Templar Silks
William Marshal has reached the end of his long and glorious life. On his deathbed at his manor in Caversham, he has one final task for his loyal servant: to fetch the silks William had woven in Jerusalem as a young man. William made a solemn promise to the Order of the Templars and he intends to leave the world as a member of that order.As he waits to perform to his last knightly duty, William is swept back into his own past. Determined to fulfil his last vow to his beloved Prince, William set forth on a quest to Jerusalem, which led him down dark and twisting paths, and brought him great passion and great loss... In the holiest and most dangerous of cities, William Marshall became the Greatest Knight.

Templar Silks Details

TitleTemplar Silks
Author
ReleaseMar 1st, 2018
PublisherSphere
ISBN-139780751564976
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Medieval

Templar Silks Review

  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    So good to see Elizabeth Chadwick return to the subject of William Marshal, the Greatest Knight. Here William looks back on his perilous pilgrimage to Jerusalem. Action and romance combine with a fantastic sense of time and place. Elizabeth Chadwick writes like few others. She always makes me feel like I'm observing the past with my own eyes.
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  • Kirsty 📚📖❤️
    January 1, 1970
    I recently read one of Chadwick's Autumn Throne and loved it and it was recommended that I pick up the William Marshal books to read. Before I had chance to do that this latest book showed up on netgalley so in typical style I'm reading everything back to front. However with this story it doesn't matter.It's quite a self contained story that flits between Marshal's last days and memories of a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. I really enjoyed the love story embedded within this both of William and the on I recently read one of Chadwick's Autumn Throne and loved it and it was recommended that I pick up the William Marshal books to read. Before I had chance to do that this latest book showed up on netgalley so in typical style I'm reading everything back to front. However with this story it doesn't matter.It's quite a self contained story that flits between Marshal's last days and memories of a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. I really enjoyed the love story embedded within this both of William and the one of his brother Ancel. I enjoyed the relationships of William and his brother. All of it just really worked for me. There's a lot of action; it was a turbulent time. It's very easy to immerse yourself into the time and place and imagine everything as was back then. The present day moments broke the story up really well. Overall this is a great book and now I really do need to go back and read the rest
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This novel fills in the gap in time in the William Marshal novels after Young King Harry dies and before William starts gaining influence and fortune. For those who have forgotten or haven't read the previous books, we get a recap of the sacrilegious pillaging William was reluctantly involved in and which sent him on a pilgrimage to Outremer. It's a nice visit back to the William Marshal books but in the late-Chadwick style, meaning we know people are getting down and dirty but we're not getting This novel fills in the gap in time in the William Marshal novels after Young King Harry dies and before William starts gaining influence and fortune. For those who have forgotten or haven't read the previous books, we get a recap of the sacrilegious pillaging William was reluctantly involved in and which sent him on a pilgrimage to Outremer. It's a nice visit back to the William Marshal books but in the late-Chadwick style, meaning we know people are getting down and dirty but we're not getting every juicy detail like we would have gotten in her earlier novels. Having said that, the boy-meets-girl aspect of this novel did seem to go on a bit too long and I would have preferred those pages be filled with more information about the Templars and the overall picture of the Holy Land of the time. We learn a fair bit about the political turmoil in Jerusalem but the overall picture could have been better painted. I did like how she portrayed his relationship with religion and pilgrimage. Overall, another good yarn. Recommended.
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  • Jennifer (JC-S)
    January 1, 1970
    ‘It is something I need to remember, but not something you need to know .’In April 1219, at his Manor of Caversham near Reading in Berkshire, William Marshal’s life is nearing its end. Marshal, Regent of England and one of England’s greatest knights, served four English kings during his long and eventful life. Marshal has sent one of his knights to Striguil in Wales to collect the silks he brought home from his pilgrimage to Jerusalem. These are what he intends to be buried in. As he lies in his ‘It is something I need to remember, but not something you need to know .’In April 1219, at his Manor of Caversham near Reading in Berkshire, William Marshal’s life is nearing its end. Marshal, Regent of England and one of England’s greatest knights, served four English kings during his long and eventful life. Marshal has sent one of his knights to Striguil in Wales to collect the silks he brought home from his pilgrimage to Jerusalem. These are what he intends to be buried in. As he lies in his bed, shifting between consciousness and unconsciousness, between pain and relief, his thoughts turn to that pilgrimage. On his deathbed, Henry, the Young King, eldest son and heir of Henry II asked William Marshal to swear an oath to undertake a pilgrimage to Jerusalem on his behalf: ‘I want you to go to Jerusalem and lay my cloak on the tomb of Christ at the Holy Sepulchre . In 1183, William Marshal was still a landless knight. Unattached, unmarried and dependent upon the patronage of others, there was no barrier to his undertaking the pilgrimage. And now, over thirty years later, he remembers the journey, the adventures, the people he met.‘I was dreaming’, he said. ‘I was not in this time and place .’ William Marshal spent three years on this pilgrimage, but little is known about this period of his life. This lack of detail has enabled Ms Chadwick (who has written several novels about William Marshal and his family) to imagine how that time was spent. In this novel, William Marshal’s trip to Jerusalem took him via Constantinople, to the court of King Baldwin IV of Jerusalem (the Leper King), febrile with internal intrigue and threatened by Saladin. We meet the Patriarch of Jerusalem and his mistress, Paschia de Riveri. And amongst these historical figures, Ms Chadwick weaves a romance for William Marshal, and a possible explanation for decisions he makes.I’ve fallen in love with the William Marshal of Ms Chadwick’s novels, and I enjoyed this novel as well. We know that William Marshal survived the pilgrimage, but I had to remind myself of this a couple of times.For those who enjoyed Ms Chadwick’s novels about William Marshal as much as I did, this is a terrific read. As the novel alternates between William Marshal’s deathbed and the experiences of his pilgrimage, past and present move together.Note: My thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Australia for providing me with a free electronic copy of this book for review purposes.Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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  • Cel Jel
    January 1, 1970
    An Elizabeth Chadwick is to be released, and I contact my bookshop to have it reserved. As soon as I get a copy it moves to the top(almost) of the to be read pile.Especially the book about William Marshall and his years in Outremer. This is the part of William's life not covered by the chronicles in detail, and without primary documents to confirm fully dates of events. So in this case the book is less filling in the aspects and helping flesh out the dates, but more thinking what may have happen An Elizabeth Chadwick is to be released, and I contact my bookshop to have it reserved. As soon as I get a copy it moves to the top(almost) of the to be read pile.Especially the book about William Marshall and his years in Outremer. This is the part of William's life not covered by the chronicles in detail, and without primary documents to confirm fully dates of events. So in this case the book is less filling in the aspects and helping flesh out the dates, but more thinking what may have happened. I love the way that Elizabeth constructs her sentences, paragraphs and passages for they enable be to create scenic pictures well. I also love most of the story, in the complexity of politics of the area, the difficulty for newcomers working to be accepted and considered worthy to be part of the decision making. Alternating chapters from a present where William is dying and a past where thanks to making an oath to his dying young king, William has to travel to Jerusalem and there makes his services and the services of his group available to the Primate of Jerusalem and the King of Jerusalem.The only downside in the book for me was my annoyance with the love story that was contained,not because it was not well written, nor because it was not possible, but for my annoyance at the way it developed, and the consequences it left. Still you may well read the book, and totally disagree with me and enjoy the love story.Do. I recommend reading this book, absolutely, every story written by Elizabeth allows you to travel in your mind and share the lives of those that went before, real and not real.
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  • Marsha Lambert
    January 1, 1970
    Templar Silks by Elizabeth Chadwick is a meticulously researched, evocatively written tale about the greatest knight, William Marshal and his pilgrimage to Jerusalem.Chadwick writes so descriptively and with a knowledge of the medieval time period that the reader is instantly transported into the storyline. A page turner from the get go, the author beautifully weaves a tale of this remarkable man’s path to redemption and regained honor.I really enjoyed how the story alternates between the Marsha Templar Silks by Elizabeth Chadwick is a meticulously researched, evocatively written tale about the greatest knight, William Marshal and his pilgrimage to Jerusalem.Chadwick writes so descriptively and with a knowledge of the medieval time period that the reader is instantly transported into the storyline. A page turner from the get go, the author beautifully weaves a tale of this remarkable man’s path to redemption and regained honor.I really enjoyed how the story alternates between the Marshal’s death bed in England to his remembrances of his journey to Outremer and his time there.Highly recommended to any historical fiction readers that like a well researched and well written book.
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  • Pauline Reardon
    January 1, 1970
    Unexpected giftWhat a truly wonderful story. I have been reading Elizabeth Chadwick books for many years and William Marshall became my hero. The four main books concerning William are beautifully written and totally engrossing. I call this one an unexpected gift because his life story had been pretty fully covered but his time on crusade was the missing piece. I cried when I read the end of The Greatest Knight and having just finished this book I am crying now. The research involved in these to Unexpected giftWhat a truly wonderful story. I have been reading Elizabeth Chadwick books for many years and William Marshall became my hero. The four main books concerning William are beautifully written and totally engrossing. I call this one an unexpected gift because his life story had been pretty fully covered but his time on crusade was the missing piece. I cried when I read the end of The Greatest Knight and having just finished this book I am crying now. The research involved in these towering stories is phenominal, so close to historical facts and I highly recommend them. Wish I could award 20 stars.
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  • HILARY ANDERSON - BELL
    January 1, 1970
    A great end to a brilliant series.The book centres on William Marshal a knight in the 12th century. It finishes the stories of his life that started in The Greatest Knight.In this book he is on his death bed and is remembering his past when he travelled to the holy land.The book seamlessly changes from his exploits in Jerusalem filled with beautiful descriptions of the life out there and the confines if his chamber where he is lying in his bed dying.A very intersecting and enjoyable end to what A great end to a brilliant series.The book centres on William Marshal a knight in the 12th century. It finishes the stories of his life that started in The Greatest Knight.In this book he is on his death bed and is remembering his past when he travelled to the holy land.The book seamlessly changes from his exploits in Jerusalem filled with beautiful descriptions of the life out there and the confines if his chamber where he is lying in his bed dying.A very intersecting and enjoyable end to what has been a brilliant series of books about the life of who is thought to be one of the greatest knights ever!
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  • Gill
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth’s fictional account of this is superb – exciting, romantic, dangerous and packed with ruthless, conniving courtiers and William’s old adversary Guy de Lusignan (previously responsible for the murder of his uncle in England). William sets out for Jerusalem with his colleagues and brother Ancel after the untimely death of his master, Henry II’s son ‘Harry’. He made an oath to place Harry’s robe on the tomb of Christ at the Holy Sepulchre in an effort to expiate their terrible sins of sac Elizabeth’s fictional account of this is superb – exciting, romantic, dangerous and packed with ruthless, conniving courtiers and William’s old adversary Guy de Lusignan (previously responsible for the murder of his uncle in England). William sets out for Jerusalem with his colleagues and brother Ancel after the untimely death of his master, Henry II’s son ‘Harry’. He made an oath to place Harry’s robe on the tomb of Christ at the Holy Sepulchre in an effort to expiate their terrible sins of sacking the shrine at Rocamadour, France to pay Harry’s troops and debts (while fighting his own father, but that’s another story!) He arrives in Jerusalem at a critical time - Baldwin the King is dying (young) of leprosy, with no clear adult successor. William is put into a position of relative importance, being a former member of Henry II’s court and Marshall to his son. The Patriarch and Senior representatives of the Templars and Hospitallers prepare to go to ask the Kings of France and England if they will take the reins of Regency until Baldwin’s son can take over. William has to tread a fine line between the remaining 2 factions – those supporting Raymond of Tripoli (who seems the most eligible and sensible) and others supporting his enemy, the irresponsible and immoral Guy de Lusignan, (husband of Baldwin’s sister Sybilla and stepfather of her son). This fine balance is further complicated by an extremely inadvisable romantic entanglement, which costs William dearly.Elizabeth Chadwick chronicles these years with a plausible, flowing story – putting the mediaeval religious beliefs firmly in the forefront of her characters’ motivations. I loved it, I did get a bit impatient with Paschia but understood her plight; against her Uncle’s command over her life, she was powerless. The sections dealing with William’s passing and his peaceful and patient acceptance of that, having thoroughly made his preparations, made very hard reading for me. Tales of his strength, ardour and honour are what we’re all used to and what I want to hear about! But who wouldn’t wish him a peaceful and honourable ending? Thanks, Elizabeth!
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