Smothered
A humorous debut crossover young adult novel about what happens when entering the "real world" means moving back in with your mother, inspired by actress and celebrity Autumn Chiklis' real life.Eloise “Lou” Hansen is graduating from Columbia University summa cum laude, and she's ready to conquer the world. Just a few minor problems: she has no job, no prospects, and she’s moving back into her childhood bedroom. Lou is grimly determined to stick to a rigorous schedule to get a job and get out of her parents’ house. Shelly “Mama Shell” Hansen, on the other hand, is ecstatic, and just as determined to keep her at home. Who else will help her hide her latest binge-shopping purchases from her husband, go to SoulCycle with her, and hold her hand during Botox shots?Smothered is a hilarious roman à clef told via journal entries, text messages, emails, bills, receipts, tweets, doctor’s prescriptions, job applications and rejections, parking tickets, and pug pictures, chronicling the year that Lou moves back home after college. Told from Lou’s point-of-view, Smothered tells the story of two young(ish) women, just trying to get it right, and learning that just because we all grow up doesn’t mean we necessarily have to grow old. (After all, what is Juvaderm for?)

Smothered Details

TitleSmothered
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 7th, 2018
PublisherWednesday Books
ISBN-139781250150493
Rating
GenreContemporary, New Adult, Fiction

Smothered Review

  • Berit☀️✨Traveling Sister✨
    January 1, 1970
    4 Silly Spoiled Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟This book was such a FUN read for me... it had a slight vibe of a Sophie Kinsella Book, and that is a huge compliment coming from me.... The characters were all over the top, some of the things that happen were quite ridiculous... but for me it just was delightful and made me laugh out loud.... it is a book that does not take itself too seriously, so to thoroughly enjoy it you have to be in that state of mind...Lou has just graduated from Columbia university, and she do 4 Silly Spoiled Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟This book was such a FUN read for me... it had a slight vibe of a Sophie Kinsella Book, and that is a huge compliment coming from me.... The characters were all over the top, some of the things that happen were quite ridiculous... but for me it just was delightful and made me laugh out loud.... it is a book that does not take itself too seriously, so to thoroughly enjoy it you have to be in that state of mind...Lou has just graduated from Columbia university, and she doesn’t quite know what she wants to do with her life yet.... so she moves back in with her parents in LA.... The biggest problem.... Mama Shell The worlds greatest helicopter mother....Mama Shell wants to control everything in Lou’s life her wardrobe, her hair, her boyfriend, her food, her job, etc. etc. etc. so not only does Lou have to sneak carbs... she has a serious boyfriend she has yet to tell her parents about.... The relationship between mother and daughter was complicated yet hilarious... they were two people that love each other so much and yet we’re so different from one another that things went a little sideways.....This book is told from Lou’s point of view, primarily through journal entries...Lou lives a privilege life and always has, so she might not be relatable to a lot of people.... and even though I grew up in the LA area, I know I was not quite as privileged as Lou, but still her problems were her problems to her..... I mean money cannot buy you a problem free life, the wealthy have their problems as well.... such as which car they’re going to drive to work that day or what vacation house they’re going to vacation in that weekend, you know... problems!😉The only place this book fell a little short for me was in the relationship between Lou and Theo.... I really could not understand why Theo was OK with her keeping him a secret.... I thought it was pretty obvious that Lou didn’t think he was good enough for her parents, even though she didn’t see it that way.... and who was Theo? In a book filled with such lively colorful characters, we really had no idea who he was other than the fact that he was a skinny chef.... i’d really like a book to follow this up... Theo and his interactions with the family, and then perhaps some flashback scenes as to how they met....Absolutely recommend if you are in the mood for a fun book that might be a little vapid at times, but it’s all in good humor...*** thank you so much to the publisher and Net Galley for a copy of this book ***
    more
  • Nat
    January 1, 1970
    Post-Graduation Depression, Mother/Daughter Dynamics, and Coming-of-AgeI was beyond keen on diving into this book, thanks to the premise of using unconventional storytelling and sounding on par with an underrated favorite of mine, Motherest by Kristen Iskandrian, by exploring themes of daughter-mother bonds through journal entries.It’s also in a similar vein to Motherest wherein essentially nothing happens plot-wise; the story relies heavily on the characters, so if you don’t connect with the m Post-Graduation Depression, Mother/Daughter Dynamics, and Coming-of-AgeI was beyond keen on diving into this book, thanks to the premise of using unconventional storytelling and sounding on par with an underrated favorite of mine, Motherest by Kristen Iskandrian, by exploring themes of daughter-mother bonds through journal entries.It’s also in a similar vein to Motherest wherein essentially nothing happens plot-wise; the story relies heavily on the characters, so if you don’t connect with the main protagonist you’re in for a rather lackluster reading experience.Smothered is a sold as a hilarious roman à clef told via journal entries, text messages, emails, bills, receipts, tweets, doctor’s prescriptions, job applications and rejections, parking tickets, and pug pictures, chronicling the year that Lou moves back home after college. Told from Lou’s point-of-view, Smothered tells the story of two young(ish) women, just trying to get it right, and learning that just because we all grow up doesn’t mean we necessarily have to grow old. (After all, what is Juvaderm for?)A list of things I'd like to highlight:• Lou's sister is nicknamed "Val" (short for Valentina), and I couldn't stop picturing Abbi's alter ego (from Broad City). How did I not know that when Abbi gets blackout drunk, she becomes Val? Source• Speaking of over-the-top women: the mother/daughter interactions have a lot to offer in the ways of entertainment. Take for example this exchange below that sums up quite well the dynamic between Mama Shell and Lou:Her voice brought to mind Kate Siegel's “Mother, Can You Not?,” especially when I came upon this exchange later on in the book:This screams of the aforementioned because:Added bonus: her mother making sure Lou doesn't relegate in her love life stays consistently funny.Sigh. Mom has somehow managed to sabotage every single one of my relationships … even the imaginary ones with celebrities. (“Eddie Redmayne? Really? Why not Ryan Gosling or Zac Efron??”)• Which is a sly way to mention Theodore Greenberg:To get on Mama Shell's level, dating a guy that uses “awesome sauce” unironically is a sign to...  But on a real note, I do not understand Theo as a character since he barely gets fleshed out beyond his niche of cooking food and taking care for Lou... Like, what are his motivations for staying with Lou? He gets dropped on us as a fact since he's introduced as her boyfriend™, but we never get to see why they chose each other, or even the bare minimum of talking to one another about something besides take-out food or Lou's jobless state. This is exactly why having a main character in a relationship from the get-go is seldom a good thing in my book, because they have this whole history together that we, as the reader, are unaware of (and that we weirdly didn't experience in here), and it consequently created this distance between us and them. Like, how can I root for you to stay together when it's hard to gauge why you're in it in the first place?• Aside: Smothered featuring texts, Instagram posts, emails, receipts, and more made for quite the upbeat and swift read.I feel like the positives come to a bit of a halt at this point because all else gets eclipsed by Lou's whining, privileged state. I mean, I couldn't comprehend how she keeps complaining about not having a job upon graduating from Columbia and experiencing jealousy when her peers find their passion… and yet she does absolutely nothing to move forward in life. Lou literally applies to only one place over the entirety of this book... She just sits in bed, waiting for her mom to order her around (and then complains when she does).Later, Theo himself has to put her entitlement in perspective:“Don’t you think you’re being a bit dramatic?”“In what way am I being dramatic?” I asked, dramatically.Theo shook his head. “You’re living rent-free. You got rejected from one job. This is hardly the end of the world.THANK YOU! She doesn’t even acknowledge how good she's got it going for herself. I mean, the author tried toning it down at one point by introducing an even shallower character so that the main character doesn’t seem as bad -- smart move on her part -- but it didn't play out in the end on account of her constant exaggerations, such as:I miss college, where being social required no more than stepping outside my dorm room and walking half a block. Now, all my friends are either on the East Coast or going to graduate school, leaving me a completely isolated introvert in La-La Land.* This is pretty much the equivalent of dropping a blind person in the Sahara and asking him to find water.I'm pretty sure Lou has never experienced thirst in her rich life, so don't.And then she goes on, while on a juice cleanse, to write: "Hunger Level: Africa."Please, reevaluate your choices in saying this. And before that, it was the Geneva Conventions with that same juice cleanse, “My whole body shuddered. No food for seven days? Surely this was banned by the Geneva Conventions.” I personally don't care for exaggerations in books, so this hit the wrong note for me.There's also the case of her mother outright lying by registering her pugs as service dogs just to bring them along on vacation, when they're the furthest thing from stable. Drew Lynch made a whole video about this phenomenon of faking service dogs, and how this behavior, perpetrated by individuals like Lou's mom, affects people with trained service dogs in receiving fair treatment at different establishments.“Service dogs?” I shouted from the backseat as Baguette blew snot in my face.“I registered them on the Internet!” Mom insisted, turning around from the front to face me. “What more do you want?”“Mom, I know newborn babies who are better behaved than these pugs.”“Oh, it’s fine!” Mom dismissed, waving her hand at me. “If anyone has a problem, I can show them my papers.”And while I'm on the topic, I couldn't agree with Lou's habit of compulsively lying to her loved ones over the course of this book, when telling the truth is so much easier than whatever hole she’s digging by making up these lies. And it's tragic because whenever she's caught spinning in her web of lies she still opts to make up another lie... The angst surrounding this whole book could've been avoided had she just told the damn TRUTH. Her anthem song could only be  Why You Always Lying .So I was beyond thankful when her father finally calls her out on her attitude.“Well, are you an adult?”I paused, taken aback. Was this a trick question?“That’s what it says on my ID.”“No, it says you’re twenty-two on your ID. Does that really make you an adult?”It brings home the quote I read in HONY: “Just because you're an adult doesn't mean you're grown up. Growing up means being patient, holding your temper, cutting out the self-pity, and quitting with the righteous indignation.”But when putting those hindrances aside, this is the first novel to compel me for the first time in weeks with its nontraditional mother-daughter relationship. And having Lou achieve some major character growth by the end of the book was satisfying to experience. So, overall, I'd say that if you know what you're getting into before reading, Smothered makes for one hell of a book.ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Expected publication: May 1st, 2018Note: I’m an Amazon Affiliate. If you’re interested in buying Smothered , just click on the image below to go through my link. I’ll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils
    more
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I love books written in diary style, it feels so intimate like you’re seeing someone’s innermost thoughts, secrets and desires. Besides journal entities from Lou you also get Facebook messages, texts,?emails and Instagram posts SO fun! The format made for a quick read and made me legit laugh out loud quite a few times.What made this such an entertaining read was the over the top personalities and behaviors of Lou and her family. Mama Shell is so overbearing and controlling that I had to laugh, s I love books written in diary style, it feels so intimate like you’re seeing someone’s innermost thoughts, secrets and desires. Besides journal entities from Lou you also get Facebook messages, texts,?emails and Instagram posts SO fun! The format made for a quick read and made me legit laugh out loud quite a few times.What made this such an entertaining read was the over the top personalities and behaviors of Lou and her family. Mama Shell is so overbearing and controlling that I had to laugh, some of her actions were so outlandish and out of bounds, poor Lou. Everyone from Lou’s friends to her moms friends were over the top, not super believable but completely engaging and funny!This isn’t a read to be taken seriously, it’s dramatic and wild but incredibly positive in the end. For a pretty light read Lou did go through some serious changes by the end too, character growth is always appreciated especially when it’s unexpected! Recommended when you need a light, easy and hilarious read that will most likely make you feel better about your own relationship with your mother.Smothered in three words: Humorous, Light and Outrageous.
    more
  • Niki
    January 1, 1970
    As a recent graduate, post-uni depression has hit me HARD, so I thought I had found the perfect book in this, but nope. Lou wasn't in any way relatable, the family is super rich and spending an extraordinary amount of money in every turn; it's clear that the only reason why she wants to find a job is to get some "HA, in your face! I'm so independent!" points, like that one friend she keeps badmouthing but secretly wants to be like, and NOT because she has any actual need for that money. She does As a recent graduate, post-uni depression has hit me HARD, so I thought I had found the perfect book in this, but nope. Lou wasn't in any way relatable, the family is super rich and spending an extraordinary amount of money in every turn; it's clear that the only reason why she wants to find a job is to get some "HA, in your face! I'm so independent!" points, like that one friend she keeps badmouthing but secretly wants to be like, and NOT because she has any actual need for that money. She doesn't really do much except for grumbling about her weight and reacting to her surroundings.Plus, her "problem" is that she can't tell her mom about her loving, supporting boyfriend, because... he isn't pretty? What fresh hell is this?? How vapid can one be??Honestly, "vapid" is the best adjective for this book. The only reason why it's getting 2 and not 1 star is because it was funny occasionally.**Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a free copy of this book**
    more
  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed reading SMOTHERED; it's laugh out loud funny! After graduating from Columbia University summa cum laude, Lou moves in with her family while searching for a job. If you are looking for some light reading, this is it! I received SMOTHERED for an honest review.
    more
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway and for that, I am thankful. I can't imagine how furiously annoyed I'd be if I spent the estimated $18.99 on this. By no means is it the worst book I've ever read, but I can't recommend it. Originally marketed as a young-adult crossover novel, I believe it has been fixed and is now being marketed more appropriately as an adult novel.It took me well over a month to finish Smothered. I dreaded having to read it because of the headache that was sure to accomp I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway and for that, I am thankful. I can't imagine how furiously annoyed I'd be if I spent the estimated $18.99 on this. By no means is it the worst book I've ever read, but I can't recommend it. Originally marketed as a young-adult crossover novel, I believe it has been fixed and is now being marketed more appropriately as an adult novel.It took me well over a month to finish Smothered. I dreaded having to read it because of the headache that was sure to accompany each page turn. This felt like a caricature of a millennial. All the characters in this book were like those Youtuber's who you think are 17, act 11, but are actually 24. Every. Single. Character. This is like those Georgia Nicholson books, you know "Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging". Like those books, but for a more adult crowd. Books with a narrator like this are fun to read when you're 10-years-old and the usage of "naughty" words are exciting. After that point, it loses its appeal. "Smothered" was shallow, vapid, pointless, mind-numbing, and frustrating. All the problems were easily avoidable, every interaction felt so fake (then again, I'm unfamiliar with the affluent so...), and this was hardly an accurate look on the millennial struggle that I thought it'd be. The entitlement just wafted off the pages and stuck with me, giving me a gnarly migraine. I can say two good things about "Smothered" though. It was at times actually funny. Not laugh out loud funny, but a little chortle. Usually when it stopped trying too hard. And the formatting was fun. We get to read journal entries, texts, bills, medical reports... It was neat to see, I just didn't care for the actual words or characters.Give "Smothered" a try if you want, a lot of people seem to have loved it. As a 17-year-old, I can't say I was a fan.
    more
  • Karen Ray
    January 1, 1970
    Love, LOVED, L O V E D this book. I honestly couldn't put it down. I don't remember the last time I laughed this much or felt such a genuine sense of happiness while reading anything. I connected to every word --as both a mother and a daughter --and I can only hope I'm one fraction as fabulous as Mama Shell (a character I am not soon to forget). Autumn Chiklis has given us a glimpse into the closeness and craziness that is family through characters who always operate from the heart, so we forgiv Love, LOVED, L O V E D this book. I honestly couldn't put it down. I don't remember the last time I laughed this much or felt such a genuine sense of happiness while reading anything. I connected to every word --as both a mother and a daughter --and I can only hope I'm one fraction as fabulous as Mama Shell (a character I am not soon to forget). Autumn Chiklis has given us a glimpse into the closeness and craziness that is family through characters who always operate from the heart, so we forgive them no matter how they stumble. Bravo! I only wish I had the sequel to read!
    more
  • Kiki Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Omg, what an amazing, witty story! I loved how this unemployed, normal adult lives in a world of successful, wealthy, care-free people and still tries to better herself and sets goals. I can see why this is a young adult novel because it shows that even when you are an adult, a lot of people don’t know what they want to be even after college and no matter what lifestyle they have. I’m so happy that Lulu’s life turned out okay in the end. I’m so proud of her 😭
    more
  • Justina
    January 1, 1970
    This was pretty much “The Princess Diaries” for the new adult crowd. If you were a fan of that series, you’ll probably like this, although be warned that the protagonist is pretty lazy, entitled, and casually racist 🤷🏻♀Lou has just graduated third in her class from Columbia University. She’s moving back to LA to live with her parents while she tries to find a job. She’s also been hiding her boyfriend from them for six months, afraid of how her obnoxious, shallow, and superficial mother will reac This was pretty much “The Princess Diaries” for the new adult crowd. If you were a fan of that series, you’ll probably like this, although be warned that the protagonist is pretty lazy, entitled, and casually racist 🤷🏻‍♀️Lou has just graduated third in her class from Columbia University. She’s moving back to LA to live with her parents while she tries to find a job. She’s also been hiding her boyfriend from them for six months, afraid of how her obnoxious, shallow, and superficial mother will react to him. The novel chronicles Lou’s year after graduating. While the authors writing style and voice was great, I really just hated Lou. She was a spoiled, rich, entitled narrator who honestly gives all millennials a bad name. She whines and bitches about not having a job, yet six months past graduation, she has only applied to ONE job. No shit you’re not going to find a job when you’re not even trying to find one. Anyone that desperate for a job and for a way to get out of the house would apply to anything, including crap like dog walking and the food industry. But no, not Lou! She prefers to stay at home and do nothing all day while whining about her lack of job prospects. Her and her mother are often casually racist and racially insensitive. Lou and her mother voluntarily decide to do a juice cleanse, and rich, blonde, entitled Lou decides to journal how her hunger level is Africa. Real cute! Let’s compare your voluntary juice cleanse to people, minorities specifically, who are starving and have nothing to eat. Her mother, despite having a Latina house cleaner for over a decade, is continuously racist and it’s just laughed off and brushed aside. Apparently in over a decade, she has not managed to pick up any Spanish and still can’t communicate with her cleaner. Lou is basically a spoiled brat who creates her own problems and then cries about them in her journal. She has no idea what it is really like to struggle, being that she grew up in a wealthy LA household and has never wanted for anything. She just expects things to be dropped into her lap — which, of course, they are by the end of the novel, with her doing literally nothing to deserve or earn it. Would I recommend this? No, not particularly. It’s a fast read, but there are better things to do with your time. Thanks to NetGalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Susanne Cutler
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads and I am so glad I did!! I really loved this book. I don't remember the last time I read a book that I actually laughed out loud. It was not only funny but so honest and down to earth. For anyone who has lived with an overbearing mother or is one, you will love how relatable this novel is. A fast fun read!
    more
  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Have you just read a psychological thriller that had you biting your nails and sitting on the edge of your seat? Are you in need of a light-hearted, fun “beach read?” If so, then Smothered is the book for you! The story begins with an invitation addressed to the family of Eloise Laurent Hansen for Columbia University’s graduation ceremony. Lou (Eloise) Hansen, the narrator of this story, is receiving her summa cum laude degree with a double major in art history and philosophy.In anticipation of Have you just read a psychological thriller that had you biting your nails and sitting on the edge of your seat? Are you in need of a light-hearted, fun “beach read?” If so, then Smothered is the book for you! The story begins with an invitation addressed to the family of Eloise Laurent Hansen for Columbia University’s graduation ceremony. Lou (Eloise) Hansen, the narrator of this story, is receiving her summa cum laude degree with a double major in art history and philosophy.In anticipation of moving back in with her parents, Lou has created a document — “Rules and Expectations for Parents now that I am moving back home as a fully realized and capable adult.” Here is a sampling from this list:Where I go, who I see, and why I am seeing them are no longer subject to inquisition-style examination. No judgey comments or faces will be tolerated.Mom has to delete the Find-My-Friend app from her phone. (which informs her where Lou is at all times).These two rules form the basis for the story. Lou’s mother (Mama Shell) is extremely controlling — what she says at dinner the night before graduation helps illustrate the point: “…Okay, so I have our whole postgrad life planned out” (note the use of the word “our”). And if that is not enough, Mama Shell continues tracking her daughter because she never deletes Find-My-Friend from her phoneUnless you have graduated from college with a job already in hand, that post-college period of one’s life can be unsettling and confusing. You’ve lived (sort of) on your own for four years but now feel like you have taken a giant step backwards — you are living like a child again, at home with your parents. As Lou explains:…for reasons unknown to psychologists, staying in one’s childhood home causes a person to revert into an incompetent teenager, as though everything one learned at college and beyond about functioning has completely gone out the window, and one is somehow inhabited by the whiny ghost of one’s inept, angst-ridden sixteen-year-old self, unable to recall any of the life skills or good habits so carefully developed while one was living happily on own’s own. Ugh.And if that’s not enough to bring you down, there is the fear that you won’t ever find a job and will be destined to live at home with the parents forever.But here’s the scary thing, Theo. What if I’m not? What if I peaked? What if being a student was the only thing I’ll ever be good at?Smothered is told through journal entries, text messages, news articles, photos, and receipts, making it an unusual and fun read. There are plenty of parts that will make you smile and/or laugh-out-loud —it’s not just events but also moments of thought or observation. We get to know Lou very well and by the end of the book, I wanted a sequel to find out how she continues to cope with her aptly named “postgraduate syndrome” (PGS). I miss college, where being social required no more than stepping outside my dorm room and walking half a block. Now, all my friends are either on the East Coast or going to graduate school, leaving me completely isolated introvert in La-La Land. This is pretty much the equivalent of dropping a blind person in the Sahara and asking him to find water.Autumn Chiiklis (yes, the daughter of Michael Chiklis, the actor) strings words and sentences together effortlessly, or at least gives that appearance. Her writing is witty, intelligent and she gives voice to many of the issues facing a new college graduate. Smothered will hold great appeal, especially among Gen X (after Baby Boomers), Gen Y (a.k.a. Millenials), and Gen Z (after Millenials).Thank you to St. Martin’s Press and NetGalley for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Izzy
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer- I got this book from a Goodreads giveaway, but that will not affect my opinion on this book whatsoever. Can I just say that I related to this book SO MUCH. Columbia has always been one of my dream colleges, so as soon as I saw the summary for this book, I was so down! And after reading the book, even though there was less Columbia than I expected, I still adored it. Let's start with a quick summary. Our MC, Lou, just graduated Columbia summa cum laude and is ready to take over the un Disclaimer- I got this book from a Goodreads giveaway, but that will not affect my opinion on this book whatsoever. Can I just say that I related to this book SO MUCH. Columbia has always been one of my dream colleges, so as soon as I saw the summary for this book, I was so down! And after reading the book, even though there was less Columbia than I expected, I still adored it. Let's start with a quick summary. Our MC, Lou, just graduated Columbia summa cum laude and is ready to take over the universe... except she has to move back in with her parents. She has no job and has become her mom's personal servant and has to try to find a way to get back on her feet and do something with her seemingly useless college degree. There wasn't much I didn't like about this book, and the few problems I had with it should be easily fixed before this book's release date. (Which was May 1st, so go buy it in a bookstore near you!) For the things I did like, there are a lot! Some people have said Lou seemed lazy and unproductive, but that was the point! I am a huge procrastinator. Right now I'm actually procrastinating on applying for an internship this summer. I can be super motivated and ambitious at some points, but that doesn't mean I'm going to do the thing right away. I even procrastinated on writing this review! Since my school year is winding down, I get super lazy and tired, and don't ever get anything done. That's exactly what is going on with Lou in this book. I recommend this book to anyone who's nervous about high school or college, or who has recently graduated high school or college, because the amount of things you will relate in this book are practically unlimited.
    more
  • Nessa
    January 1, 1970
    The book is a hybrid of Where'd You Bernadette, Bridget Jone's Diary, and many of those truly YA/middle school books you've read with text bubbles and gossiping (please note this is not a degradation of the story) all set to the backdrop of Rich Kids of Beverly Hills sort of L.A. life. Chiklis perfectly combines these elements, giving you get a host of vivid characters that make the book a fun, fast read. While this is no Pulitzer Prize winning literary piece, the story is both wildly comic and The book is a hybrid of Where'd You Bernadette, Bridget Jone's Diary, and many of those truly YA/middle school books you've read with text bubbles and gossiping (please note this is not a degradation of the story) all set to the backdrop of Rich Kids of Beverly Hills sort of L.A. life. Chiklis perfectly combines these elements, giving you get a host of vivid characters that make the book a fun, fast read. While this is no Pulitzer Prize winning literary piece, the story is both wildly comic and heartfelt--perfect for rom-com and chick-lit lovers alike. I would like to note that this novel is considered YA crossover. I agree, it is probably best enjoyed by those, like myself, in college or just about to be in college or graduated. It does read with a very "millennial" feel to it, which I enjoyed. Overall just an all-around fun read. Funny, light, and a quick read that left me wanting more.
    more
  •  Eileen
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. Laugh out loud funny - recommend to all looking for an enjoyable read. I know all of my friends will love it too!
  • Naomi Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious! There were so many laugh out loud moments. My face hurts from all the smiles. Lou tells the story about moving back to her upper class family home in Los Angeles after college though journal entries, text messages, social media posts, receipts, and other media. She struggles with living with her over bearing mother, finding a job, and telling her parents about her long-term boyfriend.Mama Shell really steals the comedy show. She has questionable parenting choices and follows the stran Hilarious! There were so many laugh out loud moments. My face hurts from all the smiles. Lou tells the story about moving back to her upper class family home in Los Angeles after college though journal entries, text messages, social media posts, receipts, and other media. She struggles with living with her over bearing mother, finding a job, and telling her parents about her long-term boyfriend.Mama Shell really steals the comedy show. She has questionable parenting choices and follows the strangest dieting trends, including snorting mushrooms, drinking algae, and taking Adderall. But she was an amazing, loving, glamorous, judgmental and comical character. She's not your average cookie baking, window washing mama, but a great mom nonetheless. Lou was more of a physical comedian with her nervous sweating, public scene causing fumbles, and beauty fails. Her awkward personality, career and family struggles are relatable for many young women. The side characters are all comical in their own right too. The Instagram famous sister. The dad with a mobster past. The activist friend.This was a super fun read and highly recommended for both mothers and daughters.
    more
  • Tiffany
    January 1, 1970
    *Book received from a Goodreads giveaway*I was in the middle of reading other books when Smothered arrived in my mailbox so I figured it would be one I'd get to eventually. Yet the book drew me in and I read it in less than 24 hours! I laughed out loud so much that my 11 year old son was concerned. Lou Hansen is on the top of the world graduating from Columbia University summa cum laude but her world is about to get pretty interesting when she's forced to move back home. We find out the reason f *Book received from a Goodreads giveaway*I was in the middle of reading other books when Smothered arrived in my mailbox so I figured it would be one I'd get to eventually. Yet the book drew me in and I read it in less than 24 hours! I laughed out loud so much that my 11 year old son was concerned. Lou Hansen is on the top of the world graduating from Columbia University summa cum laude but her world is about to get pretty interesting when she's forced to move back home. We find out the reason for the book title when we meet Lou's mom "Mama Shell" a hilarious character in the book who drives Lou nuts. I loved the format of the book which sprinkled in text messages and Instagram pictures. As a daughter I can relate to Lou and as a mom I can relate to Shelly although I'm not sure I'd download the Find Your Friends app to spy on my son's whereabouts. ;) Great, fast, funny read--I highly recommend!!
    more
  • Desiree craig
    January 1, 1970
    I received the ARC of this book from a goodreads giveaway. I couldn't put it down!!! I haven't read a book in quite some time that I was able to say that about. I can't wait to see what this author puts out next and am happily following her on instagram to see any updates on new books coming out. LOVE LOVE LOVE THIS BOOK!!!!
    more
  • Brenda Schneider
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful laugh out loud book. Really enjoyed the characters. I won this book through goodreads.
  • S
    January 1, 1970
    This book was absolutely hilarious! I'm sending my copy to my sister this evening as I know she will also love it. A+
  • Jessica Parsons
    January 1, 1970
    “Why’s my body tingling? Is that normal? It’s like I’m carbonated. Can humans be carbonated?? Whoa”Eloise (Lou) Hansen has graduated college summa cum laude and is ready to begin her awesome life. The only problem is that, of course, she doesn’t know where to start. Moving back in with her parents seems the only option, and that means dealing with her mother, who is thrilled to have her daughter back home to go shopping with her and watch the Bachelor with her and her ‘Red Hots’ crew every week. “Why’s my body tingling? Is that normal? It’s like I’m carbonated. Can humans be carbonated?? Whoa”Eloise (Lou) Hansen has graduated college summa cum laude and is ready to begin her awesome life. The only problem is that, of course, she doesn’t know where to start. Moving back in with her parents seems the only option, and that means dealing with her mother, who is thrilled to have her daughter back home to go shopping with her and watch the Bachelor with her and her ‘Red Hots’ crew every week. As the days and months continue farther from her graduation Lou still hasn’t found a job and STILL hasn’t told her parents about her secret boyfriend. Told with wit and hilarity, Smothered is an excellent portrayal of life postgrad and the struggle of launching ones self into the world.I really enjoyed this book. It was a quick and fun read, told through diary-entry style segments and footnotes to add further thought. Smothered brings up the excellent point of current day post graduate life, the “what now?” moment that graduation brings along. Lou’s list of post-grad goals was a great representation of the things that one might want to get out of life, everything from “lose 5-7 pounds” to “have kids: one boy, one girl”. Lou was an excellent character to follow and a very realistic point of view on a new grad trying to find their place, especially when moving in with your parents seems like back-tracking.Mama Shell was a whirlwind of a character and so fun to read about. She may not be someone I would ever want to meet in person but she was certainly a complex character. Her love for her daughter was evident, if a little misplaced, and her attitude was frivolous toward most situations. I found her character to be frustrating, but not in the way it was written, but due to her personality, which was excellent as it reflected the frustration of the main character, Lou.Overall the novel was a fun and entertaining read that posed some great reflection on post-grad life; the anxiety of finding a job you want to be in forever, the thought of never leaving the nest, and bettering yourself in the little things along the way. I would definitely recommend this book to someone who may be dealing with post-grad life or anyone who wants a giggle.
    more
  • Rachelle
    January 1, 1970
    Smothered... imagine your mother forcing herself into nearly aspect of your recently graduated from college- desperately searching for a job - life. Lou's Mama Shell is a stay at home mom fashionista, who spends her days shopping at high-end stores and texting Lou to keep tabs on her daughter and inject beauty/health/fashion advice. An honestly hilarious year following Lou's graduation ensues in this book as she struggles with international scandal, introducing boyfriend to family, and living at Smothered... imagine your mother forcing herself into nearly aspect of your recently graduated from college- desperately searching for a job - life. Lou's Mama Shell is a stay at home mom fashionista, who spends her days shopping at high-end stores and texting Lou to keep tabs on her daughter and inject beauty/health/fashion advice. An honestly hilarious year following Lou's graduation ensues in this book as she struggles with international scandal, introducing boyfriend to family, and living at home while trying to find her place in the world.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing book! Perfect summer beach read that you will not be able to put down, the absolute definition of a page turner. The combo of emojis, modern lingo, and text messages will have you laughing at every turn as well as relatable characters, we all have a Lou in us and know a Megan Mitchell!!!!
    more
  • Bob Pascarella
    January 1, 1970
    Love it!!! Funny, thoughtful, witty and insightful to the lighter side of the human condition. You won't put this down even after you finish it. It has so many gems that you'll go back to find quotes to pass along to your friends and family. This is a book you'll read and then talk about.
    more
  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, once I got used to the format of this book it became a really fast read. I’ve never read a book written in alternating formats (e.g., journal entries, text messages, instagram photos, receipts, etc). After finishing this book, I can say that it’s not my favorite method of storytelling, but it is an interesting way to build a character’s personality. Plus, it goes by a lot faster. That ended up being a positive thing for me because this book read like an overly dramatic romcom movie- funny a Wow, once I got used to the format of this book it became a really fast read. I’ve never read a book written in alternating formats (e.g., journal entries, text messages, instagram photos, receipts, etc). After finishing this book, I can say that it’s not my favorite method of storytelling, but it is an interesting way to build a character’s personality. Plus, it goes by a lot faster. That ended up being a positive thing for me because this book read like an overly dramatic romcom movie- funny at times, but also severely irritating.The main reason I entered the goodreads giveaway for this book was because I thought I would be able to relate to the main character, Lou, who has just graduated from college and is now at a loss as to what to do with her life. However, I found Lou and her situation completely unrelatable. Lou graduated third in her class, and presumably spent her college years working and studying extremely hard both in class and internships. She claims to be a driven individual, yet once out of school she shows no work ethic at all. Yes, I know all about how difficult it is to find a job related to your major after college- I’m living that reality right now. BUT, for a student to have graduated THIRD in her class, who is apparently so motivated and won so many awards and who actually did internships while in school, I simply can’t believe that she wouldn’t have started making plans while still in school. Or at least attempt to follow through on her many to-do lists telling her to start applying for jobs so she can get out of her parents crazy house. The problem stems from the fact that everyone in Lou’s life is either filthy rich or insanely lucky in life: her best friend is a revolutionary guru headed to India to change the world; her cousin is a fashion icon; her sister is a top instagrammer; even her secret boyfriend is the up and coming new chef to watch in town. Her mother is even more over the top (think hyperactive Kardashian). Everyone around her is rolling in money and excelling at what they do. It just isn’t real or relatable at all. And the fact that Lou says she is driven but does absolutely nothing to help herself (and complains) for the duration of this book, was a bit maddening. Most college kids are working retail to keep themselves fed on top ramen, but Lou has never had to do that, and of course she feels she’s above the working class. The whole secret boyfriend thing also grated on me. If you don’t want to tell your snobby parents about your boyfriend, I can understand that. BUT, to lie to said awesome boyfriend and to all your friends? Not cool. I really just wanted Lou to grow a spine and stand up for herself and her boyfriend, but she never does. Even the end- that oh so predictable end- just rolls right over her. Lou doesn’t grow at all during this book, which was severely disappointing. She doesn’t work for anything, complains at every turn, constantly lied to everyone she cared about- and still had everything given to her!The one thing I actually enjoyed about this book was the humor. Lou is incredibly sarcastic and funny. Her journal entries often become a downwards spiral of comedic insanity as she loses control over little things, which are really funny to read. THIS was the one thing I could relate to. Her nervous habits and need to overanalyze everything were both humorous and relatable. Plus, Lou is just a funny character. I often found myself smiling at little things she would say or text. The situations in this book are often comedic in nature as well. There’s even a part where a random receipt from her mom’s bank account is thrown in with notes from their money manager that I found funny. This is what the author is good at: providing context for the silly idiosyncrasies of her characters to help flesh them out. Thankfully, the whole book is infused with this magical humor, making every cringy scene somehow tolerable as I was reading. I kept thinking to myself that this was a reality show in book format. I HAD to remember that as I was reading or else I would start to get too annoyed. It’s a quick read, fairly superficial, filled with quick humor and over the top drama. A fun beach read, I guess. Thank you to goodreads giveaways and the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review.2.5 stars: When I finished this book last night I thought I would be giving it 3 stars, but now that I've written out how I feel I think I'm going to round down.
    more
  • Bookworm15
    January 1, 1970
    Engaging, endearing and effervescent, Autumn Chiklis’s Roman de clef is an intoxicating blend of hilarious journal entries, emails, text messages, job applications and more chronicling Eloise (Lou) Hansen’s first year back at home in sunny and sensational Los Angeles after graduating summa cum laude at Columbia University, New York. Chiklis writes with surprising self-assurance for a first-time novelist and infuses her sharp wit and keen observations into both witty scenarios and unexpected poig Engaging, endearing and effervescent, Autumn Chiklis’s Roman de clef is an intoxicating blend of hilarious journal entries, emails, text messages, job applications and more chronicling Eloise (Lou) Hansen’s first year back at home in sunny and sensational Los Angeles after graduating summa cum laude at Columbia University, New York. Chiklis writes with surprising self-assurance for a first-time novelist and infuses her sharp wit and keen observations into both witty scenarios and unexpected poignant moments. A fast and rollicking read, this memorable debut introduces its reader to the spirited and heart-warming heroine, the entire Hansen family (in particular the irrepressible Mama Shell) and a cast of winning characters that create a refreshing read – perfect for enjoying poolside with a “Shelltini” (destined to be come the hottest signature drink) in hand.
    more
  • Cornelia Sanders
    January 1, 1970
    A light-hearted, funny story that I enjoyed SO much. This was so much fun to read, I found the main character totally relateable, even though I have not been brought up where my parents could spend these amounts of money, I can still relate with needing to find myself after school and how to find the right path into a working society.I truly enjoyed the writing style and how the author utilized text messages, receipts, applications and other things. It brought another level to the story that I n A light-hearted, funny story that I enjoyed SO much. This was so much fun to read, I found the main character totally relateable, even though I have not been brought up where my parents could spend these amounts of money, I can still relate with needing to find myself after school and how to find the right path into a working society.I truly enjoyed the writing style and how the author utilized text messages, receipts, applications and other things. It brought another level to the story that I not only enjoyed but also felt very current and up to date.This is the perfect novel to read between heavy topics or as a "pallet-cleanser" between complex worlds - or simply as your next beach-read. Can totally recommend this read.Thank you to Netgalley, the Publisher and Author for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I was very lucky to win this book in a Goodreads giveaway and I am so happy I did. This book was absolutely hilarious and so real. I can't remember a book that I actually laughed as much in as I did this book. Anyone who has ever lived with their parents as an adult should read this and enjoy. The story was told through texts, social media posts, receipts, emails, etc which made for a very fast, light read. I highly recommend this book and can only hope to read more from Autumn Chiklis in the fu I was very lucky to win this book in a Goodreads giveaway and I am so happy I did. This book was absolutely hilarious and so real. I can't remember a book that I actually laughed as much in as I did this book. Anyone who has ever lived with their parents as an adult should read this and enjoy. The story was told through texts, social media posts, receipts, emails, etc which made for a very fast, light read. I highly recommend this book and can only hope to read more from Autumn Chiklis in the future.
    more
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great story - so true to life, both funny and sad in parts.So glad I won it!
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I loved that this was light read (meaning I didn't have to think hard while reading it). It was funny and spot on to the social media generation. I liked how there was a mix of texts, a few Instagram posts and her diary to tell the story. Were some of the characters over the top? Sure, but that's what made them so funny.
    more
  • Lea
    January 1, 1970
    I have to say that this book was a much appreciated break from High Fantasy. I received this arc through a goodreads giveaway from the publisher. Lou is a really relatable character on the awkward scale. Even her mom’s relatable to my mom, except on steroids. The beginning was a bit slow, but I found myself laughing at the most inappropriate moments while in class or anywhere else. Especially toward the end of the novel. If you were looking for a deeper read this may not be for you. Sure it’s de I have to say that this book was a much appreciated break from High Fantasy. I received this arc through a goodreads giveaway from the publisher. Lou is a really relatable character on the awkward scale. Even her mom’s relatable to my mom, except on steroids. The beginning was a bit slow, but I found myself laughing at the most inappropriate moments while in class or anywhere else. Especially toward the end of the novel. If you were looking for a deeper read this may not be for you. Sure it’s definitely a coming-of-age novel, but it’s much more of a light, quick beach read than a rainy day novel.
    more
Write a review