This Time Will Be Different
Katsuyamas never quit—but seventeen-year-old CJ doesn’t even know where to start. She’s never lived up to her mom’s type A ambition, and she’s perfectly happy just helping her aunt, Hannah, at their family’s flower shop.She doesn’t buy into Hannah’s romantic ideas about flowers and their hidden meanings, but when it comes to arranging the perfect bouquet, CJ discovers a knack she never knew she had. A skill she might even be proud of.Then her mom decides to sell the shop—to the family who swindled CJ’s grandparents when thousands of Japanese Americans were sent to internment camps during WWII. Soon a rift threatens to splinter CJ’s family, friends, and their entire Northern California community; and for the first time, CJ has found something she wants to fight for.

This Time Will Be Different Details

TitleThis Time Will Be Different
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 4th, 2019
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN-139780062473462
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Fiction

This Time Will Be Different Review

  • Chaima ✨ شيماء
    January 1, 1970
    Time to play a game called Am I Actually Interested in This Book? or Is The Girl on The Cover Just Pretty?
  • Mackenzi
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This. Book. Is. Excellent.
  • Sofie
    January 1, 1970
    I am a humble bisexual. I see a pretty girl on the cover. I want to read book with pretty girl on the cover.UPDATE: Always trust book covers featuring pretty girls! They haven’t failed me yet!
  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Me every time I try to eat gummy bears and then ten minutes later poop my guts out
  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    This somehow did so much more than I expected it to, even though I guess the cover copy is clear what it's about, but there was just...so much that was so good. I definitely came away learning a lot more about Japanese internment and its aftereffects than I remember absorbing from high school, but I think the way CJ was coming from a family that historically hadn't really...prospered in the area of romantic love and the ways both that and her own past kind of shut down her heart was really lovel This somehow did so much more than I expected it to, even though I guess the cover copy is clear what it's about, but there was just...so much that was so good. I definitely came away learning a lot more about Japanese internment and its aftereffects than I remember absorbing from high school, but I think the way CJ was coming from a family that historically hadn't really...prospered in the area of romantic love and the ways both that and her own past kind of shut down her heart was really lovely too. I love when characters are formed by their experiences, by nature and nurture, and I think Sugiura nailed all the different kinds of things that build who we are and how they come into our lives, from outside factors like bigotry's effect on economics to things we don't even realize we're observing. I also just really love how everyone, and I mean everyone, is deeply flawed in real, human ways, and they each come to realize it about themselves in these sort of staggered moments, identifying their weaknesses and why they make their choices. There aren't easy answers and a lot of these conversations, including the ugly ones, are just so real. I don't think every reader will love where everything lands, but that's something I particularly love about the way this book is crafted.Also, because I know people always wonder about queer rep when an author's last book was queer: the love interest is bi, the MC's best friend and the MC's adversary are both lesbians, and the word aromantic is on the page, although it doesn't actually apply to anyone in the story. Also, almost everyone in the book is of color.
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  • Cassandra {semi-hiatus}
    January 1, 1970
    This book handles the racism buried in American history, especially directed toward Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor, by smacking it in the face with this 400-page tome of truth. Humorous, diverse, and unapologetic, This Time Will Be Different is a masterpiece that attacks the term 'model minority' with the same artful skill that The Hate U Give used to address police brutality.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    This book better win all the damn awards this year. Full review to come!
  • Rachel Strolle
    January 1, 1970
    oh i loved this
  • ⋆ lils ⋆
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5 starsTHIS BOOK!!! There's so much I took away from "This Time Will Be Different" and I'm so thankful I picked it up when I did. I originally received an ARC of this at a local book festival I went to this year and the synopsis instantly captured my attention and I knew I had to pick this up asap. I started reading it a while ago but I didn't have a lot of time to finish when things started to get busy but I'm so happy I finally finished it. Guys! I'm not kidding when I say I need everyone 4.5/5 starsTHIS BOOK!!! There's so much I took away from "This Time Will Be Different" and I'm so thankful I picked it up when I did. I originally received an ARC of this at a local book festival I went to this year and the synopsis instantly captured my attention and I knew I had to pick this up asap. I started reading it a while ago but I didn't have a lot of time to finish when things started to get busy but I'm so happy I finally finished it. Guys! I'm not kidding when I say I need everyone to read this!! It's such an eye-opening and flat out entertaining novel and once I got into it I never wanted to put it down.My absolute favorite thing about "This Time Will Be Different" is how it handles sensitive topics such as racism and the internment of Japanese-Americans during WW2. I've constantly been on the lookout for books where I can educate myself more as I read, and this book was no exception. I think it handled these topics wonderfully and I'm so happy I now know more about them and got to read from that point of view. Also, this novel was simply funny and entertaining in so many ways. I found myself laughing at least once a chapter and all the characters were fantastic. Every character had their own unique development too and by the end, they had all learned something new about their behavior or social justice issues. I thought CJ was a great main character as well and I adored reading from her POV.I'm just gonna put this here: Misa Sugiura is so freaking underrated. Her writing style is amazing and so fluid and also she just writes kickass stories. It's that simple. Everyone needs to go follow her and buy her books and read them now because she deserves the world. That's all.I only have two minor problems with this book. First of all, CJ was sometimes seriously annoying. I'm 95% sure this was intentional and I totally understand the merit of that, but she was still annoying nonetheless. Secondly, there wasn't enough romance! I know romance wasn't the main plot of this novel by any means, but I was thinking we were gonna get some other romance besides just a kiss from what I read on the synopsis. This book handles family, friends, and self-discovery in a unique and diverse way. Not to mention is hilarious. Please go read this right now!This book does handle some pretty heavy topics at times! I've listed the trigger warnings that I can think of, but please search online to see if there are more detailed ones if you need to :)TW: racism, sexism, teen pregnancy, abortion, strained family relationships, the internment of Japanese-Americans during WW2, homophobia
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This Time Will Be Different is a YA contemporary novel.It is a coming of age story for 17 year old CJ. Her great-grandparents lost everything to the McAllister family (white family) during the Japanese American internment.Now CJ's family owns a flower shop. Her mom wants nothing to do with it. But CJ and her aunt Hannah love it.The narrator is CJ (1st person POV). The main story is intertwined with history and some of CJ's past.This book looks at a lot of interesting and serious topics: racism, This Time Will Be Different is a YA contemporary novel.It is a coming of age story for 17 year old CJ. Her great-grandparents lost everything to the McAllister family (white family) during the Japanese American internment.Now CJ's family owns a flower shop. Her mom wants nothing to do with it. But CJ and her aunt Hannah love it.The narrator is CJ (1st person POV). The main story is intertwined with history and some of CJ's past.This book looks at a lot of interesting and serious topics: racism, lesbian and gay issues, Japanese history in America.This story has some romance. But to me this was more a story about history, friendship and family. Truthfully for most of the book I was unclear who her actual love interest would be. There was a love triangle.This is a cute story. CJ's best friend Emily is a lesbian. And another character is bi-sexual. I think that her friend being gay worked perfectly for the story. But the other character being bi made much less sense to me.There was a part of CJ's past that we learned bit by bit in addition to the main story. I found this part of the story very interesting. Although I wanted to learn more. Also there was another key part to the story that was left un-answered to me. And I wanted more. (view spoiler)[The first was CJ being pregnant. And the second was about her dad. It seemed weird that Owen said that kid looked exactly like her. But that was never explored. (hide spoiler)]Overall, this book looked at some difficult but important topics. I learned a lot about Japanese history in America. And it was interesting to see the issues that minorities face.Thanks to edelweiss and HarperTeen for allowing me to read this book.
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  • Camryn
    January 1, 1970
    OKAY, WOW. Let me list everything I love about this book1) The family set up. I really liked the fact that CJ was raised by a single mom, wondered about her dad, but didn't go on a search for him. Her aunt lived with them and helped raise her and she called her aunt by her first name. She says her aunt feels more like a sister. This reminds me a lot of my own relationship with some of my aunts, and that was so cool to see here.2) Owen was bisexual. I kind of love seeing male love interests who a OKAY, WOW. Let me list everything I love about this book1) The family set up. I really liked the fact that CJ was raised by a single mom, wondered about her dad, but didn't go on a search for him. Her aunt lived with them and helped raise her and she called her aunt by her first name. She says her aunt feels more like a sister. This reminds me a lot of my own relationship with some of my aunts, and that was so cool to see here.2) Owen was bisexual. I kind of love seeing male love interests who are bisexual. And CJ wasn't turned off by it or wonder if he'd like boys more than her or anything. I love that.3) It deals with history and how history impacts you even if other people think you should get over it. It impacts families and livelihoods and it isn't just something you can get rid of. Sugiura is analyzing things like renaming buildings that were named for problematic people and trying to make history right, which was honestly so cool and I'm super into.4) I hated the mom for most of the book, but you honestly really understand where she's coming from as things go along, even if I didn't agree with her or how she went about doing things. And you know she loves CJ.5) There's an abortion that's just so casual that I love.6) There was discussion and background on what the model minority myth is and why it's problematic for Asian people and also Black people and puts distance between the communities. I think this is maybe the first book I've seen it laid out so clearly, from how it started to how it lingers, and it addressed the fact that some Asian people still think they work harder or are better than Black people.7) CJ is flawed, but it's super understandable and I didn't hate her for it, even when she was being kind of annoying. 8) There was discussion about white saviors and how being queer doesn't mean that your white privilege is cancelled out, which I was kind of eternally grateful for.9) I love that the author touched upon so many different things and it didn't feel like a very special episode or like a big deal or anything. It was just sort of a natural part of being in high school and things that come up. 10) CJ is disappointed with her mother's views and does something to go against them, like she's actually a little activist and I loved seeing that in a context that didn't have to do with people dying (ie police brutality.) 11) I actually really loved Brynn. 12) Discussion about owning up to the mistakes you've made.13) The cover is perfect!!!14) CJ's voice and the little interludes between the chaptersI just really, really liked this book and I sort of was captured from the first chapter. I didn't finish the author's first book and I understand she had a rough time writing this one, but I read it in a day while walking around and running errands and just really, really enjoy it a lot. Goodness.
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  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5* Oh I loved this for so many reasons - The characters were wonderful, lovable and flawed. They felt real. They were messy teenagers who had good intentions at heart but made mistakes, were called out on them and were allowed to grow from those mistakes. - The writing was so incredibly easy to read and flowed beautifully. I essentially devoured this in one sitting and despite the raging sunburn I got from refusing to move inside until I’d finished the book, I regret nothing. - I thought the w 4.5* Oh I loved this for so many reasons - The characters were wonderful, lovable and flawed. They felt real. They were messy teenagers who had good intentions at heart but made mistakes, were called out on them and were allowed to grow from those mistakes. - The writing was so incredibly easy to read and flowed beautifully. I essentially devoured this in one sitting and despite the raging sunburn I got from refusing to move inside until I’d finished the book, I regret nothing. - I thought the way this explored history (specifically that of Japanese-Americans and the period of Japanese internment camps) was superb. Not only did it dive into a piece of history I’ve not seen discussed in YA, it did it in a way that was accessible and proved how greatly the past still continues to negatively impact the lives of people today. - The book touched on so many things from racism and sexuality to money and abortion and yet, it never felt like there was ‘too much’. Everything fit together to create a story that felt organic, without the ‘big’ issues belittling the ‘smaller’ ones. - I adored the structure of the book, with CJ’s interludes and mini dives into the different faucets of her life and history. It made the reading experience so much fun and added such a fantastic a depth and sarcastic humour to CJ. I’m always a sucker for books that deviate from classic novel structure, so I thoroughly enjoyed these segments. - The multiple relationships, romantic, platonic and familial, were all brilliantly fleshed out and explored. I loved the explorations of CJ’s relationship with each individual character and amazingly enough, couldn’t point a finger at a favourite as I thought they were all fantastic and important in their own way to the story. All in all, I just really enjoyed this book. It was diverse (with nearly all the characters being people of colour, the love interest being bi and the MC’s best friend and her love interest being lesbians), funny, enlightening, adorable at times and told through a voice that captivated me from the first page.TW: racism, homophobia
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4.5 StarsCJ knew she would never live up to her mother's expectations. She had tried, and failed, at a myriad of endeavors, but the one thing she had some pride in was her work at the family flower shop. Unfortunately, the business was on the brink of collapsing, and if CJ and her aunt Hannah were unable to turn it around, her mother would be selling the shop. As CJ tried to breathe new life into the business, she discovered a lot of things about herself and her history, which would grea Rating: 4.5 StarsCJ knew she would never live up to her mother's expectations. She had tried, and failed, at a myriad of endeavors, but the one thing she had some pride in was her work at the family flower shop. Unfortunately, the business was on the brink of collapsing, and if CJ and her aunt Hannah were unable to turn it around, her mother would be selling the shop. As CJ tried to breathe new life into the business, she discovered a lot of things about herself and her history, which would greatly impact her future.I was so captivated by this book. Sugiura did an incredible job combining an honest look at the ugly things in America's past and present with family drama and everyday teen life. She tackled a wide array of social issues, but did so with such care and finesse, that it played out in a natural and organic manner. The cast of characters in this book were quite diverse, and I think the diversity was used well to explore each issue from multiple points of view.Sugiura's writing style contributed greatly to my enjoyment of this book, as well.First and foremost, I loved CJ. I found her to be so unapologetically honest and raw. She was flawed, as were almost all the major players in this book, but she was becoming a better version of herself with each new discovery. The way the author utilized flashbacks and wove in historical facts was also a plus. The small breaks in the narrative were well timed and well placed, making the story even better.There are so many things to love about CJ's story, but in the name of brevity, I will do a quick list of delights for me:• Flower magic! I thought it was fantastic learning about all the different qualities associated with the various flora. • Owen's geeky history t-shirts - I immediately googled many of these, and am ordering one for my sister (she's a history teacher).• Female friendship - Em and CJ hits some bumps, but their friendship ran deep. • The exploration of family dynamics - the relationships between CJ & her mom, CJ and her aunt, and her aunt and her mom were all pretty complicated. It was interesting to see how each of these women were shaped by their past, as well as how they shaped each other. • An adorable romance - There are multiple romances in this book, and I really liked the way they all played out. There was a quote, at the end of the book, which I thought was beautiful and did a great job of summing up the essence of this story. I felt this book was about working through the past, learning from mistakes, and taking steps to make sure the future will be better.There's no point in dwelling on the past, but you can acknowledge it and try to make things better. Or try a new way, and know that this time will be different. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. This beautiful book is full of so many things; family, identity, difficult choices, unexpected love, and forgiveness. The answers CJ looks for might not be the ones she seeks, but that doesn't always mean failure. Sugiura knows how to write a complicated teen facing coming of age issues without glossing them over as trivial, something not everyone can do. Ultimately, This Time Will Be Different's theme is the intricate, realistic life of a girl, and Sugiura makes the ordinary extraord 4.5 stars. This beautiful book is full of so many things; family, identity, difficult choices, unexpected love, and forgiveness. The answers CJ looks for might not be the ones she seeks, but that doesn't always mean failure. Sugiura knows how to write a complicated teen facing coming of age issues without glossing them over as trivial, something not everyone can do. Ultimately, This Time Will Be Different's theme is the intricate, realistic life of a girl, and Sugiura makes the ordinary extraordinary.
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  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    January 1, 1970
    The period of Japanese internment camps in the United States and Canada is so rarely discussed, and honestly, I don't really remembering it being covered much at all when I was in school, so I hope this book gives me some insight on what they all went through.
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  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    This Time Will Be Different is an endearing novel about family and family history, flowers and the magic of the language of flowers, and friendship, crushes and romance. It’s about growing up, discovering more about the world and yourself and your place in it. It’s about standing up for what’s right and learning to move on. It’s fun, cute and romantic and sure to please YA contemporary fiction readers.CJ Katusyma likes working in her family’s florist. It’s perhaps the one thing she hasn’t yet me This Time Will Be Different is an endearing novel about family and family history, flowers and the magic of the language of flowers, and friendship, crushes and romance. It’s about growing up, discovering more about the world and yourself and your place in it. It’s about standing up for what’s right and learning to move on. It’s fun, cute and romantic and sure to please YA contemporary fiction readers.CJ Katusyma likes working in her family’s florist. It’s perhaps the one thing she hasn’t yet messed up and while it doesn’t exactly make her mother proud of her at least she’s not a disappointment in her Aunt Hannah’s eyes. But when CJ’s mother threatens to sell the shop to none other than the man who stole it from CJ’s ancestors, CJ, Hannah and their new assistant, Oliver (dorky history geek and, ok, yes, slightly cute), plan to turn things around and prevent the sale. But life gets even more complicated with her best friend starts crushing on the sworn enemy, CJ is torn between geeky-cute Oliver and her long-term crush who is finally showing her some interest, and her relationship with her mother deteriorates. Romance plays a big part of this story. Crushes, first love, breakups, heartbreak, and watching your best friend falling in love, first dates, old romantic histories, and even the relationships of CJ’s aunt. There is also a focus on LGBT relationships thanks to CJ’s best friend and their involvement in the LGBT+ community and awareness raising.Through flashback sections between the main chapters, the readers are given insight into CJ’s family history and major events in her life. There is actually quite an interesting reveal within this about CJ. I won’t say what as it feels spoilerish but I’ll include the themes it encompasses at the base of my review.I love books about nature, gardening or flowers and I really enjoyed the floristry aspect of the book. The language of flowers and CJ’s semi-belief in their power, and her work in her family’s florist was really cool.This Time Will Be Different is an Important book that covers Important issues (yes, capital I). From LGBT+ awareness, to racial prejudice and righting the wrongs of the past, This Time Will Be Different weaves in some powerful messages that CJ actively fights for and believes in.The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library
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  • maya b
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you.this book was amazingthis cover is amazing and i feel amazingCJ was a character i related to on a spiritual level. I am so in love with her to be honest. This book is about a girl and feminism and racism. And all of that spoke to me. CJ is a teenage asian girl who is struggling to figure out when she is good at so she can be and I quote a #winner. CJ is sarcastic and loyal and p ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you.this book was amazingthis cover is amazing and i feel amazingCJ was a character i related to on a spiritual level. I am so in love with her to be honest. This book is about a girl and feminism and racism. And all of that spoke to me. CJ is a teenage asian girl who is struggling to figure out when she is good at so she can be and I quote a #winner. CJ is sarcastic and loyal and protective and an overall lovely person. Her mother got pregnant from a one night stand which resulted in the birthing of CJ. CJs ancestors were coned our of their by the Mcallister’s when they were sent to the Japanese internment vamps and even decades later the McAllisters are still profiting off the land the stole not only from the Kuriyamas but from other Japanese land as well. Not to mention CJs mom works for the Mcallister’s which makes things a little between her and Cjs aunt Hanna- who is currently running a flower shop that was purchased back from the McAllisters who are trying to buy it again decades later. Cj has found her place with her aunt and Owen, the cute bisexual nerd who works at the flower shop and among flower magic. CJ feels she finally belongs somewhere but how long will it last?
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  • Chloe
    January 1, 1970
    *Spoiler free*I saw 'flower shop' and was intrigued. It sounded like something different and like something I haven't read before. From the summary, it also sounded like this book would tackle complicated issues that don't really have a right answer. I wanted to know more.I've never read a book with a main character like CJ, but I'm so glad I got the chance to. I connected with her in a way I've never connected to another character. CJ feels like she doesn't really have a 'thing', something she' *Spoiler free*I saw 'flower shop' and was intrigued. It sounded like something different and like something I haven't read before. From the summary, it also sounded like this book would tackle complicated issues that don't really have a right answer. I wanted to know more.I've never read a book with a main character like CJ, but I'm so glad I got the chance to. I connected with her in a way I've never connected to another character. CJ feels like she doesn't really have a 'thing', something she's really good at. She feels like she is subpar at everything. She kinda feels like a failure. And wow, I have had those thoughts before. I have felt the subparness that CJ felt and just looking at that feeling and not knowing what to do with it. I was so touched by her character. I have learned to deal with those feelings and I loved seeing go down her path on how to deal with hers.Teens are represented so accurately in this book. It's completely amazing. The characters, their thoughts, and the situations they are put in are so reminiscent of real life. The way CJ thinks, is so close to how I think and how I've seen other teens talk. I don't see that very often, probably because I read a lot of fantasy haha, but I thought it was really cool. CJ has feelings she doesn't know how to deal with. She gets petty, angry, and upset. She messes up. It's so, so real. She always owns up to her mistakes and grows. So many characters in this book want to do better. I loved seeing that.This book also included a lot of recent events and I actually believed this book was taking place around our time. A lot of contemporaries feel like they are in this weird time vortex where I can never quite pinpoint when it's taking place. I know this is due how slow publishing is and I actually don't mind it! It was just really cool to for this book to feel so touch with modern times.Another theme that runs through this book doing what you want, doing your best, and being fine with what you want to do. Also, doing better and being better and making things different than last time. I loved seeing that.All in all, this book deals with the complicated, messy reality of life. I loved the casual queer characters, the theme of standing up for what you believe in, and learning to accept yourself. And the flowers! They were very relevant throughout the book and it was cool to learn more about their magic. I can't wait to see this book on shelves!
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  • Laura (bbliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    Going to post my full review a bit closer to the release date!
  • Gordon Jack
    January 1, 1970
    By the time we meet CJ, she's well past thinking "this time will be different" and well into thinking "I will always be a failure.” I liked her immediately. The one place she doesn't feel like a loser is in her aunt's flower shop, but it's about to be sold to the very family that stole it from her family when they were sent to the Japanese internment camps. Determined to save the family business (again), CJ finds the motivation to make a difference. Her noble quest doesn't prevent her from makin By the time we meet CJ, she's well past thinking "this time will be different" and well into thinking "I will always be a failure.” I liked her immediately. The one place she doesn't feel like a loser is in her aunt's flower shop, but it's about to be sold to the very family that stole it from her family when they were sent to the Japanese internment camps. Determined to save the family business (again), CJ finds the motivation to make a difference. Her noble quest doesn't prevent her from making mistakes though, and in her zeal she jeopardizes friendships and romantic relationships. It's a big, engrossing story, one that uses one family's struggle to tackle big social issues. What I love so much about This Time Will Be Different is that it fully acknowledges how complicated these issues are. Sugiura gives us both the family and our nation's history to help us understand how CJ's present is as thorny as the roses she sells. Plus there are lines that make you laugh out loud because they perfectly capture CJ's conflicted feelings, "He doesn't reply, and I feel a little sorry for being so blunt, but not sorry enough to apologize because gahhh, Owen and his relentless optimism."
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Grade: CAn e-galley was provided by HarperCollins via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: I am always big proponent of "the longer, the better" when it comes to books, but sometimes...longer isn't better. This Time Will Be Different clocks in at 400 pages and I felt that length throughout the whole book. While there are some good themes throughout, I think the plot needed to be condensed to something at least 50, if not 75 to 100, pages shorter.I wanted to Grade: CAn e-galley was provided by HarperCollins via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: I am always big proponent of "the longer, the better" when it comes to books, but sometimes...longer isn't better. This Time Will Be Different clocks in at 400 pages and I felt that length throughout the whole book. While there are some good themes throughout, I think the plot needed to be condensed to something at least 50, if not 75 to 100, pages shorter.I wanted to read TTWBD because I was interested in exploring how the internment of Japanese Americans has affected the present. Most of the history behind the present day is told in a super quick summary, though, which was a bit disappointing. I definitely felt that theme driving one of the main plots, which was great, but it felt kind of...weak? Like I had trouble seeing the connection in the present-day and why it was still such a big deal that the Katsuyamas were continuing to hold this grudge. When it began to tie into the community at large, that helped. There was plenty of good commentary all around about social activism and friendship and how people can grow.There's kind of a love triangle in that CJ has had a crush on this one guy forever and he starts to express an interest in her, but at the same time everyone in her life thinks she'd be cute with Owen, the new guy at the flower shop. I definitely thought she and Owen had better chemistry, which was the point I guess. Besides getting the Katsuyama family history, we also get CJ's romantic history, which just felt kind of...unnecessary? Like I don't mind that she dated other guys before the book, but I didn't need a run-down of the relationships.Content warnings: bigotry, racism, foul language, underage drinking and drug use, references to sleeping together and an abortionThe Verdict: Overall, I was just kind of disappointed. With such a pretty cover, I expected the inside to be just as good.
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  • theresa 🌸🥑
    January 1, 1970
    ahhh that cover was too good to be true.the story was not bad,the political message really damn important but i found everyone in this book super annoying and imo 400 pages was too long for a book where nothing really happens?THAT COVER THOUGH
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    This is such an incredible book. So relevant to our time, yet such a classic story of finding oneself in the face of oppression. I'm completely in love with this book, and you will be too.
  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    The thing that attracted me to this book was that it’d be partially set in a flower shop. And that the main character, CJ, is conflicted by what is expected of her for her future and what she’s happy doing, which is working at the family’s family shop...Review: http://bit.ly/2MUzDNx
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. (will probably be bumped up to a 5 soon).I loved this book. I loved it so much that I don't even know where to start. The characters - CJ and her friends and family. The relationships show how fully realized these characters were written. And, the history of the Japanese American internment during one of the more shameful parts of our history. CJ's grandparents were unlawfully imprisoned and the financial losses and outright racism were staggering for all the Japanese Americans. Throu 4.5 stars. (will probably be bumped up to a 5 soon).I loved this book. I loved it so much that I don't even know where to start. The characters - CJ and her friends and family. The relationships show how fully realized these characters were written. And, the history of the Japanese American internment during one of the more shameful parts of our history. CJ's grandparents were unlawfully imprisoned and the financial losses and outright racism were staggering for all the Japanese Americans. Throughout the plot, CJ weaves in her past relationships as well as family history in such a natural way. But, she also manages to tell this shameful history that isn't preachy and WHY it's still relevant all these decades later. Just as important, these kids, are kids, with kid problems including relationships, parents, coming out and things that just happen in high school.Bumping it up to 5 stars.ETA: June 2019 staff pick
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  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    “When you called the paper and got them to do an interview featuring you, who did you think it was going to be about? You said it was about calling attention to the movement, but who came out looking like a hero? And don’t even tell me you don’t plan to use this whole experience as a college application essay. About how instrumental you were, even though you didn’t have to be. Have you ever heard of the term, ‘white savior?’”- This Time Will Be Different by @misallaneous1✍🏼Wow! I wish books like “When you called the paper and got them to do an interview featuring you, who did you think it was going to be about? You said it was about calling attention to the movement, but who came out looking like a hero? And don’t even tell me you don’t plan to use this whole experience as a college application essay. About how instrumental you were, even though you didn’t have to be. Have you ever heard of the term, ‘white savior?’”- This Time Will Be Different by @misallaneous1✍🏼Wow! I wish books like this existed when I was growing up. This book was amazing. I used to think YA books were just light and fluffy reads and underestimated them. I tend to like heavier books that explore social issues and thought YA books wouldn’t be able to fulfill them. But boy am I quickly learning again and again how wrong I am!This book introduces a very diverse cast including the main character, CJ, who is biracial. CJ’s BFF Emily is queer and I loved how Emily’s romantic life was covered as well. The author does an outstanding job covering all the issues / questions teenagers face in High School, and it was a touch more interesting and relatable as the cast were mostly all Asian. What I loved so much about this book were the flawed characters. Flawed yet realistic people. While the ending was not what I was hoping for, it was perhaps the most realistic one.While This Time Will Be Different covers a range of topics, racism is a big one. I never really gave it much though, how Pearl Harbor affected the Japanese-American community. This novel covers America’s not so proud history towards Japanese-Americans, and I learned more about the aftermath of Pearl Harbor. However, “history” seemed eerily relevant with the social / racial issues we face even now and made me wonder how much we have progressed as a nation.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher via EdelweissI absolutely adored THIS TIME WILL BE DIFFERENT. It’s the novel with a Japanese American main character that I wish existed when I was teen….THE TIME WILL BE DIFFERENT fills a gap for a radically underserved community, both in YA and contemporary fiction broadly. While first generation American stories are dominating shelves, Misa Sugiura breaks away from the pack with a coming of age story that recognizes the experience of fourth and fifth-generation J ARC provided by the publisher via EdelweissI absolutely adored THIS TIME WILL BE DIFFERENT. It’s the novel with a Japanese American main character that I wish existed when I was teen….THE TIME WILL BE DIFFERENT fills a gap for a radically underserved community, both in YA and contemporary fiction broadly. While first generation American stories are dominating shelves, Misa Sugiura breaks away from the pack with a coming of age story that recognizes the experience of fourth and fifth-generation Japanese Americans and the legacy of the Internment.CJ Katsuyama leads a cast of compelling, complex characters. She’s working in her family’s flower shop with her auntie Hannah. Her mom, Mimi, works for McAllister Venture Capital, the very same McAllisters who took advantage of the Internment and cheated the Katsuyamas out of the flower shop for a fraction of its value. When she discovers the McAllisters transgressions go even further, she finds a cause worth fighting for. CJ’s struggle with balancing her own desires and her mother’s expectations is super relatable, particularly from an Asian American perspective.THIS TIME WILL BE DIFFERENT is jam-packed thematically, but I never felt overwhelmed. It provides food for thought about racism and the model minority myth, social justice and also the complexity of being young and LGBTQ+ in today’s society. Sure to resonate with a wide range of readers, but especially Japanese Americans, it’s an important book I’ll be recommending to anyone who’ll listen. Thanks to Misa Sugiura, I’ll be thinking about letting go versus forgetting for a long time to come.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)You know when a book just seeps into your soul and touches something deep inside of your heart? That was This Time Will Be Different. Sometimes I feel like a book is just magic, the way it falls into your lap at exactly the right moment. This Time Will Be Different is timely, genuine, and complex. If you're in the mood for a book that tackles the way racism permeates our history, and t (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)You know when a book just seeps into your soul and touches something deep inside of your heart? That was This Time Will Be Different. Sometimes I feel like a book is just magic, the way it falls into your lap at exactly the right moment. This Time Will Be Different is timely, genuine, and complex. If you're in the mood for a book that tackles the way racism permeates our history, and the model minority myth - this is your book. Or if you want to read a book about a family with past grudges, a whole lot of honesty, and difficult questions about expectations, and disappointment, then this is your book. And if you want to read a book about a girl who finds love in unexpected places and who has to learn to take a leap of faith, this is your book.
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  • Caitlin R.
    January 1, 1970
    CJ is a Japanese-American teen trying to work through her feelings on so many things: feelings of letting her mother down, not wanting her family’s flower shop to close down, her friend canoodling with the mean girl, boys. On top of that, CJ starts getting interested in the history of the town they live in, that has the name of a known racist plastered all over everything, and white-washing the history of the Japanese immigrants that lived and worked in this community until they were sent to int CJ is a Japanese-American teen trying to work through her feelings on so many things: feelings of letting her mother down, not wanting her family’s flower shop to close down, her friend canoodling with the mean girl, boys. On top of that, CJ starts getting interested in the history of the town they live in, that has the name of a known racist plastered all over everything, and white-washing the history of the Japanese immigrants that lived and worked in this community until they were sent to interment camps during the war.This book was super interesting, and it taught me a lot (as a Canadian not knowing about this history). I loved the writing style, and the chapters that weren’t real chapters with background about the history and CJ’s love life. I also loved to hate CJ? At times she was likeable, and at other times I wanted to yell at the poor girl, but either way I was rooting for her in the end! My only criticism of this book is that it was A LOT. There were so many different themes, stories and characters, that I actually feel like it could have been two separate books. But either way I really enjoyed it!Thanks to Harper Collins Canada/HCC Frenzy for sending me a copy of this book for review! It comes out TOMORROW!
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  • fatin (booksforahufflepuff)
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by HarperTeen on Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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