Hocus Pocus & The All New Sequel
Hocus Pocus is beloved by Halloween enthusiasts all over the world. Diving once more into the world of witches, this electrifying two-part young adult novel, released on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 1993 film, marks a new era of Hocus Pocus. Fans will be spellbound by a fresh retelling of the original film, followed by the all-new sequel that continues the story with the next generation of Salem teens.Shortly after moving from California to Salem, Massachusetts, Max Dennison finds himself in hot water when he accidentally releases a coven of witches, the Sanderson sisters, from the afterlife. Max, his sister, and his new friends (human and otherwise) must find a way to stop the witches from carrying out their evil plan and remaining on earth to torment Salem for all eternity.Twenty-five years later, Max and Allison's seventeen-year-old daughter, Poppy, finds herself face-to-face with the Sanderson sisters in all their sinister glory. When Halloween celebrations don't quite go as planned, it's a race against time as Poppy and her friends fight to save her family and all of Salem from the witches' latest death-defying scheme.

Hocus Pocus & The All New Sequel Details

TitleHocus Pocus & The All New Sequel
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 10th, 2018
PublisherFreeform
ISBN-139781368020039
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Fantasy, Holiday, Halloween, Fiction, Paranormal, Witches

Hocus Pocus & The All New Sequel Review

  • Banny Kirsten Marie Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    You guys are kidding me!!! This is not going to be a book… Wait it is? In that case... AHHHH!!!!! That was a sequel of delight!!!! Hocus Pocus is one of my all time favorite movies!! The Sanderson sisters crack me up!Nani i had guess we had better have that heart attack together son because this book is bound to give me one… Remember we said that if we croak then we croak together… HahahaI cannot wait for this to hit the library and i cannot wait to check it out!!!!
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  •  ⚔ Sh3lly - Cranky Crone of Rabid Hedgehogs and Fire Breathing Kittens ⚔
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first time Disney has "granted my wish" through Netgalley! Release date: July 10, 2018
  • Brittany (The Book Addict's Guide/Novelly Yours)
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED THIS YESTERDAY
  • TheYALibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    I legit got a little woozy from the shock of finding out about this novel. I never thought there would be an actual book on my favorite movie ever and a sequel to go with it. It also comes out less than a week after my birthday so happy birthday to me but July has never felt so far away.
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  • TheYALibrarian
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewRating 2.5 StarsFirst off I have to say Hocus Pocus was my childhood so I'm going to be a bit biased in my review instead of judging it like any other book. I just can't help it when you really expected something to be good and be true to the characters and the story but it just falls flat in the end...I went into this "sequel" thinking we would get to finally see the characters more than two decades later and what they have ARC provided by publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewRating 2.5 StarsFirst off I have to say Hocus Pocus was my childhood so I'm going to be a bit biased in my review instead of judging it like any other book. I just can't help it when you really expected something to be good and be true to the characters and the story but it just falls flat in the end...I went into this "sequel" thinking we would get to finally see the characters more than two decades later and what they have been up to now that they are grown adults. But no Max, Allison, and my favorite Dani, were only in a sliver of the book. The rest of it was all just their kids facing down the witches. A cool concept but Max, Allison, and Dani should have been involved in taking the witches down once again instead of just banished into hell. Reminded me too much of the disaster the unofficial next installment of Harry Potter was but I digress. I can't really express how disappointed this makes me to have to say this is just another failed sequel to a beloved film.What really made this fail was also the new characters. They didn't have a strong personality or anything that would have made me overlook the fact that the original character were not a big part of the story. They were just a carbon copy of the typical teenager who thought their parents were lame and were destroying their social life. Also not listening to their warnings and doing something stupid and sometimes illegal. Those details could be connected to several books. I can't even remember their names that's how unremarkable they were. I also had a problem with the half-assed plot. There was no real explanation as to how playing with an ouijia board was able to open a portal that would let the witches back into the present day world. Also the fact that three souls had to take their places in hell. I was just sitting their completely confused as to how this could all happen with no context whatsoever. It would have been way better if Poppy (I had to go look up her name) just got her hands on the black flame candle that was hidden somewhere and lit the candle just like her father had twenty five years ago and that's how the witches were able to come back. It would have been something she would have done since she thought her parents were crazy and the Sanderson sisters never came back one Halloween night all those years ago. There also was the small scene of Emily and Thackery Binx coming back to briefly help Poppy and their friends. That would have been awesome if they were involved more in helping get rid of the Sanderson sisters instead of the witch's sister Elizabeth. But no no dice on that one either all the original characters I guess had to be basically out of the picture. It was also super easy for Poppy to find the bloodstone that has been missing for centuries. But hey it was the key to defeating the Sanderson sisters so it had to be easy to find right? *rolls eyes* There was more problems but I think I made my point clear.Here's what made this have at least two stars. I really liked that the first part of the book was the first movie in book form so I enjoyed reading that and it is a good refresher for people have not watched Hocus Pocus enough to remember everything. I also really loved that were was a LGBT part to this story with the romance between Poppy and Isabella. That was a surprising but pleasant surprise and I thought it was cute despite having a lot of issues with the characters. Then there was the characters I did enjoy was the Sanderson Sister's themselves. The author had them down pat they acted just like they did in the movie and it was amusing to hear Sarah sign song "Amok Amok Amok!!" again as well as new words. So I have to give credit that at least the Sanderson sister's did not fall flat in this "sequel" I wish I could say there was more I liked about this book but unfortunately not and I am just going to forget there ever was a sequel and just love the original story as it is.
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  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    I was told there's lesbians so I have to read it now
  • Amelia Sandoval
    January 1, 1970
    Being a 90’s kid, the story of Hocus Pocus has been a favorite of mine. I completely devoured this book from beginning to end and I loved the retelling of the original film. It gave readers a more in depth detail of the original story and first person point of view. And I enjoyed the small details from the movie that were included in the retelling story. I thought the sequel was great! With the majority of the original characters returning 25 years later with their children and friends. Poppy, M Being a 90’s kid, the story of Hocus Pocus has been a favorite of mine. I completely devoured this book from beginning to end and I loved the retelling of the original film. It gave readers a more in depth detail of the original story and first person point of view. And I enjoyed the small details from the movie that were included in the retelling story. I thought the sequel was great! With the majority of the original characters returning 25 years later with their children and friends. Poppy, Max and Allison’s daughter is the main character of the story. She and her friends, Travis and Isabella, accidently bring back the sisters with a spirit board. The three of them race throughout Halloween night trying to find the Blood Moon Stone hidden somewhere in Salem and defeat the Sisters once more.It’s interesting to know how Max, Allison and Dani feel about Halloween since their encounter with the Sanderson sisters. They are physically taken away from earth and are not able to join Poppy and her friends in their quest. But with the help of Binx, Emily and a new character, they are able to connect with them.This sequel kept me on my toes with its many twists and turns in the plot. I enjoyed reading it and this story kept me waiting in suspense! I truly hope for a movie adaption. It would be the ultimate nostalgic movie in the 21st century.
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  • Kylie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a low 3.5 stars for me.The retelling of the movie was very accurate, but it just didn’t have the same feel as the movie. There was a little bit of extra information which was fun.The sequel, in my opinion, felt like it was trying too hard. Too many things from today (instagram, Twitter etc) were added in and it seemed so forced. Max and Allison didn’t act like I thought they would when they were grown up. I feel like parts of it were trying to be like the movie and it just didn’t work. L This is a low 3.5 stars for me.The retelling of the movie was very accurate, but it just didn’t have the same feel as the movie. There was a little bit of extra information which was fun.The sequel, in my opinion, felt like it was trying too hard. Too many things from today (instagram, Twitter etc) were added in and it seemed so forced. Max and Allison didn’t act like I thought they would when they were grown up. I feel like parts of it were trying to be like the movie and it just didn’t work. Like Dani calling people jerk faces (who weren’t Max), Sarah saying things like “afoot afoot afoot” instead of “amuk amuk amuk.” It may just be because I love the movie so much that I’m just being way too critical.I did like the story and Poppy, Travis and Isabella. I didn’t really like Katie because it felt like she was a bully and turned her whole life around in 5 seconds and became friends with everyone.One of my favorite parts was when the witches brooms got stolen (again) Mary rode on a Swiffer and Sarah rode on a Roomba.Overall, I did like the sequel, I’m feeling like it’s meant to be more middle grade, which could be why I am so critical about it, because the movie seemed anything but a good movie to be made into a middle grade book. It was a really fun read and I absolutely loved the last chapter!
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  • andrea caro
    January 1, 1970
    This was two books in one. The first was a novelization of the 1993 film Hocus Pocus. The second is a bit longer, taking place 25 years after the first film was set and following Max and Allison's 17 year old daughter, Poppy.The novelization of the film is exactly what it says on the tin - there are minor additions in it to set up the sequel, but you're still getting the exact same plot, the exact same characters, the exact same dialogue, the exact same ending. My childhood. I loved it.Realistic This was two books in one. The first was a novelization of the 1993 film Hocus Pocus. The second is a bit longer, taking place 25 years after the first film was set and following Max and Allison's 17 year old daughter, Poppy.The novelization of the film is exactly what it says on the tin - there are minor additions in it to set up the sequel, but you're still getting the exact same plot, the exact same characters, the exact same dialogue, the exact same ending. My childhood. I loved it.Realistically, the sequel was bound not to stand up to the first part of the book and that's fine. I didn't really have any lofty expectations about what I was going to get with the new material and I think that's the reason why I rate this entire book so highly. FIRST THING THAT'S KINDA COOL - Poppy, Max and Allison's 17-year-old daughter, is not heterosexual. Nope. She has a crush on one of her best friends, Isabella. Isabella is black. So the inclusion of LGBTQIA characters and POC characters is pretty cool.So anyway, Poppy is pretty fed up with her parents being anti-Halloween as well as living with the belief she thinks they're kind of nuts because of their wild story about what happened with the Sanderson sisters so many years prior. Randomly, they decide to throw a Halloween party. Turns out it's because Halloween falls on a blood moon, when magic is supposed to be at its peak, and Max and Allison feel like Poppy will be safer at home.So, naturally, Poppy skips the party with her friends to try out a Ouija board at the old Sanderson house to prove her family's story wrong. What she doesn't know is that Isabella's ancestor is Elizabeth Sanderson, sister to Winifred, Mary, and Sarah. When the original witch trio disintegrated, their spellbook did not and found its way into Isabella's hands. The book is inherently evil - a fun twist I thought was smart - and through the Ouija board fed Poppy and her friends a soul trade spell. The spell brought the sisters back from Hell and banished her parents and aunt Dani (yes, she makes a cameo) to Hell in their place. The clincher is, unlike the original film, the spell isn't over at midnight, the spell becomes permanent at midnight. So Poppy and her friends (including crush Isabella, who gets turned into a Boston terrier) have to go on a wild hunt for a missing magical bloodstone that they must destroy before it's too late.One of the fun things about this was seeing how the witches handled modern technology. Mary gets a whole of a cellphone and dubs it a "memory box" and it was funny seeing her trying to figure out, then Sarah figures out a way to sing her song hypnotizing children to her via phone calls. One thing about Mary - there was a weird part where she sang about independence from Winifred, but not much was done with that in the story. It felt like a missed opportunity to add depth.Also, the sequel was full of Sarah running around screaming words over and over i.e. the way she did with AMOK AMOK AMOK in the film. It was a nod to the original movie, I realized, but it was a touch much at times.Whatever, I loved this.
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  • Brenda Ayala
    January 1, 1970
    The novelization of Hocus Pocus is exactly what you’d expect, no surprise there.The sequel is.....cute. It’s a trio of characters again, it’s the Dennison kid trying to impress their crush again, it’s an animal transformation again. Much of it was recycled into newer forms, but not necessarily better. I found Poppy a bit insufferable and Isabella’s convenient appearance annoying, even if I liked their blooming romance. The rest gets a bit silly. The Sanderson sisters themselves basically rehash The novelization of Hocus Pocus is exactly what you’d expect, no surprise there.The sequel is.....cute. It’s a trio of characters again, it’s the Dennison kid trying to impress their crush again, it’s an animal transformation again. Much of it was recycled into newer forms, but not necessarily better. I found Poppy a bit insufferable and Isabella’s convenient appearance annoying, even if I liked their blooming romance. The rest gets a bit silly. The Sanderson sisters themselves basically rehash the same jokes from the movie, which is great for nostalgia’s sake but didn’t really feel like anything New was brought to the table in terms of funny quips and one-liners. The flip side of that is the introduction to a whole new Sanderson sister that is never once mentioned in the movies. Sort of like Voldemort having a love child in The Cursed Child—felt too forced and silly. The twist at the end was just plain confusing.
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  • Jana | BookishWiccan
    January 1, 1970
    I can't even handle this book, and I ESPECIALLY cannot handle the ending. It's just a bunch of hocus pocus, and I absolutely adored it. Stay tuned into my blog for an upcoming review!
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    You know those TV shows that continue past their prime and loyal viewers want to pretend the last few seasons never happened because it destroys the magic of the earlier seasons? That's what this book is. I love Hocus Pocus and watch it every Halloween, but this book almost ruins it for me. Just a warning before you read further. I'm ranting here, so there may be some mild spoilers.The first third or so is just the movie in novel form. It's done pretty well and was exactly what I expected. It wa You know those TV shows that continue past their prime and loyal viewers want to pretend the last few seasons never happened because it destroys the magic of the earlier seasons? That's what this book is. I love Hocus Pocus and watch it every Halloween, but this book almost ruins it for me. Just a warning before you read further. I'm ranting here, so there may be some mild spoilers.The first third or so is just the movie in novel form. It's done pretty well and was exactly what I expected. It was cute.Then there was the sequel.Oh boy. Where to start?It read like a checklist of every YA fad book out there:Mean girl who's dad was the authority figure? CheckSide kick "best friend" who happened to be a person of color? CheckLGBTQ character? CheckRehash of a popular movie? CheckPopular girl who is jealous of main character? Check"Twist" ending that can be used to write yet another unneeded book? CheckThe plot for the sequel as EXACTLY the same as the original Hocus Pocus, except there was an annoying best friend instead of an annoying little sister. Even the jokes were the same.The sequel tried too hard to be trendy. It kept comparing things to when Poppy's parents were in high school, trying to make it seem old. It actually used "IRL" in the narrative. The hashtags flowed like waterI have no idea how the witches' lightning power worked. In the movie, Winifred could "zap" Thackery or Max, but if she wanted anything useful done, she had to cast an actual spell. Here, Winifred, and several other witches, could just zap up whatever they needed to be done. It made everything way too easy.The story just dragged and dragged and DRAGGED. 521 pages and the showdown with the witches was not complicated or hard. It was just drug out. It wasn't exciting. There was no way that Poppy and her friends would lose. It never felt like the stakes were high. Ever.Poppy was an annoying spoiled brat. I hated her. I wanted Winifred to zap her into oblivion. Isabella (really, Isabella? Twilight fan much?) was so perfect I wanted to smack her. On top of that, the story tried to make Max seem like the bad guy and the reader feel sorry for the bully Jay.The ending absolutely did it for me. I won't say more to keep from spoiling it, but I've only ever had one other book's ending annoy me more, and I had to restrain myself from throwing that one.I should have known better. When will I learn?
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  • Sara (sarabara081)
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars Sigh. I wanted to love this so much. I've always loved the the Hocus Pocus movie and was excited to be back in that world with a new familiar faces. I didn't really pay attention to the blurb heading in so I didn't realize the first like 1/3 of the novel would basically be Hocus Pocus, in book form. It's extremely accurate to the movie and was fun to read. Could it have dived deeper into the plot and characters? Perhaps but obviously it was setting up the main sequel portion that takes 2.5 stars Sigh. I wanted to love this so much. I've always loved the the Hocus Pocus movie and was excited to be back in that world with a new familiar faces. I didn't really pay attention to the blurb heading in so I didn't realize the first like 1/3 of the novel would basically be Hocus Pocus, in book form. It's extremely accurate to the movie and was fun to read. Could it have dived deeper into the plot and characters? Perhaps but obviously it was setting up the main sequel portion that takes place 25 years later with Max and Allison's daughter as the star. Parts were very reminiscent of the first story, especially when Poppy does something stupid in regards to calling on the witches all to try to impress her crush, Isabella. It was fun to see the Sanderson witches back, desperately trying to stake their claim on the world. We even see a reappearance of the beloved Binx and his sister, Emily. But I don't know, some of the plot seemed a little too ridiculous to me - a Boston Terrier transformation, characters being transported to Hell, zombie like kids doing the witches biddings. And okay, I get some of the original had that fun quirkiness too but it just seemed like it was trying a little too hard with the sequel and didn't hold that fun magic at quite the same level. Of course there were a few great moments too and I think readers will enjoy seeing the witches take to even newer technology than the last one. But on a whole, it didn't live up to my expectations, sadly.
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  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    "You know, I always wanted a child, and now I think I’ll have one. On toast!"The retelling of the original film was fantastic. It made me want to dust off the old VHS player and watch the film. I know that the sequel is going to be a big deal but I don't think it'll hit it's dedicated fans like they are thinking it will. It was fun seeing where the original cast of characters are now and what they have been doing with themselves but there was just something missing. With all this new technology "You know, I always wanted a child, and now I think I’ll have one. On toast!"The retelling of the original film was fantastic. It made me want to dust off the old VHS player and watch the film. I know that the sequel is going to be a big deal but I don't think it'll hit it's dedicated fans like they are thinking it will. It was fun seeing where the original cast of characters are now and what they have been doing with themselves but there was just something missing. With all this new technology and different terminology being used, it loses all its nostalgia. This was still a good read. I'm glad that I got a chance to read it. I just hope fans will find this to be a great addition to its cult history. Also, Poppy is the best character though!! You'll instantly fall in love with her. But it's time, witches to dust off your old brooms and fly again!!
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    (Lbr y'all... it's probably going to be bad, but imma read it anyway.)
  • Claire (GimliBeesBooks)
    January 1, 1970
    ooooh my god - I need this more than I need air!
  • chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    This cult classic Retelling and all new sequel was simply spell binding. The refresher was a nostalgic Throwback and homage to a classic Halloween movie I hold dear to my heart ; and the sequel is something I've been waiting for, for well over 20 years!I absolutely loved all the references to the movie that the sequel had (Peter Pan, Dani, etc). It was honestly everything I could have wished for and more. This was an amazing tribute to my childhood.
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  • Jennie Damron
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 rating. I love Hocus Pocus. It's my favorite Halloween movie and I just adore Bette Midler as Winnifred Sanderson. I was so excited to read this book. I liked that the author stayed true to the movie and the characters. The sequel left me wanting more. The writing was mediocre and the story was missing something. I don't know but the charm in the movie was not reflected in this book. The magic just wasn't there which is sad considering the book is about witches and magic is essential. Maybe 3.5 rating. I love Hocus Pocus. It's my favorite Halloween movie and I just adore Bette Midler as Winnifred Sanderson. I was so excited to read this book. I liked that the author stayed true to the movie and the characters. The sequel left me wanting more. The writing was mediocre and the story was missing something. I don't know but the charm in the movie was not reflected in this book. The magic just wasn't there which is sad considering the book is about witches and magic is essential. Maybe I'm being overly critical, but I had high expectations and they were just not met.
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  • Caitlin Bronson
    January 1, 1970
    A mess, a mess, a mess!Oh my. How I've longed for and dreaded this day."Hocus Pocus" is such a lightning-in-a-bottle film. Like other cult movies, it was panned on release but managed to gain a wide base of loyal fans...including me! I can't think of another film that manages to capture the joy of the holiday quite as well: the beautiful aesthetic; the nostalgia; the barely restrained sense of adventure; and the big, over-the-top goofiness that's tempered by just the right amount of danger.I've A mess, a mess, a mess!Oh my. How I've longed for and dreaded this day."Hocus Pocus" is such a lightning-in-a-bottle film. Like other cult movies, it was panned on release but managed to gain a wide base of loyal fans...including me! I can't think of another film that manages to capture the joy of the holiday quite as well: the beautiful aesthetic; the nostalgia; the barely restrained sense of adventure; and the big, over-the-top goofiness that's tempered by just the right amount of danger.I've spent an embarrassing amount of time watching the film, going to themed parties, taking tours, and -- of course -- thinking about what might have happened to Max, Allison, and Dani after Halloween 1993. Of course we all wanted a sequel, but instead of the false Tina Fey rumors (seriously, who would be better to resurrect Winifred, Sarah, and Mary Sanderson?), we got a book.I'm pretty sure everyone knew a book wasn't the ideal format for a "Hocus Pocus" sequel but hey, after 25 years, you take what you can get, right? So I bought it the first day it was available.Aaaaand...well, here we go.THE NOVELIZATIONThe first third of the book is a novelization of the film. It's pretty cute, but suffers from a lot of the same problems all novelizations have.Movie scripts don't translate well into books, and a lot of scenes that work on the screen just don't work on the page. The worst offender was the "I Put a Spell on You" sequence. I get that it needs to be in there because it's a plot point, but did they really need to describe EVERY ACTUAL SECOND of that scene? Seriously, every time Sarah and Mary sing a backup line, it's translated onto the page. Every time the musicians play a riff, the drummer hits a high-hat, or someone in the audience screams in delight, we're told about it. This continues for about five pages. Like Marcel Proust, I'm in search of my lost time.Anyway, it's even worse because while the author includes that, she doesn't bother to include the fun, stand-out scenes from the film. There's no silly "Dad-cula" jokes, "watch your language" retorts after Max says "sucks," and no scene with the fake cop who pulls Max aside to ask if he's really a virgin. Why? Why?? It's classic!The author also doesn't really know how to deal with scenes that revolve solely around the Sanderson sisters. Instead of taking a third-person omniscient point of view, she sticks to a sort of limited third-person narration and can't decide how to describe modern items like televisions, buses, or service vehicles. Sometimes we get straightforward narration, but other times we get long, tortured descriptions of modern objects from the point of the view of the witches...and ugh. It's not funny; it's boring and weird.The format is also a little odd; it starts out with alternating chapters telling the story of Thackery and Emily Binx as well as Max and Dani Dennison. Thankfully, it only continues until the prologue portion of the film is over, but it's still a weird structural choice and a bit distracting.Content-wise, there's not a lot new in the novelization. We get a few more details about Max and Dani's move to Salem, their relationship with each other, and how they're adjusting to their new home. We also see more of the burgeoning relationship between Max and Allison, and get a couple of glimpses into the Sanderson sisters' past, including their home life and how they interacted with the village. The author also fills out the characterization of the main characters a bit more, and we learn a lot more about who Allison is and a little bit more about Max and Winifred. She doesn't bother to flesh out the other characters as much, but that's fine.The writing is okay. It's a bit better than you'd normally see in a novelization, and there are a few skillful descriptions that manage to create a good sense of place. I also got the feeling that the author really cared about the characters, which was sweet. Overall, the novelization was mostly included to slip in a few new bits of information and set up for the sequel. It wasn't necessary, but it was still kind of fun. On its own, it probably warrants 3 or 4 stars.THE SEQUELThe bulk of the book is the "all-new sequel," which for some reason didn't warrant a name. It picks up in October 2018, 25 years after the events of the film. Max and Allison's daughter, Poppy, is a normal high school student trying to navigate bullies, crushes, and her own bland-but-pretentious photography (very high school!). She's also got a big secret: her parents and aunt actually believe in witchcraft--specifically the Sanderson sisters. It's all very embarrassing.We learn that Max has gone on to become a high school history teacher, Allison is now a lawyer, and Dani hangs out a lot with her brother, sister-in-law, and niece.For the upcoming Halloween (which happens to fall on a night with a blood moon), they plan a big holiday party at their house to keep an eye on Poppy and make sure she's safe. But Poppy has other plans. In order to impress her crush, Isabella, she sneaks out with her, best friend Trevor, and a spirit board to break into the Sanderson sisters' home. One accidental spell later, she's summoned Winifred, Sarah, and Mary back from Hell in exchange for her parents and Aunt Dani.Now, in order to rescue her family, she and her friends must find the missing blood moonstone and break all the Sandersons' spells for good.The setup actually isn't bad. With Max, Allison, and Dani relegated to Hell, the stakes are raised, and the search-and-destroy quest plot is a fun departure from the keep-away game the kids play with the witches in the first film. I also like Poppy and her friends, even if they're a little under-developed.Unfortunately, the setup just never delivers. The blood moonstone proves far too easy (view spoiler)[ to find (hide spoiler)], and the final act drags on and ON AND ON. The teenage characters are also far less resourceful than Max, Allison, and Dani were; instead of coming up with their own plans, they rely on other deus ex machina characters (more on that later) and spend their time reassuring each other that everything is going to be okay,.The author also tries to shoehorn technology into the plot, with mixed results. Seeing the Sanderson sisters find an iPhone and use Siri was pretty hilarious and felt like something that could have happened in the film, but going on to use the phone to (view spoiler)[bewitch the entire town of Salem (hide spoiler)] felt pretty stupid and forced. The witches' tactics in the film worked just as well (even better, TBH) and it seemed like a wasted effort to make the sequel feel modern. The kids also list off random social media platforms for no reason and sometimes slip into text speak, which feels less organic and more like an older YA author attempting to be relevant.Several characters from the film make walk-on appearances, including blonde bully Jay (who has somehow gone on to become a principal), Binx and Emily (who seemed nothing like themselves and whose inclusion mostly felt sad--they should be off enjoying the afterlife!), and the seafood restaurant owner (random, but kind of fun). Binx and Emily, along with new character (view spoiler)[and surprise fourth Sanderson sister (hide spoiler)] Elizabeth, mainly exist as deus ex machina plot points, who have randomly helpful and specific knowledge and who tell Poppy and her friends exactly what to do to beat the witches.The humor is also really lame and forced. The Sanderson sisters repeat all the same jokes from the film, including endless variations of Sarah's "Amuk! Amuk! Amuk!" line and musical numbers that have ABSOLUTELY NO POINT. Seriously! You have to sit through and READ two separate musical numbers that serve no purpose to the plot and take up at least five pages. The witches also ride various "haha, that's not a broom" items, including a rake, a Swiffer, a leaf blower, and a Roomba, and the diminishing returns are so thin that by the end, you'll want to throw the book across the room. There are also never-ending witch puns, including "witch please" and (sigh) "resting witch face."The narration is pretty poor. The author chooses the trendy first-person present-tense device that's so popular in YA right now to narrate Poppy's portions of the novel, switching to third-person limited present-tense to describe what's happening with the Sanderson sisters. It's so weird. It works for Poppy's portion, but the witches' scenes just fall flat. The present-tense is distracting, and the whole thing feels like I'm reading badly written fan fiction that's describing a badly written fan film.Finally, the whole sequel ends with a completely unnecessary cliffhanger intended to allow room for a lot more "Hocus Pocus" installments, which...honestly, do we even need those? This franchise was NOT set up to allow for multiple entries. A sequel is perfectly fine, but Winnie, Sarah, and Mary would wear out their welcome REALLY quickly if this became an annual thing.I wanted to like this so much, especially after the beginning was so promising, but it just...didn't deliver. FINAL VERDICTI don't know, Disney. I was super happy to get a sequel to (and even a novelization of!) this Halloween classic, but this wasn't the one I wanted.I liked the characters, I liked the setup, and I even liked a few of the jokes...but you've got to be able to deliver. This book could never decide if it wanted to be scary, romantic, funny, a franchise-builder, or just a light-hearted romp with some old favorite characters. The result is a tonally uneven, sometimes deeply unfunny book that wore me out before it was even halfway through. I probably won't pick this up again, and I definitely won't recommend it to any but the most devoted fans.Overall, this is probably 2.5 regretful, witchy stars. "Hocus Pocus" deserved better than this.
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  • Tara Weiss
    January 1, 1970
    Trying not to let childhood nostalgia get in the way of a fair review, but it is hard. So hard. The wickedly wonderful Sanderson sisters are back with continued antics. And it's fun, without feeling that scared feeling of nighttime in a cemetery with ghosts and spell books and witches and zombies. There is adventure and family history dredged up, or unearthed, which leads to secrets and finding out the truth about your parents. So, there are some good parts, but there aren't any surprises. You'l Trying not to let childhood nostalgia get in the way of a fair review, but it is hard. So hard. The wickedly wonderful Sanderson sisters are back with continued antics. And it's fun, without feeling that scared feeling of nighttime in a cemetery with ghosts and spell books and witches and zombies. There is adventure and family history dredged up, or unearthed, which leads to secrets and finding out the truth about your parents. So, there are some good parts, but there aren't any surprises. You'll smile, but you won't be scared.
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  • Yasamin
    January 1, 1970
    I WOULD SELL MY SOUL FOR A COPY OF THIS NOWPLEASE, OH PLEASE OH PLEASE OH PLEASE DO NOT DISAPPOINT ME.
  • Brittany Young
    January 1, 1970
    Nostalgic! I loved reading through the actual movie of Hocus Pocus with small details added in that connect the first with the sequel. I won’t go too deep into this as I really don’t want to spoil the beauty within this book. Max is now the history teacher, the one that teaches once a year about the Sanderson sisters! Allison works at a law firm and somehow, that jerk Jay is the principal. Max and Allison have a daughter and now live in that huge house together. The Sanderson sisters return agai Nostalgic! I loved reading through the actual movie of Hocus Pocus with small details added in that connect the first with the sequel. I won’t go too deep into this as I really don’t want to spoil the beauty within this book. Max is now the history teacher, the one that teaches once a year about the Sanderson sisters! Allison works at a law firm and somehow, that jerk Jay is the principal. Max and Allison have a daughter and now live in that huge house together. The Sanderson sisters return again in a similar way, and young Poppy Dennison has to fix the HUGE mess they’ve caused. With the help of Thackery and Emily Binx, of course! And someone else that will very much surprise you. If you’ve seen Hocus Pocus 1693 times, I urge you to read it and not skip straight to part two. As I said, there are a few very tiny details added and they are important. Why four instead of five stars? I’m only nitpicking. I wish Dani, Allison and Max were in the sequel more. Otherwise, it was an absolute joy to read this!!!
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  • Susy Rogers
    January 1, 1970
    Let me just start by saying, Hocus Pocus is my favorite movie of all time. That being said, I had super low expectations for this book, but was still super excited for it. The first 200 pages was a retelling of the original movie, and it was painful. When you try to turn a classic movie into a book, it’s just awkward. I especially wasn’t a fan of this author’s writing style. The second half was a brand new story stemming off of the original. The storyline was actually fairly decent. It was unfor Let me just start by saying, Hocus Pocus is my favorite movie of all time. That being said, I had super low expectations for this book, but was still super excited for it. The first 200 pages was a retelling of the original movie, and it was painful. When you try to turn a classic movie into a book, it’s just awkward. I especially wasn’t a fan of this author’s writing style. The second half was a brand new story stemming off of the original. The storyline was actually fairly decent. It was unfortunate how hard it seemed to be trying to be current and hip with all the lingo and such. But again, the writing style wasn’t my favorite. The author just seemed to be trying a little too hard to channel the essence of Hocus Pocus. All in all, I’m glad I read it because I will always read/watch anything Hocus Pocus related, but it was nowhere near the awesomeness of the original movie.
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  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    Delightful! I enjoyed I enjoyed the added inner dialogue included in the original, because that always adds to a great story and is the best part of a book that often gets lost in a movie. The sequel added a wonderful addition to one of my favorite (seriously, I still watch the movie every Halloween) movies. Reading about how Dani, Max, Alliso , Binx, and Emily continued on and reading about a new generation of Salem teenagers gets into more trouble with the Sanderson sisters was fantastic! Add Delightful! I enjoyed I enjoyed the added inner dialogue included in the original, because that always adds to a great story and is the best part of a book that often gets lost in a movie. The sequel added a wonderful addition to one of my favorite (seriously, I still watch the movie every Halloween) movies. Reading about how Dani, Max, Alliso , Binx, and Emily continued on and reading about a new generation of Salem teenagers gets into more trouble with the Sanderson sisters was fantastic! Add inclusivity and this is something I cannot wait for my son to read. I would recommend this to anyone that is a fan of the movie or those who have yet to find their way to the wonderful story that is Hocus Pocus!
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Okay so - part one - basically identical to the movie we all know and love. A few KEY details added to the book (that weren’t in the movie - ex. There’s a 4th Sanderson sister named Elizabeth) Forward to 2018 - we are introduced to Poppy Dennison who, quite obviously, is the daughter of our beloved Max and Allison. Look I don’t want to get into all the details of the second half of this book but I couldn’t put it down. It was amazing. It was everything I could have hoped for AND we get left with Okay so - part one - basically identical to the movie we all know and love. A few KEY details added to the book (that weren’t in the movie - ex. There’s a 4th Sanderson sister named Elizabeth) Forward to 2018 - we are introduced to Poppy Dennison who, quite obviously, is the daughter of our beloved Max and Allison. Look I don’t want to get into all the details of the second half of this book but I couldn’t put it down. It was amazing. It was everything I could have hoped for AND we get left with a cliffhanger ending - which might be a hint to a sequel of the sequel. If they don’t make the sequel into a movie I’ll be upset but I’m happy I was able to relive one of my favourite stories and have it forever on my bookshelf!
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  • KayCee K
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsI grew up with this movie so I'm going to do my best to not let nostalgia play to big of a part in this review. I enjoyed taking it in, in a different format. It’s a classic, so you can’t go wrong with it. I’m not going to talk about the first half as it’s just the original movie and doesn’t feel I need to say anything other than it’s such a fun read! Now part two, the sequel!! I was over the moon happy when I saw this and I was hoping there would be a connection between the two and the 3.5 StarsI grew up with this movie so I'm going to do my best to not let nostalgia play to big of a part in this review. I enjoyed taking it in, in a different format. It’s a classic, so you can’t go wrong with it. I’m not going to talk about the first half as it’s just the original movie and doesn’t feel I need to say anything other than it’s such a fun read! Now part two, the sequel!! I was over the moon happy when I saw this and I was hoping there would be a connection between the two and there is. The main character we follow is the daughter of someone from the first film. She’s a good character but her two friends are my favorites in this story. I enjoyed how this sequel reflected the first movie. There were so many characters who played a part in this story. I don’t want to say too much about this book or the plots but there is an LGBTQ character, it ’s well written and doesn’t read as a movie script, it’s a book, book. There is a twist that made this story good. These characters are clear and full of wittiness. If you like the movie, you will at less find something in the sequel that will make you smile. But in the end, you have to remember that this is a young YA Halloween, cheesy fun read.I was giving a copy to review, so this is 100% my own thoughts.
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  • Preston
    January 1, 1970
    Hocus Pocus & the All-New Sequel brings to life the love and magic of the original Hocus Pocus while adding some small details that lead into the sequel. The sequel presents what happens when Max and Allison’s daughter unleashed the Sanderson Sisters with all of the fun that was in original while adding a new twist to it. There was however one spot that may of been a typo where a new characters name is introduced yet is no where in the story and leaves the way in which the reader needs to kn Hocus Pocus & the All-New Sequel brings to life the love and magic of the original Hocus Pocus while adding some small details that lead into the sequel. The sequel presents what happens when Max and Allison’s daughter unleashed the Sanderson Sisters with all of the fun that was in original while adding a new twist to it. There was however one spot that may of been a typo where a new characters name is introduced yet is no where in the story and leaves the way in which the reader needs to know what happens next!
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  • John Amory
    January 1, 1970
    The sequel took me a little bit to get into, but once it takes off, it's pure nostalgic fun through to the end.The author did some things that I found annoying, like taking the famous "amok, amok amok!" line from the original film and having Sarah repeat words like that throughout the second story (enough, afoot, etc), and typing out full musical numbers, with lyrics, which are seriously dull on the page; and if I had to read one more bad pun substituting witch for bitch, I was going to scream ( The sequel took me a little bit to get into, but once it takes off, it's pure nostalgic fun through to the end.The author did some things that I found annoying, like taking the famous "amok, amok amok!" line from the original film and having Sarah repeat words like that throughout the second story (enough, afoot, etc), and typing out full musical numbers, with lyrics, which are seriously dull on the page; and if I had to read one more bad pun substituting witch for bitch, I was going to scream (witch slap, resting witch face, witch please, OMGSTOP).But the story, itself, is a worthy follow-up to Hocus Pocus, with all the magic, camp, and fun that we've come to love about the original. Even the adaptation of the film as presented here is solid, with enough additions and structural differences to make it feel almost new again.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Fun!!! Can't take it too seriously, tho, or else it falls apart (there's an actual musical scene that reads like fanfic.) First third of the book is a retelling of the movie and unnecessary, you can skip it just fine and whittle it down to 300 pages (the retelling is kinda awful but the modern day story is much better.) Super cute F/F pairing & diverse. Leaves it open for another book! Felt very much in the spirit of the movie.If you think the book is too silly, you need to consider the audi Fun!!! Can't take it too seriously, tho, or else it falls apart (there's an actual musical scene that reads like fanfic.) First third of the book is a retelling of the movie and unnecessary, you can skip it just fine and whittle it down to 300 pages (the retelling is kinda awful but the modern day story is much better.) Super cute F/F pairing & diverse. Leaves it open for another book! Felt very much in the spirit of the movie.If you think the book is too silly, you need to consider the audience for it: kids & teens.
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  • Lana B
    January 1, 1970
    Both the novelization of the movie and the sequel were like hugging dear old friends. The beginning was a well done retelling in a new form, and the new story was a welcome return to a familiar world with some nicely placed updates. It perfectly built on the blocks of my nostalgia, and I loved it.
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