friend. Highly recommend. I received this book as an advanced review copy from NetGalley. The thoughts and opinions listed above are my own.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    `In His Image` 10 Ways God Calls us to Reflect His Character by author Jen Wilkin is a Spiritual growth book for believers. Jen says most Christians are asking the wrong question, `What Should I Do`, instead they should ask, `Who Should I Be`? She says, `If we focus on our actions without addressing our hearts, we may end up merely as better behaved lovers of self.` (see introduction) In describing the four kinds of love the author mentions characters in a movie she has seen, without giving the `In His Image` 10 Ways God Calls us to Reflect His Character by author Jen Wilkin is a Spiritual growth book for believers. Jen says most Christians are asking the wrong question, `What Should I Do`, instead they should ask, `Who Should I Be`? She says, `If we focus on our actions without addressing our hearts, we may end up merely as better behaved lovers of self.` (see introduction) In describing the four kinds of love the author mentions characters in a movie she has seen, without giving the title of the movie. Further reading mentions more about the characters but since I am not familiar with the character, or the movie, it does me little good. Jen reminds the reader that no one is righteous, that is why Jesus had to die on the cross. God is a just God and He cannot look upon sin. Jesus was the only just human who walked on earth. If it weren't for Him no mere mortal could be saved. The author does a great job at explaining God's attributes and explaining why Christ had to die and rise again for all mankind. This book would make a great Bible study with verses for meditation, questions to ponder, and a prayer prompt at the end of every chapter.Disclaimer: "I was provided a free copy of this ebook. All opinions are my own."
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve heard a lot about Jen Wilkin and her books on social media, so I was really excited when I saw this book was available on Crossway’s blogger program for review! (I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)This book is short— less than 200 pages— but it’s packed full of deep scriptural insight. You will learn so much. Jen Wilkin is straight forward and easy to understand. She doesn’t water down anything or tickle ears, she tells you the truth.Each chapter covers a I’ve heard a lot about Jen Wilkin and her books on social media, so I was really excited when I saw this book was available on Crossway’s blogger program for review! (I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)This book is short— less than 200 pages— but it’s packed full of deep scriptural insight. You will learn so much. Jen Wilkin is straight forward and easy to understand. She doesn’t water down anything or tickle ears, she tells you the truth.Each chapter covers an attribute of God… Holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, and wise. At the end of every chapter are a few questions and a prayer. This book would be great for individual study as a devotional, or small group study. I highly recommend it. “Growing in holiness means growing in our hatred for sin. But reflecting the character of God involves more than just casting off the garment of our old ways. It entails putting on the garment of our new inheritance. Growing in holiness means growing into being loving, just, good, merciful, gracious, faithful, truthful, patient, and wise. It means learning to think, speak, and act like Christ every hour of every day that God grants us to walk this earth as the redeemed.”
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  • Ami Coote
    January 1, 1970
    We know that God is merciful and gracious but we typically try to separate the two, instead of as Jen puts it, seeing them as sisters. We separate God’s mercy and grace from His justice when in fact all three are connected.Know God: In His Image is an invitation to learn more about the character of God. As children of God, we should hunger for a connection with Him. That connection will deepen as we spend time getting to know who He is.Know yourself: As we learn more about who God is, a stark co We know that God is merciful and gracious but we typically try to separate the two, instead of as Jen puts it, seeing them as sisters. We separate God’s mercy and grace from His justice when in fact all three are connected.Know God: In His Image is an invitation to learn more about the character of God. As children of God, we should hunger for a connection with Him. That connection will deepen as we spend time getting to know who He is.Know yourself: As we learn more about who God is, a stark contrast emerges. God is so much greater than us. Who we are is tied up in who He is. At then end of each section Jen gives some verses for reflection and questions to ponder.These questions ask you to think about the impact of God’s attributes on your life. They also encourage you to examine yourself in relation to God’s attributes – what do you need to change to better reflect the image of God.Run your race: Each chapter ends with a prayer, or rather the guidelines to write a prayer. This is your chance to apply the lessons of the book. My prayer will be different from yours because my experiences are different. My interpretation of how the concepts expressed in the book apply to me will vary from another person’s.
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  • Patti Whitson Stephenson
    January 1, 1970
    This is an encouraging, inspiring, and convictIng study on the attributes of God. This book was refreshing. It’s not a Christian “self-help” book, but one that is grounded in Scripture. Jen Wilken writes with conviction and purpose. She includes examples from her own life and the lives of others as practical application, but the heart of this book comes directly from the Scripture she uses to introduce and teach each attribute. The first chapter on God’s holiness is worth the cost of the book. A This is an encouraging, inspiring, and convictIng study on the attributes of God. This book was refreshing. It’s not a Christian “self-help” book, but one that is grounded in Scripture. Jen Wilken writes with conviction and purpose. She includes examples from her own life and the lives of others as practical application, but the heart of this book comes directly from the Scripture she uses to introduce and teach each attribute. The first chapter on God’s holiness is worth the cost of the book. As you read through the chapters describing 10 of the attributes of God and how these apply to our lives, you are invited into a closer walk with Him. At the end of each chapter, there are questions and scripture references for further thought. This book would be great for a weekly study with a group, as well as for individual study. It’s not a long book, but there’s much to learn from it. I highlighted quite a few passages in this book, and I’ll be going back through this again for a slower, thoughtful study. I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All opinions are my own.
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  • Jennifer Mcilwain
    January 1, 1970
    I have done a few of Wilkin's Bible studies and have great respect and appreciation for her high view of God and the study of His Word. I'm reading/studying my way through her most recent book, In His Image, and I can tell you it is NOT one to miss out on."All of God's attributes are defined by His holiness and should not be emphasized above or apart from His holiness."Wilkin's writing is robust in its content but as inviting as a chat with a friend. Her desire for the reader to know and love Go I have done a few of Wilkin's Bible studies and have great respect and appreciation for her high view of God and the study of His Word. I'm reading/studying my way through her most recent book, In His Image, and I can tell you it is NOT one to miss out on."All of God's attributes are defined by His holiness and should not be emphasized above or apart from His holiness."Wilkin's writing is robust in its content but as inviting as a chat with a friend. Her desire for the reader to know and love God and then adjust one's life accordingly comes through strong. Each chapter covers a characteristic of God that we as believers are to adopt and live out. Wilkin speaks to practical ways we can do this. Included at the end of each chapter is a list of Scriptures for further study/reflection of the characteristic covered and questions for further discussion. The book is great for personal/devotional reading but would also be an awesome resource for small group studies. I can not recommend In His Image highly enough!*I was provided a complimentary digital copy of the book by the publisher. All opinions here are my own.
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  • Suzanne Kane
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance review copy of this book from Netgalley and Crossway.Having been blessed by Jen Wilkins’ previous books I was excited to read her newest title and I was certainly not disappointed.The book outlines 10 communicable attributes of God (eg. Gracious, Merciful, Faithful) Truth and for each one explains how God is like this and how we in turn should seek to be like this.The book is engaging with personal stories but is rooted in scripture and although an excellent read is also in I received an advance review copy of this book from Netgalley and Crossway.Having been blessed by Jen Wilkins’ previous books I was excited to read her newest title and I was certainly not disappointed.The book outlines 10 communicable attributes of God (eg. Gracious, Merciful, Faithful) Truth and for each one explains how God is like this and how we in turn should seek to be like this.The book is engaging with personal stories but is rooted in scripture and although an excellent read is also incredibly challenging. For example on the chapter on Grace, she states: “ Christians should not have the reputation for being merely fair. We should have the reputation for playing favourites with everyone except ourselves…”- What a challenge!I would recommend this to anyone who is passionate to know God’s will for their life and who wants to grow in their sanctification. It is not a hard or long read but is definitely a volume which will leave you, challenged and encouraged to grow more like Christ.
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  • Dorothy
    January 1, 1970
    Jen Wilkin begins by urging readers to ask a different question: not "What does God want me to do?" but, "Who does God want me to be?" and has written a great Bible study on growing in God's image by describing ten of His attributes. Her ideas are backed by scripture. Her writing is clear, her points vivid, and her chapters concise. Each chapter concludes with a few questions that encourage the reader to apply the ideas to our lives; keeping a journal is suggested, and I found it very helpful. I Jen Wilkin begins by urging readers to ask a different question: not "What does God want me to do?" but, "Who does God want me to be?" and has written a great Bible study on growing in God's image by describing ten of His attributes. Her ideas are backed by scripture. Her writing is clear, her points vivid, and her chapters concise. Each chapter concludes with a few questions that encourage the reader to apply the ideas to our lives; keeping a journal is suggested, and I found it very helpful. I intend to use it for review and further study. The application of the attributes of God focuses not just on self, but also on how we treat others.I got a lot out of this book, and I recommend it for personal and group study.I received a free copy of this book from Amazon Vine in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Chris MacLeavy
    January 1, 1970
    After reading Jen Wilkin’s None Like Him in 2017, there was zero hesitation on grabbing this new work. This time, exploring ten attributes of God that we are called to reflect, Wilkin answers the question “what is God’s will for my life?” by reorienting our hearts to the better question: who should I be like? The answer is also the journey: be like God.This book wonderfully describes ten attributes—and what the ultimately perfected version of each looks like in God through Christ—while simultane After reading Jen Wilkin’s None Like Him in 2017, there was zero hesitation on grabbing this new work. This time, exploring ten attributes of God that we are called to reflect, Wilkin answers the question “what is God’s will for my life?” by reorienting our hearts to the better question: who should I be like? The answer is also the journey: be like God.This book wonderfully describes ten attributes—and what the ultimately perfected version of each looks like in God through Christ—while simultaneously exhorting us from scripture to be further conformed to the image of God, better displaying his beauty in our brokenness as we walk in step with the Spirit. Down-to-earth practical, and yet making much of our glorious God, this book will propel you to worship as you choose to live to be more like Christ.
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  • Jessie Young
    January 1, 1970
    This is the best book I’ve read in a long time. The goal of the book is to know God and allow him to make us more like Him. Wilkin gently but firmly guides the reader to know more about Gods character and challenges us to desire to reflect that character. Very practical. The application side of the book is fabulous. Wilkin has such a great way of saying it like it is but in a loving way. EVERYTHING is backed by scripture. This is not fluff. It is deep and meaty. I read it slowly so I could chew This is the best book I’ve read in a long time. The goal of the book is to know God and allow him to make us more like Him. Wilkin gently but firmly guides the reader to know more about Gods character and challenges us to desire to reflect that character. Very practical. The application side of the book is fabulous. Wilkin has such a great way of saying it like it is but in a loving way. EVERYTHING is backed by scripture. This is not fluff. It is deep and meaty. I read it slowly so I could chew on every nugget of wisdom. My understanding of who God is has increased tremendously after reading this book. My bible reading has also gotten better with this increased understanding of who God is. Great book. I received a digital copy of this book from netgalley and he publisher in exchange for my honest review. It was so good I bought a copy!
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  • Brianna Harmon
    January 1, 1970
    ** This is one of those cases where I wish for 1/2 stars so badly, I can taste it - because this book straddles somewhere between 3 1/2 and 4 stars, right on the fence line. I’ll be honest. I haven’t read a Christian book for years but Jen Wilkin was a welcome reintroduction into the genre. She’s got literary bite. There is so little fluff lining the edges and I LOVED that aspect. This isn’t a “feel-good” book by basic standards. It’s a “do-good” book that spurs you into either action or deep th ** This is one of those cases where I wish for 1/2 stars so badly, I can taste it - because this book straddles somewhere between 3 1/2 and 4 stars, right on the fence line. I’ll be honest. I haven’t read a Christian book for years but Jen Wilkin was a welcome reintroduction into the genre. She’s got literary bite. There is so little fluff lining the edges and I LOVED that aspect. This isn’t a “feel-good” book by basic standards. It’s a “do-good” book that spurs you into either action or deep thought. (At least, that’s what it did for me.) Several light bulbs went off in the timespan of start to finish. Overall, what matters is - it’s staying on my shelf. I’m not ready to part ways just yet.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    "In His Image" is a Bible study on ten attributes of God that Christians are called to reflect. She talked about: holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, and wise. The author explored what it means to be holy, loving, etc., in a biblical sense--how God displays this attribute and how we can reflect this in our own lives. At the end of each chapter, she provided several Bible verses for meditation, questions for reflection, and a prayer prompt. This book worked "In His Image" is a Bible study on ten attributes of God that Christians are called to reflect. She talked about: holy, loving, good, just, merciful, gracious, faithful, patient, truthful, and wise. The author explored what it means to be holy, loving, etc., in a biblical sense--how God displays this attribute and how we can reflect this in our own lives. At the end of each chapter, she provided several Bible verses for meditation, questions for reflection, and a prayer prompt. This book worked well as a devotional and could work well as a group Bible study, though it's not specifically made for this. Overall, I'd highly recommend this excellent book.I received an ARC review copy of this book from the publisher through Amazon Vine.
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