Well, That Escalated Quickly
In this sharp, funny, and incredibly timely collection of personal essays, veteran video blogger and star of MTV's Decoded Franchesca Ramsey explores race, identity, online activism, and the downfall of real communication in the age of social media rants, trolls, and call-out wars. Franchesca Ramsey didn't set out to be an activist. Or a comedian. Or a commentator on identity, race, and culture, really. But then her YouTube video "What White Girls Say. . . to Black Girls" went viral. Twelve million views viral. Faced with an avalanche of media requests, fan letters, and hate mail, she had two choices: Jump in and make her voice heard or step back and let others frame the conversation. After a crash course in social justice and more than a few foot-in-mouth moments, she realized she had a unique talent and passion for breaking down injustice in America in ways that could make people listen and engage.In her first book, Ramsey uses her own experiences as an accidental activist to explore the many ways we communicate with each other--from the highs of bridging gaps and making connections to the many pitfalls that accompany talking about race, power, sexuality, and gender in an unpredictable public space...the internet. WELL, THAT ESCALATED QUICKLY includes Ramsey's advice on dealing with internet trolls and low-key racists, confessions about being a former online hater herself, and her personal hits and misses in activist debates with everyone from bigoted Facebook friends and misguided relatives to mainstream celebrities and YouTube influencers. With sharp humor and her trademark candor, Ramsey shows readers we can have tough conversations that move the dialogue forward, rather than backward, if we just approach them in the right way.

Well, That Escalated Quickly Details

TitleWell, That Escalated Quickly
Author
ReleaseMay 22nd, 2018
PublisherGrand Central Publishing
ISBN-139781538761038
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Feminism, Writing, Essays

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Well, That Escalated Quickly Review

  • Megan (Best of Fates)
    January 1, 1970
    This book is less memoir and more guide to how to critique and be critiqued, told through her own mistakes and experiences. I have somewhat followed Fran's career (i.e. I followed her on Snapchat and tried to remember to watch The Nightly Show) so was somewhat familiar with lots of the stories she shares but appreciated being reintroduced to them from her current perspective. A really fast, enjoyable read and a good reminder that we can all do better.
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  • Hanna
    January 1, 1970
    Franchesca Ramsey has been an Internet personality I've enjoyed watching since she joined MTV's Decoded. She's smart, open, and willing to learn just as much as she's willing to guide & teach. This book was basically activism 101, and is absolutely something I would have enjoyed deeper if It had come up a few years ago. As I am further into my activism journey, this felt redundant. That being said, just because it wasn't applicable for me, doesn't mean it's not relevant. I think this is a fi Franchesca Ramsey has been an Internet personality I've enjoyed watching since she joined MTV's Decoded. She's smart, open, and willing to learn just as much as she's willing to guide & teach. This book was basically activism 101, and is absolutely something I would have enjoyed deeper if It had come up a few years ago. As I am further into my activism journey, this felt redundant. That being said, just because it wasn't applicable for me, doesn't mean it's not relevant. I think this is a fine book for folks just starting their journey, but can be passed up by folks a little more well-seasoned in the activism world.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an advanced reader copy of this book through a Goodreads giveaway*I've been a fan of Franchesca Ramsey for a while and have followed her success and evolution from YouTuber to panelist on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore and host of MTV's Decoded.. Ramsey's book recounts this journey for those who may be unfamiliar with her work and provides important context surrounding it for those who are.Ramsey's book reads like an extended version of one of her videos in the sense that it pro *I received an advanced reader copy of this book through a Goodreads giveaway*I've been a fan of Franchesca Ramsey for a while and have followed her success and evolution from YouTuber to panelist on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore and host of MTV's Decoded.. Ramsey's book recounts this journey for those who may be unfamiliar with her work and provides important context surrounding it for those who are.Ramsey's book reads like an extended version of one of her videos in the sense that it provides readers with information about issues of race, gender, sexuality, and inequality, infusing humor and frankness whenever possible. What distinguishes the book from her videos, is Ramsey's openness about her stumbles and downright failures as a social media and television personality. She admits at multiple points in the book that sharing these failures is difficult but important to do. Alongside these reflections, Ramsey shares advice to readers about navigating social media and in-person interactions that are now so often grounded in "call-out culture."Readers should not worry about unfamiliarity with Ramsey or even the terms she uses to describe these phenomena: "call-out" versus "call-in"; "TERF"; "MRA"; etc. are defined for readers both in the text, through footnotes, and a useful glossary at the end of the text. Ever the teacher, Ramsey's writing reassures readers that not knowing something does not remove them from the conversation. Rather, it positions them as listeners who have a chance to learn more.There were sections of the book that I wanted more from. In one chapter, Ramsey describes the various television shows, movies, and songs that she has decided to boycott due to racist, sexist, cissexist, etc. content. While this list might be helpful for those who are curious about Ramsey's viewing or listening habits, it differs from other chapters in the sense that it does not provide a heuristic or method for reaching those conclusions about other media. Readers might be amused that despite her dislike, Ramsey still hate-watches Game of Thrones, but they might not have a clear idea of when or how to articulate why they want to stop watching, listening, or participating in any given show or fandom. Arguably the most useful sections of Ramsey's book are on call-out culture and how to best address a friend, family member, co-worker, or even rando that posts or says something racist, sexist, or homophobic. Ramsey's attention to how to avoid feeding trolls and alienating friends--while fully admitting she has been guilty of both--gives readers a place to start engaging meaningfully with people they care about on difficult subjects. There's even a flowchart on when to unfriend someone! Ramsey's book is a great tool for those unsure of how to navigate what seems like an ever more hostile social media (and in-person) climate. Whether you're engaging in larger scale activist activities or simply trying to confront your Uncle Ron about his fascination with racist memes, Ramsey's book is a guide worth picking up.
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  • Kristen Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    Conflict resolution for the social media age: FTW!!! This isn’t usually my type of book, but everyone who owns a social media account should be forced to read this book before using said account. There are lots of great concepts - calling in vs calling out, learning to live your natural self, criticizing without personal attacks, haters vs trolls, and fighting racism - and practical examples of how to use those concepts. I really hope there’s a young readers version of this book coming, because Conflict resolution for the social media age: FTW!!! This isn’t usually my type of book, but everyone who owns a social media account should be forced to read this book before using said account. There are lots of great concepts - calling in vs calling out, learning to live your natural self, criticizing without personal attacks, haters vs trolls, and fighting racism - and practical examples of how to use those concepts. I really hope there’s a young readers version of this book coming, because I feel like it contains really useful concepts for owning a social media account responsibly.
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  • Amanda (Books, Life and Everything Nice)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free through Goodreads Giveaways. As always, an honest review.Well That Escalated Quickly: Memoirs and Mistakes of an Accidental Activist tells the story of Francesca Ramsey’s journey into activism. She starts as a YouTuber with a moderate following and still works her normal daytime job. When her video, Shit White Girls Say to Black Girls, goes viral her life changes. While it’s not immediate stardom, a lot of people have seen her videos and her voice reaches many more I received this book for free through Goodreads Giveaways. As always, an honest review.Well That Escalated Quickly: Memoirs and Mistakes of an Accidental Activist tells the story of Francesca Ramsey’s journey into activism. She starts as a YouTuber with a moderate following and still works her normal daytime job. When her video, Shit White Girls Say to Black Girls, goes viral her life changes. While it’s not immediate stardom, a lot of people have seen her videos and her voice reaches many more people than before. While she didn’t set out to be an activist, she was calling out racism, sexism, and overall not so great behavior. The book takes us through her journey into activism including all the struggles along the way.I enjoyed the book for it’s serious yet light hearted approach to activism. Sometimes I was cringing along with the author’s stories. I would suggest this memoir to anyone who wants a, dare I say fun, easy approach to learning more about activism and social justice.There were very few aspects of this memoir that I didn’t enjoy. Some of Franchesca’s past behavior made me cringe. She admits that she was wrong and how she remedied the situations, but they weren’t my favorite parts to read. Also, some of the detail oriented aspects about a career online weren’t the most intriguing parts to me. If you’re interested in that career field, then you might feel differently.The biggest appeal for me was the honest way the author tells her story. She doesn’t sugar coat or dumb down things, nor does she try to make people feel ignorant. She’s inclusive. She wants to invite people to hear her story and learn along the way. I especially enjoyed the list of offensive words that people don’t realize they’re using and why they’re problematic. Such examples include spirit animal, spas, and lame. I also loved the eulogies for cringe worthy comments; a list of ignorant offensive things that people say and good intelligent comebacks to them. Franchesca also mentions the importance of self care for activists. I especially appreciated this. Well That Escalated Quickly is a serious informative but fun book that shows the author’s quirky personality. I definitely recommend this approachable memoir.
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  • Destri
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy of this book via Goodreads giveaway.I love this book! I agree with previous comments that it's not too heavy on the memoir but it does consist of a lot of honest self reflection about her activism and internet presence. As the internet and its content continues expanding I think these kind of self reflective looks at how we can use the internet more effectively will be important for keeping it an essential element of activism. I also think this book had a lot of good I received an advanced copy of this book via Goodreads giveaway.I love this book! I agree with previous comments that it's not too heavy on the memoir but it does consist of a lot of honest self reflection about her activism and internet presence. As the internet and its content continues expanding I think these kind of self reflective looks at how we can use the internet more effectively will be important for keeping it an essential element of activism. I also think this book had a lot of good insight for anyone trying to get into activism or maybe dig a little deeper into it. I also found that explanation of language and concepts made it a book accessable to those who aren't as familiar with social justice terminology. And all of the positive content is told through a narrative voice that is humerous and engaging. I basically couldn't put this book down! Definitely a recommended read!
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  • Siobhan
    January 1, 1970
    I read an uncorrected proof copy. As an over-50 Canadian still learning to identify and let go of the outmoded (and often dangerous) teachings of my childhood, I was pleasantly surprised at how relatable this book is. My only criticism is that too many acronyms may limit the audience to a very specific age and geographic range.
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  • Kelli Gleiner
    January 1, 1970
    A funny memoir with realistic and simple ways to combat racist comments. Enjoyable!
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Social media memoir meets Franchesca's evolution in understanding and advocating for social justice, foibles and all. Handy guide on dealing with pervasive internet trolls. When to call in, when to call out. What that means. If you're a fan of her YouTube videos, you'll also love this book.
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  • Kerri
    January 1, 1970
    I've been aware of Franchesca Ramsey since she posted her powerful video sharing her rape experience, and I have kept up with her Twitter via RT's that have made their way onto my timeline, but I have not watched Decoded, or Larry Wilmore or stayed on top of every social media scandal Ramsey has been involved in. But that didn't take away my enjoyment of this book at all. Ramsey has written a guide to activism in the online age, a witty, hilarious collection of memories and missteps about what n I've been aware of Franchesca Ramsey since she posted her powerful video sharing her rape experience, and I have kept up with her Twitter via RT's that have made their way onto my timeline, but I have not watched Decoded, or Larry Wilmore or stayed on top of every social media scandal Ramsey has been involved in. But that didn't take away my enjoyment of this book at all. Ramsey has written a guide to activism in the online age, a witty, hilarious collection of memories and missteps about what not to do from someone who is considered a "queen" of online social justice. If you're interested in any of the above, you'll find this book both entertaining and illuminating.
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  • Sharlena
    January 1, 1970
    **I received an advanced review copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways.**3.5 stars. This was a quick, easy read. This wasn't so much a memoir as it was a how-to primer on social media and activism. Ms. Ramsey's writing style is conversational, accessible and funny which made this book enjoyable to read. Anyone who is familiar with social media or activism, in general, may not find a lot of new information here but should still be able to enjoy this book.
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  • Just Reading Everything
    January 1, 1970
    Everything about this is so, so great and honest. There are certainly many people in my life who NEED to read it. Don't miss out on this one!
  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    I was really enjoying this book for the first seven chapters. And then I started to understand why she claims so many haters and trolls.For the first part of the book, Franchesca was an insightful narrator, sharing her experiences with social media fame. She was humble, self-aware and willing to share. But then she started dispensing her unasked-for opinions, reminding me why the term "social justice warrior" has such negative connotations for so many people . This change, interestingly, was mar I was really enjoying this book for the first seven chapters. And then I started to understand why she claims so many haters and trolls.For the first part of the book, Franchesca was an insightful narrator, sharing her experiences with social media fame. She was humble, self-aware and willing to share. But then she started dispensing her unasked-for opinions, reminding me why the term "social justice warrior" has such negative connotations for so many people . This change, interestingly, was marked by a shift in language from "I" to "you". I have no interest in the moral superiority she thinks we would all feel if we would stop listening to R. Kelly and watching Game of Thrones and this exemplifies perfectly the problem with these youngsters: they always know exactly what we're all doing wrong but have no clue how to fix the problem. Don't even get me started about her tips on "self-care," a term that healthy people employ with no real concept what it means to take care of yourself. She's not a bad writer but sigh, I cannot bear to have a narrator speak to me like I'm a recalcitrant child in need of correction.I recommend reading chapters 1-7 and also 11 if you're bored, but just skip the rest of it, unless you're capable of mentally substituting "I" for every "you", which seems like an unnecessary burden for most readers. Thank you to Grand Central who sent me an advance review copy of this book.
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  • Mackenzie Ross
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Lizenbyl
    January 1, 1970
    Fast moving and quick read--was not my type of book--
  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    Some parts were a bit slow and redundant, but overall a fun, easy book to read and re-ground.
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