The Sealwoman's Gift
In 1627 Barbary pirates raided the coast of Iceland and abducted some 400 of its people, including 250 from a tiny island off the mainland. Among the captives sold into slavery in Algiers were the island pastor, his wife and their three children. Although the raid itself is well documented, little is known about what happened to the women and children afterwards. It was a time when women everywhere were largely silent.In this brilliant reimagining, Sally Magnusson gives a voice to Ásta, the pastor's wife. Enslaved in an alien Arab culture Ásta meets the loss of both her freedom and her children with the one thing she has brought from home: the stories in her head. Steeped in the sagas and folk tales of her northern homeland, she finds herself experiencing not just the separations and agonies of captivity, but the reassessments that come in any age when intelligent eyes are opened to other lives, other cultures and other kinds of loving.The Sealwoman's Gift is about the eternal power of storytelling to help us survive. The novel is full of stories - Icelandic ones told to fend off a slave-owner's advances, Arabian ones to help an old man die. And there are others, too: the stories we tell ourselves to protect our minds from what cannot otherwise be borne, the stories we need to make us happy.

The Sealwoman's Gift Details

TitleThe Sealwoman's Gift
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 8th, 2018
PublisherTwo Roads
ISBN-139781473638952
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

The Sealwoman's Gift Review

  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    The Scottish Icelandic Magnusson family are very well known in Scotland and the UK. Sally is a broadcaster and journalist, her father, Magnus Magnusson, was chair of Mastermind for many years and an expert on Iceland’s history and sagas. This isn’t Sally’s first book but it is her first novel. It’s based on a raid on Iceland in 1627 by Algerian and Moroccan corsairs (pirates) during the course of which many Icelanders were killed and 400 were captured to be sold as slaves in Algiers. The event i The Scottish Icelandic Magnusson family are very well known in Scotland and the UK. Sally is a broadcaster and journalist, her father, Magnus Magnusson, was chair of Mastermind for many years and an expert on Iceland’s history and sagas. This isn’t Sally’s first book but it is her first novel. It’s based on a raid on Iceland in 1627 by Algerian and Moroccan corsairs (pirates) during the course of which many Icelanders were killed and 400 were captured to be sold as slaves in Algiers. The event is considered one of the most traumatic in Icelandic history.Asta and Olafur (a Lutheran priest) and two of their three children are amongst those taken. She gives birth to another child at sea. On arrival in Algiers, the couple are bought by a wealthy man, Cilleby, who also takes the two smallest children. Egill, their older son, is purchased by the pasha, who was known for his taste in young boys so what remained of Egill’s childhood was probably very difficult. Asta and the children are taken to Cilleby’s main residence. Olafur is kept separately and after a while is sent to Copenhagen to ask the Danish king (Iceland was under Danish rule) for a ransom to free the captives. It would be many years before this was achieved and few were ever to return home to Iceland.This is a book about stories and their role in our lives. The Icelandic sagas were a source of comfort to Asta and were to prove useful in her relationship with Cilleby, just as the other women of the household enjoyed listening to the tales of Scheherazade in the evenings. It’s about the stories we tell ourselves and each other to keep our spirits up during difficult times. Asta was able to transport herself back to Iceland by imagining what she would be seeing and feeling, smelling and touching. It’s about love and separation - ‘Is it by the wanting that we measure love or is it something else?’ It’s about the choices people make when their lives are changed forever and they have to find a way to survive. It’s about the judgements of others who cannot imagine what they would have done in the same situation but are quick to condemn.This is a very well researched historical novel as the Author’s Note at the end explains but it never gets bogged down by detail. It is first and foremost a story and it’s very well told. I was frustrated when I had to stop reading it and took every opportunity to get back to it. The pace is perfect and I found it a real page turner.4.5-5 stars and I’m really looking forward to her second novel. With thanks to NetGalley and Two Roads/John Murray Publishers for a review copy.Aside: when I was living in London in the early 80s, Sally Magnusson was a newsreader on, I think, LWT. One night, she was finishing with a piece on the Edinburgh Festival. Sally, who grew up in Glasgow, read the piece and then went off script to say, “Why is there such a fuss over a piddling little festival in Edinburgh that only lasts three weeks? Glasgow is home to both national orchestras (the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra), to the national opera company (Scottish Opera) and ballet (Scottish Ballet), The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (now Royal Conservatoire), one of the most esteemed art schools (Glasgow Art School) and one of the most admired theatre companies in the UK (the Citizens Theatre). Edinburgh has three short weeks. Pfffff!” She then smiled to the camera and said ‘Have a good evening’, cool as you like. I loved her for that. She made my day! Everyone knows the best thing to come out of Edinburgh is the Glasgow train! ;-)
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  • Eric Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    There’s something so wonderful about being wholly drawn into a richly imagined historical novel that both illuminates a somewhat forgotten or not-widely-known period of history and gives voice to people who are only glancingly referred to in the history books. Sally Magnusson does all this in her debut novel “The Sealwoman’s Gift” which recounts the abduction of over four hundred Icelandic citizens from their homes in the year 1627 by pirates from Morocco and Algeria. These prisoners were sold i There’s something so wonderful about being wholly drawn into a richly imagined historical novel that both illuminates a somewhat forgotten or not-widely-known period of history and gives voice to people who are only glancingly referred to in the history books. Sally Magnusson does all this in her debut novel “The Sealwoman’s Gift” which recounts the abduction of over four hundred Icelandic citizens from their homes in the year 1627 by pirates from Morocco and Algeria. These prisoners were sold into slavery and a ransom for their release wasn’t obtained until several years later – by which point many of those abducted had either died, been irretrievably lost or converted/integrated into life along the Barbary Coast. Copies still exist of a famous account of these abductions written by a Reverend who was captured himself, but Magnusson focuses her novel more on the journey and inner-struggles of his wife Ásta. It’s noted how “others may have written their own accounts of captivity. Men, of course. Does it matter that nobody will know how it was to be a woman?” In doing so, this novel brilliantly engages with many of the heartrending conflicts a woman in Ásta’s position must have faced while also powerfully illuminating the cultural importance of storytelling and the complicated dynamics of love.Read my full review of The Sealwoman’s Gift by Sally Magnusson on LonesomeReader
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  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fictionalised account of a real-life historical event in the 1600s when hundreds of people in Iceland were killed by pirates or captured and taken as slaves. The story is told from the perspective of the wife of a priest from a small southern island. (As a disclaimer I should admit that since visiting several years ago, I’m a keen enthusiast for contemporary books set in Iceland. It’s an amazing place.)Despite being set in different countries and different centuries, this story reminde This is a fictionalised account of a real-life historical event in the 1600s when hundreds of people in Iceland were killed by pirates or captured and taken as slaves. The story is told from the perspective of the wife of a priest from a small southern island. (As a disclaimer I should admit that since visiting several years ago, I’m a keen enthusiast for contemporary books set in Iceland. It’s an amazing place.)Despite being set in different countries and different centuries, this story reminded me of the Good People by Hannah Kent. The heavy mood created by the cold foggy landscape, the intensity of small-town social relationships, the theme of loss and grief, the role of women in Europe several centuries ago, and the tension between Christianity and pagan mythology - both of which are tightly bound in culture - are all parallels. However, while the Good People causes readers to feel increasing heaviness and despair as the characters get more and more trapped, the Sealwoman’s Gift has times of lightness and resolution. Both book embrace the complexity of real people and societies but with this I came out feeling like I had greater insight into humanity, rather than feeling distressed for humankind. Also after reading several novels in a row that seemed self-important and irritatingly meandering, this novel seemed very well-considered. Careful thought has been given to what information to include, and when or how to reveal new information. It feels like the work of an experienced author who is focussed on creating something for her audience rather than herself. I’ve also recently read books that try to weave mythology into a new narrative, but it can feel forced or dull. In this book, it’s cleverly inter-twined so that the sagas add new dimensions and twists to the primary narrative rather than being a distraction or coming across as pretentious waffle.Finally, the amount of research that must have gone into this novel must have been enormous. For those who like historical fiction, I highly recommend this book.
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  • Victoria (Eve's Alexandria)
    January 1, 1970
    I have a thing for Iceland and a thing for pirates, so this surprisingly fluent and moving historical novel had me at hello. It opens in the spring of 1628 when nearly 400 Icelanders from the remote Western Isles are kidnapped by the renowned Algerine pirate Murat Reis. Dozens of others are murdered during the brutal and unprecedented raid. Amongst the taken are priest Olafur Egilson, his wife Asta Thorsteinsdottir and two of their children, 11 year old Egill and three year old Marta. Heavily pr I have a thing for Iceland and a thing for pirates, so this surprisingly fluent and moving historical novel had me at hello. It opens in the spring of 1628 when nearly 400 Icelanders from the remote Western Isles are kidnapped by the renowned Algerine pirate Murat Reis. Dozens of others are murdered during the brutal and unprecedented raid. Amongst the taken are priest Olafur Egilson, his wife Asta Thorsteinsdottir and two of their children, 11 year old Egill and three year old Marta. Heavily pregnant Asta gives birth to a third child, Jon, in the dank crowded hold of the slavers ship.It’s a captivating beginning, tightly and atmospherically told in a complicated structure of flash back and changed perspective. You would be excused for thinking that what follows will be an adventure story, but that’s not the style of Magnusson’s debut at all. Instead it is a moving account of Olafur and Asta’s response to their varied fates: Olafur almost immediately released to go and beg for ransom for his fellow slaves from the Danish King, and Asta sold into the household of a prodigiously rich Moor, Ali Pitterling Cilleby. Both are separated from home, family and the strict religious belief that has previously shaped their lives. Asta emerges from this as a powerful and enigmatic personality, driven by her cultural identity and love of the Icelandic sagas. The novel is based on a true story, passed down to us in the biography that Olafur Egilson wrote about his own experiences. Asta is almost entirely missing from that narrative (what a big surprise) but here Magnusson writes her back in to history as a fierce and imaginative survivor. Love is at the centre of the story, in one way or another and in all its various guises. It almost, at times, tips over into the sentimental but the atmosphere, historical delicacy and subtlety that come with it make it somehow acceptable. It reminds me powerfully in this sense of another novel of the emotions that I loved, Witch Light by Susan Fletcher. I would certainly recommend this to all readers of historical fiction.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I'd like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.The Sealwoman’s Gift is an absolute gem of an historical novel, and evokes the atmosphere, struggles and joys of a bygone era with rare elegance and authenticity. It is clearly a labour of painstakingly researched love - in fact, I was astounded to realise just how much of the novel was based on pure historical fact when reading the author’s note at the end - whi First of all, I'd like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.The Sealwoman’s Gift is an absolute gem of an historical novel, and evokes the atmosphere, struggles and joys of a bygone era with rare elegance and authenticity. It is clearly a labour of painstakingly researched love - in fact, I was astounded to realise just how much of the novel was based on pure historical fact when reading the author’s note at the end - which makes the fact that this novel deliberately sets out to give a voice to those who have been almost entirely erased from history even more poignant. This is always one of my absolute favourite kinds of fiction, and this novel pulls it off beautifully. It tells the story of Ásta, an Icelandic woman who really was kidnapped from her remote island and sold into slavery in Algiers in the early 17th century - but of whom almost nothing else is known, even though her husband Ólafur’s book about the raid is the most comprehensive surviving historical account of the event. This novel takes it upon itself to fill in the gaps in the historical narrative, painting a vivid picture of some of the women and children that male authors throughout history never thought worth mentioning in detail.One of the novel’s great strengths is the life it breathes into everything. Ásta is a marvellous protagonist, brimming with life, wit and heart, and I was surprised by how much I came to care about Ólafur, too. He’s not the kind of character I usually warm to, but his compassion, curiosity, gentleness, and the gradual softening of his stern principles eventually won me over. I also found the relationship between them very compelling, as were Ásta’s relationships with all of her children, all of which were beautifully nuanced and different. Honestly, that’s a particularly impressive feat, because I tend to find it very difficult to relate to fictional depictions of motherhood.However, I really felt that most of the other characters who appeared in the chapters set in Algiers could have been fleshed out a bit more - even the ones who were focused on most heavily never felt particularly compelling to me. This section - which takes up a considerable chunk of the novel - does a wonderful job of conveying the culture shock Ásta is experiencing, and there is a lot to be said for the way it portrays the agony of loss and the turmoil of doubt and guilt. However, the narrative always seemed a little bit more detached in these chapters, which I think was maybe a deliberate choice on the author’s part to reflect the feeling of alienation that comes with being uprooted from one’s home so violently (or I may have been imagining it, because I admittedly didn’t have as much free time while I was reading that section, so I mostly got through it in tiny bursts when I had a few moments to spare). Whatever the reason, I just didn’t feel as emotionally connected to those chapters and the characters they focused on, which is the main reason I knocked a star off this review (as well as the way the narrative often switched perspective from one paragraph to the next, which is a style I’m REALLY not fond of).However, that’s my only major criticism! For the most part, I found the characters and their relationships highly compelling, the plot well-paced, and the setting gorgeously rendered. It almost feels as though you could step into 17th-century Iceland or Algiers at any moment - I absolutely adored how much this novel felt like a window into the past. Plus, I was tremendously moved by the last few chapters of the novel, which more than made up for any emotional distance in the earlier chapters.Also, I’m not usually a fan of novels which feature religion as a major theme, but the way it was explored here was nothing short of wonderful, focusing on the little concessions and doubts that creep into everyone’s mind over the course of their lives and showing all the ways that different belief systems can be alike, compatible, overlapping, and yet distinct, and what that means for the people who find themselves caught between two or even three worlds (or who simply care about other people whose beliefs don’t quite match up with their own). It could maybe be best summed up as an unpretentious exploration of what personal faith means, and I found it surprisingly lovely.Of course, that goes hand in hand with one of my all-time favourite themes - the power and importance of stories (and, in this case, the extent to which they can coexist with religious doctrine). Folklore and memory are the cornerstone of this novel, which revolves around the ways that all of our lives are built on stories and draw on our own histories, while also reminding us just how many people have been erased from those narratives.And finally, I just want to say that I was utterly charmed by the way the story incorporated elements of fantasy; normally I find it immensely irritating when they’re used sparingly, because it often feels like the author is afraid of committing to the story they really want to tell (and, sidenote, the main criterion I use when rating a book is “how close I think it comes to being the book it’s trying to be”), but in this case, the little touches of magic around the edges felt perfect. In the end, this isn’t a story about magic: it’s a story about finding your own understanding of the world, and it just so happens that this novel’s understanding of the world includes a sprinkling of myth and magic.
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  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    Review by Lorraine ParkerKnowing that the book is a combination of fact, folklore, historical fiction and almost mythology makes for an intriguing and mesmerizing read. A remarkable opening is set in 1627 with Asta, giving birth on the floorboards of a Barbary pirate vessel, surrounded by so many others who have also been brutally captured by the raiders, stolen from their Icelandic island and thrown as human cargo into the bowels of this ship.I was a little put off by the long list of character Review by Lorraine ParkerKnowing that the book is a combination of fact, folklore, historical fiction and almost mythology makes for an intriguing and mesmerizing read. A remarkable opening is set in 1627 with Asta, giving birth on the floorboards of a Barbary pirate vessel, surrounded by so many others who have also been brutally captured by the raiders, stolen from their Icelandic island and thrown as human cargo into the bowels of this ship.I was a little put off by the long list of characters, all with unfamiliar mostly Icelandic names at the beginning of the book. However, the pages turn with compulsion and I did not refer to the list even once. A clever mix of their present intermingled with vivid recollections of those catastrophic events that saw death, destruction and families split, is further tangled with folk lore stories that bring them comfort. The birth of Asta’s baby Jon is horrendous and this is followed by the death of old Odrum who is the ‘Sealwoman’, storyteller and foreteller of the future. What is the gift that she gives to Asta? It remains an enigma to the very end.Olafur, husband to the spirited Asta and father to Helga, Egill, Marta and now baby Jon is the community priest. I tried to have empathy with Olafur. However, the further I read the more my antipathy toward him grew, or was it the blindness of religion. Is this what the author intended?The loss suffered from one island alone, over 200 out of a population of over 400 is unimaginable. However, In Algiers the Asta family are ‘lucky’. Their eldest, Helga has not been captured. Their family of five, except for Egill are sold in the huge slave market together. The wealthy Moor, Cilleby, is the purchaser and will do with them as he wills. They cling to the possibility of ransom and return home. Olafur is sent on a journey by Cilleby to request ransom from the King of Denmark. Cilleby, who has two wives, eventually summons Asta to his private domain. An interesting interaction, of words only, takes place. On the second summons Asta finds herself ‘out of line’ and Cilleby is shocked to find himself ‘explaining’. Asta’s gaze is not fixed where it should be, she discovers he has blue eyes and he finds her privately ‘exhilarating’. After 6 years in Algiers Olafur is not so much on her mind. She finds joy in Marta, now 9 and Jon. The clash of Christianity and Islam is a fascinating integral element in this saga. The acceptance of the present, adaptation of the human spirit (even if sometimes reluctantly) and will to survive are so very powerfully depicted in this skilfully told saga. Tension keeps the reader completely spellbound as we suspect where certain aspects are going and always there is the question of Asta’s children. What happens to Jon, at the age of six and Marta at the age of 11. The wisdom of young Jon will help Asta eventually make a decision of her own free will.Being judgemental and giving platitudes is so easy. This book can only enrich every single individual who reads this realistic but sometimes fanciful book.
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  • Thelastwordreview
    January 1, 1970
    I was very fortunate to have met and even interviewed Magnus Magnusson back in the mid 1980’s and so when The Sealwoman’s Gift by the Broadcaster and Journalist Sally Mangnusson landed on my desk it brought so much excitement to me. Old stories from Iceland are part of folklore and The Sealwoman’s Gift is a remarkable debut that just adds to the legend of Icelandic stories.This is a story that is set in the 17th Century and a pirate raid on the small Westman Island close to Iceland. The pirates I was very fortunate to have met and even interviewed Magnus Magnusson back in the mid 1980’s and so when The Sealwoman’s Gift by the Broadcaster and Journalist Sally Mangnusson landed on my desk it brought so much excitement to me. Old stories from Iceland are part of folklore and The Sealwoman’s Gift is a remarkable debut that just adds to the legend of Icelandic stories.This is a story that is set in the 17th Century and a pirate raid on the small Westman Island close to Iceland. The pirates were only after one thing to round up as many of the men and women and children and sell them as slaves in the far off Arabian countries. It is 1627 and the pirates have taken the Pastor Olafur Egilsson, his wife and children along with hundreds of the inhabitants of this small island and now they are on a long voyage not without danger. When they arrive in Algiers the islanders are sold off for slavery with the exception of the Pastor Egilsson who is allowed to travel back to his country to seek a ransom to free those now captured and are now slaves. Egilsson’s wife Asta has three children and with a fourth on the way she is now thrust into new life thousands of miles away from her home on the island of Westman. For Asta she is a voice in this extraordinary novel which she breathes life to this story. On the island of Westman life is incredibly hard were the weather never seems to let up. Asta has always believed on the Icelandic fables and she believes in elves much to the dismay of her much older husband Olafur Egilsson. Sally Magnusson has managed to recreate the dreadful conditions on the pirate ship as the islanders have to contend with the stench and the cramped conditions on-board and this is where Asta will give birth to her fourth child a son and the name of Jon. What a life this poor child arrives into aboard a slave ship wrapped in nothing more that filthy rags. Now sold into slavery in a country so vastly different, food in abundance and a riot of colour, and also the weather is so different gone is the cold and wet and now it is hot sun nearly every day. Asta has never forgotten the old stories and it is here that she now tells these stories to her master Ali Pitterling Cilleby. Old stories from thousands of miles away from a far off small island now be told in Algiers. These stories are a reminder of her far off homeland and she thinks constantly of her husband is travelling to seek a ransom to free them. Will Asta ever be re-united with her husband or even her homeland ever again? I have to say that I am deeply impressed with the writing of Sally Magnusson and how she tells such an engrossing and accomplished novel. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED My thanks to Rosie Gailer at Two Roads Books for the review copy of The Sealwoman’s Gift.384 Pages
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  • Eleanor
    January 1, 1970
    The Sealwoman's Gift is an utterly brilliant book hampered by a fairly terrible title; you'd think, to look at it, that it's a kind of Celtic romance involving a dreamy, windswept woman who spends a lot of time gazing out to sea. It's actually based on an event that really happened: a Barbary pirate raid on the Westman Islands of Iceland in 1627. We know from historical sources that among those captured were the Reverend Ólafur Egilsson, his heavily pregnant wife, and three of their children. Eg The Sealwoman's Gift is an utterly brilliant book hampered by a fairly terrible title; you'd think, to look at it, that it's a kind of Celtic romance involving a dreamy, windswept woman who spends a lot of time gazing out to sea. It's actually based on an event that really happened: a Barbary pirate raid on the Westman Islands of Iceland in 1627. We know from historical sources that among those captured were the Reverend Ólafur Egilsson, his heavily pregnant wife, and three of their children. Egilsson's memoir of the voyage, his brief time as a slave in Algiers, his release on a mission to beg for ransom from King Christian IV of Denmark (then the colonial ruler of Iceland), and his return to his home, was a major source for Magnusson's book. What she tells us, though, is the story of Egilsson's wife, Ásta Thórsteinsdottir, a literate and strongwilled (if impractical) woman whose myriad losses - her liberty, her husband, each of her children in one way or another - ought to have floored her. Magnusson's success is in balancing on a line that could easily tip her into anachronism or sentimentality. Ásta is clever and resourceful, but believably powerless: her owner in Algiers, although he begins to have feelings for her, is never capable of seeing her as anything more than a mere woman, inherently confusing and irrational. Her agonies over religion are also beautifully conveyed: as the wife of a Lutheran priest, albeit one who has been known to tell tales of the elves and the hidden people, she is in a particular bind when it comes to the potential conversion to Islam of her small children. Her fear that she will not only be separated from them in this life, but in the next, is piercingly convincing. And Magnusson's prose never falters, never slides into awkward phrasing or excessive lyricism, even maintaining a light, dry humour that doesn't feel out of place. What an exceptional and moving fiction debut this is.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    This book was everything and more than I expected. It captivated me and I was there in the story. This novel is based on a true event that happened in the 17th century where Barbary pirates captured 400 of Iceland's people and sold them into slavery. Among the captured were a priest, his wife and their children. His account is well documented but his wife's isn't so Sally Magunsson the author wanted to write Asta ( the priests wife's) story of what may have happened to her even though nobody kno This book was everything and more than I expected. It captivated me and I was there in the story. This novel is based on a true event that happened in the 17th century where Barbary pirates captured 400 of Iceland's people and sold them into slavery. Among the captured were a priest, his wife and their children. His account is well documented but his wife's isn't so Sally Magunsson the author wanted to write Asta ( the priests wife's) story of what may have happened to her even though nobody knows. Sally Magnusson's writing is gorgeous and the descriptions of the Icelandic islands and Tangiers etc are wonderful that you could see it and smell it. I was so torn by what Asta went through and the decisions that she had to make. I put this book up there among the best books that I have read. I can't praise this book enough. The cover to is gorgeous.
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  • Mrs Sarah J Bruce
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant story telling, I was completely immersed in the lives of the characters. I liked the way events were told from different people's perspective but it didn't feel like you were languishing on the event either. It flowed very well & when I'd finished the book I still felt like I was invested in the characters. What made it more poignant was the fact that it was based on a true story from a period & a country that I'd never read about. Would heartily recommend it to anyone who enjo Brilliant story telling, I was completely immersed in the lives of the characters. I liked the way events were told from different people's perspective but it didn't feel like you were languishing on the event either. It flowed very well & when I'd finished the book I still felt like I was invested in the characters. What made it more poignant was the fact that it was based on a true story from a period & a country that I'd never read about. Would heartily recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical novels.
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  • Claire Rush
    January 1, 1970
    Book #20 of 2018: This is an incredible read that emphasises the power of stories, examining complex themes of motherhood, identity, exile and freedom. Inspired by a real-life Berber pirate raid of Iceland in 1600s, I was swept away in Astra's story. Beautifully powerful...!5*s
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  • Ashleigh
    January 1, 1970
    Review can be found on my blog, will appear soon!
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Deeply impressed with this. It’s not perfect, but it gets the alienation and isolation of the main character spot on. I love the ‘woman’s half of the story’ genre, and this is a great addition to it.
  • Janey Simpson
    January 1, 1970
    Nicely written and interesting historically, but did take a little while to get in to.
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