Templar Silks
William Marshal has reached the end of his long and glorious life. On his deathbed at his manor in Caversham, he has one final task for his loyal servant: to fetch the silks William had woven in Jerusalem as a young man. William made a solemn promise to the Order of the Templars and he intends to leave the world as a member of that order.As he waits to perform to his last knightly duty, William is swept back into his own past. Determined to fulfil his last vow to his beloved Prince, William set forth on a quest to Jerusalem, which led him down dark and twisting paths, and brought him great passion and great loss... In the holiest and most dangerous of cities, William Marshall became the Greatest Knight.

Templar Silks Details

TitleTemplar Silks
Author
ReleaseMar 1st, 2018
PublisherSphere
ISBN-139780751564976
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, European Literature, British Literature, Fiction, Medieval

Templar Silks Review

  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    So good to see Elizabeth Chadwick return to the subject of William Marshal, the Greatest Knight. Here William looks back on his perilous pilgrimage to Jerusalem. Action and romance combine with a fantastic sense of time and place. Elizabeth Chadwick writes like few others. She always makes me feel like I'm observing the past with my own eyes.
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  • Kirsty 📚📖❤️
    January 1, 1970
    I recently read one of Chadwick's Autumn Throne and loved it and it was recommended that I pick up the William Marshal books to read. Before I had chance to do that this latest book showed up on netgalley so in typical style I'm reading everything back to front. However with this story it doesn't matter.It's quite a self contained story that flits between Marshal's last days and memories of a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. I really enjoyed the love story embedded within this both of William and the on I recently read one of Chadwick's Autumn Throne and loved it and it was recommended that I pick up the William Marshal books to read. Before I had chance to do that this latest book showed up on netgalley so in typical style I'm reading everything back to front. However with this story it doesn't matter.It's quite a self contained story that flits between Marshal's last days and memories of a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. I really enjoyed the love story embedded within this both of William and the one of his brother Ancel. I enjoyed the relationships of William and his brother. All of it just really worked for me. There's a lot of action; it was a turbulent time. It's very easy to immerse yourself into the time and place and imagine everything as was back then. The present day moments broke the story up really well. Overall this is a great book and now I really do need to go back and read the rest
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  • Jennifer (JC-S)
    January 1, 1970
    ‘It is something I need to remember, but not something you need to know .’In April 1219, at his Manor of Caversham near Reading in Berkshire, William Marshal’s life is nearing its end. Marshal, Regent of England and one of England’s greatest knights, served four English kings during his long and eventful life. Marshal has sent one of his knights to Striguil in Wales to collect the silks he brought home from his pilgrimage to Jerusalem. These are what he intends to be buried in. As he lies in his ‘It is something I need to remember, but not something you need to know .’In April 1219, at his Manor of Caversham near Reading in Berkshire, William Marshal’s life is nearing its end. Marshal, Regent of England and one of England’s greatest knights, served four English kings during his long and eventful life. Marshal has sent one of his knights to Striguil in Wales to collect the silks he brought home from his pilgrimage to Jerusalem. These are what he intends to be buried in. As he lies in his bed, shifting between consciousness and unconsciousness, between pain and relief, his thoughts turn to that pilgrimage. On his deathbed, Henry, the Young King, eldest son and heir of Henry II asked William Marshal to swear an oath to undertake a pilgrimage to Jerusalem on his behalf: ‘I want you to go to Jerusalem and lay my cloak on the tomb of Christ at the Holy Sepulchre . In 1183, William Marshal was still a landless knight. Unattached, unmarried and dependent upon the patronage of others, there was no barrier to his undertaking the pilgrimage. And now, over thirty years later, he remembers the journey, the adventures, the people he met.‘I was dreaming’, he said. ‘I was not in this time and place .’ William Marshal spent three years on this pilgrimage, but little is known about this period of his life. This lack of detail has enabled Ms Chadwick (who has written several novels about William Marshal and his family) to imagine how that time was spent. In this novel, William Marshal’s trip to Jerusalem took him via Constantinople, to the court of King Baldwin IV of Jerusalem (the Leper King), febrile with internal intrigue and threatened by Saladin. We meet the Patriarch of Jerusalem and his mistress, Paschia de Riveri. And amongst these historical figures, Ms Chadwick weaves a romance for William Marshal, and a possible explanation for decisions he makes.I’ve fallen in love with the William Marshal of Ms Chadwick’s novels, and I enjoyed this novel as well. We know that William Marshal survived the pilgrimage, but I had to remind myself of this a couple of times.For those who enjoyed Ms Chadwick’s novels about William Marshal as much as I did, this is a terrific read. As the novel alternates between William Marshal’s deathbed and the experiences of his pilgrimage, past and present move together.Note: My thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Australia for providing me with a free electronic copy of this book for review purposes.Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This novel fills in the gap in time in the William Marshal novels after Young King Harry dies and before William starts gaining influence and fortune. For those who have forgotten or haven't read the previous books, we get a recap of the sacrilegious pillaging William was reluctantly involved in and which sent him on a pilgrimage to Outremer. It's a nice visit back to the William Marshal books but in the late-Chadwick style, meaning we know people are getting down and dirty but we're not getting This novel fills in the gap in time in the William Marshal novels after Young King Harry dies and before William starts gaining influence and fortune. For those who have forgotten or haven't read the previous books, we get a recap of the sacrilegious pillaging William was reluctantly involved in and which sent him on a pilgrimage to Outremer. It's a nice visit back to the William Marshal books but in the late-Chadwick style, meaning we know people are getting down and dirty but we're not getting every juicy detail like we would have gotten in her earlier novels. Having said that, the boy-meets-girl aspect of this novel did seem to go on a bit too long and I would have preferred those pages be filled with more information about the Templars and the overall picture of the Holy Land of the time. We learn a fair bit about the political turmoil in Jerusalem but the overall picture could have been better painted. I did like how she portrayed his relationship with religion and pilgrimage. Overall, another good yarn. Recommended.
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  • Geoff Boxell
    January 1, 1970
    Some books I read in a day or two, other take weeks. The ones that take weeks normally are either academic tomes that need serious digestion, or fiction that is only worthy of being a time filler as they have not grabbed my attention. So, why did it take a week to read Templar Silks? The problem was not just that my week was filled with other distractions, but also that I did not want to finish reading it. It was a book to savour rather than gulp down. I first came across Elizabeth Chadwick when Some books I read in a day or two, other take weeks. The ones that take weeks normally are either academic tomes that need serious digestion, or fiction that is only worthy of being a time filler as they have not grabbed my attention. So, why did it take a week to read Templar Silks? The problem was not just that my week was filled with other distractions, but also that I did not want to finish reading it. It was a book to savour rather than gulp down. I first came across Elizabeth Chadwick when a late Aunt gave me The Conquest as a birthday present. I was not not overly impressed as I felt it was a love story that could have been fitted into any historical period. Also, given my own views, I felt the heroine should have poised the food she gave the Norman rather than become his lover and follow him to the northern land holding he had been given after the slaughter of its English owner seeing as he had been involved in the battle that killed her two brothers and belonged to the race that had killed her husband. However, a chance purchase of another Chadwick novel at a book fair shewed that she was a better historical fiction writer than I had first thought. Over the past few years I have bought all her historical novels, and at full price, I hasten to add. Templar Silks is Chadwick’s latest novel and her increased maturity as a writer is so very apparent and is indicative of the wisdom she has shewn in now using historical figures to write her tales around rather than fictitious ones.Templar Silks tells the story of William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke, during his time on pilgrimage and crusade in the Holy Land – a period of his life about which little is known. William, surrounded by family and comrades, lies dying and the story flicks between his death bed and his life in the Holy Land. Whilst recalling the past in his dreams Marshall hangs on to life long enough for the silk shrouds he was given when he became a secular Templar Knight to be brought to his manor at Caversham from their hiding place in Wales. As the fly cover says of the Hold Land at the time the book is full of: “deadly politics, devious scheming, and lusts of powerful men and women who rule the kingdom”.Elizabeth Chadwick is well known for her meticulous research and is well respected by all who know their history, but what impressed me most with this novel is her insight into the spiritual and religiousness not just of the period, but of William Marshall, the greatest knight, a man who made the move from secular to full Templar Knight just before he died. This novel makes understanding his total loyalty, commitment and integrity to the four Kings of England that he served so much clearer and why he came to be trusted by all he had dealings with.
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  • J.P. Ashman
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow...
  • Cel Jel
    January 1, 1970
    An Elizabeth Chadwick is to be released, and I contact my bookshop to have it reserved. As soon as I get a copy it moves to the top(almost) of the to be read pile.Especially the book about William Marshall and his years in Outremer. This is the part of William's life not covered by the chronicles in detail, and without primary documents to confirm fully dates of events. So in this case the book is less filling in the aspects and helping flesh out the dates, but more thinking what may have happen An Elizabeth Chadwick is to be released, and I contact my bookshop to have it reserved. As soon as I get a copy it moves to the top(almost) of the to be read pile.Especially the book about William Marshall and his years in Outremer. This is the part of William's life not covered by the chronicles in detail, and without primary documents to confirm fully dates of events. So in this case the book is less filling in the aspects and helping flesh out the dates, but more thinking what may have happened. I love the way that Elizabeth constructs her sentences, paragraphs and passages for they enable be to create scenic pictures well. I also love most of the story, in the complexity of politics of the area, the difficulty for newcomers working to be accepted and considered worthy to be part of the decision making. Alternating chapters from a present where William is dying and a past where thanks to making an oath to his dying young king, William has to travel to Jerusalem and there makes his services and the services of his group available to the Primate of Jerusalem and the King of Jerusalem.The only downside in the book for me was my annoyance with the love story that was contained,not because it was not well written, nor because it was not possible, but for my annoyance at the way it developed, and the consequences it left. Still you may well read the book, and totally disagree with me and enjoy the love story.Do. I recommend reading this book, absolutely, every story written by Elizabeth allows you to travel in your mind and share the lives of those that went before, real and not real.
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    In her latest novel, Templar Silks, Elizabeth Chadwick returns to the hero of her earlier books The Greatest Knight and The Scarlet Lion: William Marshal, knight, soldier, statesman and adviser to kings of England. Unlike those other two books, which took us right through William’s life and career, from youth to death, Templar Silks concentrates on one specific episode – William’s journey to the Holy Land – which was mentioned only briefly in The Greatest Knight. The novel opens in April 1219 wi In her latest novel, Templar Silks, Elizabeth Chadwick returns to the hero of her earlier books The Greatest Knight and The Scarlet Lion: William Marshal, knight, soldier, statesman and adviser to kings of England. Unlike those other two books, which took us right through William’s life and career, from youth to death, Templar Silks concentrates on one specific episode – William’s journey to the Holy Land – which was mentioned only briefly in The Greatest Knight. The novel opens in April 1219 with William on his deathbed, surrounded by family and friends at his home in England, Caversham Manor. Before he dies, he asks his squire to bring him the silk burial shrouds he was given by the Templars in the Holy Land thirty years ago. As he waits the arrival of the silks, he looks back on the long-ago adventure that shaped the rest of his life.In 1183, William was in the service of Henry II’s eldest son, known as the Young King. In need of money to pay his soldiers, the Young King gives orders to raid the shrine of Rocamadour, but falls ill with dysentery shortly afterwards. Aware of the sacrilege he has committed, his dying wish is for William to atone for his sins by taking his cloak to Jerusalem and placing it on Christ’s tomb. Still unmarried at this point and free from the greater responsibilities he will hold in later life, William is happy to undertake the pilgrimage, but the journey proves to be even more eventful and dramatic than he had expected.William spent three years on his pilgrimage but historians know very little about what actually happened during this period of his life. This allows Elizabeth Chadwick to use her imagination to create William’s story – and with her own knowledge of the medieval world and the political situation in 12th century Jerusalem, she is able to make his actions feel plausible and realistic.William is accompanied on his journey by a small party of fellow knights and squires, two Templar Knights who act as guides, and his younger brother Ancel. There is no historical evidence that Ancel took part in the pilgrimage – in fact, he is barely mentioned in historical records at all – but the relationship between the brothers was one of my favourite aspects of the book. Ancel and William are very different people, with Ancel depicted as more sensitive, more cautious, and not as quick to learn when it comes to fighting, jousting and other knightly pursuits. There are times when they become frustrated with each other, but the love and loyalty between them is always plain to see. And William needs all the loyal friends he can find if he is going to survive this difficult mission. After a traumatic experience in Constantinople, he and his men arrive in Jerusalem to find this most holy of cities approaching a moment of crisis. King Baldwin is dying of leprosy and his nephew, his only heir, is too young to rule. Baldwin’s brother-in-law, Guy de Lusignan, is the next most logical contender, but Guy has many rivals and Jerusalem desperately needs strong, united leadership to deal with the threat of Saladin. William has more reason than most to dislike Guy, who was responsible for his uncle’s death several years earlier, but choosing to support another claimant could lead him into even more danger. Due to the nature of the story, the setting and the focus on politics and the military, most of the main characters in this particular novel are male, but there is one female character who has a large role to play during William’s time in Jerusalem. She is Paschia de Riveri, the beautiful concubine of the Patriarch Heraclius. It is never very clear what Paschia’s motives are or how she truly feels, but as William became more entangled in her schemes, I couldn’t help thinking that it would all end unhappily for him – while hoping, for his sake, that I was wrong. I enjoyed Templar Silks, with all of its adventure and intrigue, but it does feel a bit different from Elizabeth Chadwick’s other recent novels such as her Eleanor of Aquitaine trilogy and Lady of the English, which are more biographical and cover much longer time periods. It seems that Chadwick is not ready to leave the Marshals behind just yet; her next novel, The Irish Princess, is going to be about the parents of William’s wife, Isabelle de Clare.
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  • Jo-anne Atkinson
    January 1, 1970
    On his deathbed, surrounded by his family, William Marshall looks back on a particular time in his life where everything changed. In the service of Harry, the Young King, William has been fighting against Henry II but as funds run low Young Henry decides to raid the shrine of Rocamadour in order to pay his mercenaries. Sticken by dysentery Henry believes this is God's punishment for his sins and his dying wish to ask William to take his cloak on pilgrimage to Jerusalem. As William dies he rememb On his deathbed, surrounded by his family, William Marshall looks back on a particular time in his life where everything changed. In the service of Harry, the Young King, William has been fighting against Henry II but as funds run low Young Henry decides to raid the shrine of Rocamadour in order to pay his mercenaries. Sticken by dysentery Henry believes this is God's punishment for his sins and his dying wish to ask William to take his cloak on pilgrimage to Jerusalem. As William dies he remembers the events of the year he spent on pilgrimage, his love and betrayal and his promise to join the order of the Knights Templar to atone for his sins.Chadwick writes high quality historical fiction with a more romantic twist than most. This has gained her legions of fans and, although I sometimes find her prose a little too 'chocolate box', I cannot help but admire the research and passion in her works. Here Chadwick returns to the story of William Marshall which she began in 'The Greatest Knight' however this novel is a slight aside as it is mainly fiction. The fact that William Marshall went to the Holy Land in the early 1180s after the death of the Young King is not in dispute, his adventures there are not recorded and so Chadwick has made free with her imagination. She weaves known events in with fiction so the politics about the illness and death of King Baldwin of Jerusalem, which are copiously recorded, are used to place William. This is great storytelling and another excellent tale from Chadwick.
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  • Clare
    January 1, 1970
    William Marshall is on his death bed and is looking back on his life. The Templar Silks of the story are the burial silks that he was given 30 years previously, when he became a secular Knight of the Templar Knights in Jerusalem. He promised that he would become a full member of the Order before he died, so he sends a trusted servant to collect the silk shroud from where he had entrusted it. While he waits for the silks, William slips into drug-induced remembrances of his time leading up to and William Marshall is on his death bed and is looking back on his life. The Templar Silks of the story are the burial silks that he was given 30 years previously, when he became a secular Knight of the Templar Knights in Jerusalem. He promised that he would become a full member of the Order before he died, so he sends a trusted servant to collect the silk shroud from where he had entrusted it. While he waits for the silks, William slips into drug-induced remembrances of his time leading up to and during his time in Outremer. We learn of the riches of Jerusalem and those that ruled it; that King Baldwin had crippling leprosy, yet still ruled; and that those who ruled supposedly under the eye of God, did so only to gain more money and power (so, the same as everywhere else then, really!). I'm sad to see that this is the end of William Marshall (I'm giving nothing away here!). I've enjoyed reading all of the books about him: even though they're largely speculation, Elizabeth Chadwick has still done her research in to the time very well.
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  • Marsha Lambert
    January 1, 1970
    Templar Silks by Elizabeth Chadwick is a meticulously researched, evocatively written tale about the greatest knight, William Marshal and his pilgrimage to Jerusalem.Chadwick writes so descriptively and with a knowledge of the medieval time period that the reader is instantly transported into the storyline. A page turner from the get go, the author beautifully weaves a tale of this remarkable man’s path to redemption and regained honor.I really enjoyed how the story alternates between the Marsha Templar Silks by Elizabeth Chadwick is a meticulously researched, evocatively written tale about the greatest knight, William Marshal and his pilgrimage to Jerusalem.Chadwick writes so descriptively and with a knowledge of the medieval time period that the reader is instantly transported into the storyline. A page turner from the get go, the author beautifully weaves a tale of this remarkable man’s path to redemption and regained honor.I really enjoyed how the story alternates between the Marshal’s death bed in England to his remembrances of his journey to Outremer and his time there.Highly recommended to any historical fiction readers that like a well researched and well written book.
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  • Chroniclesoftania
    January 1, 1970
    William finds his judgments questioned time and time again while journeying through unknown lands such as Constantinople to the Holy Land. He almost dies in his attempt to get to his destination. When he finally gets there after months on the road, the Holy Land isn’t what he expects it to be. Instead of the morally upright and ethical citizens he expects, he discovers a nest of vipers, a worldly prelate with a concubine and political factions vying for power as the young King Baldwin dies of le William finds his judgments questioned time and time again while journeying through unknown lands such as Constantinople to the Holy Land. He almost dies in his attempt to get to his destination. When he finally gets there after months on the road, the Holy Land isn’t what he expects it to be. Instead of the morally upright and ethical citizens he expects, he discovers a nest of vipers, a worldly prelate with a concubine and political factions vying for power as the young King Baldwin dies of leprosy, leaving behind a tiny child as his heir...https://wordpress.com/post/chronicles...
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  • Pauline Reardon
    January 1, 1970
    Unexpected giftWhat a truly wonderful story. I have been reading Elizabeth Chadwick books for many years and William Marshall became my hero. The four main books concerning William are beautifully written and totally engrossing. I call this one an unexpected gift because his life story had been pretty fully covered but his time on crusade was the missing piece. I cried when I read the end of The Greatest Knight and having just finished this book I am crying now. The research involved in these to Unexpected giftWhat a truly wonderful story. I have been reading Elizabeth Chadwick books for many years and William Marshall became my hero. The four main books concerning William are beautifully written and totally engrossing. I call this one an unexpected gift because his life story had been pretty fully covered but his time on crusade was the missing piece. I cried when I read the end of The Greatest Knight and having just finished this book I am crying now. The research involved in these towering stories is phenominal, so close to historical facts and I highly recommend them. Wish I could award 20 stars.
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  • Cathie
    January 1, 1970
    This was the final book in the series written by Elizabeth Chadwick about William Marshall. In Templar Silks, Ms. Chadwick creates for the reader a wonderful story of William Marshall's three years in the Holy Land, to do penance for the Young King Henry, son of Henry II and Eleanor. William Marshall is an old man dying back in England who has flash backs of his life in the Holy Lands.
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  • Brenna
    January 1, 1970
    Dah...another home run and my favorite Marshall. While the characters were familiar, the setting was not (except for what I remembered from Lionheart & Kings Ransom). Now how do I find some historical fiction on Baldwin? Guy? I have to know more about what happened in Outremer between Templar Silks and a Kings Ransom. Who has recommendations to share?
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  • Amanda Chadderton
    January 1, 1970
    Have found this a very emotional story being close on the heels of my own father's lingering passing, but also a very illuminating insight into events which shaped William Marshall's character.Thank you Elizabeth Chadwick for another masterpiece.
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    This accounts for the missing years of the great William Marshal's pilgrimage to Jerusalem. Full of wonderful historical detail, plenty of political intrigue, good dose of jousting and a dangerous romance. Above all, a story of faith and honour.
  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    I am sure this is a great book and I usually adore anything by Elizabeth Chadwick but for some reason I just couldn't get into this novel! I'm sad about it and will probably give it another try in the future.
  • Sally Archer
    January 1, 1970
    great read as always
  • Marg
    January 1, 1970
    I've always enjoyed Elizabeth Chadwick's portrayal of William Marshal and this book was no exception!
  • Mrs G C Fairclough
    January 1, 1970
    Great readHaving read other books in this series I found this an excellent read, good balance of story and action, it fits well into the series.
  • Patzia
    January 1, 1970
    Kindle ebook. I enjoy her writing. Good account of the Marshall's stay in Outremer.
  • JKB MATHERS
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent historical novelExcellent historical novel, well researched and written . I had not read the other ebook s in the series but this one can be read alone and still makes sense . I may now read more of the stories as I enjoyed this one especially.
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