I'm Not a Girl
Based on a true transgender identity journey, the picture book I'm Not a Girl is an empowering story from writers Maddox Lyons and Jessica Verdi about a boy who is determined to be himself, illustrated by Dana Simpson.Nobody seems to understand that Hannah is not a girl.His parents ask why he won't wear the cute outfits they pick out. His friend thinks he must be a tomboy. His teacher insists he should be proud to be a girl.But a birthday wish, a new word, and a stroke of courage might be just what Hannah needs to finally show the world who he really is.

I'm Not a Girl Details

TitleI'm Not a Girl
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 4th, 2020
PublisherRoaring Brook Press
Rating
GenreLGBT, Childrens, Picture Books, Family

I'm Not a Girl Review

  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    The slow rise of positive and affirming books about transgender children fills me with hope for a kind and open future. I've hardly seen any about transgender boys, and I'm thrilled that this one exists. Hannah does not know how to verbally express to his family and friends that he's a boy in a way that they can understand-- many children like Hannah are referred to as "tomboys" by adults, but this is not always the case. When Hannah's new friends tell him about their transgender cousin, he fina The slow rise of positive and affirming books about transgender children fills me with hope for a kind and open future. I've hardly seen any about transgender boys, and I'm thrilled that this one exists. Hannah does not know how to verbally express to his family and friends that he's a boy in a way that they can understand-- many children like Hannah are referred to as "tomboys" by adults, but this is not always the case. When Hannah's new friends tell him about their transgender cousin, he finally has a way to tell people who he really is. This book is a good read for anyone, no matter how young or old; whether you resonate with it, or use it as a learning experience, this one is an essential.
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  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    I've read very few books about transgender kids. I'm Not a Girl is based on the transgender identity journey of 12-year-old Maddox Lyons. It skilfully shows Hannah's emotional reactions to trying to navigate between how the world sees him and how he sees himself.The story is clear and simple, and offers a main character that other transgender kids will be able to relate to. Illustrated by Dana Simpson of Phoebe and Her Unicorn fame (who is a transgender woman herself), this book would be a usefu I've read very few books about transgender kids. I'm Not a Girl is based on the transgender identity journey of 12-year-old Maddox Lyons. It skilfully shows Hannah's emotional reactions to trying to navigate between how the world sees him and how he sees himself.The story is clear and simple, and offers a main character that other transgender kids will be able to relate to. Illustrated by Dana Simpson of Phoebe and Her Unicorn fame (who is a transgender woman herself), this book would be a useful, reassuring tool for kids who are just starting out on their own journey to live as they truly are.The notes at the back add some interest (there's a great list of transgender figures in recent history, for example) and help the reader understand a bit about the background of the story. There's also a nice bibliography with resources for kids and parents.Quotable moment:
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  • Helen Ishmurzin
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah knows he’s not a girl. The trouble is, no one listens to him. Despite becoming increasingly frustrated when his well-meaning parents and everyone around him continue to treat him as a girl, Hannah never gives up – because he knows in his heart that he’s really a boy.This is an inspiring true story about (and co-written by) now 12-year-old Maddox Lyons, a courageous transgender boy who was determined to be himself, despite everyone telling him what he should wear and how he should act. It Hannah knows he’s not a girl. The trouble is, no one listens to him. Despite becoming increasingly frustrated when his well-meaning parents and everyone around him continue to treat him as a girl, Hannah never gives up – because he knows in his heart that he’s really a boy.This is an inspiring true story about (and co-written by) now 12-year-old Maddox Lyons, a courageous transgender boy who was determined to be himself, despite everyone telling him what he should wear and how he should act. It realistically and sensitively portrays his struggle to convince the world of his gender identity and to find the words to express who he really is.The beautiful illustrations portray the full extent of Maddox’s frustration and his subsequent relief at finally being heard, while back matter includes notes from the creators, a list of inspirational transgender individuals, and important resources for further reading.This book would be an invaluable read for any child who is struggling with their gender identity, and should additionally be read by all children (and adults!) to help them gain an understanding of gender issues.
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  • Tori Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a touching, wonderful picture book. I love that the parents weren't depicted as malicious or unkind, while also not diminishing the pain their words and actions caused. Sometimes we can hurt the people we love without realizing it or meaning to, and it doesn't mean that we love them any less. I think that's an important lesson for kids to learn, and I'm glad that as soon as he's able to talk to his parents about his identity they're shown as understanding and supportive. I also lov This was such a touching, wonderful picture book. I love that the parents weren't depicted as malicious or unkind, while also not diminishing the pain their words and actions caused. Sometimes we can hurt the people we love without realizing it or meaning to, and it doesn't mean that we love them any less. I think that's an important lesson for kids to learn, and I'm glad that as soon as he's able to talk to his parents about his identity they're shown as understanding and supportive. I also love that it was the two kids of color (probably, but not explicitly Black) that got to introduce him to the word "transgender", and the page where he practices what he's going to say to his parents in front of his stuffed animals was very, very sweet. I'm so glad this book exists, and can't wait to get to recommend and give it to people.
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  • Raven Black
    January 1, 1970
    Told from the point of view of the child. Seems realistic as to a child's journey to their real selves.
  • Jodene
    January 1, 1970
    I felt this book did a good job capturing the frustration trans children feel before they have words to describe that they are not cis.
  • Y.Poston
    January 1, 1970
    A great exploration for childrenof what it means to be trasgender.
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