Twisted Prey (Lucas Davenport, #28)
Lucas Davenport confronts an old nemesis, now more powerful than ever as a U.S. senator, in the thrilling new novel in the #1 New York Times-bestselling Prey seriesLucas Davenport had crossed paths with her before.A rich psychopath, Taryn Grant had run successfully for the U.S. Senate, where Lucas had predicted she’d fit right in. He was also convinced that she’d been responsible for three murders, though he’d never been able to prove it. Once a psychopath had gotten that kind of rush, though, he or she often needed another fix, so he figured he might be seeing her again.He was right. A federal marshal now, with a very wide scope of investigation, he’s heard rumors that Grant has found her seat on the Senate intelligence committee, and the contacts she’s made from it, to be very…useful. Pinning those rumors down was likely to be just as difficult as before, and considerably more dangerous.But they had unfinished business, he and Grant. One way or the other, he was going to see it through to the end.

Twisted Prey (Lucas Davenport, #28) Details

TitleTwisted Prey (Lucas Davenport, #28)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 24th, 2018
PublisherG.P. Putnam’s Sons
ISBN-139780735217355
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Crime

Twisted Prey (Lucas Davenport, #28) Review

  • Kemper
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free advance copy of this from NetGalley for review.Me in 2013: “I love John Sandford novels, but this Silken Prey seems a bit outlandish. Could a rich person with a narcissistic personality disorder who engages in criminal behavior really hope to win an election to an important position in the US government? That seems highly unlikely.”Me on Election Night 2016: “Why didn’t we heed John Sandford’s warning?!?”Back in Silken Prey Lucas Davenport tangled with a crazy woman named Taryn I received a free advance copy of this from NetGalley for review.Me in 2013: “I love John Sandford novels, but this Silken Prey seems a bit outlandish. Could a rich person with a narcissistic personality disorder who engages in criminal behavior really hope to win an election to an important position in the US government? That seems highly unlikely.”Me on Election Night 2016: “Why didn’t we heed John Sandford’s warning?!?”Back in Silken Prey Lucas Davenport tangled with a crazy woman named Taryn Grant who was running for the Senate. She was capable of framing a rival for child pornography and then forming a conspiracy to commit murder to cover it all up. Since she was rich and this is America, (view spoiler)[ she got away with it. (hide spoiler)].Now a rival of Grant’s is almost killed in a car accident which he is positive was an attempt to murder him, and Lucas Davenport is asked to check into the case. Davenport is off to D.C. and is quickly convinced that the accident was indeed a professional attempted hit, and he suspects that Grant’s friends at a military contractor filled with ex-special forces members were responsible for it on her orders. Getting evidence on trained killers who know how to cover their tracks and are backed by a powerful rich woman with her eye on the White House won’t be easy though.Despite the DC setting and Davenport facing off against a crew of bad ass ex-soldiers this all feels like pretty standard stuff for Sandford. Not that it’s a bad thing. Sandford at his worst can write circles around most of the thriller writers on the best seller list, and this is has a lot of intriguing elements like figuring out how the bad guys could have rigged the car accident without leaving a trace. Davenport joined the US Marshals in the last book, and that change has enabled the series to do some interesting new stuff like this. However, I think this one fell a little short of high potential in a few areas. For starters, even though this is set in DC and involves members of Congress it just doesn’t seem like the circus it would be. I also thought that Grant's response to being investigated would be more politically vicious and involve her trying to do more to smear Davenport in the media rather than going after him with more direct methods. It all just seems a little naïve and optimistic in that the system pretty much works and Davenport is free to investigate without having to worry about the press or the politics of it much at all. And bear in mind that what I’m essentially saying here is the biggest problem with a plot that involves a member of the US Congress trying to assassinate a political rival and cover it up with the help of shady intelligence connections is that IT'S NOT CYNICAL ENOUGH!Welcome to America 2018.There’s a few other issues too, but most of them fall into the category of spoilers. (view spoiler)[ Grant really came across as a dangerous nut job in her first appearance, but she doesn’t seem to have the same evil energy here. Plus, it seems like a mistake that she and Lucas never come face-to-face. We’ve also seen the villains try to distract Davenport by going after his family or friends before so to have it happy yet again here seems kind of predictable. Again, I’d more expect Grant to use her political influence and media contacts to drop a world of hurt on Davenport as a way of neutralizing him rather than going to physical attacks against him and his wife as a first response. (hide spoiler)]While I was a little let down by some of this it was still a solid page turner, and I very much enjoyed the ending which went a long way towards making me forget about some of my quibbles.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I think John Sandford has outdone himself with this book. Where he shines is in getting the details exactly right. Lots of dry humor here, especially when it comes to DC and politics. There’s a wonderful sense of tension throughout. Even though Davenport knows who’s behind the foul play, that doesn’t mean he can prove it for a court of law. Watching him put the pieces of the puzzle together kept me riveted. You can see the ending coming, but it was the perfect ending. I have to give Sandford cre I think John Sandford has outdone himself with this book. Where he shines is in getting the details exactly right. Lots of dry humor here, especially when it comes to DC and politics. There’s a wonderful sense of tension throughout. Even though Davenport knows who’s behind the foul play, that doesn’t mean he can prove it for a court of law. Watching him put the pieces of the puzzle together kept me riveted. You can see the ending coming, but it was the perfect ending. I have to give Sandford credit. It’s wild to imagine this is the 28th book in the series. If anything, he’s getting better. I listened to this book and once again Richard Ferrone does a great job as the narrator.
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  • Andrew Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Lucas Davenport is one of my favourite characters in crime fiction. Good looking and rich (some time ago he designed some software that made him his pile) he’s also mean and funny. Sandford has cleverly managed Davenport’s career in law enforcement, finding him new jobs that provide him with ever more freedom to chase down villains anywhere he chooses to roam. His latest job is that of a U.S. Marshall and this time around he receives a call from Minnesota Senator Porter Smalls who has just survi Lucas Davenport is one of my favourite characters in crime fiction. Good looking and rich (some time ago he designed some software that made him his pile) he’s also mean and funny. Sandford has cleverly managed Davenport’s career in law enforcement, finding him new jobs that provide him with ever more freedom to chase down villains anywhere he chooses to roam. His latest job is that of a U.S. Marshall and this time around he receives a call from Minnesota Senator Porter Smalls who has just survived an attempt on his life – in an incident that cost the life of his lover. But Smalls is having a hard time persuading the local cops that the incident itself was anything other than a routine motor accident. He’s convinced that Taryn Grant is behind the attempt: the pair have history and hate each other (an earlier novel in the series Silken Prey provides the full background). Grant is a deliciously bad woman, beautiful but also a deadly sociopath who seemingly has no conscience whatsoever. Lucas sets off to Washington DC to scout out the background to the incident and to liaise with the local police. One of the clever things Sandford does in this series is to maintain a sense of continuity through Davenport’s contact with his family and ex-colleagues whilst moving the whole thing forward by continuously introducing new characters who become part of ’the family’. His focus in one book may be his wife or his daughter or a particular colleague and then in the next book they may be absent or just a peripheral background figure. I really like this approach as it stops the books from feeling samey and routine. And another thing he does is to cleverly show both sides of the story, so that at the same time the reader knows both what the hunters and the hunted are doing and thinking. It all adds up to a quality product, one that rivals Michael Connelly’s brilliant novels in terms of pure readability and clarity. In all honesty, this isn’t my favourite book in the series - but it’s still good. My only real qualm is that the mid section of the book feels a little slow, but that’s judging this episode against the very high standard of the author’s very best books. Here, it all makes sense, the characters (particularly Smalls and Grant) are great, the new guys are interesting and amusing and, once the pace picks up, the whole thing races to a brilliant conclusion. What’s not to like!There are now 28 books in the Lucas Davenport (‘Prey’) series and a further 11 in the offshoot series featuring Davenport’s close friend and former colleague Virgil Flowers. The quality of these books is extremely high and I’d recommend any lover of crime fiction to seek them out if, for some reason, Sandford has flown under their personal radar.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    After 28 books, the Lucas Davenport series is still going strong. This was a very enjoyable read. Lucas is asked to investigate the attempted assassination of a U. S. Senator, and he calls on Bob and Rae for assistance. Along with local law enforcement and the FBI, the U. S. Marshals follow leads and try to put together a case. There are several deaths as the investigation is thwarted time and time again.Both Virgil (of “that fuckin' Flowers” fame) and Kidd make minor appearances in this book. G After 28 books, the Lucas Davenport series is still going strong. This was a very enjoyable read. Lucas is asked to investigate the attempted assassination of a U. S. Senator, and he calls on Bob and Rae for assistance. Along with local law enforcement and the FBI, the U. S. Marshals follow leads and try to put together a case. There are several deaths as the investigation is thwarted time and time again.Both Virgil (of “that fuckin' Flowers” fame) and Kidd make minor appearances in this book. Good to know they are both well, and it seems Virgil is still headed toward domestication. You’ll know what I mean if you’ve read Sandford's Virgil Flowers series. Lucas's wife, Weather, and their daughter, Letty, have small roles as well.As is usual in John Sandford's books, the dialogue feels natural with lots of ribbing and humor. Lucas is a clotheshorse, and some downtime allows him to visit a tailor with Bob. I enjoy those little side stories. There is cooperation between all agencies involved, meaning they share information, so the case moves along to a satisfying conclusion.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    Can this possibly be the 28th book in the Prey series? I know I haven't missed many, so guess that makes me an oldie (but goodie). And so is the series; even if "star" character Lucas Davenport, now a federal marshal, seems to be a bit more laid back these days, there's plenty of action here that kept me reading until my Kindle battery insisted it needed a recharge.Happily - and in one case, unhappily - a few other characters make return appearances in this one. There's Weather, Lucas's surgeon Can this possibly be the 28th book in the Prey series? I know I haven't missed many, so guess that makes me an oldie (but goodie). And so is the series; even if "star" character Lucas Davenport, now a federal marshal, seems to be a bit more laid back these days, there's plenty of action here that kept me reading until my Kindle battery insisted it needed a recharge.Happily - and in one case, unhappily - a few other characters make return appearances in this one. There's Weather, Lucas's surgeon wife, Letty, his daughter, some former professional colleagues and the even more lovable (to me, at least) Virgil Flowers, upon whom Mr. Sandford has bestowed a series all his own.Still another blast from the past is Taryn Grant, a psychopath who's now a U.S. Senator. Lucas is certain she's up to her old tricks (and being a billionaire, she's able to grease wheels till the Minnesota cows come home). One of her other enemies, Sen. Porter Smalls, knows firsthand how dangerous the woman is. In fact, he's convinced that a recent auto accident that nearly killed him - and did kill the driver - was all her doing. Proving that, though, just isn't in his skill set.So, he calls in Lucas - who turns to local law enforcement, the FBI and others to help with the investigation. All heck breaks loose in the process, with suspicions turning into twists and turns that threaten the well-being of everyone involved, including Lucas's own family. And in the end, getting to the truth doesn't necessarily mean justice will be done. Or does it?Many thanks to the publisher, via NetGalley, for the opportunity to read and review an advance copy.
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  • Maureen Carden
    January 1, 1970
    The psychopathic Minnesota Senator Taryn Grant and U.S. Marshall Lucas Davenport have faced off before in a murderous duel in the book Silken Prey. The best one can say is that is was a draw between the two.But now Grant is becoming more powerful and is eyeing the White House. Holding on to her coattails, I mean skirts, are members of a private and lethal military contracting company. Fortunately, they aren’t completely successful in their assignment to eliminate another senator but they draw th The psychopathic Minnesota Senator Taryn Grant and U.S. Marshall Lucas Davenport have faced off before in a murderous duel in the book Silken Prey. The best one can say is that is was a draw between the two.But now Grant is becoming more powerful and is eyeing the White House. Holding on to her coattails, I mean skirts, are members of a private and lethal military contracting company. Fortunately, they aren’t completely successful in their assignment to eliminate another senator but they draw the attention of Davenport. Always a big mistake. With whip smart dialogue, returning characters and a logical but a twisting plot, the fast moving Twisted Prey is a pleasure to read. A pleasure, but I have a few problems.I also found it annoying that Flowers and Kidd would show up for very minor appearances. A couple of paragraphs? Really? Why bother?I’m also confused about all of the Marshals in this book. U.S.Marshals are politically appointed by the President and approved by the Senate. There are very few of them. Most people who work for the Marshal’s service are Deputy U.S. Marshals. In theory Davenport could be a Marshall, but I doubt the rest of the Marshals that show up are actually Marshals, more like Deputy Marshals. Stuff like this really bothers me in a book.I don't understand why if the first person they plan to arrest is killed that they wouldn’t go eyes on with their next subjects. Oh come on, that’s not a spoiler, its obvious early on that he is a red shirt.If y’all think I am being a bit bitchy about minor plot holes, think about this being book 28. This is a hugely popular series for very good reasons. Carelessness makes no sense.Set mostly in the Washington DC area, Sandford amusingly portrays the disdain that most hold for the area. He managed to get in some terrific shots at the current political climate too.Everyone is fair game in this book. Big mistake, because Davenport is nothing if not Machiavellian.Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic! My favorite "Prey!" 10 of 10 stars!
  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    The 28th book in the series and a strong entry. Part of what I enjoy about a John Sandford novel is his humor and he doesn't disappoint in Twisted Prey. With Washington D.C. and politics as the backdrop he has plenty of opportunity. And a favorite (?) foe, Taryn Grant, is back. Taryn Grant was first introduced in Silken Prey. Lucas Davenport couldn't prove she was guilty of three murders then and now she is a powerful U.S. senator. She has a seat on the Senate intelligence committee and eyes on The 28th book in the series and a strong entry. Part of what I enjoy about a John Sandford novel is his humor and he doesn't disappoint in Twisted Prey. With Washington D.C. and politics as the backdrop he has plenty of opportunity. And a favorite (?) foe, Taryn Grant, is back. Taryn Grant was first introduced in Silken Prey. Lucas Davenport couldn't prove she was guilty of three murders then and now she is a powerful U.S. senator. She has a seat on the Senate intelligence committee and eyes on the White House. Davenport is a U.S. Marshall now and he has more power too. He receives a call from Minnesota Senator Porter Smalls. He and a supporter/sometime girlfriend/ and his wife’s best friend, Cecily “CeCe” Whitehead, were returning from his remote cabin in West Virginia where they were having "a planning session" when a pick up truck runs them off the road. Her skillful driving prevents them from going over a cliff but she is killed. Porter Smalls is convinced that Taryn Grant tried to have him assassinated but the local authorities believe it was just a routine vehicular accident. Smalls calls Davenport for assistance. Lucas and Taryn Grant have unfinished business and he receives permission to investigate Smalls claim.This is politics and it is Washington D.C. You can see where the "twisted" in the books title comes from. Thankfully we have Sandford's humor and dialogue to help make this bearable. Those readers familiar with Lucas Davenport know that he is a clotheshorse and a Prey novel would not be complete without a trip to the tailor to augment his wardrobe. We also meet many familiar friends. Bob and Rae are called in for assistance. Virgil Flowers, Kidd, Davenport's wife Weather, their daughter Letty also have small roles as well. I am still waiting for a book where Letty Davenport is the protagonist. She has been great as a side character in these stories and I think it is time for her to be the main character. If anyone were to mess with her they would have Lucas and that "[email protected]$&ing" Flowers to contend with.All in all a very fun read with lots of twists and turns. Fans of the Prey series should not miss.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those series that is kind of a sure thing. You may have favourites among the 28 books but if you like one, you'll enjoy them all.In this outing Lucas Davenport runs up against an old foe while investigating the politically charged assassination attempt of a senator. Politics, secret military contracts & backroom deals...you guessed it. We're in Washington D.C. & the swamp is alive & well.Luca again gets assistance from Bob & Rae, 2 characters I really enjoyed in th This is one of those series that is kind of a sure thing. You may have favourites among the 28 books but if you like one, you'll enjoy them all.In this outing Lucas Davenport runs up against an old foe while investigating the politically charged assassination attempt of a senator. Politics, secret military contracts & backroom deals...you guessed it. We're in Washington D.C. & the swamp is alive & well.Luca again gets assistance from Bob & Rae, 2 characters I really enjoyed in the previous book & even that fuckin' Flowers does a walk on. Sandford is a master storyteller & keeps you turning the pages with a tightly spun plot & expert pacing. As usual, a quick & entertaining read.
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  • Lo9man88
    January 1, 1970
    Back in Silken Prey Davenport faced off against Taryn Grant: a psychopath who was running for senator , in order to ensure her victory she framed her opponent by planting child pornography in his computer , she also killed to cover other murders she orchestrated in the past .... Despite our charming and stylish detective's best efforts he couldn't find any evidence linking her to any crime and everything was blamed on her security team , he proved the innocence of the other candidate but it was Back in Silken Prey Davenport faced off against Taryn Grant: a psychopath who was running for senator , in order to ensure her victory she framed her opponent by planting child pornography in his computer , she also killed to cover other murders she orchestrated in the past .... Despite our charming and stylish detective's best efforts he couldn't find any evidence linking her to any crime and everything was blamed on her security team , he proved the innocence of the other candidate but it was too late: the damage was already done ...In this book Lucas gets another shot at taking her down, she is now a senator...He is a "presidential" appointee in the US Marshals service now so He has more power and political clout than before .He was contacted by the same person as before who is now a senator too and who claims that Grant tried to have him assassinated ,instead his mistress was killed while saving him in the process.... Davenport did everything right : he found the why ,the how and the where of the crime , he identified the killers (ex-army/CIA) contractors , not without some difficulties "he almost got killed "again" and his wife too "... On the verge of taking her down she decided to take matters in her own hands and she slipped away"again" .... Being the dirty cunning bastard that he is and having lost to her before , Davenport have been preparing for such a possibility by :(view spoiler)[subtly manipulating a crazy girlfriend/CIA assassin and pushing her in the direction of Grant after the later killed her boyfriend , you can guess the end of course, it came in the form of a rifle bullet through her cold oh so cold heart (hide spoiler)]. AS always Sandford doesn't disappoint i enjoyed this book thoroughly i can't believe it's number 28 already ... great memories with this series so far...
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    Lucas, you dirty dirty dog, you...I love you so much! Another Prey book that I started one day and finished the next, finding it very easy to want to pick up where I left off and harder still to put down. I found the 'S' sink thing a bit far fetched, but at the end of the day I don't really give a crap. I was so happy to see more of Rae and Bob. I really worried about having Davenport in the middle of politics, not that Sandford has ever been quiet in that regards, but having Davenport as a US M Lucas, you dirty dirty dog, you...I love you so much! Another Prey book that I started one day and finished the next, finding it very easy to want to pick up where I left off and harder still to put down. I found the 'S' sink thing a bit far fetched, but at the end of the day I don't really give a crap. I was so happy to see more of Rae and Bob. I really worried about having Davenport in the middle of politics, not that Sandford has ever been quiet in that regards, but having Davenport as a US Marshal just seemed to be pushing it a bit far, however, although it's clear that politics play a part in these novels, in Sandford's minds and yes, in Davenport's mind, it's still clear that at the end of the day Lucas doesn't really care about much except the adrenaline rush he gets from winning against these 'bad' guys and girls. Lucas seems to have cooled his hot head a bit in his older years and doesn't quite act so rashly...or maybe I should say, he's gained enough patience to think through his plans and the long term consequences. He also seems more and more willing to manipulate others to see that justice is served as it should be at the end of the day. In the past, he would have just flown off the handle and cleaned up best he could afterwards. Now he lines up the players and patiently sits back until justice is done.As always, the dialogue is there, the action is there, and my love for Sandford is ALWAYS there...ARC provided by Netgallery for an honest review
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  • Truman32
    January 1, 1970
    Twisted Prey is a perfunctory and disposable entry into John Sandford’s usually stellar Lucas Davenport mystery series. Consider it the foil-lined wrapper your takeout hamburger comes in. Or better yet, imagine you have just driven your hungry self to the nearest Shake Shack (it’s easy if you try) and ordered a double Shack Stack and a large black and white shake. You unwrap your burger only to dismay at finding inside just another wrapper! You wanted a Shack Stack, not some throwaway paper. Dis Twisted Prey is a perfunctory and disposable entry into John Sandford’s usually stellar Lucas Davenport mystery series. Consider it the foil-lined wrapper your takeout hamburger comes in. Or better yet, imagine you have just driven your hungry self to the nearest Shake Shack (it’s easy if you try) and ordered a double Shack Stack and a large black and white shake. You unwrap your burger only to dismay at finding inside just another wrapper! You wanted a Shack Stack, not some throwaway paper. Disappointing! Well, at least you have this shake. But when you suck at that straw no delicious hand-spun ice cream shoots into your mouth performing an enticing Tango of happiness across your taste buds. You take off the lid to discover the cup is empty except for another hamburger wrapper. And that my friend is Twisted Prey.What makes this so hard to swallow (the complete opposite of Shake Shack’s black and white shakes that are not only easy to swallow, but also easy to order with the new Shake Shack iPhone app) is that Sandford can usually be relied upon to deliver tight, exciting, and well-written thrillers. I can only imagine that perhaps his attentions were otherwise occupied. Maybe he took up a new hobby or perhaps he decided to seriously tackle learning the ins-and-outs of that acoustic guitar that has been sitting in the corner of his living room for years. That F barre chord can be a bear.In Twisted Prey, federal marshal Davenport hunts an old adversary: the wealthy killer Taryn Grant. Now a Senator, Grant has just attempted to knock off a fellow Congressman and a buddy of Davenports. This leads to mayhem and mischief on “the Hill”. Unfortunately, everything comes off as halfhearted and empty. Grant is an extremely uninteresting antagonist; she is billed as a psychopath but is written as a lifeless and dull individual who is more grumpy than insane. Seriously, my Uncle Marty would be a more compelling adversary and he pretty much just sits around in Aunt Flo’s basement completing TV Guide crossword puzzles, eating Cheetos, and writing book reviews for Goodreads. The plotting is slow and the action contains about as much tension as the elastic in an old pair of tube socks that refuse to stay up. Probably much of this unusually poor storytelling lies in Sandford’s schedule to deliver two thrillers a year. I would imagine that the creative work of writing a novel cannot be rushed and these deadlines result in a lower quality of tale. But I also understand Sandford must pay his bills. The mortgage on his 75,000 square foot Bel Air mansion is due every month. As is the monthly payment for his Gulfstream V private jet, the costs of caring for his three Bengal tigers as well as the menagerie of his other exotic pets, and let’s be honest – while he’s dating Taylor Swift he will need to hit up only the hottest clubs and restaurants wearing only the hippest designer hats. There is a Virgil Flowers book no doubt coming this winter, lets hope Sandford extends a little more effort and care.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    To begin with, I think it is only appropriate that I admit to being a fairly avid reader of John Sandford, especially a fan of his Lucas Davenport “Prey” series. A pretty big fan to be honest. However, I am coming off the last book, “Golden Prey” with a bit of disdain and disappointment. The plotting was one of his weaker ones and the last hundred pages was an overly drawn out, anti-climactic ending. Because of that I have been worried about how this one was going to turn out. Turns out I was wr To begin with, I think it is only appropriate that I admit to being a fairly avid reader of John Sandford, especially a fan of his Lucas Davenport “Prey” series. A pretty big fan to be honest. However, I am coming off the last book, “Golden Prey” with a bit of disdain and disappointment. The plotting was one of his weaker ones and the last hundred pages was an overly drawn out, anti-climactic ending. Because of that I have been worried about how this one was going to turn out. Turns out I was wrong. What a difference a year makes…When we last saw our fearless hero, Lucas Davenport, he was getting comfortable in his federal marshal job which afforded him lots of freedom in cases he investigates. He had two agents assigned to him – Bob and Rae - both of whom are witty, hard-working and never lack an opinion. When this book begins, we see the return of Taryn Grant, the rich and power-hungry psychopath that previously beat out Porter Smalls for his U.S. Senate seat using murder to help her achieve her lofty goals a few years ago back in “Silken Prey” (book 23). Grant is beautiful, intriguing, and downright pure evil.Davenport is still angry over not being able to prove her responsibility in at least three murders back home in Minnesota and his opportunity for a second chance has arrived. Grant has found herself a seat on the Senate Intelligence Committee and is using it to seek the higher position in the land – the presidency. Lucas finds himself having to balance his own selfish desires when he is asked to investigate the claim that she is trying to eliminate those in her way. This time, Lucas is determined to settle his unfinished business with Grant, one way or another. This was the enjoyable read that I was hoping it would be. The plotting had more energy, tension, and risk for our hero. Unlike the last book, we get to see more of the family members and team mates that are a key part of Davenport’s life. In some ways, some appearances are for the wrong reasons, but that adds to the strong challenges that Lucas faces in this increased emotional plot line. We see Davenport’s wife, Weather. His outspoken daughter, Letty. We even get to see Kidd, the computer hacking wizard in action, as well as that awesome freaking Virgil Flowers. I missed them the last time out.The first third of the book is spent setting up the chess pieces on the game board and stirring the pot to get the action bubbling. Then when things just start to settle in – WHAM – the plot completely turns on an emotional game changing twist that boils over. What a twist! I found myself caught off guard but completely impressed by Sandford’s wicked manipulation of his reader’s emotions. No spoilers will be shared here other than to say there are “classic” Davenport moments in this outing that will not be forgotten for a long time. Sandford is definitely dipping into the emotional bank account this time around. And it paid off handsomely. In some ways that I did see coming and in some ways that didn’t see anticipate. There is a character introduced in this book that has multiple names, none of which may even be the real one, that develops an interesting relationship with Lucas and serves as a wildcard in in one of the outcomes. I definitely want to see her again in a future outing and I am sure there’s a lot more we can learn about her own background and story. Overall, this book was the great summer-time read that Stephen King talks about in his cover blurbs promoting John Sandford’s Lucas Davenport series. It was much better plotted and tension-filled than the last one where less feared bad guys provided a much weaker climax. Taryn Grant serves as a stronger adversary that challenges Davenport on a much more analytical and emotional level. There is no one around him she is not afraid to go after, whether it be professional relationships or personal ones. In my humble opinion, with “Twisted Prey” John Sandford has regained his writing groove and Lucas Davenport has rediscovered his detective mojo. He is the true law enforcement rebel with a badge and a cause. Unlike last year at this time, I cannot wait to read Davenport’s next adventure. If you haven’t tried reading him, pick up the first book and get started…
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  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    Back when he was still at the Minnesota BCA, Lucas Davenport tangled with sociopath Taryn Grant, who while running for the Senate, framed her rival (Porter Smalls) for child pornography and killed a few people to cover it up. Lucas cleared Smalls, but did not have evidence to arrest Grant, who was elected. Senator Smalls is coming back from his cabin with a female political supporter/girlfriend when a pickup runs them off the road, killing her. When the police cannot find evidence of another veh Back when he was still at the Minnesota BCA, Lucas Davenport tangled with sociopath Taryn Grant, who while running for the Senate, framed her rival (Porter Smalls) for child pornography and killed a few people to cover it up. Lucas cleared Smalls, but did not have evidence to arrest Grant, who was elected. Senator Smalls is coming back from his cabin with a female political supporter/girlfriend when a pickup runs them off the road, killing her. When the police cannot find evidence of another vehicle, Smalls asks Lucas Davenport to investigate, and his superiors agree to the Senator's request. Lucas is joined by the husband and wife U.S. Marshal team of Bob and Rae, as well as a competent and cooperative FBI agent, and together, they begin to look into the matter, tracking down the culprits, a bunch of shady government military contractors. As Lucas gets close, they derail his efforts with a solid offense, and then the contractors start dying, closing off all ties to the Machiavellian Taryn Grant. Unlike Silken Prey, where I was disappointed by the ending, I was quite pleased with this one.
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  • Darlene
    January 1, 1970
    I believe this is book 28 in the Prey series, and what a fantastic addition to the series this is. Like me, many of you have followed Lucas Davenport from the beginning and he keeps getting better with age. With each Prey book I feel like I'm back with a dear old friend. There are quite a few humorous parts where I actually was laughing out loud, even though the topic of the book was very serious. Don't wait so long to come back to your friends, Lucas.
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  • Chris Conley
    January 1, 1970
    I love the way Lucas Davenport’s mind works. I certainly would never to be on his bad side.
  • LInda L
    January 1, 1970
    It's a toss-up if I love Lucas Davenport or Virgil Flowers the most. But -- in this book, Lucas was outstanding. He is wonderful as a Marshal and this case was just fascinating. There were SO MANY bad guys, but all directed in some way by the worst guy of all -- an old enemy of Lucas. He gets help from fellow-marshals Bob and Rae and together, they meet all the many challenges thrown at them. John Sandford has such a way with words -- so clever, so funny, so insightful. I would not miss one of h It's a toss-up if I love Lucas Davenport or Virgil Flowers the most. But -- in this book, Lucas was outstanding. He is wonderful as a Marshal and this case was just fascinating. There were SO MANY bad guys, but all directed in some way by the worst guy of all -- an old enemy of Lucas. He gets help from fellow-marshals Bob and Rae and together, they meet all the many challenges thrown at them. John Sandford has such a way with words -- so clever, so funny, so insightful. I would not miss one of his books unless I was comatose.
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  • Chuck
    January 1, 1970
    Not much more to say than that this is my forty fifth John Sandford novel that I have read and I still thirst for the next one. Some people have strange addictions but mine is lawful. Lucas Davenport has become a U.S. Marshall and the only change is that I have already learned every town and backroad in Minnesota and now am learning towns and backroads throughout the country.
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  • Janet Newport
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley and the Penguin Group/G P Putman & Sons for this ARC.I love Lucas as a US Marshall. He seems to really enjoy it as well. Seems like there's less bureaucratic red tape for him (no employee overtime sheets to approve) yet he still has the autonomy to work a case as he sees fit and the ability to get the resources he needs. Twisted Prey was the usual fast wild ride one expects from John Sandford with the usual suspects and supporting characters. I'm still giggling at the tho Thank you Netgalley and the Penguin Group/G P Putman & Sons for this ARC.I love Lucas as a US Marshall. He seems to really enjoy it as well. Seems like there's less bureaucratic red tape for him (no employee overtime sheets to approve) yet he still has the autonomy to work a case as he sees fit and the ability to get the resources he needs. Twisted Prey was the usual fast wild ride one expects from John Sandford with the usual suspects and supporting characters. I'm still giggling at the thought of Bob with the tailor.
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  • Cindy Newton
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think John Sandford could write a bad book if he tried. The man just knows what he's doing! That being said, this one just seemed a little flat to me. Plenty of action, but it just wasn't one of his best. I think the difference is that usually the reader knows who the villain is, but Lucas doesn't. We watch with anticipation as he works the clues, getting closer and closer to the killer. This time, he knew from the beginning who the killer was--it was just a matter of finding the proof. I don't think John Sandford could write a bad book if he tried. The man just knows what he's doing! That being said, this one just seemed a little flat to me. Plenty of action, but it just wasn't one of his best. I think the difference is that usually the reader knows who the villain is, but Lucas doesn't. We watch with anticipation as he works the clues, getting closer and closer to the killer. This time, he knew from the beginning who the killer was--it was just a matter of finding the proof. I think that took away a lot of the suspense. I don't know--I'm just trying to put my finger on the reason I wasn't blown away when I'm not sure exactly what that is. Sandford is so very good at this, though, that I feel guilty even expressing this! Sorry, Mr. Sandford--it's not you, it's me!
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  • Judie
    January 1, 1970
    US senator Porter Smalls was well-liked in Minnesota, but he was defeated in a run to retain his office by Taryn Grant. She had run a vicious smear campaign against him which resulted in three murders, but there is not enough evidence to convict her. Two years later, Smalls ran again and was elected. Grant secured a seat in the Senate Intelligence Committee and is not averse to doing whatever she could to get her way and has the personal funds to buy anything she wants.. While they were on a we US senator Porter Smalls was well-liked in Minnesota, but he was defeated in a run to retain his office by Taryn Grant. She had run a vicious smear campaign against him which resulted in three murders, but there is not enough evidence to convict her. Two years later, Smalls ran again and was elected. Grant secured a seat in the Senate Intelligence Committee and is not averse to doing whatever she could to get her way and has the personal funds to buy anything she wants.. While they were on a weekend getaway, Smalls and his friend Cecily Whitehead were forced off the road and down and embankment. Whitehead was driving and her skills kept them from dropping all the way to the bottom. She steered toward trees to slow them down. Unfortunately she died in the process. Because there was no physical evidence of another vehicle being involved, the local officials determined it was an accident even though Smalls insisted it was a deliberate attack. There was evidence of the car hitting a tree. Smalls called his friend Lucas Davenport who was now a federal marshal in Minnesota to help him prove what had happened. The investigators wanted to help and some did believe Smalls’ story but without evidence there was nothing they could do. Davenport wasn't in DC very long before he became a target. He called in his professional friends, Bob Matees and Rae Givens to help him solve the case. He was sure Grant was behind it but proving it would not be easy. TWISTED PREY tells the story of the search for evidence of the crime as well as the perpetrators. It reveals corruption in awarding lucrative government contracts and a blind obedience to orders, eliminating whoever might get in the way. At one point Davenport is called back home after his wife becomes a victim but as soon as she is home from the hospital, he returns to DC and the investigation. He doesn't call her nor inquire about her condition after that. Toward the end the language became more crude and there are a couple homophobic comments. A few years ago, this story would have been relatively unbelievable but with the philosophy and actions of the current administration and its ties to Russia, it becomes more of a portent of what could happen. The book was a fast read and John Sandford knows how to tell a good story.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.The bloodthirsty world of politics takes center stage in John Sandford's newest release, Twisted Prey. This twenty-eighth installment in the Lucas Davenport series takes place in Washington, DC and pits US Marshall Lucas Davenport against a formidable foe who rather ruthlessly attempts to eliminate her opposition on her climb up the political ladder.Following an attempt on his life that leaves one person dead, Minnesota Senator Porter Smalls does not hesitate to reach out to Lucas Dave 4.5 stars.The bloodthirsty world of politics takes center stage in John Sandford's newest release, Twisted Prey. This twenty-eighth installment in the Lucas Davenport series takes place in Washington, DC and pits US Marshall Lucas Davenport against a formidable foe who rather ruthlessly attempts to eliminate her opposition on her climb up the political ladder.Following an attempt on his life that leaves one person dead, Minnesota Senator Porter Smalls does not hesitate to reach out to Lucas Davenport for help. Smalls is convinced his former rival and current Senator Taryn Grant is behind the plot to take him out and he knows that Lucas is more than up to the task of proving it. For his part, Davenport would love nothing than another crack at Grant who once before turned to murder and nasty shenanigans to clinch her Senate seat. Quickly traveling to Washington, DC, Lucas, aided by fellow Marshalls, Rae Givens and Bob Matees, works hard to prove Grant and her merry band of henchman are behind the attempt on Smalls' life.Taryn's Chief of Staff Jack Parrish is the first person who falls under Davenport's scrutiny. A former Army officer and CIA operative, he is the obvious person for Grant to use for her dirty work. He, in turn, has some rather surprising ties to a defense contractor, Heracles Personnel, which is run by George Claxson. The discovery that Claxson has several former military members and mercenaries on his payroll raises eyebrows, but this does not necessarily mean they are involved in anything illegal.Lucas quickly ferrets out some dubious defense contracts that lead right back to Heracles. He also locates the person whom he believes was involved in Smalls' car "accident" and he must work quickly to get the authorities on board with his theory before evidence is lost or destroyed. Just as he, Rae and Bob are closing in on the person they hope will flip on key players,  the suspects put in motion a devious plan to divert Lucas's attention.  Taryn and her crew continue to be one step ahead of him and although he, Rae and Bob make considerable progress on the case, Lucas fears she will once again slip through his fingers.Twisted Prey is an intricately-plotted and riveting mystery. The storyline is quite clever and well-executed.  John Sandford keeps the long running Lucas Davenport series fresh by changing up Lucas's career and adding new faces to the cast. This newest release features a topical storyline, a particularly loathsome cast of despicable criminals and an interesting investigation that takes all of Lucas's skills to solve.  Will Lucas finally make a case against the vile and abhorrent Taryn Grant? Or will she once again escape punishment for her appalling  crimes?
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Twisted PreyJohn Sanford is the best writer around today. He has been one of my favorite authors since the very first Prey novel I read. I can sincerely say that his writing just gets better and better every year. I loved this book and I especially loved the ending. I don't know if I can wait another year for his next book to come out.
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  • RachelW (BamaGal)
    January 1, 1970
    Competent, by-the-numbers read; but dry and not overly compelling. Davenport just isn't fun anymore, and I find I much prefer the Virgil Flowers books these days. The ending was anticlimactic and unsatisfactory. Maybe it's time to wrap this series up...
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  • Cameron Wiggins
    January 1, 1970
    John Sandford is back with Twisted Prey, book #28 in the Prey series, and boy has he scored a winner with this one. I hate to use cliches, but I literally could not put this one down, and read it very fast, considering my health. This book simply amazed me.Lucas Davenport is a U.S. Marshall now, and he is called into action by an old friend, Senator Porter Smalls. Smalls is returning to Washington, DC, with his associate and lover Cecily Whitehead after a relaxing getaway at Small’s West Virgina John Sandford is back with Twisted Prey, book #28 in the Prey series, and boy has he scored a winner with this one. I hate to use cliches, but I literally could not put this one down, and read it very fast, considering my health. This book simply amazed me.Lucas Davenport is a U.S. Marshall now, and he is called into action by an old friend, Senator Porter Smalls. Smalls is returning to Washington, DC, with his associate and lover Cecily Whitehead after a relaxing getaway at Small’s West Virgina cabin. Cecily was driving and a pick-up truck began tailgating them. Eventually, it pulled up beside them and rammed into the side of their Escalde running them off the road. It was a steep, long and dangerous descent that was meant for certain death. Cecily skillfully navigates the descent ad deliberately tries to crash into some trees to prevent going over a cliff. Small’s survives due to this skillful manuvering, however, a tree smashes through the driver’s side window and kills Cecily.The Escalade is totalled, but oddly, there is no other automobile damage such as paint or metal from the pick-up on the Escalade. Smalls knows that they were deliberately rammed off the road. He knows that this was an assasination attempt. And, he believes that he knows who is behind the attempt. However, finding no other damage, the West Virgina authorities attribute it to an unfortunate accident. Things begin not to add up, and Lucas begins to get too close. No, you’re saying? Yes, it’s true. And things begin to heat up in a big way. People come after Lucas, and some people get hurt and some people get killed. Yep, it’s true. Lucas is getting into something big and dirty. He has to call in Bob and Rae for help. Danger lurks everywhere. Yep, it’s true.All sarcasm aside, Twisted Prey is one very enjoyable book. It can be read as a stand-alone, however, one may wish to read Silken Prey before reading this one. In fact, it is one of the best books that I have read in quite a while. I believe that anyone who enjoys mystery thrillers will enjoy this book. John Sandford has established a special place in his genre, and Lucas Davenport is probably easily one of the top five American detective characters in this genre. Believe it or not, this is an easy, but very rare 5-star rating IMHO.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    John Sandford has never failed to bring on the twisted and wicked tale. His skill to create malevolent characters, hero and foe, is his and his alone.
  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    TWISTED PREY by John Sandford is the 28th book in the Lucas Davenport series, and Lucas is again called into a case involving Senator Portis Smalls, who believes a vehicle accident near his cabin that causes the death of the woman driving him was in fact an attempt on his life, although there is no proof to back up his claims. Taryn Grant, who is the Senator from a previous Prey book, is who Smalls suspects, and whom Lucas agrees would be a likely suspect based on her past ruthless behavior.Luca TWISTED PREY by John Sandford is the 28th book in the Lucas Davenport series, and Lucas is again called into a case involving Senator Portis Smalls, who believes a vehicle accident near his cabin that causes the death of the woman driving him was in fact an attempt on his life, although there is no proof to back up his claims. Taryn Grant, who is the Senator from a previous Prey book, is who Smalls suspects, and whom Lucas agrees would be a likely suspect based on her past ruthless behavior.Lucas has been a U.S. Marshall for some time now, and characters from his past like Jenkins and Shrake have been replaced by Bob and Ray, partners who enthusiastically work with him on the case after the boredom of their recent assignments leaves them hungry for action.One of the aspects that I like about the Prey books is how Lucas uses all the resources available to him, whether local authorities or FBI specialists, he’s always used unconventional and creative ways to piece together the clues discovered in a way that leads to the killer(s) responsible in the cases.Sandford has aged Lucas nicely, and the series has taken a shift from the high action and chase predominance of his earlier novels to a more focused investigative approach that fits with Lucas getting older and wiser, and as always a little bit of luck enters into solving the case.I liked this one as it got better the further the story progressed, something I’ve found true of my favorite books in the series, and once again I’m amazed at how many quality books author Sandford has written in this series with Lucas keeping his edge over the years in a way that makes him feared and respected by both colleagues and the criminal element alike.4 stars.
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  • Jessica Bronder
    January 1, 1970
    Lucas Davenport is back and working as a US Marshall. But he is going to find himself investigating a previous enemy, Senator Taryn Grant. Lucas was never able to prove three murders were committed by Grant due to her money and status. Senator Porter Smalls is involved with a car bomb that killed his driver and almost himself. Smalls has a feeling that Grant tried to kill him so he calls in Davenport to investigate. Of course Davenport is eager to prove this and starts calling in people to help Lucas Davenport is back and working as a US Marshall. But he is going to find himself investigating a previous enemy, Senator Taryn Grant. Lucas was never able to prove three murders were committed by Grant due to her money and status. Senator Porter Smalls is involved with a car bomb that killed his driver and almost himself. Smalls has a feeling that Grant tried to kill him so he calls in Davenport to investigate. Of course Davenport is eager to prove this and starts calling in people to help him. But that is where things go sideways. Grant is not going to give Davenport the chance to prove he tried to kill Smalls and is willing to go to any length to stop him.This is a great story that is filled with lots of action, plenty of thrills, and a great story that twists and turns around itself and keeps you guessing about what is really going on. I have not read a lot of the books in the Lucas Davenport series but compared to the few I have, I loved it. Davenport is a tough person that is willing to prove that Grant is involved in this attempted murder. And when Grant decides to threaten his family, he made a BIG mistake.I really enjoy this series and think anyone that likes political thrillers will enjoy it too. I really need to go back and catch up on what I have missed in this series. I would love to see how Davenport started out compared to where he is now.I received a complimentary copy of this book. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
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  • Carol Jean
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely, entertaining, typical Lucas Davenport -- or "Davenport Drains the Swamp." Quite an enjoyable read!
  • Ruth Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Well executed plot in an action-packed thriller based in Washington DC, Virginia and West Virginia. Bob and Rae make a return, as well as the much-despised Taryn Grant, Minnesota Senator.This one would make a perfect movie.
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