Death by Sex Machine
Poetry. In Death by Sex Machine fem-surrogate cyborgs of manga and film are used as a force "for understanding personal suppression of language," a series of poems made uncomfortable by both what is said and not said.

Death by Sex Machine Details

TitleDeath by Sex Machine
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 7th, 2017
PublisherSibling Rivalry Press
ISBN-139781943977383
Rating
GenrePoetry, Lgbt, Unfinished

Death by Sex Machine Review

  • yan 🔪
    January 1, 1970
    a lot of these poems were cathartic and almost terrifying for me to read from how closely the concepts reflected on the objectification and alienation of my own body under two dominating spheres of gender & race
  • Avery Guess
    January 1, 1970
    I just devoured this book whole in one sitting. Exquisite collection with wicked word play and wit and sharp attentiveness to language and what it means to be woman/machine/woman/machine in this world of ours. Highly recommend.
  • Paisley Green
    January 1, 1970
    "A scientist made a machine girl and wedded her to the Internet. He walked her down the aisle and said, Teach her well. The trolls rubbed their soft hands on their soft thighs." - "A Brief History of Cyborgs"I love Franny Choi's work, so I was excited to pick up this chapbook from Sibling Rivalry Press. As a double fan of Donna Haraway and cyborgs, and as someone who has been thinking about gender/race and depictions of fetishized female, Asian cyborgs in films like Ex Machina and shows like Hum "A scientist made a machine girl and wedded her to the Internet. He walked her down the aisle and said, Teach her well. The trolls rubbed their soft hands on their soft thighs." - "A Brief History of Cyborgs"I love Franny Choi's work, so I was excited to pick up this chapbook from Sibling Rivalry Press. As a double fan of Donna Haraway and cyborgs, and as someone who has been thinking about gender/race and depictions of fetishized female, Asian cyborgs in films like Ex Machina and shows like Humans, I was doubly and triply enthralled when reading. In addition to being intimate, this chapbook does some fascinating stuff with moving from the Turing Test (machines passing for human) to the "Kyoko Assessment," so named for the Asian cyborg in Ex Machina who, unlike the white-coded, female-coded cyborg, is rendered mute to preserve company secrets. I'm still mulling over my thoughts on this one, but it's a strong recommend. "remember / all humans / are cyborgs / all cyborgs / are sharp shards of sky / wrapped in meat / be delicate / as you approach this subject / not all humans are ready / to call themselves / glass stalactites / pissing the bed / remember / they love their blood / even as they retch / at the smell of it" - "Turing Test_Love"Motifs:-fish-rot-cyborgs-speech/silence-mothers-smellHighlights: - "Acknowledgments" - "Beg" - "Letter to Kyoko"- "A Brief History of Cyborgs"- "@FannyChoir"- "Turing Test_Love"
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  • Will
    January 1, 1970
    Franny Choi has again succeeded at writing a cerebral, haunting, and at times deeply visceral work of poetry. Death by Sex Machine focuses around the stories of Asian depicted robot women from movies and manga as well as the author’s experience being treated as a silent docile fetish object. Choi’s poems are inventive & varied in form. She writes translations, interpretations, reflections, and speculations. The poems speak to the ways that cyborgs and robots are human inventions and grapple Franny Choi has again succeeded at writing a cerebral, haunting, and at times deeply visceral work of poetry. Death by Sex Machine focuses around the stories of Asian depicted robot women from movies and manga as well as the author’s experience being treated as a silent docile fetish object. Choi’s poems are inventive & varied in form. She writes translations, interpretations, reflections, and speculations. The poems speak to the ways that cyborgs and robots are human inventions and grapple with human problems. The work lives in the liminal spaces between human and machine often dealing in otherworldly terms. I’m still processing Choi’s chapbook and planning on re reading several more times. I think Franny Choi is among the best younger poets in America right now. Can’t wait to read her next work!
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    I meant to just read one poem for the night and focus on doing work elsewhere, but then I read the second poem and then the third and then... and so on. What a fantastically crafted chapbook, each poem capitalizing on and expanding on the themes and motifs, but each one working as a standalone to the major ideas. I love the interplay between Choi as speaker, but also Kyoko and Chii (and this is the first time I've seen any poems reference a CLAMP character, so as a long-time CLAMP fan that was v I meant to just read one poem for the night and focus on doing work elsewhere, but then I read the second poem and then the third and then... and so on. What a fantastically crafted chapbook, each poem capitalizing on and expanding on the themes and motifs, but each one working as a standalone to the major ideas. I love the interplay between Choi as speaker, but also Kyoko and Chii (and this is the first time I've seen any poems reference a CLAMP character, so as a long-time CLAMP fan that was very cool).
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  • Kiren Chaudhry
    January 1, 1970
    There are books that you will read and not understand. That has nothing to do with the quality of the book. It's lazy to say, "I don't get it", because I do get bits and pieces of it. We should read poetry we don't understand so we can learn how to read and understand it. Just like we're not born knowing how to do multiple regression analysis we are not born knowing how to approach challenging material. Both are within reach if we try and practice.
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  • Jacque
    January 1, 1970
    I tore through this book in a single sitting and am already looking forward to sitting with each piece again. Choi’s obsession with images and and the questions of language, of the body, and of reality are visceral and unsettling. Her letters to Chi and Kyoko are especially haunting. This book is so necessary, and I can’t wait to recommend it to all of my friends.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed these poems. Choi uses a framing concept of artificial intelligence and androids to look at voicelessness, dehumanization, Asian fetishism, and probably a lot more that I missed on this first read-through. Really smart, sharp, and surprising poems.
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  • David Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike any other poetry collection I’ve read. That’s a good thing, in case you’re wondering
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