The Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2)
Puritans. Quakers. Pirates. Mohawks. Witches. And a brutal war…If you thought New England was dull in the 1670s, get ready for a history lesson.In the critically acclaimed “My Father’s Kingdom,” debut author James W. George transported his readers to 1671 New England, and the world of Reverend Israel Brewster. It was a world of faith, virtue, and love, but it was also a world of treachery, hatred, and murder.Four years later, Brewster is a disgraced outcast, residing in Providence and working as a humble cooper. Despite his best efforts, war could not be averted, and now, “King Philip’s War” has begun.The rebellion is led by Metacomet, known as “King Philip” to the English colonists. He is the tormented son of the great Massasoit, and leader of the Wampanoag nation. Once the most reliable of Plymouth Colony’s allies, they are now the bitterest of enemies. Meanwhile, Metacomet’s mysterious counselor, Linto, despises this war and will do anything to end the bloodshed.Meticulously researched, “The Prophet and the Witch” is a tale of hope and brotherhood in the face of evil and violence. It features the remarkable cast of fictional and historical characters from book one, including Josiah Winslow, Linto, Increase Mather, Constance Wilder, and Jeremiah Barron. Additionally, new characters such as America’s first ranger, Captain Benjamin Church, bring this chapter of history to life like never before.

The Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2) Details

TitleThe Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 7th, 2017
PublisherAmazon Digital Services
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, United States

The Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2) Review

  • E.M. Swift-Hook
    January 1, 1970
    King Philip's War as it was lived.“If I continue to live under the English, I will have no nation left to rule.  Just as the English fight for their king, I will die fighting for my father’s kingdom.”It is 1675 and four years since the events that introduced us to Linto and Israel Brewster and now both their worlds are being challenged and shaken. The colonists are plunging into war with the Wampanoag, spurred on by the belief that they are doing the work of God. The result is the bloody conflic King Philip's War as it was lived.“If I continue to live under the English, I will have no nation left to rule.  Just as the English fight for their king, I will die fighting for my father’s kingdom.”It is 1675 and four years since the events that introduced us to Linto and Israel Brewster and now both their worlds are being challenged and shaken. The colonists are plunging into war with the Wampanoag, spurred on by the belief that they are doing the work of God. The result is the bloody conflict known to history as 'King Philip's War' - which led to incredible atrocities.'War was about money and munitions.  It was about muskets, gunpowder, and dried biscuit.  War was about coats, blankets, and boots.'Having read My Father's Kingdom' the first book in the series, I was really looking forward to getting into this book and I was not disappointed. In many ways, I enjoyed this book more, maybe because the characters in it are familiar and maybe because to me the author seemed somehow more confident. The pace is good, the historical research excellent and the way we feel those events as experienced through the characters is a tribute to the author's ability.'Williams immigrated to Boston in 1631 with his wife, Mary.'I have the same comment as before about the occasional odd word use or sentence structure, but the whole is much greater than such parts. I do think there were a few too many dry expositions and I do wish there had not been a chapter-by-chapter synopsis of the first book at the front (I might suggest that it be relegated to the back of the book as a voluntary appendix for those who want to access it).But none of these things diminished what to me was a very enjoyable and interesting historical fiction read.
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  • Ellie Midwood
    January 1, 1970
    Having previously read “My Father’s Kingdom” I was delighted to get my hands on this second book in the series as soon as it came out. It was just as brilliant as the first one, with the already familiar characters but who now face new challenges as the bloody war rages in their land. Just like book one, book two is a wonderful historical account of the war that I’m sure not too many people know about but which nonetheless left a devastating scar on the early Puritan nation’s history. I was genu Having previously read “My Father’s Kingdom” I was delighted to get my hands on this second book in the series as soon as it came out. It was just as brilliant as the first one, with the already familiar characters but who now face new challenges as the bloody war rages in their land. Just like book one, book two is a wonderful historical account of the war that I’m sure not too many people know about but which nonetheless left a devastating scar on the early Puritan nation’s history. I was genuinely happy for Israel Brewster who finally found his happiness with the Quakers but as the war approaches the land that is too dear to him, Israel joins the militia and prays for the best. I was also happy to once again encounter Linto - probably the most sympathetic character of the Wampanoag tribe - who tries to do his utmost to prevent the bloodshed. However, soon the war touches him and his family as well, turning his loving wife Wawetseka into something sinister, and even Linto isn’t so certain about the future anymore…Just like book one, “The Prophet and the Witch” is an incredibly well-researched novel and a delightful read for the fans of the historical fiction genre. You will feel like you’re right there, in the middle of the action in old Puritan Massachusetts, and it doesn’t get any better than that. Highly recommended, and five very well deserved stars!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    The Prophet and the Witch is the second installment from James W George’s My Father’s Kingdom series. Thank goodness the beginning starts with a summary of what had happened in the first book. Since I have not read this one yet, I found the summary quite helpful. I was intrigued seeing the author’s vision of what living in the 1670s New England was like. The vivid descriptions made me feel as though I was right there living among the people. The Prophet and the Witch is so so good. I found it to The Prophet and the Witch is the second installment from James W George’s My Father’s Kingdom series. Thank goodness the beginning starts with a summary of what had happened in the first book. Since I have not read this one yet, I found the summary quite helpful. I was intrigued seeing the author’s vision of what living in the 1670s New England was like. The vivid descriptions made me feel as though I was right there living among the people. The Prophet and the Witch is so so good. I found it to be well written and rich in historical details. Mr George obviously did his research on this era. I hope there will be more in this series. I will, also, be adding the first book to my wishlist. Highly recommended. 100 stars. I received this book from the author. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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  • Ann McManus
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another bit of American history that my Catholic school education failed to cover. I read the second volume(this one) first and despite a deep synopsis of the first volume that it contains, I am compelled to backtrack to volume one.I had some trouble following the story lines, but it all came together in the end.
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    James George’s The Prophet and the Witch provides a fascinating and insightful look at a period of history of which many modern readers are likely unfamiliar: King Philip’s War. In spite of its name which may suggest European vs. European warfare, the war actually took place in New England in the 1670s between the English Colonists and Native American inhabitants of the area. George’s novel, which is the second in the series, follows three separate but interconnected stories. The first follows L James George’s The Prophet and the Witch provides a fascinating and insightful look at a period of history of which many modern readers are likely unfamiliar: King Philip’s War. In spite of its name which may suggest European vs. European warfare, the war actually took place in New England in the 1670s between the English Colonists and Native American inhabitants of the area. George’s novel, which is the second in the series, follows three separate but interconnected stories. The first follows Linto, a young spiritual leader among the Wampanoag tribe (which is led by Metacomet, also known as “King Philip”); the second follows Israel Brewster, a disgraced Puritan minister now living in Providence; and the third follows the English army leaders as they wage war against King Philip and other American Indian tribes. I found The Prophet and the Witch to be a completely engrossing and thoughtful five-star story. King Philip’s War is not a period with which I was previously very familiar, so George’s incorporation of historically accurate figures, events, and customs in the novel was fascinating and eye-opening to me. George does an excellent job of creating depth within parts of 17th century history that are often glossed over in history class – for instance, “all Native Americans” or “all English colonists.” In following the path of Linto with the Wampanoag tribe, George shows the depth, divisions, and unity between the many varied Native American tribes in the New England area. In following the path of Israel Brewster, George explores the differences between Puritans and Quakers, or Plymouth and Providence. And in following the English army leaders, George provides insight into hardships of early colonial life and warfare, as well as the painful-to-read views that these colonists held of Native Americans. For readers who are not lucky enough to have read George’s first novel in the series (My Father’s Kingdom), George kindly provides a list of major characters, signifying them as either historical or fictional, as well as provides a thorough overview of the first book’s events. These two features are exceedingly helpful in that it provides historical background for the events of the novel as well as eliminates the need for wordy backstory once the novel gets going. And George truly jumps right into the midst of the war without hesitation, and he keeps readers enthralled through the two-hundred pages with an active plot and both historical and fictional surprises throughout. The Prophet and the Witch excels not only in creating a fascinating work of historical fiction, but also in creating multi-dimensional and alluring characters to draw readers in. The two protagonists, Linto and Israel, are not perfect heroes by a long shot, but they are real people who experience real challenges in their lives and relationships, making them relatable and sympathetic, even though they’re living 350 years in the past. At the end, when readers may suspect the story may be coming to a tragic close, George pulls out one last surprise and leaves the story poised for a third installment – hopefully one just as full of historical intrigue, action, and relationships.
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  • Geoff Baggett
    January 1, 1970
    I love American history. However, as a Revolutionary War enthusiast, I have rarely explored early American history prior to Lord Dunmore’s War or the unrest in New England that led to Lexington and Concord.Shame on me for being so narrowly focused!J.W. George has opened my eyes to an entirely new epoch in our history. Indeed, he has presented me with a new literary “thread” that helps me complete my tapestry of the European history in North America.“The Prophet and the Witch” focuses upon King P I love American history. However, as a Revolutionary War enthusiast, I have rarely explored early American history prior to Lord Dunmore’s War or the unrest in New England that led to Lexington and Concord.Shame on me for being so narrowly focused!J.W. George has opened my eyes to an entirely new epoch in our history. Indeed, he has presented me with a new literary “thread” that helps me complete my tapestry of the European history in North America.“The Prophet and the Witch” focuses upon King Philip’s War, a tragic and largely forgotten conflict in the United Colonies. George uses a fascinating juxtaposition of viewpoints … giving the reader detailed and emotional glimpses into the politics, causes, and characters on both sides of the conflict. This is not the usual “David and Goliath” story, with clear-cut and easily discernible protagonists and antagonists. The presentation is much more complex. The reader discovers the real evils that existed on both sides, and often finds him/herself torn in allegiances between parties. I found myself identifying strongly with the native, Linto, and his plethora of insecurities and shortcomings. As a pastor who is viewed as something of a “renegade” within his own denomination, I found myself rooting unashamedly for the religious outcast and family man, Israel Brewster. His romance and relationship with his wife is beautiful and touching. I almost imagined myself and my wife playing their roles in this drama.The cast of characters in this novel is large and complex. Though it took some work, I managed to command the vast array of Native American tribes presented, as well as the numerous native names. It was not easy, but it was well worth the effort.As a fan of historical fiction, I did spot a few “modernisms” that seemed to “stick out” to me. For instance, there were several references to people eating “lunch,” which is a relatively modern 20th Century expression. Dinner and supper were more the norms for the day. But, overall, I found the language to be appropriate.The Christian/Biblical themes were evident, but not “in your face.” I have read some so-called “Christian” historical fiction in which the characters seemed to have need to pause for prayer every half-hour. The Christian themes and interaction were real and honest, and in no way contrived. I greatly appreciated that.Overall, “The Prophet and the Witch” is amazing historical fiction. I look forward to “backtracking” and reading the first installment, and cannot wait for Part 3 to arrive!
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  • Shashane Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    The Prophet and the Witch is a book for everyone. I'm usually a romance reader but when I took up this book to read, it gripped my attention, mainly because of the keen attention to details the author includes. His writing is of impeccable standards. The writer is precise in the telling of this war King Philip's War which is not often a topic of discussion. Reading the book, woke up my old passion for the historical times as I read about the conflict in the British colonies at the time. At first The Prophet and the Witch is a book for everyone. I'm usually a romance reader but when I took up this book to read, it gripped my attention, mainly because of the keen attention to details the author includes. His writing is of impeccable standards. The writer is precise in the telling of this war King Philip's War which is not often a topic of discussion. Reading the book, woke up my old passion for the historical times as I read about the conflict in the British colonies at the time. At first, I thought the War would be in Europe but quickly caught on that it's actually in the Americas. One of the things I enjoyed about this book is not giving into the cliche of having a clear protagonist and antagonist. The story is told from multiple perspectives so you can see the motives behind certain actions, unpleasant though the may be. The author also takes the time to include details outside the story so individuals interested in history can note where he took liberties and the characters who are fictitious. Great and enjoyable read.
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  • T.J. Dell
    January 1, 1970
    A surprisingly delightful, heart-heavy tale of war and violence. George has woven an intricate tapestry of historical fiction. The proportions of which approach a classically epic categorization. Each of the approximately eight thousand characters has been carefully developed and presented to the readers as a full and faceted human being. Even the horse has facets In this the second book of the series we are reunited with Brewster who has found a place for himself in a Quaker community. We stru A surprisingly delightful, heart-heavy tale of war and violence. George has woven an intricate tapestry of historical fiction. The proportions of which approach a classically epic categorization. Each of the approximately eight thousand characters has been carefully developed and presented to the readers as a full and faceted human being. Even the horse has facets  In this the second book of the series we are reunited with Brewster who has found a place for himself in a Quaker community. We struggle with him through his trials of faith and personal convictions. We celebrate for each of his triumphs, and we mourn with him as he feels his soul is being chipped away by the atrocities of war. His story though, is dwarfed by the mind bending account of a terrible bloody war and the role that Christian faith played in those events. I found myself sympathizing with all that were involved, despite knowing from history where the winning chips would lay.This is no small feat, as George has succeeded in every author’s goal of drawing a reader fully into the pages of the story. I will be watching for a third installment, and another peak into the fates of these people whose lives were (realistically) facing some uncertainties.
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  • Erin Bomboy
    January 1, 1970
    Like many Americans, my historical knowledge about my country is riddled with gaps. In particular, my grasp on colonial history is weak. It pretty much ends around the first Thanksgiving and then picks up again with the French and Indian War.James W. George’s The Prophet and the Witch certainly fills in a gap I didn’t know I had—King’s Philip’s War, which pitted colonists against Native Americans in New England. While the war provides the architecture for the plot, the characters bring it to lif Like many Americans, my historical knowledge about my country is riddled with gaps. In particular, my grasp on colonial history is weak. It pretty much ends around the first Thanksgiving and then picks up again with the French and Indian War.James W. George’s The Prophet and the Witch certainly fills in a gap I didn’t know I had—King’s Philip’s War, which pitted colonists against Native Americans in New England. While the war provides the architecture for the plot, the characters bring it to life. Narrated from both Native American and colonist perspectives, the novel does an excellent job of creating a complicated morality where heroes and villains aren’t clear-cut.The writing is crisp and clear with especial kudos for dialogue that is suggestive, but not representative, of the time period. Although the novel is briskly paced, George allows his characters space to reflect, which adds depth and complexity to scenes that unspool like a movie. I would have liked a few more identifying details about the characters to help keep them straight although the two major protagonists—Linto and Brewster—are well drawn. The Prophet and the Witch is a must read for anyone looking to flesh out his or her knowledge of colonial history in an engaging manner.
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  • Laura Graves
    January 1, 1970
    The Prophet and the Witch, by James W. George, is the second book in the My Father’s Kingdom series. If you have not been able to read the first book in the series or it has been a while since your reading, George presents a detailed summary of the first book, at the outset of this book. This makes it very easy to just start with this text. These books are set in Puritan, New England, and are generally written in the style of historical fiction. On a continuum of historic fiction where some is m The Prophet and the Witch, by James W. George, is the second book in the My Father’s Kingdom series. If you have not been able to read the first book in the series or it has been a while since your reading, George presents a detailed summary of the first book, at the outset of this book. This makes it very easy to just start with this text. These books are set in Puritan, New England, and are generally written in the style of historical fiction. On a continuum of historic fiction where some is much more fictionalized than others, this book is a very detailed, well-researched retelling of historical context with specific events that could have occurred but are indeed fictionalized. George does seem to do a lot of research for his work and I felt that in contrast to other historical fiction, his imagined stories were fairly faithful to the time and setting. The events described within The Prophet and the Witch, cover the little-known time period in American colonial history, known as King Philip's War.For those unfamiliar with the time period of American history known as King Phillip’s War, the author does provide some good backstory (and some internet searching let me also learn a few more facts). In short, this is a time period of war from June 1675 to April 1678 between the Wampanoag Indians and the colonists. The book seems to accurately highlight many of the historic details regarding the events of the war. When events or characters are altered, George clearly informs his audience of those changes. A few characters are altered or added, where records were sparse and also to make for more emotional and impactful writing. In general, it was interesting to read a text that highlighted such a little-known part of our history and I did learn some new information from the book. I did especially like that George was clear and honest about the lines between fact and fiction, so that I could enjoy a story without getting a false sense of history. Within the historical context of The Prophet and the Witch, the story is mostly centered on the lives of two fictionalized characters, Israel Brewster and Linto. As we are introduced to them, both characters already know each other from the previous book in the series. Brewster is a former Puritan minister who has turned to drink, while Linto is viewed as a holy man among the Wampanoag tribe. Both characters seemed to experience a sort of Hero's Journey, through the course of the text. Both are unwillingly drawn into the coming war, experience horrific tragedy and trauma, seek atonement for their various sins, and return to an unknown life ahead of them. There is also a broader cast of characters who play a role directly in Brewster and Linto’s lives or in the broader context of the story. I generally enjoyed this book because it was a character focused story set in an interesting historical context. George is clearly a very detailed writer, who cares a lot about accurately portraying the historical context. That level of detail was both good and bad. Sometimes the writing felt dense and it was not necessarily an “easy” read, meaning it took more focus and attention than some other books read for fun. Another aspect of the book that I struggled with, is the way in which the book jumps from place to place and sometimes from one time period to another. This typically occurred between chapters. It was sometimes a little confusing and I had to re-orient myself to where and when the events were occurring. Also, flashbacks and memories were sometimes used to convey information such as backstory, but it was not always initially clear to me that this information was out of sequence.Even still, I would strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in historical fiction because the story is so well-researched and fairly accurate to what transpired in King Philip's War, including the missteps, traumas, and dislocations, as well as the victories. If you enjoy a little bit of mystery, you can also challenge yourself to figure out ‘who are the prophet and the witch?’ The answer to this is not necessarily obvious and here George does use some interesting literary devices. Discovering for yourself that bit of information helps to enhance your understanding of the story and in a way the messages/lessons George allows us to take away from this bit of history. One final note for potential readers is that, if you are uncomfortable with descriptions of violence, sexual assault, and trauma, then this book may not be a good fit for you. The style and content makes it suited for mature audiences.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Note: This is Book 2 and it can be read on its own if you check out the author’s notes about Book 1 but it works best if you have read Book 1.There is quite a bit going on in this book. I finished it and I felt heavy with my new understanding of this little slice of time in colonial America. This is a serious subject and horrible things happen during King Phillip’s War. I really appreciate that the author didn’t shy away from showing that, and showing that all sides committed war atrocities.Lint Note: This is Book 2 and it can be read on its own if you check out the author’s notes about Book 1 but it works best if you have read Book 1.There is quite a bit going on in this book. I finished it and I felt heavy with my new understanding of this little slice of time in colonial America. This is a serious subject and horrible things happen during King Phillip’s War. I really appreciate that the author didn’t shy away from showing that, and showing that all sides committed war atrocities.Linto and Wawaseca are spiritual leaders of their people and Linto is a special character. He’s knowledgeable about both the colonial English ways and their various flavors of Christianity but is also Native American. Throughout the entire book, he could be the one to bring everyone together. On the English side, there’s Brewster. He’s a bridge between the Puritans and the Quakers because he’s left one in disgrace and grudgingly embraces the other through marriage. He’s also a treasured friend of Linto’s.Some of my favorite parts of the book were the times that Linto and his fellow Wampanoags interpret various Bible stories. I wasn’t raised with the Bible and I could really relate to some of the questions they ask and their take on the meanings of these stories. These scenes also provide a bit of levity in a pretty serious novel.My one criticism about this tale is that the ladies are mostly sidelined. Wawaseca is a leader of her community but we rarely see that. We’re told it over and over again but we only see her providing marital comfort to her husband or playing with kids. Late in the story, her character does get a little bit of growth. However, she then becomes a character to pity, not follow. One of the other tribes also has a female leader but she’s described as uppity and rude. Her role is very small. All other ladies are there for comfort. One English lass is described as having a mind to rival any mind in the colony but we only have one brief scene where she cites some Bible trivia. The rest of the time, she’s being a wifely comfort. The ladies could have contributed much more and I was disappointed with their minimal showing.The tale does have a lot of Bible references but I never felt that the story was preaching at me. For the people in 1670s American colonies, their religion was a major part of their lives so I felt that was reflected well in the story. I also like that there are several views and some people do their best to live up to their chosen spiritual book while others abuse their spiritual authority.I was very glad to see that the author provides some historical notes at the end about the indulgences he took in creating this tale. The story shows the author’s great care in researching the time and location. This is both enlightening and entertaining. 4.5/5 stars.The Narration: Angus Freathy was a joy to listen to for this narration. He had the perfect voice for Brewster and also for Linto, the two main characters. I loved all his regional accents for the various characters. There’s also some national accents as Scotsmen and Frenchmen join the cast of characters. My one quibble is that his female character voices weren’t always feminine. All his character voices were distinct. And there’s a bit of singing! Freathy did his singing well and then a short Psalm is sung by a woman (and done well too). The recording quality is excellent. 4.5/5 stars.I received this audiobook as part of my participation in a blog tour with Audiobookworm Promotions. The tour is being sponsored by James W. George. The gifting of this audiobook did not affect my opinion of it.
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  • Zola
    January 1, 1970
    'The Prophet and The Witch' is a historical fiction book that recounts King Philips' war in an interesting, well written way. It is the second book in a series, and I think that a third book would be really well received. Much of the book features the lands and swamps native to the Indian's but there are times when the setting shifts to other places. Based off of the author's notes and my own conclusions, I think the main idea of the novel was to draw attention to a very interesting period of hi 'The Prophet and The Witch' is a historical fiction book that recounts King Philips' war in an interesting, well written way. It is the second book in a series, and I think that a third book would be really well received. Much of the book features the lands and swamps native to the Indian's but there are times when the setting shifts to other places. Based off of the author's notes and my own conclusions, I think the main idea of the novel was to draw attention to a very interesting period of history that is often glossed over and bring to light the atrocities that occurred.The book is a combination of fictitious characters as well as real and the combination of the two is flawlessly interwoven. My favourite narratives to read were Linto's and Israel Brewster's, though character narration changed frequently which I found slightly off-putting at the start of the book, as it was harder to connect with the characters.Despite this being a (mostly) historical account, the story had plenty of twists and turns which was enjoyable, though at points these plot twists were predictable (For example, the Mohawks confronting Metacomet and Linto's wife later role). James W George accurately portrays the reality of the war, clearly highlighting the less savoury aspects and raises awareness to some of the issues in the book that are still a problem within parts of the world today. In this sense, the novel really resonated with me. I liked the writing style a lot, but found Brewster's romance scene with Constance to be slightly cheesy. There is a gentle humour to the writing of this novel at the start of the book and the writing has a flair for the dramatic which really captures the essence of the highly religious men portrayed. However, because of this some parts of the story that demand heightened drama had less of an effect on the reader.The writing had a smoothness to it that really draws the reader in and demands their attention, the characters are interesting - if a little uppity - and it leaves things open ended. Leaving the reader to wonder about Linto's fate as well as his wives' next move.Out of everything in the book, my least favourite passages to read were the ones with anyone that wasn't Linto, Church, Brewster or Metacomet. Whilst these passages were still interesting, I disliked the frequent changing of narrative within the same chapter, at times it became disorienting trying to work out whose viewpoint we were seeing this from. In this way I feel the writing could be made clearer.Overall, this was a very interesting read and I would rate it 4/5. It will be interesting to see how far the historical accuracy of this time period can extend into a third book without edging too far into fiction.
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  • Eileen Dandashi
    January 1, 1970
    Audiobook Review:I found I was sorely lacking in my understanding of this time period during the growth of the colonies of North America. I’m happy to see someone tried to unravel this difficult time, giving it life through a fictious story, yet following historical events. It’s true, it is understood the indigenous Indians didn’t take kindly to the colonists. However, the colonists wouldn’t have survived their initial time in North America if it weren’t for the Indians.This is a story, true to Audiobook Review:I found I was sorely lacking in my understanding of this time period during the growth of the colonies of North America. I’m happy to see someone tried to unravel this difficult time, giving it life through a fictious story, yet following historical events. It’s true, it is understood the indigenous Indians didn’t take kindly to the colonists. However, the colonists wouldn’t have survived their initial time in North America if it weren’t for the Indians.This is a story, true to form, people, no matter what race, find something to harbor against each other. We see our present by reviewing our past. In this historical fiction, Indian tribes fight against each other, the French and vice versa, the English colonists work the Indians against the other colonists to have the upper-hand in controlling the land taken from the Indians. Add to the mix, religious inclinations. It is rather a dismal time in history, one of greed, power, hardship and tragedy, and yes, there is hope.If I had read or listened to book one of the series, I might have had a better grounding in what was happening. The narrator moved the story along in one aspect, but I was a little confused on the other. Perhaps it was my lack of the historical layout?Freathy’s voiceover in singing was enjoyable, yet his various dialog voices for the various character kept me guessing who was speaking. His French is very good and the dialog from the Frenchmen I enjoyed. I liked the way he played up some of the witty dialog. Noted, the women didn’t sound like women, so I didn’t catch on who Linto’s wife was when she spoke. The Indian’s spoke with such a wide vocabulary, I had a hard time identifying they were from Indian tribes. Author George wrote the dialog, so Freathy couldn’t really make it sound anything other than it was written. Only in one scene, Linto spoke with broken English, and that was intentional, since he normally spoke fluent English.I think if I listened to the story another time, I would get more out of the story and follow the historical events better. There were different Indian tribes and several English colonists which were difficult to follow. I admire the author’s attempt to shed some light on this epoch in the colonial history and look forward to his continued work.I received this audiobook as part of my participation in a blog tour with Audiobookworm Promotions. The tour is being sponsored by James W. George. The gifting of this audiobook did not affect my opinion of it.
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  • Phil Sageser
    January 1, 1970
    "The Prophet and the Witch" tells the story of King Phillip's War, which, for most readers, is almost completely unknown. Set approximately 50 years after the Pilgrims' arrival in New England, it is the story of a war between the descendants of those who celebrated the "first Thanksgiving" together as friends. It is not always easy for works of historical fiction to find the right balance between telling a good story and telling an historically accurate story. Typically, we know how the story t "The Prophet and the Witch" tells the story of King Phillip's War, which, for most readers, is almost completely unknown. Set approximately 50 years after the Pilgrims' arrival in New England, it is the story of a war between the descendants of those who celebrated the "first Thanksgiving" together as friends. It is not always easy for works of historical fiction to find the right balance between telling a good story and telling an historically accurate story. Typically, we know how the story turns out, at least in its historically relevant points. But because this period is an unfamiliar one, George is able to maintain that balance while still maintaining the suspense. This is the second book of a trilogy, but it stands alone without any difficulty. There is an extensive summary of the first book, but it is largely unnecessary because the characters and events of that story are well introduced when they become important. And, however the third book shall proceed, there is no great sense of incompleteness about the ending of this one. The book is well written and the cast of characters, although extensive, are believable and the key ones are complex. The reader learns about, not only the unfamiliar events of the period, but about what was important to the people of this time. Both their faith and their prejudices are presented with understanding. And, with all of this -- the story is a good one!
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  • X. Culletto
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the audiobook version of this story, and was so glad I did. George's writing and Freathy's narration are a spot-on match in this riveting sequel. I was eager to jump back to the 1600s again and revisit the characters in this story. They are fully developed, relatable individuals capable of evolving. My favorite character is Brewster, whose moral trials cause him to undergo real change. As with its predecessor, the history is rich and well-researched. Another outstanding contributio I listened to the audiobook version of this story, and was so glad I did. George's writing and Freathy's narration are a spot-on match in this riveting sequel. I was eager to jump back to the 1600s again and revisit the characters in this story. They are fully developed, relatable individuals capable of evolving. My favorite character is Brewster, whose moral trials cause him to undergo real change. As with its predecessor, the history is rich and well-researched. Another outstanding contribution by both George and Freathy. You won't be disappointed with this one!
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  • john g poole
    January 1, 1970
    1st was betterI really liked and recommended both novels. Mr. George, certainly Israel, of all people, would know that Jesus never called nor claimed to be the Son of God- no, he called himself the 'Son of Man'. That's when I realized that you may not know what your talking about. He never ascribed such a vainglorious title to himself. Sorry that came at end of an otherwise great work.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    As with the first novel in this series, I really enjoyed that this series takes on the subject matter of King Phillip’s War. This is an event that is very often overlooked, but very important in the history of early America. Whereas the first novel focused on the early events that led up to the start of the war, this novel deals with the actual war itself. We are witness to battles and strategies (and failures) on both sides and it was interesting to see how the two different sides perceived thi As with the first novel in this series, I really enjoyed that this series takes on the subject matter of King Phillip’s War. This is an event that is very often overlooked, but very important in the history of early America. Whereas the first novel focused on the early events that led up to the start of the war, this novel deals with the actual war itself. We are witness to battles and strategies (and failures) on both sides and it was interesting to see how the two different sides perceived this war. This book picks up essentially where the prior left off and as it has been a little while since I read it, it did take me a little longer to ease my way back in and reacquaint myself with the events (again since this isn’t a period I am familiar with).I enjoyed being able to see the characters that we were introduced to in the first novel grow here in the second. Brewster has become very different from his earlier incarnation thanks to his fall from his high place and I always enjoy the scenes with Linto as I find him to be a dynamic character. Religion plays a huge role in the decisions of both sides in this war and George does an excellent job in bringing the reader into the mindset of what was going on at the time. This book addresses much more of the brutality and reality of war during this time: surprise attacks, disfigurement, death, loss of children and loss of innocence among others. I feel that George accurately reflects the perspectives and feelings of the time across his cast of characters – some who would feel sympathetic, others who are vindictive, and those who fall somewhere in between.There is to be a third book in this series, but I’m not sure what direction it will go because this book felt very resolved (whereas the first book felt open ended). I am interested in seeing where the author takes this next.Angus Freathy does a very good job narrating this book. His more subtle British accent lends itself well to the personification of the colonial characters. Freathy creates unique voices for all of his characters which lends itself to their uniqueness and how they stand out as individuals in my mind even looking back on it. I loved that Freathy actually sang the songs that make appearance in the novel rather than simply reading them. While not an excellent singer, his attempt at this made the listening experience feel more full and to what the author would have wanted the reader to experience; I know that I tend to sing songs in my head when I encounter them on the page even when I have no point of reference for the tune. I also liked that they had a female singing a song that they were to have overheard in the church, which was a nice touch.This review was previously posted at The Maiden's Court blog and a copy was received for the book tour.
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