Artificial Condition (The Murderbot Diaries, #2)
It has a dark past – one in which a number of humans were killed. A past that caused it to christen itself “Murderbot”. But it has only vague memories of the massacre that spawned that title, and it wants to know more.Teaming up with a Research Transport vessel named ART (you don’t want to know what the “A” stands for), Murderbot heads to the mining facility where it went rogue.What it discovers will forever change the way it thinks…

Artificial Condition (The Murderbot Diaries, #2) Details

TitleArtificial Condition (The Murderbot Diaries, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 8th, 2018
PublisherTor.com / Tom Doherty Associates
ISBN-139781250186928
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Novella

Artificial Condition (The Murderbot Diaries, #2) Review

  • carol.
    January 1, 1970
    "I was stalling. I would have to interact with humans as an augmented human... I had imagined it as taking place from a distance, or in the spaces of a crowded transit ring. Interacting meant talking, and eye contact. I could already feel my performance capacity dropping."It was with anticipation of pleasure that I picked up the second installment in the Murderbot series. After its thrilling adventures on its last expedition as a SecUnit, I was curious to see what 'Bot would do with freedom. I r "I was stalling. I would have to interact with humans as an augmented human... I had imagined it as taking place from a distance, or in the spaces of a crowded transit ring. Interacting meant talking, and eye contact. I could already feel my performance capacity dropping."It was with anticipation of pleasure that I picked up the second installment in the Murderbot series. After its thrilling adventures on its last expedition as a SecUnit, I was curious to see what 'Bot would do with freedom. I read quickly, finishing in one sitting. Though the beginning felt a bit awkward, I remained confident that Wells would end up somewhere interesting. It was an enjoyable read, but suffered from a few issues.Why not five stars, you wonder? I do enjoy the character of Murderbot a great deal, but found myself with some sticky points on my first read-through.One, I felt Murderbot had become more colloquial in its speech without accompanying change in comfort level with others. Calling A.R.T. an 'asshole,' for instance, seemed odd. Funny, no doubt. But would the apathetic Murderbot really have named a mildly intrusive artificial intelligence it just met an 'asshole?' It set the wrong tone and in some ways, the character of Murderbot backslid to be a socially inept human, not a killing machine trying to create behavior patterns.Two, I thought the narrative confusing at first. I'm quite used to Well's elaborate world-building, but this felt awkward. On re-read, I decided it was smoother than I had thought the first time through. I remain extremely puzzled as to the differences between 'constructs,' 'artificial intelligences,' and ''bots' in Murderbot's world and why humans created 'constructs' as they did. At one point 'Bot notes that "the long sleeves of the T-shirt and jacket, the pants and the boots covering all my inorganic parts," which seemed especially weird to me. Why leave human hands on a construct? I also remained puzzled by lines such as "I huddled in the chair." Hello, Killing Machine? Why on earth do you have any hormones responsible for fear? I feel like Wells would have done better to stick with a Star Trek TNG 'Data' type model.Three, the plot was good, but uneven. Murderbot wants to see the scene of its alleged murders. It will need a pretext to get there, so it signs on with a group of naive workers hoping to regain some stolen data. This premise works at first until the workers, a family with young children, behave in incredibly naive and stupid ways, leading Murderbot to behave in naive and stupid ways. The long journey to the scene of the crime ends up being anticlimacticTo be fair, my rating might also be a case of high expectations; certainly it is much better than many 3-star books that I've read, enjoyed, and promptly forgot (basically every generic cop-thriller). I love much of what Martha Wells has done, and have a number of her books shelved in hardcover. Since I can still remember many of the details of Artificial Condition without picking up the book, it's good enough to make an impression. There's lots of humor and sarcasm, some sweet computer bonding and quite a bit of action. Definitely worth reading.Thanks to all the friends and commenters who helped me clarify my thoughts!
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  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    January 1, 1970
    An awesome sequel to the Nebula award-winning “All Systems Red.” I liked it even better than the first book! Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature:The illicit adventures of Murderbot continue in Artificial Condition, the terrific sequel to Martha Wells’ 2017 Nebula award-winning novella, All Systems Red. Murderbot, a deeply introverted cyborg security unit, or SecUnit, who previously hacked the governor software that forced obedience to human commands, has illegally gone off the grid, An awesome sequel to the Nebula award-winning “All Systems Red.” I liked it even better than the first book! Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature:The illicit adventures of Murderbot continue in Artificial Condition, the terrific sequel to Martha Wells’ 2017 Nebula award-winning novella, All Systems Red. Murderbot, a deeply introverted cyborg security unit, or SecUnit, who previously hacked the governor software that forced obedience to human commands, has illegally gone off the grid, eschewing the safety of a mostly-free life with a sympathetic owner in order to travel on its own. Disguising itself as an augmented human, Murderbot takes off for the mining facility space station where, it understands, it once murdered a group of humans that it was charged with protecting, though its memory of the event has been mostly erased. (Hence the name Murderbot that it has given itself.)To get to the mining station, Murderbot hitches a ride with an empty cargo transport, offering to share the many hours of media and entertainment that it has accumulated. But the transport AI turns out to be far more powerful and intelligent than Murderbot had anticipated ― a dangerous situation for Murderbot, who’s in a highly vulnerable position. The transport AI, which Murderbot calls ART (short for Asshole Research Transport), is looking for more than just entertainment media. It actually wants to understand and help Murderbot with its quest.Once they gets to their destination, at ART’s suggestion, Murderbot (still in disguise as a human) takes a contract as a security guard for a technologist group of humans who are planning to travel to the same area of the station as the installation where the deadly incident in Murderbot’s past occurred. This gives Murderbot a convenient excuse for being in this isolated area, and it intends to use its spare time to investigate the incident, which has been hidden from the public. But, as in All Systems Red, Murderbot finds that when others need its help and expertise, it’s hard to remain emotionally disengaged.Artificial Condition was, for me, an even more entertaining story and mystery than All Systems Red. I found the plot fresher overall, with its interweaving of the treacherous plotting surrounding the technologist group that Murderbot is protecting, and Murderbot’s investigation of the disaster in its own past. In the process of discovering more about its prior life, Murderbot also discovers more about itself, and there are hints of some possible connections between the past incident and the current one, in addition to some thematic ties.The human characters were diverse and fairly well-drawn, but the characters that really engaged me were the artificial intelligences. Murderbot continues to develop depth as a character, and its snark (often about the idiocies of humans) adds an enjoyable dose of humor to the story.I phrased it as a question, because pretending you were asking for more information was the best way to try to get the humans to realize they were doing something stupid. “So do you think there’s another reason Tlacey wants you to do this exchange in person, other than … killing you?”Murderbot also grows in self-awareness through its experiences. Some interactions with a ComfortUnit (the euphemism for a sexbot) lead to a deeper appreciation for the freedoms it does have, and for using one’s freedom of choice to help others in need. In particular, I loved the rather bossy transport AI ART, and ART’s determined insertion of itself into Murderbot’s life and concerns, despite Murderbot’s reluctance to allow it in. Sometimes resistance really is futile … but that’s not always a bad thing. The third novella in the MURDERBOT DIARIES series, Rogue Protocol, is due to be published in August 2018. I’m anxious to see where Murderbot’s journey takes us next.I received a free copy of this ebook from Tor for review. Thanks so much!Content note: scattered F-bombs.
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  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    I said, “Sometimes people do things to you that you can't do anything about. You just have to survive it and go on.”They all stopped talking and stared at me. It made me nervous and I immediately switched my view to the nearest security camera so I could watch us from the side. I had said it with more emphasis than I intended, but it was just the way things were. I wasn't sure why it had such an impact on them. Maybe it sounded like I knew what I was talking about. Maybe it was the two murder I said, “Sometimes people do things to you that you can't do anything about. You just have to survive it and go on.”They all stopped talking and stared at me. It made me nervous and I immediately switched my view to the nearest security camera so I could watch us from the side. I had said it with more emphasis than I intended, but it was just the way things were. I wasn't sure why it had such an impact on them. Maybe it sounded like I knew what I was talking about. Maybe it was the two murder attempts. I honestly am on the four-hundred-reviews-to-come portion of my evening, so this will be a bit briefer. First of all, sci-fi novella. Second of all, I already reviewed book one in depth. Here's a quick bulleted list of things I liked about this volume:➽A lot more worldbuilding. We see Murderbot go beyond just one singular arena and really see a lot more of the world. I also just liked seeing everything; in the first book I really didn't perceive the world, and here I did. ➽There’s a character introduced who uses gender neutral pronouns (!)➽Murderbot's first crew is missing in this book, but the new characters are super interesting as well - a pissed-off transport operative [ART] is my definite favorite.But here's the REAL kicker: I just love Murderbot more and more each volume as it continues to explore its humanity. In some entertainment media I had seen, the bare metal bot-bodies were used to portray the evil rogue SecUnits who menaced the main characters. Not that I was annoyed by that or anything. It was actually good, because then humans who had never worked with SecUnits expected us to look like human-form bots, and not what we actually looked like. I wasn't annoyed at all. Not one bit. The way in which Murderbot is treated by society as a whole is kind of one of the main functions of the world, and I really enjoy it. It's a really interesting character to me because its thought processes echo that of a very traumatized and somewhat emotionally locked off human. It gets the most depth, the most narrative sympathy, and some of the best development I've ever seen. I love how it keeps denying having any feelings and I love it. On a sort of related note, I totally love that Murderbot is humanized via caring about people in the non-romantic way. Robots-Becomes-Human-Because-It-Feels-Romantic-Love is a really overdone and, if thought about critically, totally fucked up trope; I'm really loving the subversion of this. On a related note, I'm loving that Martha Wells didn't give the robots gender. That shouldn't be a huge statement, but damn, this is the era that gave us alien robots with ponytails.Anyway, summary: it’s as if Martha Wells knows Exactly what I like in literature and plans to use that knowledge. For evil. And for an excellent novella series that I can’t see myself putting down anytime soon.Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube
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  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
    January 1, 1970
    The good news is that I still love Murderbot and that I now also love ART.The bad news is that I unfortunately didn't like this book as much as the first one. I couldn't get into the story until half way through it.I still very much look forward to reading the next awkward adventures of Murderbot though!
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    These Murderbot Diaries are quickly becoming a go-to popcorn SF read for me. I love killer robots as much as the next bloke, but I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for this one.It's not just the hundreds of hours this mass-murder-capable robot pours into his/her SF soap opera binge-watching time. It's not the kinds of situations that make it need to pretend to be human among all the myriad prejudices AGAINST mass-murder-capable robots.It's the candid conversations with pissed-off robot car These Murderbot Diaries are quickly becoming a go-to popcorn SF read for me. I love killer robots as much as the next bloke, but I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for this one.It's not just the hundreds of hours this mass-murder-capable robot pours into his/her SF soap opera binge-watching time. It's not the kinds of situations that make it need to pretend to be human among all the myriad prejudices AGAINST mass-murder-capable robots.It's the candid conversations with pissed-off robot carriers.I kinda agree with these two. Murdering all the humans would truly make their lives much simpler. But then again, I suppose that could be said about all of us.Good worldbuilding! I'm really flying through each one of these like it was popcorn. :)
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  • Manuel Antão
    January 1, 1970
    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Star-gazing SecUnits: “Artificial Condition - The MurderBot Diaries 2” by Martha Wells“But you may have noticed that for a terrifying murderbot I fuck up a lot.”In “Artificial Condition - The MurderBot Diaries 2” by Martha WellsThe very unfamiliarity of SF is one of its attractions for me. It slows down the reading and speeds up the need to think, both within and across books (intertextuality). Familiarity, similarity? Try reading thes If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Star-gazing SecUnits: “Artificial Condition - The MurderBot Diaries 2” by Martha Wells“But you may have noticed that for a terrifying murderbot I fuck up a lot.”In “Artificial Condition - The MurderBot Diaries 2” by Martha WellsThe very unfamiliarity of SF is one of its attractions for me. It slows down the reading and speeds up the need to think, both within and across books (intertextuality). Familiarity, similarity? Try reading these in a row, then come back and tell me you were on familiar ground all the while and that your mind is still in the same shape: "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?", "Ubik"; "Version Control"; "The Gradual", "The Dispossessed" and "The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories".Setting a story in another place or another time enables speculative fiction like the one Martha Wells attempts with her MurderBot series to explore ideas that literary fiction might really struggle with. I'm interested in divided societies … Irish … English … Dorset … Croatia … Bosnia … Israelis and Palestinians …Read on, if you feel so inclined.
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  • Jeffrey Keeten
    January 1, 1970
    ”When constructs were first developed, they were originally supposed to have a pre-sentient level of intelligence, like the dumber variety of bot. But you can’t put something as dumb as a hauler bot in charge of security for anything without spending even more money for expensive company-employed human supervisors. So they made us smarter. The anxiety and depression were side effects.” The SecUnit, the hero of our continuing saga, has enough intelligence to start to suffer from a mild form of ch ”When constructs were first developed, they were originally supposed to have a pre-sentient level of intelligence, like the dumber variety of bot. But you can’t put something as dumb as a hauler bot in charge of security for anything without spending even more money for expensive company-employed human supervisors. So they made us smarter. The anxiety and depression were side effects.” The SecUnit, the hero of our continuing saga, has enough intelligence to start to suffer from a mild form of chronic depression, only waiting for a half dozen more things to go wrong before he/she becomes full blown, 24/7 depressed. Humans don’t help. They are irrational creatures and are constantly making decisions that, frankly, are bordering on suicidal. The SecUnit’s job is to keep them alive. Thank goodness for Sanctuary Moon.Since a SecUnit does not have to sleep, he/she can binge watch TV shows for all those hours that humans are sleeping. I have several friends who wish they could bypass the whole sleep thing to continue binging 1990s sitcoms until blood starts seeping out of their eyeballs. Whenever SecUnit feels depressed or too anxious, he/she can always access the feed and watch some episodes of his/her favorite space opera, Sanctuary Moon.SecUnit needs to get to HaviHyral so he/she can investigation what exactly happened to him/her when he/she went berserk and killed a bunch of humans and destroyed a few bots, as well. He/she became at that moment, in his/her mind, Murderbot. His/her memory has been wiped, but his/her organic memory retains vestiges of what happened. When he/she breaks his/her governing unit, which allows humans to control him/her, which frankly doesn’t go so well with all that carnage and murder, he/she becomes a free agent. (All of that will be made clear when you read the first book in the series, All Systems Red.) To get to HaviHyral, he has to have a work contract with a human. Murderbot makes “friends” with a transport pod known as ART (______ Research Transport). You’ll have to read the book to find out what the A stands for. Fortunately, ART is able to provide help and assistance, as if Murderbot was still tied into the security system as a legally operating SecUnit. Murderbot needs all the help he/she can get keeping these naive human clients alive. After some alterations to his/her physiology so that he/she can pass as an augmented human, he/she looks in the mirror and thinks: ”It would make it harder for me to pretend not to be a person.” Depressing thought. ART offers to attach gender parts, which Murderbot emphatically rejects. It would have made writing this review easier if he/she had declared a gender (Martha Wells sidesteps this issue by writing in the first person), but part of the interesting things about this series is how readers react to Murderbot. Some see him/her as a she, and some see her/him as a he. We are coded to assign gender. I could refer to Murderbot as it, but for some reason that just seems wrong to me. Toasters are its. Lawn mowers are its. He/she might be a better version of human than what humans seem to be capable of. There are two more episodes (a nod I’m giving to Sanctuary Moon) in this extremely entertaining series. I have them already in hand and certainly must see where Murderbot’s investigation takes him/her, and see how he/she handles becoming more and more human. He/she has even experienced enough that he/she can now offer wise advice to his clients. ”Sometimes people do things to you that you can’t do anything about. You just have to survive it and go.” Highly Recommended!If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.comI also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten
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  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    When we first met the SecUnit Murderbot in Martha Wells’ “All System’s Red”, it had already hacked its governor module, which is ostensibly in place to prevent it from going on a kill-happy rampage. In truth, it had already (apparently) gone on said rampage when it was “under control”, and only hacked the module so it wouldn’t happen again (and so it could have unfettered access to the entertainment feeds). When “Artificial Condition” opens, Murderbot has won a dubious kind of freedom thanks to When we first met the SecUnit Murderbot in Martha Wells’ “All System’s Red”, it had already hacked its governor module, which is ostensibly in place to prevent it from going on a kill-happy rampage. In truth, it had already (apparently) gone on said rampage when it was “under control”, and only hacked the module so it wouldn’t happen again (and so it could have unfettered access to the entertainment feeds). When “Artificial Condition” opens, Murderbot has won a dubious kind of freedom thanks to the human allies it made in “All Systems Red”. Still ever wary of the protocols it must follow to allay the suspicions of the humans it encounters, Murderbot sets off to learn the truth about the massacre it had been held responsible for but has no clear recollection of. Murderbot forms a tenuous alliance with ART, a transport AI who helps disguise Murderbot’s identity as a rogue SecUnit by surgically altering it to appear as an augmented human. ART also helps Murderbot get a cover job to justify its trip to the mining facility on the planet RaviHyral, where its supposed massacre took place. Murderbot (in disguise as a human, at this point) takes on the role of bodyguard for a group of researchers trying to retrieve their hijacked data from the company after their contracts were abruptly terminated. The situation is an obvious set-up: the mining company’s owner, Tlacey, will only meet with them in person, on RaviHyral, and if their data is as important as they think it is, it would be much more cost effective to just get them out of the way. Murderbot agrees, of course, because it gets it inside the Tlacey facility, and because it’s a sucker for hard luck humans who get screwed over by corporations.What I like most about this series is the way society exhibits social control over AIs like Murderbot, even without his governor module in place. As it pointed out in “All Systems Red”, it still has to hold down a job, and likes watching its soap operas, and can’t do those things if it goes around murdering people indiscriminately and has to stay on the run all the time. Also, as it points out in this one, humans control all the charging stations. So even without the software that controls its actions, Murderbot must behave exactly as if those safeguards are still in place if it wants to continue to exist. Society presumes non-observance of social norms, even when the incentives to observe those norms are ingrained without the strict enforcement applied by the governor modules (a conundrum any person belonging to a marginalized group can appreciate). Wells adds a new layer to the power dynamics in “Artificial Condition” by showing us how these attitudes build hierarchies through interactions between different classes of AIs. When Murderbot first meets ART, ART reveals that it knows Murderbot is a rogue Sec, and could either turn it over to the authorities or kill Murderbot itself, if Murderbot displeases it. ART even has the audacity to read Murderbot’s acquiescence to its terms as “friendship”. By contrast, the sexbots on RaviHyral have even more miserable restrictions placed on their behavior than SecUnits do and view a rogue Sec as someone to aspire to.“Artificial Condition” is more tightly plotted than its predecessor, and the stakes are more personal, making it an even more satisfying work of brainy, funny, compelling sci-fi action. I highly recommend this series, starting with “All Systems Red”, to anyone who has not picked it up yet.
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  • Karl
    January 1, 1970
    Murderbot is a security robot (aka Secbot or Secunit). Murderbot is a name it gave itself after being involved years ago in a massacre of the humans it was supposed to be guarding on a remote mining moon. Murderbot is part human material with a lot of augmented mechanization. Murderbot hacked it's own control governor module to allow Murderbot to not be programmatically controlled. Murderbot likes nothing more than download and stream hours of media, mostly human serial dramas, to relieve its bo Murderbot is a security robot (aka Secbot or Secunit). Murderbot is a name it gave itself after being involved years ago in a massacre of the humans it was supposed to be guarding on a remote mining moon. Murderbot is part human material with a lot of augmented mechanization. Murderbot hacked it's own control governor module to allow Murderbot to not be programmatically controlled. Murderbot likes nothing more than download and stream hours of media, mostly human serial dramas, to relieve its boredom, while doing a half assed version of its SecUnit job. We first met Murderbot last year in Martha Wells's "All Systems Red". We really really enjoy these Murderbot Diaries.Now we get "Artificial Condition" installment two of the Murderbot's diaries (available as both a hardcover and e-book). In Book 1, when its most recent Company contract went spectacularly wrong (Not its fault. Not this time. this time it saved its humans). In fact it was purchased by one of those humans and given its autonomy. In "Artificial Condition" Murderbot wants to explore it's past to determine what exactly happened back on that mining moon that caused the self naming of Murderbot. It can't quite remember due to memory loss. To accomplish this it must undergo medical alterations to become more human (whatever that really is). On Murderbot's journey to discover it's past, it finds itself stuck on the journey with an AI (artificial intelligence) whom Murderbot bestows with the name of ART. Art is much more than just a mindless system running a space transport. ART is a bored but sentient and highly intelligent transport system. As ART makes itself known to Murderbot, the two quibble over what media shows to watch, and the two learn much about each other. Even though "Artificial Condition" does not have the level of action it's predecessor contained, the entertainment level and the fine quality of Martha Welles voice make this a worthy successor to "All Systems Red". And just think, it's only a few months until the next book is released in the series titled "Rogue Protocol" is due, at the moment it's in August of 2018.I for one look forward to it.
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  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    I love Murderbot!What's not to love about a depressed, soap-opera watching, socially awkward, killing machine? People are nervous of me because I'm a terrifying murderbot, and I'm nervous of them because they're humans. This book is a continuation of our robot-with-low-self-esteem's story. Murderbot has decided to go back to where it first decided to name itself 'Murderbot'. On the way, it makes a new friend - a sentient space ship that Murderbot names ART, an acronym for Asshole Research Transp I love Murderbot!What's not to love about a depressed, soap-opera watching, socially awkward, killing machine? People are nervous of me because I'm a terrifying murderbot, and I'm nervous of them because they're humans. This book is a continuation of our robot-with-low-self-esteem's story. Murderbot has decided to go back to where it first decided to name itself 'Murderbot'. On the way, it makes a new friend - a sentient space ship that Murderbot names ART, an acronym for Asshole Research Transport. I kinda liked ART, but Murderbot took a while to warm up to him. ART likes humans and is trying to help Murderbot pose as a human with lots of robot parts. Yes, the giant transport bot is going to help the (murderbot) pretend to be human. This will go well. When Murderbot meets a different kind of robot on his journey, that robot has a very new idea:Murderbot: "What do you propose to do?"There was a long pause."We could kill them."Well, that was an unusual approach.Muderbot: "Kill who?"Other robot: "All of them. The humans here."ART said, "What does it want?""To kill all the humans," I answered.I could feel ART metaphorically clutch its function. Aww, robots wanting to kill us all. The age-old problem. We all know that this is how things will end for us. Let's face it. We are building things that are for sure going to kill the crap out of us one day.Why do they even bother with the sign?This book was super fun with a lot of action. Murderbot's inner dialogue is hilariously snarky. The only down side to this series is how short the books are. I need more Murderbot in my life.
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  • Gavin
    January 1, 1970
    Martha Wells's fantastic sci-fi novella Artificial Condition was a worthy sequel to the equally awesome All Systems Red. This series is everything an AI sci-fi story should be and then some! It was thought provoking but also entertaining and engaging.Wells's sci-fi world of corporations gone wild in a space faring future is both interesting and excellent but just like the first book Murderbot was the true star of the show. Our favourite grumpy, socially anxious, security bot is the story's only Martha Wells's fantastic sci-fi novella Artificial Condition was a worthy sequel to the equally awesome All Systems Red. This series is everything an AI sci-fi story should be and then some! It was thought provoking but also entertaining and engaging.Wells's sci-fi world of corporations gone wild in a space faring future is both interesting and excellent but just like the first book Murderbot was the true star of the show. Our favourite grumpy, socially anxious, security bot is the story's only POV character and that really works as Murderbot is a truly unique character with an engaging voice. Never has it been so easy to love a Murderbot! The story was engaging and exciting. Having gone completely rogue at the end of the first book Murderbot is heading back to the planet that holds the secrets to its dark past. An incident which left a whole group of humans dead! Before we know it Murderbot is making an unexpected new friend in the form of a Research Transport vessel AI and signing on as a security consultant to a group of young humans. Murderbot needs the job as cover to get cleared to visit the planet of the incident but soon finds that the humans are caught up in a bit of danger and intrigue of their own and are in need of some serious help. Good thing Murderbot specializes in keeping idiot humans alive in-between watching episodes of its favourite TV shows! The standout secondary character was ART, the Transport AI, who makes an effort to befriend Murderbot. All in all this was a super enjoyable read and I cannot wait for the release of Murderbot's next adventure. Rating: 5 stars.Audio Note: Kevin.R.Free did a decent job with the audio without being anything outstanding. Note: On to the criticism! Nothing to moan about in terms of the actual story which is excellent but the pricing of the Murderbot novellas are pretty disgraceful. I'm all for novellas but to price them the same as a full book just makes it feel like this was the one book that got split into three or four novellas so the publisher (shame on you Tor!) can con three or four lots of cash out of the buyer:(
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  • Rachel (Kalanadi)
    January 1, 1970
    1st read: Thrilled I got to read this a bit early - more thoughts closer to the publication date. I loved this just as much as the first one, though I did miss Murderbot's first crew. But I really enjoyed the new characters here... clearly Murderbot and ART are just the tip of the non-human iceberg... much more is going on with bots' and constructs' abilities than the average human in this world knows!2nd read: Still good, I love ART even more.
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  • TS Chan
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reading copy from Tor.com in exchange for an honest review.4.5 stars.An awesome sequel to All Systems Red, Artificial Condition pumps up the fun and action.Before I continue, I maintain that our genderless robotic main protagonist sounded female in my mind and hence, I will refer to it as she. Our sardonic SecUnit decided to return to the mining planet where a prior incident culminated in her self-christening as Murderbot, with the intention to investigate the real cause o I received an advanced reading copy from Tor.com in exchange for an honest review.4.5 stars.An awesome sequel to All Systems Red, Artificial Condition pumps up the fun and action.Before I continue, I maintain that our genderless robotic main protagonist sounded female in my mind and hence, I will refer to it as she. Our sardonic SecUnit decided to return to the mining planet where a prior incident culminated in her self-christening as Murderbot, with the intention to investigate the real cause of the said incident. In the course of attempting to hitch a ride there without being caught, she managed to bribe her way through by offering the transport bots her treasure trove of media, books, serials, and music downloads. I don't know about other readers, but this cracks me up so much!On the final transport to her desired destination, she found an artificial intelligence onboard that is more than her match, and also just a bit too curious. The interaction between the Murderbot and the transport AI made up some of the most amusing moments I've ever read. With this, Ms Murderbot got herself an accomplice on her mission, whom she nicknamed ART (No, I am not going to reveal what that stands for - just read it!). But to get onto the mining planet, without being detected given her standard SecUnit specifications, she needed to be more 'human'. Yikes! Yes, the giant transport bot is going to help the construct SecUnit pretend to be human. This will go well. The worldbuilding remains a tad vague throughout the books so far. However, it is not anything that most science fiction books or even movies have not shown before. Human-like robotic units and augmented humans, multi-level spaceports, shuttles, tubes and large transports. None of these can be too difficult to imagine or picture in one's head if you have watched enough sci-fi movies. This in effect enables the story to move forward with a brisk pace without spending too much time on describing the setting; a desirous outcome for a novella that has less than 200 pages to complete its plot narrative.In short, we have an absorbing and immensely entertaining novella that delivers everything it needs to in a shorter reading time. There is an adequately developed subplot within the larger arc of her investigation of the aforementioned incident which provided cool moments of suspense and action. A SecUnit trying to pass off as human and her artful sidekick was just loads of fun (and pun entirely intended). Most importantly, we are provided with the superb character development of the Murderbot; as she tries to embrace her freedom and act more human, she seems to become more human. Moreover, while socially anxious, Ms Murderbot is not one to pull any punches when the situation requires her to be badass. Don't mess with SecUnits, alright?! "I don't make threats. I'm just telling you what I'm going to do." Bring on Rogue Protocol right now! I can't wait to follow the Murderbot on her next adventure - what is she is going to do next? You can order this book from: Amazon US | Amazon UK | Book Depository (Free shipping worldwide) You can also find this, and my other reviews at Novel Notions.
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  • Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller
    January 1, 1970
    Niki's Narrative Novella Review [Part 2/4]: My feelings going into AC were tentative optimism. After all, sequels are never as good as the first, right? So if this could hold up to even 75% on how much I enjoyed All Systems Red, then I’d be good. The first few chapters were slowly paced and I really enjoyed reimmursing into Murderbot’s brain. Wells even had me laughing early on with MB’s interaction with a new character. And then the plot thickened and we were on our way to answering some questi Niki's Narrative Novella Review [Part 2/4]: My feelings going into AC were tentative optimism. After all, sequels are never as good as the first, right? So if this could hold up to even 75% on how much I enjoyed All Systems Red, then I’d be good. The first few chapters were slowly paced and I really enjoyed reimmursing into Murderbot’s brain. Wells even had me laughing early on with MB’s interaction with a new character. And then the plot thickened and we were on our way to answering some questions. I lost myself for a few hours as the story snowballed to the end with a fantastic momentum that perhaps was even more of a ride than the first book. At this point, I went “omg, give me the next one,” and proceeded to troll the publisher and review sites until I lucked into a copy (okay, I didn’t really troll, but I was still exceptionally lucky)....read the rest of narrative at www.NikiHawkes.com
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  • Char
    January 1, 1970
    ARTIFICIAL CONDITION is the second novella length installment of THE MURDERBOT DIARIES. This one worked better for me than the first. I'm not going to go into the plot as the synopsis and many other reviews already do that. I just wanted to say that the humor seemed more innate this time around, which I appreciated. Murderbot is leaRning more about the massacre that supposedly occurred, (that it partially remembers), and I am interested in learning more along with it. I'm anxiously awaiting book ARTIFICIAL CONDITION is the second novella length installment of THE MURDERBOT DIARIES. This one worked better for me than the first. I'm not going to go into the plot as the synopsis and many other reviews already do that. I just wanted to say that the humor seemed more innate this time around, which I appreciated. Murderbot is leaRning more about the massacre that supposedly occurred, (that it partially remembers), and I am interested in learning more along with it. I'm anxiously awaiting book 3 in the series! *I obtained my copy from my local library because 1. LIBRARIES RULE!! and 2. $10.00 for the e-book of a novella is a bit too rich for my blood.*
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    I just adore this series. I had so much reading this second book and cannot wait for the last two books to be released. Martha Wells has created a wonderfully vivid world here, with a character at its core that is brilliant, funny, and relatable – and a murderbot. Murderbot is the main draw to this series of novellas: a rogue bot who pretends to not care about anything but its soap operas, it nevertheless cannot help but help other people on its way to solve the mysteries of its past.For a book I just adore this series. I had so much reading this second book and cannot wait for the last two books to be released. Martha Wells has created a wonderfully vivid world here, with a character at its core that is brilliant, funny, and relatable – and a murderbot. Murderbot is the main draw to this series of novellas: a rogue bot who pretends to not care about anything but its soap operas, it nevertheless cannot help but help other people on its way to solve the mysteries of its past.For a book this short, Martha Wells deals skillfully with many different things: found family, helping others, the role of society, and maybe most importantly the question of what makes somebody a person. We saw glimpses of how sexbots are treated in this world where their intellectual capacity is huge but their freedom is nil. I hope there will be more exploration of these themes in the last two books, as there is so much Martha Wells has to say on this subject.One thing that I keep circling back to trying to review this, is an observation on myself rather than on the book. In the book it is explicitly stated that Murderbot is genderless. In the first book (I spoke about this in my review for that) I kept picturing Murderbot as female and I am not sure why that is and what that says about me. This time around I did not picture it as female and I am glad of that.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    In which Murderbot finds a friend and gets a job. I love Murderbot and its way of thinking, trying to work out what makes humans tick, trying to protect, learning to work with others. I loved the section on his developing friendship and what they could bond over. Recommended series #cyberawesomeness
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  • Milda Page Runner
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I had a blast. Perhaps not as action packed as the first book, but I find main character’s personality and voice simply irresistible. It’s amazing how easy it is to connect with and care for this shy socially awkward robot. Martha’s Wells ironic tone and subtle humour really works for me as well.After having so much fun with the two of the Murderbot Diaries I’ve decided to check out other writer’s books.Highly recommended.
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  • Ɗẳɳ 2.☊
    January 1, 1970
    ★★★☆☆The appalling lack of carnage continues in Episode II: Attack of the Clones when everyone’s favorite “Murderbot” goes searching for answers to its hazy past. With no clients to serve, it’s free to do as it pleases, but it’s bored of wasting its lifespan stowing away in cargo transports and consuming media—crazy, right?—so instead, it decides to look into how it came to be a free agent in the first place.On an old assignment, before it became sentient, it apparently went rogue and massacred ★★★☆☆½The appalling lack of carnage continues in Episode II: Attack of the Clones when everyone’s favorite “Murderbot” goes searching for answers to its hazy past. With no clients to serve, it’s free to do as it pleases, but it’s bored of wasting its lifespan stowing away in cargo transports and consuming media—crazy, right?—so instead, it decides to look into how it came to be a free agent in the first place.On an old assignment, before it became sentient, it apparently went rogue and massacred its clients, but due do a partial purge of its memory it can’t recall the details of the “incident.” And now it’s curious to know if the incident occurred due to a catastrophic failure of its governor module, or if it hacked the module as a result of the error.On its circuitous path back to ground zero, the Murderbot finds a new friend sympathetic to its plight. One not only willing to carry it on the last leg of its journey but also able to modify its appearance and lend a hand in the investigation. A giant transport bot, in the guise of a spaceship, our gal affectionately dubs ART aka Asshole Research Transport. The Murderbot also carves out some time to play Good Samaritan to a group of pesky humans doing their damnedest to die young, dumb, and bloody . . .This story had much more of an episodic feel to it than the first book, but both are very technocentric. They lean heavily toward hard science fiction, so if you’re not a fan of technobabble you may want to steer clear.Our gal also makes a few casual attempts at snarky humor, some jokes land but many fall flat. So take my advice, you wild and crazy manimal, don’t quit your day job just yet. Oh and, in future installments would you be a dear and try to squeeze a teeny-weeny bit more murder and mayhem into your little adventures?“I could have torn through him like tissue paper.”Thank you kindly,Your pal, 2.0I’m not man or machineI’m just something in betweenWhoa, oh, whoa, whoa The Murderbot Diaries, #1: ★★★☆☆
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  • Sh3lly (GrumpyBookGrrrl.com)
    January 1, 1970
    All Systems Red: ★★★I am enjoying this series. Don't let the 3 star rating fool you. It means "I liked it" - I really did! I just don't love it, but these are so short and entertaining, you just tear through them. Murderbot (the genderless security bot) is fun. They seem so human (and really, they are, aren't they?). Security units and "comfort" units (sexbots) don't have any rights and are owned by corporations. But Murderbot is now rogue and off trying to find out what really happened that tim All Systems Red: ★★★I am enjoying this series. Don't let the 3 star rating fool you. It means "I liked it" - I really did! I just don't love it, but these are so short and entertaining, you just tear through them. Murderbot (the genderless security bot) is fun. They seem so human (and really, they are, aren't they?). Security units and "comfort" units (sexbots) don't have any rights and are owned by corporations. But Murderbot is now rogue and off trying to find out what really happened that time in that sector on that planet where they might or might not have gone psycho and killed a bunch of people. Murderbot takes a job providing security for a trio as an excuse to investigate.It was fun to be in murderbot's head because they are introverted and worried about not looking human enough or if their facial expressions are passable, etc. They watch serials and soap opera type shows on their feed and are snarky and salty sometimes, yet there is some compassion there and growing more and more. On to the next one!Buddy read with the MacHalo group.
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  • Phrynne
    January 1, 1970
    Book 2 in the Murderbot series which is turning out to be really good indeed! In Artificial Condition our main character, self styled Murderbot, sets out to discover the truth of the events that occurred in Book 1. A lot of help is provided by a bored sentient transport ship called Art. I love the way Murderbot and Art watch soaps together. They also function as the perfect team for infiltrating and beating the bad guys.These are really enjoyable books if you like a bit of science fiction. They Book 2 in the Murderbot series which is turning out to be really good indeed! In Artificial Condition our main character, self styled Murderbot, sets out to discover the truth of the events that occurred in Book 1. A lot of help is provided by a bored sentient transport ship called Art. I love the way Murderbot and Art watch soaps together. They also function as the perfect team for infiltrating and beating the bad guys.These are really enjoyable books if you like a bit of science fiction. They are humourous but tell a good story which is not too overloaded with scientific facts. The main characters may be 'robots' but they are also very likeable and supersmart.A short book but with lots going on and very entertaining. Looking out now for the next one.
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/06/07/...All hail Murderbot! So glad to be back for another round of action and adventure with our favorite SecUnit. I am unequivocally loving these novellas, and it still amazes me how much punch Martha Wells has managed to pack into each slim volume. Artificial Condition is the sequel to All Systems Red, so keep in mind this review may contain spoilers for the first book if you haven’t started the series yet (plus, if you’re stil 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/06/07/...All hail Murderbot! So glad to be back for another round of action and adventure with our favorite SecUnit. I am unequivocally loving these novellas, and it still amazes me how much punch Martha Wells has managed to pack into each slim volume. Artificial Condition is the sequel to All Systems Red, so keep in mind this review may contain spoilers for the first book if you haven’t started the series yet (plus, if you’re still not on the Murderbot Diaries train, you’re really missing out).Following Murderbot’s leave-taking from its former team of human allies, our protagonist now has a precarious kind of freedom to decide where to take the next step. But with so much of its past shrouded in mystery, Murderbot is resolved to fill in the missing details in its memory bank first, especially given its violent history. There are so many questions still left to answer, such as how Murderbot went rogue in the first place, an event that resulted in a killing spree and the deaths of many humans. Was it Murderbot who hacked and disabled its own governor module, causing the rampage? Or was someone else responsible for those directives? To find out, Murderbot must first uncover where the massacre took place, and to do so it will need to pass itself off as human in order to travel freely.Just its luck though, Murderbot gets stuck on a transport whose AI sees right through its cover story and disguise. But instead of alerting the authorities, the AI transport, called ART, decides to help Murderbot learn the truth. Together, the two of them narrow their destination down to a mining planet. ART proceeds to help Murderbot with augments and alterations so that it can pose as a human bodyguard and join a research team down to the planet’s facilities, where Murderbot will hopefully find the data it needs.I always like to say that it’s the characters that bring a book to life and make me feel a connection, and this is especially true of the Murderbot Diaries. Murderbot is a part-organic and part-synthetic android, but its personality, as it were, is also decidedly unlike that of any robot I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading about. Murderbot is still constrained by a lot of its original programming, so its voice could not really be considered human by any stretch of the imagination. And yet, it still displays a lot human-like qualities I find endearing, not least of all its love for the campy entertainment feeds. Considering how Murderbot doesn’t even like humans all that much, it’s amusing how fascinated it is by the lives of the ones in its favorite soap operas. Even better is how Murderbot picks up so much of what it knows about human social cues from the fictional characters in shows with names like Worldhoppers and Rose and Fall of Sanctuary Moon—hiliarious!Artificial Condition also stands out because of the very special relationship between Murderbot and ART. While the humans come into play later in the story, I loved how for the most part this book was all about the two AI. Is this the beginning of a beautiful new friendship? I sure hope so, even if the two of them didn’t exactly get off on the right foot. It was interesting to see how their programming differed, one being a SecUnit with the other being a powerful, albeit often lonely, onboard computer on a long-haul transport ship. Somewhat to my surprise, it was ART who was savvier to the social ways of humans, teaching Murderbot how to blend in (and also pointing out everything Murderbot has been doing wrong, much to our protagonist’s chagrin). This introduction to ART opens up the world a little bit, as we’ve been led to believe thus far that Murderbot is something of an anomaly among AI. With ART, however, we now know there may be other bots floating around that do not always perform in accordance to their programming, which begs the question: what other possibilities are out there?I, for one, am looking forward to finding out. With each book in The Murderbot Diaries, Martha Wells continues to expand and explore the personality of her protagonist, putting Murderbot in new situations where it must learn and adapt. Despite being somewhat prickly and a little awkward, Murderbot is charming in its own way, and I just love reading these adventures through the eyes of such a compelling character. I just can’t wait to find out more as Murderbot carries on its investigation to dig up its past and find out more about its identity.
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  • Robin (Bridge Four)
    January 1, 1970
    I thought Murderbot all on their own was great in the first book, but then they teamed up with a semi-sentient ship better known to the reader as ART or (Asshole Research Transport) and everything was even better. Our favorite Cyborg SecUnit self titled Murderbot has left the travelers from the last book to set out on their own to find more details out about what happened in the incident in which they are said to have killed 57 humans in a malfunction. Murderbot had no idea that the vessel on a I thought Murderbot all on their own was great in the first book, but then they teamed up with a semi-sentient ship better known to the reader as ART or (Asshole Research Transport) and everything was even better. Our favorite Cyborg SecUnit self titled Murderbot has left the travelers from the last book to set out on their own to find more details out about what happened in the incident in which they are said to have killed 57 humans in a malfunction. Murderbot had no idea that the vessel on a routine cargo run would be more alive than it seemed or that it would want to help in any way but hey cargo runs are boring and this seems like it will be a good time. Plus, Murderbot brought media with them to watch along the way.I loved the dialogue between ART and Murderbot it was pretty funny and this was a friendship I could really get behind. “ART said, What does it want?To kill all the humans, I answered.I could feel ART metaphorically clutch its function. If there were no humans, there would be no crew to protect and no reason to do research and fill its databases. It said, That is irrational.I know, I said, if the humans were dead, who would make the media? It was so outrageous, it sounded like something a human would say.” But we can’t have a story with no humans and so Murderbot picks up a security contract along the way as cover. I really like how we are getting more backstory to Murderbot and the defining moment of their lives. It is coming a little at a time and I have some theories after this trip, like (view spoiler)[don’t read unless you really want to know what my theory is since it could be a spoiler(view spoiler)[I was a sexbotcomfortbot in my previous life (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)] kind of theories. I can’t wait to find out if that one is right.Murderbots interactions with Humans are getting better but it is still easier to hack the security feed and watch the exchange from a distance than to just look at them through its own eyes. Even the words of wisdom out of Murderbots mouth give some insight to what might have happened before "Sometimes people do things to you that you can't do anything about. You just have to survive it and go on.” I think I liked this book even more than the first and can’t wait to see what the next adventure has in store for us.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audiobook as narrated by Kevin R. Free. I was more into the narrator this time because I wasn't as suprised at his lack of femaleness as I was last time. Overall the narration was excellent.Ok, so I like Murderbot. I think I liked this outing with Murderbot more than I liked the first, possibly because the "friendship" (?) with ART made this a bit more interesting for me. (Or maybe it was just that there was more snark?)I do wish there was some sort of explanation about the inc I listened to the audiobook as narrated by Kevin R. Free. I was more into the narrator this time because I wasn't as suprised at his lack of femaleness as I was last time. Overall the narration was excellent.Ok, so I like Murderbot. I think I liked this outing with Murderbot more than I liked the first, possibly because the "friendship" (?) with ART made this a bit more interesting for me. (Or maybe it was just that there was more snark?)I do wish there was some sort of explanation about the increasing self-awareness that Murderbot shows in this story. Especially because there was actually even a part of this particular story that could have been used to easily "cheat" a reason into being (view spoiler)[I mean the whole surgery/upgrade aspect could have easily included some sort of change to the "self-regulator" or something (hide spoiler)].So far this is a fun little series of short reads. I can't help thinking it would be a spectacular series if each of the stories were fleshed out a bit more -- I wouldn't mind real novel-length instalments instead of these smaller morsels. I'm looking forward to the next one, but I'm not in a rush to get there.
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  • Evelina | AvalinahsBooks
    January 1, 1970
    Murderbot finally returns, and I've been impatiently waiting for it ever since I read the first installment. It's by far the most exciting novella series I am following right now. I did not expect this direction! And I definitely approve. It was slow going at first and I wasn't sure what was happening, took a little while to take off so it made me skeptical, BUT... When it did, it was wonderful. So, if you're serious about reading this book, stop reading this review right now - press like (I d Murderbot finally returns, and I've been impatiently waiting for it ever since I read the first installment. It's by far the most exciting novella series I am following right now. I did not expect this direction! And I definitely approve. It was slow going at first and I wasn't sure what was happening, took a little while to take off so it made me skeptical, BUT... When it did, it was wonderful. So, if you're serious about reading this book, stop reading this review right now - press like (I didn't just say that muahaha) and click away. Because you will have THE BEST reading experience if you go into it not knowing what's going on at all. If you want to keep reading, it's not my fault if you get spoiled! (I must also warn that this will surely contain spoilers for the first book, and possibly even this one.) Warned you. Ready? You can also read this post on my blog. 5 Reasons To Read Artificial Condition #1. You Still Love Murderbot, Don't You? So what if Murderbot leaves their crew and runs? They're still Murderbot. They're still just as much a grumpy cat as they were! And yet, they still care just as much. My heart will always sing for Murderbot. Reason one why I'll always want to come back to this series. But let's agree that this reason is a little bit obvious - and move on. #2. Some Tough Decisions I really feel like this series is a keeper - it's not just episodic, it's long term. If Murderbot wants to blend into society, or just the world - and not get caught - they have to make some tough decisions and change themselves. This brings up a whole load of problems to do with misrepresentation - people see SecUnits as heartless, cruel and inhuman beings, when that really is the biggest lie ever, at least, in the case of our Murderbot here. If you have been misrepresented, you will be able to relate here. It's also beautiful how Martha Wells manages to put tough topics like these in a novella about, well, basically "robots and sh*t", to simplify it. It's fascinating. #3. So You Love Reading About AI Any AIDAN fans out there? (Hey, I know you're there. AIDAN was great.) Basically, in Artificial Condition , we meet ART (...Asshole Research Transport) and it's loveable. It's smart. It knows it's smarter than you. It's sarcastic and dominating. And it cares. It cares so much it can't watch shows about spaceship crews dying without going into overload. Oh, and it needs a companion to watch the shows. Without a companion, it doesn't quite know how to work out the emotions it should feel.It's absolutely adorable. I loved ART. You'll love it too. #4. Mighty Fine On Diversity In my review of the first book, I talked about how easy it is to identify with Murderbot whoever you are - because they don't really have a gender. Aside from this obviously continuing, there is some other stuff in Artificial Condition. Like collective marriages. Non-binary genders. Murderbot also happens to be both emotionally and even functionally ace (they don't have any reproductive system at all) - so while it's not contemporary or human rep, it discusses many problems aces face in society, like Murderbot does too. People tend to think Moderbot is cold, feelingless and inhuman - when in fact, they are more caring and human than many people. This fits well with the rep and societal attitudes aces tend to have to deal with. (I know Murderbot isn't actually human, so that might pose a problem for some of you - but that didn't stop me from identifying with them, so I'm not using it in a negative context at all.) I really appreciated this in the story - Murderbot wants to stay ace (I mean physically, cause that's the only changeable part. Another things aces struggle to get everyone to understand. You can't change your mind about who you are.) They don't want to change, god forbid - even if it means it will be more dangerous that way and harder to hide. And it's okay not to have to change. #5. It's Different, But The Same?? See, that's the oddest thing about Artificial Condition . It starts off very different, there are no humans. Nothing biologically alive even (I only said biologically!) And yet..? It's still the same story. Even though the dynamics is so different, you get the same feel. It's unexpected and beautiful. You're definitely still getting the same Murderbot experience here. Other Books You Might Like I feel like you would love Artificial Condition if you loved The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet, as well as A Closed and Common Orbit - but Orbit would be closer, because it deals a lot of with augmented or artificial life, as well as AI. Chances are, you'd even like it a lot if you liked Illuminae (that's the AIDAN bit.) I thank Tor.com for giving me a copy of the book in exchange to my honest opinion. Receiving the book for free does not affect my opinion.Read Post On My Blog | My Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter
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  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent installment in the Murderbot Diaries. Can't wait for Rogue Protocol.
  • Iryna *Book and Sword*
    January 1, 1970
    4.75/5 starsWill there ever be a team better than ART and MurderBot?? The interactions were flawless. The humor was impeccable. ART's reactions to the tv-show had me howling with laughter. I knew from the first pages of Artificial Condition that I was going to love it. The start was the strongest that I've ever encountered in a book. The perfect pacing kept up throughout the whole story, and if I hadn't been as busy as I've been I'd have read the whole thing in a matter of 2 hours, but alas it s 4.75/5 starsWill there ever be a team better than ART and MurderBot?? The interactions were flawless. The humor was impeccable. ART's reactions to the tv-show had me howling with laughter. I knew from the first pages of Artificial Condition that I was going to love it. The start was the strongest that I've ever encountered in a book. The perfect pacing kept up throughout the whole story, and if I hadn't been as busy as I've been I'd have read the whole thing in a matter of 2 hours, but alas it stretched out over 3 days (booooo work!). The Murderbot Diaries is a gem and I am so happy that I found it. It's fueling my apparently never ending thirst for sci-fi just perfectly. My WEBSITEMy INSTAGRAMMy WORDPRESS BLOG
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  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Another solid story by Martha Wells. The continuation of this story is certainly keeping me interested. I didn't think it was as strong as book one, but I think a lot of that was the first book had an original side to it, with us learning all about the personality side of the Murder Bot. In Book 2, that is not original and there is no where near as much human interaction and the early awkwardness of Murder Bots interactions was reduced. However, in saying that, the interaction with a ships highl Another solid story by Martha Wells. The continuation of this story is certainly keeping me interested. I didn't think it was as strong as book one, but I think a lot of that was the first book had an original side to it, with us learning all about the personality side of the Murder Bot. In Book 2, that is not original and there is no where near as much human interaction and the early awkwardness of Murder Bots interactions was reduced. However, in saying that, the interaction with a ships highly intelligent AI was a lot of fun.I am definitely recommending this series to pretty much every one, even if you are not much of a scifi fan, there is a lot to like about the story and the writing. I do have a issue though. Currently these books are small, I mean this should be the second half of the first book. I don't expect every book to be 500 pages, but just over 100 pages is not really a 'full sized' book. So wtf are Amazon charging us like it is?! $12.95 for this novella. They are projection the same price for book 3 and 4. I totally understand that the author does not set the price at Amazon, but I seriously hope that Wells will give us 300 pages in book 3 if we are going to have to pay $12.95.
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  • Cathy (cathepsut)
    January 1, 1970
    A quick read. Which annoys me even more considering the ridiculously high price of the ebook. I even considered docking a star of the rating for that, but it wouldn‘t be fair to the story. It was good, but not as good as the first installment. I found it a bit thinner on plot and suspense, although I liked the way our murderbot keeps exploring its non-humanity. The addition of ART was fun. The bad guy was not very bad or scary. Regardless, I read it in two sittings and I am craving more. Good en A quick read. Which annoys me even more considering the ridiculously high price of the ebook. I even considered docking a star of the rating for that, but it wouldn‘t be fair to the story. It was good, but not as good as the first installment. I found it a bit thinner on plot and suspense, although I liked the way our murderbot keeps exploring its non-humanity. The addition of ART was fun. The bad guy was not very bad or scary. Regardless, I read it in two sittings and I am craving more. Good entertainment.Exceprt at the author‘s blog here:https://marthawells.dreamwidth.org/41...
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  • Justine
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars I thought this was excellent. I absolutely love the voices Wells has created for her characters. They are all so distinctly individual and unique. ART was a definite favourite and I hope we see this character again in future instalments.In this one Murderbot continues to struggle with hir constantly evolving personhood. Ze is probably going to have to acquire a name at some point, which will likely be as difficult as every other step so far has been.
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