The Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2)
Puritans. Quakers. Pirates. Mohawks. Witches. And a brutal war…If you thought New England was dull in the 1670s, get ready for a history lesson.In the critically acclaimed “My Father’s Kingdom,” debut author James W. George transported his readers to 1671 New England, and the world of Reverend Israel Brewster. It was a world of faith, virtue, and love, but it was also a world of treachery, hatred, and murder.Four years later, Brewster is a disgraced outcast, residing in Providence and working as a humble cooper. Despite his best efforts, war could not be averted, and now, “King Philip’s War” has begun.The rebellion is led by Metacomet, known as “King Philip” to the English colonists. He is the tormented son of the great Massasoit, and leader of the Wampanoag nation. Once the most reliable of Plymouth Colony’s allies, they are now the bitterest of enemies. Meanwhile, Metacomet’s mysterious counselor, Linto, despises this war and will do anything to end the bloodshed.Meticulously researched, “The Prophet and the Witch” is a tale of hope and brotherhood in the face of evil and violence. It features the remarkable cast of fictional and historical characters from book one, including Josiah Winslow, Linto, Increase Mather, Constance Wilder, and Jeremiah Barron. Additionally, new characters such as America’s first ranger, Captain Benjamin Church, bring this chapter of history to life like never before.

The Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2) Details

TitleThe Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 7th, 2017
PublisherAmazon Digital Services
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction

The Prophet and the Witch (My Father's Kingdom #2) Review

  • Literary Titan
    January 1, 1970
    The Prophet and The Witch by James W. George is a historical fiction book, continuing on from the first book, My Father’s Kingdom. The year is 1675, and four years have passed since readers joined popular characters such as Brewster and Linto in New England. The signs of war have been steadily brewing since, with so many individuals struggling to hold the peace. Inevitably, all efforts have proved futile, and the battle now begins between the English and the Indians. This is one of the most grue The Prophet and The Witch by James W. George is a historical fiction book, continuing on from the first book, My Father’s Kingdom. The year is 1675, and four years have passed since readers joined popular characters such as Brewster and Linto in New England. The signs of war have been steadily brewing since, with so many individuals struggling to hold the peace. Inevitably, all efforts have proved futile, and the battle now begins between the English and the Indians. This is one of the most gruesome wars many will be privy to, but one which numerous people are determined to end, preventing further bloodshed and restoring peace to both sides.The Prophet and The Witch is divided into three parts, covering the summer of 1675 to the summer of 1676. Within each section, the chapters are short and focused on some wonderfully developed individual characters as they contend with the implications of this war.I was genuinely shocked at the obvious association between war and religion in this account. A huge proportion of the story focuses on the beliefs of the men fighting, highlighting how their personal religious understandings act as an explanation of why war is a necessity. The English see things, such as the turbulent weather, as the wrath of God’s displeasure, but then condemn what they see as mere pagan superstitions of the Indian tribes. However, if they were to reflect, they would soon see more similarities than differences in that both sides look for signs, albeit just of a different type!As a reader, it is difficult to pick a side of this battle. The English Christians rely on the word of God, trusting they are doing his work in ridding a blasphemous tribe who butcher innocent civilians. Yet, to the Indians, the English and their own actions are similarly threatening! The reader never fully feels they can condemn either side, for each are doing what they see as their duty to survive. The question of religion therefore lingers throughout the book, quietly encouraging you to question whether man or God is responsible for this creation of war…Israel Brewster and Linto are firm favourites throughout the story. Their portrayal is refreshing and their actions commendable, in an otherwise fraught and harrowing period. These two are both the savours of the story for me personally as they question man’s motives and speak out when they feel an injustice is occurring.For those who haven’t read the first book, there is an extensive summary at the beginning of book two, instantly bringing readers up-to-date with the action so far. You never feel like you are at a disadvantage because of this.The Prophet and The Witch is expertly written and instantly engaging from the first few pages. An exceptionally drawn historical fiction account. I was captivated by this very well-structured book, and would recommend as one of the more intellectual of reads.Literary Titan
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  • Laura Graves
    January 1, 1970
    The Prophet and the Witch, by James W. George, is the second book in the My Father’s Kingdom series. If you have not been able to read the first book in the series or it has been a while since your reading, George presents a detailed summary of the first book, at the outset of this book. This makes it very easy to just start with this text. These books are set in Puritan, New England, and are generally written in the style of historical fiction. On a continuum of historic fiction where some is m The Prophet and the Witch, by James W. George, is the second book in the My Father’s Kingdom series. If you have not been able to read the first book in the series or it has been a while since your reading, George presents a detailed summary of the first book, at the outset of this book. This makes it very easy to just start with this text. These books are set in Puritan, New England, and are generally written in the style of historical fiction. On a continuum of historic fiction where some is much more fictionalized than others, this book is a very detailed, well-researched retelling of historical context with specific events that could have occurred but are indeed fictionalized. George does seem to do a lot of research for his work and I felt that in contrast to other historical fiction, his imagined stories were fairly faithful to the time and setting. The events described within The Prophet and the Witch, cover the little-known time period in American colonial history, known as King Philip's War.For those unfamiliar with the time period of American history known as King Phillip’s War, the author does provide some good backstory (and some internet searching let me also learn a few more facts). In short, this is a time period of war from June 1675 to April 1678 between the Wampanoag Indians and the colonists. The book seems to accurately highlight many of the historic details regarding the events of the war. When events or characters are altered, George clearly informs his audience of those changes. A few characters are altered or added, where records were sparse and also to make for more emotional and impactful writing. In general, it was interesting to read a text that highlighted such a little-known part of our history and I did learn some new information from the book. I did especially like that George was clear and honest about the lines between fact and fiction, so that I could enjoy a story without getting a false sense of history. Within the historical context of The Prophet and the Witch, the story is mostly centered on the lives of two fictionalized characters, Israel Brewster and Linto. As we are introduced to them, both characters already know each other from the previous book in the series. Brewster is a former Puritan minister who has turned to drink, while Linto is viewed as a holy man among the Wampanoag tribe. Both characters seemed to experience a sort of Hero's Journey, through the course of the text. Both are unwillingly drawn into the coming war, experience horrific tragedy and trauma, seek atonement for their various sins, and return to an unknown life ahead of them. There is also a broader cast of characters who play a role directly in Brewster and Linto’s lives or in the broader context of the story. I generally enjoyed this book because it was a character focused story set in an interesting historical context. George is clearly a very detailed writer, who cares a lot about accurately portraying the historical context. That level of detail was both good and bad. Sometimes the writing felt dense and it was not necessarily an “easy” read, meaning it took more focus and attention than some other books read for fun. Another aspect of the book that I struggled with, is the way in which the book jumps from place to place and sometimes from one time period to another. This typically occurred between chapters. It was sometimes a little confusing and I had to re-orient myself to where and when the events were occurring. Also, flashbacks and memories were sometimes used to convey information such as backstory, but it was not always initially clear to me that this information was out of sequence.Even still, I would strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in historical fiction because the story is so well-researched and fairly accurate to what transpired in King Philip's War, including the missteps, traumas, and dislocations, as well as the victories. If you enjoy a little bit of mystery, you can also challenge yourself to figure out ‘who are the prophet and the witch?’ The answer to this is not necessarily obvious and here George does use some interesting literary devices. Discovering for yourself that bit of information helps to enhance your understanding of the story and in a way the messages/lessons George allows us to take away from this bit of history. One final note for potential readers is that, if you are uncomfortable with descriptions of violence, sexual assault, and trauma, then this book may not be a good fit for you. The style and content makes it suited for mature audiences.
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    James George’s The Prophet and the Witch provides a fascinating and insightful look at a period of history of which many modern readers are likely unfamiliar: King Philip’s War. In spite of its name which may suggest European vs. European warfare, the war actually took place in New England in the 1670s between the English Colonists and Native American inhabitants of the area. George’s novel, which is the second in the series, follows three separate but interconnected stories. The first follows L James George’s The Prophet and the Witch provides a fascinating and insightful look at a period of history of which many modern readers are likely unfamiliar: King Philip’s War. In spite of its name which may suggest European vs. European warfare, the war actually took place in New England in the 1670s between the English Colonists and Native American inhabitants of the area. George’s novel, which is the second in the series, follows three separate but interconnected stories. The first follows Linto, a young spiritual leader among the Wampanoag tribe (which is led by Metacomet, also known as “King Philip”); the second follows Israel Brewster, a disgraced Puritan minister now living in Providence; and the third follows the English army leaders as they wage war against King Philip and other American Indian tribes. I found The Prophet and the Witch to be a completely engrossing and thoughtful five-star story. King Philip’s War is not a period with which I was previously very familiar, so George’s incorporation of historically accurate figures, events, and customs in the novel was fascinating and eye-opening to me. George does an excellent job of creating depth within parts of 17th century history that are often glossed over in history class – for instance, “all Native Americans” or “all English colonists.” In following the path of Linto with the Wampanoag tribe, George shows the depth, divisions, and unity between the many varied Native American tribes in the New England area. In following the path of Israel Brewster, George explores the differences between Puritans and Quakers, or Plymouth and Providence. And in following the English army leaders, George provides insight into hardships of early colonial life and warfare, as well as the painful-to-read views that these colonists held of Native Americans. For readers who are not lucky enough to have read George’s first novel in the series (My Father’s Kingdom), George kindly provides a list of major characters, signifying them as either historical or fictional, as well as provides a thorough overview of the first book’s events. These two features are exceedingly helpful in that it provides historical background for the events of the novel as well as eliminates the need for wordy backstory once the novel gets going. And George truly jumps right into the midst of the war without hesitation, and he keeps readers enthralled through the two-hundred pages with an active plot and both historical and fictional surprises throughout. The Prophet and the Witch excels not only in creating a fascinating work of historical fiction, but also in creating multi-dimensional and alluring characters to draw readers in. The two protagonists, Linto and Israel, are not perfect heroes by a long shot, but they are real people who experience real challenges in their lives and relationships, making them relatable and sympathetic, even though they’re living 350 years in the past. At the end, when readers may suspect the story may be coming to a tragic close, George pulls out one last surprise and leaves the story poised for a third installment – hopefully one just as full of historical intrigue, action, and relationships.
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  • Zola
    January 1, 1970
    'The Prophet and The Witch' is a historical fiction book that recounts King Philips' war in an interesting, well written way. It is the second book in a series, and I think that a third book would be really well received. Much of the book features the lands and swamps native to the Indian's but there are times when the setting shifts to other places. Based off of the author's notes and my own conclusions, I think the main idea of the novel was to draw attention to a very interesting period of hi 'The Prophet and The Witch' is a historical fiction book that recounts King Philips' war in an interesting, well written way. It is the second book in a series, and I think that a third book would be really well received. Much of the book features the lands and swamps native to the Indian's but there are times when the setting shifts to other places. Based off of the author's notes and my own conclusions, I think the main idea of the novel was to draw attention to a very interesting period of history that is often glossed over and bring to light the atrocities that occurred.The book is a combination of fictitious characters as well as real and the combination of the two is flawlessly interwoven. My favourite narratives to read were Linto's and Israel Brewster's, though character narration changed frequently which I found slightly off-putting at the start of the book, as it was harder to connect with the characters.Despite this being a (mostly) historical account, the story had plenty of twists and turns which was enjoyable, though at points these plot twists were predictable (For example, the Mohawks confronting Metacomet and Linto's wife later role). James W George accurately portrays the reality of the war, clearly highlighting the less savoury aspects and raises awareness to some of the issues in the book that are still a problem within parts of the world today. In this sense, the novel really resonated with me. I liked the writing style a lot, but found Brewster's romance scene with Constance to be slightly cheesy. There is a gentle humour to the writing of this novel at the start of the book and the writing has a flair for the dramatic which really captures the essence of the highly religious men portrayed. However, because of this some parts of the story that demand heightened drama had less of an effect on the reader.The writing had a smoothness to it that really draws the reader in and demands their attention, the characters are interesting - if a little uppity - and it leaves things open ended. Leaving the reader to wonder about Linto's fate as well as his wives' next move.Out of everything in the book, my least favourite passages to read were the ones with anyone that wasn't Linto, Church, Brewster or Metacomet. Whilst these passages were still interesting, I disliked the frequent changing of narrative within the same chapter, at times it became disorienting trying to work out whose viewpoint we were seeing this from. In this way I feel the writing could be made clearer.Overall, this was a very interesting read and I would rate it 4/5. It will be interesting to see how far the historical accuracy of this time period can extend into a third book without edging too far into fiction.
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  • Alyssa Nardelli
    January 1, 1970
    Alyssa "The Prophet and the Witch" by James W. George is a historical fiction narrative centered around King Philip's War, which was fought between the New England colonists and Native Americans in the region. While rooted in historical events that take place in the same settings as they once did, the book also contains fictional characters and details. The chapters switch off from the different characters' perspectives, such as the colonist soldiers who are fighting, outcasted Puritan Israel Br Alyssa "The Prophet and the Witch" by James W. George is a historical fiction narrative centered around King Philip's War, which was fought between the New England colonists and Native Americans in the region. While rooted in historical events that take place in the same settings as they once did, the book also contains fictional characters and details. The chapters switch off from the different characters' perspectives, such as the colonist soldiers who are fighting, outcasted Puritan Israel Brewster, Native American Linto, and Native American chief Metacomet. Through the various point of views, the author recounts King Philip's War as he ties together the complete story and brings to life how its events impacted the colonists and Native Americans. I enjoyed the author's style of writing. It was easy to read and connect with the characters of Israel Brewster and Linto. These characters specifically struggle with their internal conflicts that the readers can relate to. These internal struggles complement the external struggle of the war raging on throughout the book. The author also included humor in the right places, which was appreciated amongst the conflict and imagery of the war. I specifically enjoyed the scene with Linto's wife chanting with herbs to rid of Nimrod, who was interrogating Linto about his visions.My favorite feature of the novel was the uniqueness in which George included many characters' perspectives to tell the entire story. This kept the story moving in an interesting way and helped to include a universal view of the plot. Although many parts of the story were fictional, it seemed essential to the whole picture of the historical events, as it showed the reader insight into the true affects of King Philip's War. Some parts of the novel were difficult to grasp, such as the scenes with the soldiers fighting. In addition, it was confusing to remember all of the characters and how they fit into the story. I preferred reading Israel Brewster's and Linto's perspectives because they were more grounded and really gave light to their true feelings and connection with the plot events. The author achieved his goal of informing readers about an event in history involving the Native Americans that isn't taught in school or only told from the perspective of the white American. Especially with events that are happening in America today, this novel is even more important to tell the full story of the impact on both the colonists on the Native Americans and the Native Americans on the colonists. With that said, I would give this novel a 4 out of 5.
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  • Ellie Midwood
    January 1, 1970
    Having previously read “My Father’s Kingdom” I was delighted to get my hands on this second book in the series as soon as it came out. It was just as brilliant as the first one, with the already familiar characters but who now face new challenges as the bloody war rages in their land. Just like book one, book two is a wonderful historical account of the war that I’m sure not too many people know about but which nonetheless left a devastating scar on the early Puritan nation’s history. I was genu Having previously read “My Father’s Kingdom” I was delighted to get my hands on this second book in the series as soon as it came out. It was just as brilliant as the first one, with the already familiar characters but who now face new challenges as the bloody war rages in their land. Just like book one, book two is a wonderful historical account of the war that I’m sure not too many people know about but which nonetheless left a devastating scar on the early Puritan nation’s history. I was genuinely happy for Israel Brewster who finally found his happiness with the Quakers but as the war approaches the land that is too dear to him, Israel joins the militia and prays for the best. I was also happy to once again encounter Linto - probably the most sympathetic character of the Wampanoag tribe - who tries to do his utmost to prevent the bloodshed. However, soon the war touches him and his family as well, turning his loving wife Wawetseka into something sinister, and even Linto isn’t so certain about the future anymore…Just like book one, “The Prophet and the Witch” is an incredibly well-researched novel and a delightful read for the fans of the historical fiction genre. You will feel like you’re right there, in the middle of the action in old Puritan Massachusetts, and it doesn’t get any better than that. Highly recommended, and five very well deserved stars!
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