peluda
One of the most original performance poets of her generation, Melissa Lozada-Oliva has captivated crowds across the country and online with her vivid narratives. Humorous and biting, personal and communal, self-deprecating and unapologetically self-loving, peluda (meaning “hairy” or “hairy beast”) is the poet at her best. The book explores the relationship between femininity and body hair as well as the intersections of family, class, the immigrant experience, Latina identity, and much more, all through Lozada-Oliva’s unique lens and striking voice. peluda is a powerful testimony on body image and the triumph over taboo.

peluda Details

Titlepeluda
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherButton Poetry
ISBN-139781943735242
Rating
GenrePoetry, Own

peluda Review

  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Humorous and biting, personal and communal, self-deprecating and unapologetically self-loving, peluda (meaning “hairy” or “hairy beast”) is the poet at her best. The book explores the relationship between femininity and body hair as well as the intersections of family, class, the immigrant experience, Latina identity, and much more, all through Lozada-Oliva’s unique lens and striking voice. peluda is a powerful testimony on body image and the triumph over taboo.“the loser of the war: has the bes Humorous and biting, personal and communal, self-deprecating and unapologetically self-loving, peluda (meaning “hairy” or “hairy beast”) is the poet at her best. The book explores the relationship between femininity and body hair as well as the intersections of family, class, the immigrant experience, Latina identity, and much more, all through Lozada-Oliva’s unique lens and striking voice. peluda is a powerful testimony on body image and the triumph over taboo.“the loser of the war: has the best memory.the winner: gets to forget.”What originally caught my attention with this collection was the vibrantly powerful book cover:  Then, as always, I looked the author up online to see if any memorable quotes of hers were shared. And was taken back by quite a gripping one: SourceI continued on with raised expectations that were mostly met with the occasional poem here and there in the collection. Such as: The highlighted responses made my mouth drop with surprise. An utterly strong poem from start to finish. This one poem cemented my decision to check out the first season of Jessica Jones. This collection full of creativity, feminism, love, bodies would be recommend for anyone looking to spruce up their poetry shelf.ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Expected publication: September 26th, 2017 Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Peluda, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! This review and more can be found on my blog.
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  • Kristy K
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing book of poetry that focuses on beauty, immigrants (and being a minority), feminism, and so much more. Lizada-Oliva has a way of writing that reaches out and pulls you into her experiences as a Latina woman living in America.
  • Liv (Olivia Chanel's Galaxy of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Button Poetry, for my ARC of peluda. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review; this does not affect my opinion. Any quotes mentioned below are taken from the ARC and are subject to change upon publication.I have fallen in love with the poetry collection peluda and for me, what makes peluda such a unique poetry collection is how brutally honest and charismatic it is. It’s funny, deep, and a must-read for contemporary poetry lovers. peluda is feminist and about body hair, fa Thank you, Button Poetry, for my ARC of peluda. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review; this does not affect my opinion. Any quotes mentioned below are taken from the ARC and are subject to change upon publication.I have fallen in love with the poetry collection peluda and for me, what makes peluda such a unique poetry collection is how brutally honest and charismatic it is. It’s funny, deep, and a must-read for contemporary poetry lovers. peluda is feminist and about body hair, family, friendship, Latina identity, and the immigrant experience. I believe poetry collections about, and written by, women of color should be celebrated, and this collection is no exception.jessica jones is so dark-haired she must be Latinai pretend she is so that i amnot once again rooting for some angry white girlso i tell myself thatall of this throwing a heater out of the windowmust be chingonaall of this rude lonely girl must be brujaall of this breaking & entering & you shoot at me,i’ll pull the bullet out of my ruined jacket &shove it up your ass with my pinky fingermust be mujeristaI love how Melissa Lozada-Oliva puts everything on the page and it just speaks to you. The writing in peluda is magnificent and I love the vivid imagery in Lozada-Oliva’s poems. The rhythm and overall way she portrays her experiences, it’s just my favorite. Furthermore, I also love how this book is not afraid to shy away from the speaking its truth, no matter what that is. My favorite poems in this collection are 1) Maybe She’s Born With It, Maybe She Got Up Early 2) Ode To Brown Girls With Bangs 3) AKA What Would Jessica Jones Do? 4) The Women In My Family Are Bitches 5) I Shave My Sister’s Back Before Prom and 6) We Play Would You Rather at the Galentine’s Party.on our own til infinity! bitchesthe vengeful violentpissed prissed and polishedlipstick stained on an envelopei’ll be damned if i’m compliant! bitchesIf you love contemporary poetry then you need to read peluda. It will speak to your heart and take you on a journey few other poetry collections will. This book celebrates Latina women and their experiences, it touches on what body hair and our relationship to it is and how it looks so differently for different people. This book is feminist, badass, and beautiful. I’m deeply in love with peluda and I know you won’t regret putting it in your shopping cart. It’s a must-read for all poetry lovers.This review is set to be published September 26, 2017, on my book blog Olivia Chanel's Galaxy of Books.
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  • Jessica | Booked J
    January 1, 1970
    As a note, an e-galley of this novel was sent to me via NetGalley by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way.Wow, 2017 has been a stellar year for poetry and I can't stress enough how much I loved Melissa Lozada-Oliva's peluda without bordering on incoherent fangirling. Because there's something so deeply moving in her words and one thing is certain: she is a voice that was desperately needed in poetry. And her prose is something of magic, humor As a note, an e-galley of this novel was sent to me via NetGalley by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way.Wow, 2017 has been a stellar year for poetry and I can't stress enough how much I loved Melissa Lozada-Oliva's peluda without bordering on incoherent fangirling. Because there's something so deeply moving in her words and one thing is certain: she is a voice that was desperately needed in poetry. And her prose is something of magic, humor and complexity. peluda is one of the best releases this year (one of those rare 5 stars) and something I feel incredibly honored to have experienced. If you're dubious about the page count, and how short it is, know this: she packs a serious punch. A. Serious. Punch. Seriously, I'm still kind of staggering back a bit from being knocked out like this. Lozada-Oliva, do it again. Thanks. Following up fantastic releases like Depression & Other Magic Tricks, The Chaos of Longing, Smoke & Mirrors, Stuff I've Been Feeling Lately, I Am More Than a Daydream and The Princess Saves Herself in this One, PELUDA makes its mark as something new when it comes to what makes young poets prolific these days. Her journey is just as intimate as you'd expect but there's something undeniably necessary to her story and what it means for diversity in literature. What it means for people who often have no voice or are muffled out by their counterparts. Young readers, young poets, are going to pick up this release and find themselves in Melissa like they may not in other poets. Further, it gives us that honesty that is so desperately lacking and really, really compels readers. If you have 50 pages of work to show us, chances are it's going to be lackluster or sensational. Thank-fully, this is sensational. What I loved most about her prose is that it's got everything in it--a raw intensity that makes poetry so captivating, the complexities of who she is, a specific sort of humor and it's all woven so intelligently that you can't help but to feel like what you've read was truly something special.And it is. Overall, PELUDA is one of my favourite releases in poetry this year and it would be a tragedy not to pick it up. I can't wait to hear more from Melissa Lozada-Oliva and am eagerly keeping my eyes on her in the least creepy way possible.
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  • Krystal
    January 1, 1970
    Exceptional poetry collection! Her writing illuminates the immigrant experience with depths of emotion. She evokes the trauma of colonialist white supremacist xenophobic misogyny!
  • Tiana
    January 1, 1970
    This poetry book is SO GOOD! The whole thing was this unapologetic look at what it means to be a first generation American and living in a world where cultures combine and touch your life to where your parts become nothing else, but human. However, Peluda is so much more then that. It is about being comfortable in your own skin and not being ashamed of who you are, even letting out your inner werewolf and being unafraid of being feral every once in a while.There was one single poem that made thi This poetry book is SO GOOD! The whole thing was this unapologetic look at what it means to be a first generation American and living in a world where cultures combine and touch your life to where your parts become nothing else, but human. However, Peluda is so much more then that. It is about being comfortable in your own skin and not being ashamed of who you are, even letting out your inner werewolf and being unafraid of being feral every once in a while.There was one single poem that made this poetry book so much more to me and that poem was “You Know how to say Arroz Con Pollo but Not What You Are”. I finished this poem and I cried. I cried because even though her situation is the complete opposite of my own it felt like she got it.. got me. It was everything I had ever wanted to say, but in different words.As it was World Poetry Day today I will share this poem with you all in full.You Know how to say Arroz Con Pollo but Not What You AreIf you ask me if I am fluent in Spanish I will tell youMy Spanish is an itchy phantom limb: reaching for a word and only finding airMy Spanish is my third birthday party: half of it is memory, and the other half is a photograph on the fridge is what my family has told meIf you ask me if I am fluent I I will tell you thatMy Spanish is a puzzle left in the rainToo soggy to make its parts fit so that it can look just like the picture on the box.I will tell you thatMy Spanish is possessive adjectives.It is proper nouns dressed in pearls and bracelets.It is are you up yet. It is there is a lot to do todayMy Spanish is on my resume as a skill.My Spanish is on his favorite shirt in red mouth marksIf you ask me I will tell youMy Spanish is hungrier than it was before.My Spanish reaches for words at the top of a shelf without a stepping stoolis hit in the head with all of the old words that have been hiding up thereMy Spanish wonders how bad is it to eat something that’s expiredMy Spanish wonders if it has an expiration dateIf you ask me if I am fluent in Spanish I will tell you thatMy Spanish is the smell of Windex, the tearing of paper towels, the flushing of toilets, the splash of a mopMy Spanish bites on a pencil in the corner of a classroom and does not raise its handMy Spanish cancelled plans with you so that it could watch moviesMy Spanish is my older sister’s sore smile at her only beauty pageantMy Spanish is a made up story about a parent who never came homeMy Spanish is a made up story about a parent who never came home and traveled to beautiful places and sent me post cards from all of themMy Spanish is me, tracing my fingers along every letter they were able to fit inMy Spanish is the real story of my parent’s divorceChaotic, broken and something I have to choose to remember correctlyMy Spanish is wondering when my parents will be Americanasking me if I’m white yetIf you ask me if I am fluent in Spanish I will try to tell you the storyof how my parents met in an ESL classHow it was when they trained their mouths to sayI love you in a different language, I hate you with their mouths shutI will tell you how my father’s accent makes him sound like Zorohow my mother tried to tie her tongue to a post with an English language leashI will tell you that the tongue always ran stubbornly back to the language it had always been in love withEven when she tried to tame itit always turned looseIf you ask me if I am in fluentI will tell youMy Spanish is understanding that there are stories that will always be out of my reachthere are people who will never fit together the way that I want them tothere are some letters that will always stay silentthere are some words that will always escape me.This poem is gorgeous, emotional, and full of so much raw truth. I know it is not one that would make most people cry, but for me after I first read it I was an emotional mess. I am someone who was born only being seen as a typical white girl to outsiders. However, I was adopted and raised into a Spanish family. I grew up in a way not connecting to any specific culture and so I don’t really feel like anything but a human being (I don’t really believe I can claim any specific culture or that I should claim one). However, I grew up hearing Spanish around the house and listening to mariachi music at fairs and eating tamales, pupusas, and huevos con chorizo. More then anything else I learned how to speak Spanish in the way of food, but I never became fluent and can understand far more then I could ever say. But for me it was the end of this poem that really got to me. There will always be words I don’t understand and so many stories that I will never hear and it felt like a great loss to me and the tears came. This poem was beautiful and in so many ways it broke my heart.All of the poems in Peluda are filled with power. This is one of my favorite poetry books I have ever read and I hope that so many others find the beauty in it that I did.
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  • Bejaka Phoenix
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book on NetGalley for an honest review. Melissa Lozada-Oliva's Peluda plays with the stereotypical ideals of femininity by juxtaposing the typical with the atypical of the feminine voice and body image. The title, itself, reveals one of the more important motifs in her poetrybook. In a show of self-love, Lozada-Oliva often references with an air of indifference how 'peluda', (meaning "hairy" in Spanish) her body is; yet, her indifference is also marked with a tinge of acceptance. I received this book on NetGalley for an honest review. Melissa Lozada-Oliva's Peluda plays with the stereotypical ideals of femininity by juxtaposing the typical with the atypical of the feminine voice and body image. The title, itself, reveals one of the more important motifs in her poetrybook. In a show of self-love, Lozada-Oliva often references with an air of indifference how 'peluda', (meaning "hairy" in Spanish) her body is; yet, her indifference is also marked with a tinge of acceptance. Another recurring theme is the Latina immigrant experience. Once satirized negatively, Lozada-Oliva attempts to cast light on these hardworking individuals whose rights in America have usually been non-existent. From stories of her parents, to even her own stories as a strong-minded, self-loving, unapologetic Latina "mami", Lozada-Oliva definitely hasmade her imprint as a Latina feminist whose lexical voice will hopefully inspire others to do the same or give a voice to those who cannot.
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  • Camila
    January 1, 1970
    I don't read a lot of poetry, but I knew I had to get this one. I've loved watching videos of Melissa Lozada-Oliva's spoken word performances on YouTube, finally feeling represented by her words and stories. Melissa has a way with mixing humour and emotion, so that I didn't know whether I wanted to laugh or cry at her words. Peluda explores so many topics in its 21 poems. In a single poem, you'll find explorations of Latina identity, beauty and femininity, class and family relationships, all see I don't read a lot of poetry, but I knew I had to get this one. I've loved watching videos of Melissa Lozada-Oliva's spoken word performances on YouTube, finally feeling represented by her words and stories. Melissa has a way with mixing humour and emotion, so that I didn't know whether I wanted to laugh or cry at her words. Peluda explores so many topics in its 21 poems. In a single poem, you'll find explorations of Latina identity, beauty and femininity, class and family relationships, all seen through the lens of the immigrant experience. I cannot recommend this collection enough. The poems are beautiful and fun to read, filled with humour and emotion. I can't wait for my own copy to arrive in the mail so that I can show this to everyone who will listen!Full review to be posted on my blog!
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  • hamna
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars I really, really liked this book. It explores the relationship between a woman and her body hair, the insecurities and the confidence, the relationship between being an immigrant and belonging, the relationship between a mother and her daughter, the relationship between love and being lost. It's beautiful, it's tiring, it's striking and it's poetry in it's honest form. Commun Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 3.5 stars I really, really liked this book. It explores the relationship between a woman and her body hair, the insecurities and the confidence, the relationship between being an immigrant and belonging, the relationship between a mother and her daughter, the relationship between love and being lost. It's beautiful, it's tiring, it's striking and it's poetry in it's honest form. Communicate. Scream. Be cranky. Be a bitch. Wolf girl. Cam girl. Girl girl. I would probably, honestly, truly recommend this book to maybe, perhaps everyone I know. It's amazing. Pop.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.This poetry collection is FANTASTIC - truths about the impossibility of trying to contort yourself into the societal ideal; of the battle between wanting to accept the things that make you who you are, and wanting to erase all traces of them in order to fit in; of the complex struggles of femininity, of culture, of history - all delivered with beautiful honesty and biting wit.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
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  • Nikki King
    January 1, 1970
    I saw a spoken word video of one of her poems and it was so powerful (5/5 Stars for that one). Definitely getting this book soon so I can read the rest 💗
  • Dearna Mulvaney
    January 1, 1970
    “…maybe: the Cloud is historical memory the reason i wince when some people touch meor: the reason i need to be touched…”I will start by saying that I was given an ARC copy in exchange for an honest review. These opinions are my own. I really enjoyed this collection. I adore getting a look into backgrounds different to my own. I don’t have much knowledge about that Latina culture so a lot of the Spanish words and phrases went over my head. Despite this, the raw heart Lozada-Olivia pours into ea “…maybe: the Cloud is historical memory the reason i wince when some people touch meor: the reason i need to be touched…”I will start by saying that I was given an ARC copy in exchange for an honest review. These opinions are my own. I really enjoyed this collection. I adore getting a look into backgrounds different to my own. I don’t have much knowledge about that Latina culture so a lot of the Spanish words and phrases went over my head. Despite this, the raw heart Lozada-Olivia pours into each poem still hits me in the chest, still resonates with me because, despite the cultural differences love, feminism, body hair and wanting to fit is universal for young women. Ultimately this collection is about what it’s like to be human. This is a collection I will read over and over again. Highly recommend.
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