The Dirty Book Club
This is an updated cover edition of 9781451695977 .From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Clique series comes a novel about the importance of friendship, and, of course, the pleasure of a dirty book. M.J. Stark’s life is picture-perfect—she has her dream job as a magazine editor, a sexy doctor boyfriend, and a glamorous life in New York City. But behind her success, there is a debilitating sense of loneliness. So when her boss betrays her and her boyfriend offers her a completely new life in California, she trades her cashmere for caftans and gives it a try. Once there, M.J. is left to fend for herself in a small beach town, with only the company of her elderly neighbor, Gloria, and an ocean that won’t shut up. One afternoon, M.J. discovers that Gloria has suddenly moved to Paris with her friends to honor a fifty-year-old pact. And in lieu of a goodbye, she’s left a mysterious invitation to a secret club—one that only reads erotic books. Curious, M.J. accepts and meets the three other hand-selected club members. As they bond over naughty bestsellers and the shocking letters they inherited from the original club members, the four strangers start to divulge the intimate details of their own lives… and as they open up, they learn that friendship might just be the key to rewriting their own stories: all they needed was to find each other first.

The Dirty Book Club Details

TitleThe Dirty Book Club
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherGallery
Rating
GenreWomens Fiction, Chick Lit, Fiction, Contemporary, Adult

The Dirty Book Club Review

  • Chris Carroll
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! A delightful, humorous, and even spicy look at women’s relationships today. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Hopefully we all have at lest one friend that we can let loose with and be who we really are. Just tell it like it is and say anything and everything friend. Nothing is held back and all is a sworn to secrecy friend. The strong connection is evident for those that see you together friend.That connection is a big part of this new book. A wonderful and fun look at two sets of women’s live Loved it! A delightful, humorous, and even spicy look at women’s relationships today. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Hopefully we all have at lest one friend that we can let loose with and be who we really are. Just tell it like it is and say anything and everything friend. Nothing is held back and all is a sworn to secrecy friend. The strong connection is evident for those that see you together friend.That connection is a big part of this new book. A wonderful and fun look at two sets of women’s lives. Their interactions; belief in each other; support systems when everything goes astray. Their promises to each other and the secret book club that opens their eyes to another world.This book is an awesome read. You can tell it was a labor of love. To be able to get the sarcasm just right. The bitchiness, the understanding, and finally the unwavering support is something we all wish we had in a friend.Plus the book club and the secrets held within is a fabulous and witty idea that just made this book a delightful and a wee bit raunchy read that just made me laugh in so many places.The author has crafted the perfect women’s fiction read. With a bit of romance, sex chat, men talk, and strong women’s support group feel, you have to join The Dirty Book Club yourself. You may find it holds the answers to several questions you may have but were afraid to ask.Full review - http://amidlifewife.com/the-dirty-boo...* copy received for review consideration
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    I had to read about 30% of this before I got totally invested in the characters but turned out to be a fun and quick romp about friendships and family relationships. Every once in a while a bit of raunchy content would arise but don't let the title turn you off of reading this. The books read in the club weren't what one would call "dirty"--unless you think Jong's FEAR OF FLYING, 50 SHADES OF GREY, and HOW TO MAKE LOVE LIKE A PORN STAR are on the prurient side--OK, the last one might be consider I had to read about 30% of this before I got totally invested in the characters but turned out to be a fun and quick romp about friendships and family relationships. Every once in a while a bit of raunchy content would arise but don't let the title turn you off of reading this. The books read in the club weren't what one would call "dirty"--unless you think Jong's FEAR OF FLYING, 50 SHADES OF GREY, and HOW TO MAKE LOVE LIKE A PORN STAR are on the prurient side--OK, the last one might be considered on the crude side. The writing seemed a little choppy but I enjoyed it and the ending was unexpected but very satisfying. This might be a good fiction companion to Ann Hood's Morningstar: Growing Up with Books, and a readalike for The Accidental Book Club. Also, even though the books aren't discussed in detail, add this title to your list of books about books. Thanks to the publisher for the advanced reading copy.
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  • Lexxie (un)Conventional Bookviews
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on (un)Conventional Bookviews The Dirty Book Club is all about female friendships and empowerment, and how books may be the way to both! Story: M.J. thought she had it all, but living her life not fully knowing what she wanted didn't make her happy The Dirty Book Club changed all that. At first, she had some awkward interactions with some of the women her own age, but she felt like people in LA were so very different from the New Yorkers she was used to.The Dir This review was originally posted on (un)Conventional Bookviews The Dirty Book Club is all about female friendships and empowerment, and how books may be the way to both! Story: M.J. thought she had it all, but living her life not fully knowing what she wanted didn't make her happy The Dirty Book Club changed all that. At first, she had some awkward interactions with some of the women her own age, but she felt like people in LA were so very different from the New Yorkers she was used to.The Dirty Book Club followed both M.J. and her new friends and Gloria and her friends. Quite a bit of the story happened in the past, when Gloria and her friends were younger. They were rather open-minded, and they enjoyed finding books that were not necessarily readily accepted by society.Friendships, learning to get to know themselves, and accept both themselves and others for who they are are among the important themes in The Dirty Book Club. Characters: M.J. was so sure she'd get the promotion she wanted. When it became a co-editor position instead, she became so disappointed she left the magazine behind to go live with her boyfriend at the opposite coast. And that's when she felt completely lost and without direction.Gloria was still in her prime. At times, she felt like she had sacrificed her life for her husband and children, but The Dirty Book Club and her friends helped her through both bad times and good.The other characters were side side characters, but they were still well fleshed out and were realistic. Writing style : Third person, past tense with lots of well-done dialogues. The narration mostly follows either Gloria or M.J. Feels : I felt both happy and sad for these women - in the present and in the past. I also felt a certain melancholy. So often, society, and we, ourselves, put so much pressure on women to be a certain way. To fit a certain picture. The Dirty Book Club is a way to show that more than one way can be the good way.Their relationship was more like an arranged marriage designed to preserve a bloodline and uphold traditions. It lacked history, chemistry, passion. Still. There would be a next time."Fuck!" she said, wiping her lips on the back of her hand - her thirty-fifth birthday and the only thing in her mouth was an electric toothbrush. The night was not supposed to end this way. No night was! It didn't matter how many times she brushed, the taste of resentment was still there - metal and dirt, like prison bars - prison bars disguised as a gift from Gloria, Liddy, Dot and Marjorie.
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  • Melissa Rochelle
    January 1, 1970
    Four women who unknowingly need each other are brought together by Gloria Golden and her group of lifelong friends. They grow closer to each other and discover more about themselves over a summer of reading "dirty books".
  • The Belle
    January 1, 1970
    There are a few things I dislike:Watching any season of American Horror Story without The Supreme Jessica Lange.A PSL with no whipped cream on top.Waiting for a new season of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.And most importantly . . . being super excited about a book, loving the first few chapters and then . . . hating the rest.I began The Dirty Book Club on a wonderfully quiet Tuesday night. I grabbed my pint of Peanut Butter Swirl Ben & Jerry's, put the baby to bed, took my bra off, an There are a few things I dislike:Watching any season of American Horror Story without The Supreme Jessica Lange.A PSL with no whipped cream on top.Waiting for a new season of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.And most importantly . . . being super excited about a book, loving the first few chapters and then . . . hating the rest.I began The Dirty Book Club on a wonderfully quiet Tuesday night. I grabbed my pint of Peanut Butter Swirl Ben & Jerry's, put the baby to bed, took my bra off, and snuggled into my king-sized bed complete with vibrating and adjustable mattress. I pulled my iPad over to me and called up the new book I was scheduled to read and review. I'd been looking forward to this one. My last few months of reading have been mostly mid-grade novels and some dark YA thrown in, a few heavy books with even heavier content, and one superbly convoluted thriller. I needed a nice and easy chick-lit book full of steamy romance and secrets, and I was sure this was it.The first few chapters went by so fast, it was a blur. I was on a roll. My husband popped his head in at some point to ask me a question and all he got was a grumbling mumble in response, as I was set on shoveling ice cream in my mouth while sliding the pages of this intriguing book onward, desperate to know what would happen next.The premise : a group of girlfriends who have known each other since they were teenagers. Now in their 20's, a few are married, children are on the horizon, and life is becoming a big stagnated. The women meet as often as they can around the heavily pie-laden tables of their Pearl Beach, California homes, and they spend time catching up on the ins and outs of their lives over drinks. They share stories of grief, rejection, love, hope, and promise. At the suggestion of one friend, they begin a book club. A secret book club . . . because at the time, the 1960's were full of oppressing weights for women, and books as dirty as their martinis were seriously taboo. So, covering their dirty books with prim-and-proper jackets to hide their insides, the women vow to meet once a month at the full moon and discuss the books and effects each novel has. They also make a pact: that once the men in their lives kick the bucket (because men always go before the women), they will jet-set it off to Paris and spend the rest of their lives together among the handsomely French and eloquently decadent.During the course of the book club's meetings, the women are forced to face issues that they've hidden just as well as the forbidden books they've been reading. It's funny how a silly book can change you, can help you delve into the deepest parts of yourself and face some serious realities. Infidelity, homosexuality, feelings of "I'm not good enough" and domestic violence are topics that make their way steadily around the table. The women all vow to share everything with one another with in the strictest of confidence, and to let no stone go unturned when it comes to their confessions.But, this is only the first couple of chapters.Fast-forward - and readers are introduced to M.J. She's a New York blonde living to work, instead of working to live. After the tragic death of her entire family (of which she blames herself), M.J. has thrown herself into her job as an editor of City Magazine and is looking forward to her impending promotion as editor-in-chief. The only real connection she has to the outside world is her boyfriend, Dan, who is a doctor and an adventurer . . . and who consequently lives on the opposite side of the country. After her promotion takes a turn for the unexpected and worse, M.J. follows Dan out to California and his newly purchased cottage in Pearl Beach. She's floundering in depression and anxiety, and has no idea what to do with herself.Dan encourages her to make friends and so she travels as far as next door where she meets Gloria, a spicy Jewish housewife who enjoys a good martini and an even better slice of gossip. But soon after their meeting, Gloria hitches a plane to Paris with her girlfriends, leaving M.J. without the neighborly advice she'd wanted to become accustomed to, leaving a gift propped up on her doorstep instead.Gloria has left her spot in the Dirty Book Club to M.J., just as her friends have left their spots to a woman of their own choosing. There are a couple of rules, the first one being -- you're either all in or you're all out, and it takes some convincing to get everyone to stay on board. But secret meetings in a curious bookstore partnered with prosecco and hidden letters placed delicately in each book means M.J. will have something to get her out of the house at least one night a month, and she's not willing to let the other girls just give up without a fight. Addie, the promiscuous bombshell who'd rather spend her time flagging down her latest conquest really hates the idea. Britt, the real-estate agent with twins and a lazy husband dragging her down doesn't see the point. Jules, an event planner and liaison of love for a hotel, who can't seem to solidify love for herself, could be on board if the others were there with her. It takes a little persuasion and a lot of alcohol, but M.J. plows ahead. The four women grudgingly agree to meet once a month on the full moon and discuss their books, and maybe allow their fellow girlfriends into a slice of their lives.The Dirty Book Club is the first adult novel by famed YA author, Lisi Harrison. The self-proclaimed participant in a dirty book club of her own, Harrison is best known for her mid-grade series The Clique and Monster High.While I absolutely adored the premise and the beginning promises of the book, I found myself so let down as the chapters began to melt into one another. The characters were at times so hard to relate to and sometimes to even like. I found myself baffled at more than a few of their choices, which were a combination of predictable and non-sensical, almost as if the author could tell that she was making the women too mundane and as a result, fruitlessly attempted to spice them up with subplots that went nowhere. I was most interested by the first group of women, the founders of The Dirty Book Club, but despite the hint that there would be more of them and a greater depth to their stories, it all fell short. Deciding to throw in unemotional and disconnected letters by way of forming relationships with their predecessors seemed silly, and at times made a mockery of real issues. The ending felt rushed and forced, which was really a shame, as I felt that there was so much to dive into with the characters and their lives were so worthy of a build, to just end it the way it did seemed strange and realistically unresolved. In the end, so much was left on the table and to be desired, and so I was left disappointed. I have to regretfully give this book 3 out of 5 stars. I had such high hopes those first few chapters, but The Dirty Book Club didn't grow the way I so desperately wanted it to. 
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  • Lexxie (un)Conventional Bookviews
    January 1, 1970
    The Dirty Book Club is all about female friendships and empowerment, and how books may be the way to both!
  • ☆~BookishDani~☆
    January 1, 1970
    I want to give a huge thank you to NetGalley and Gallery Books for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an unbiased and honest review.Synopsis: M.J. is a workaholic trying to hide from her past by burying herself in work. When M.J. gets screwed on a promotion she's been waiting on, she moves suddenly with her boyfriend to his beach cottage in California. M.J. has a hard time coping with lack of employment to keep her mind busy so she has to face her demons. M.J. is relieved to meet her free I want to give a huge thank you to NetGalley and Gallery Books for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an unbiased and honest review.Synopsis: M.J. is a workaholic trying to hide from her past by burying herself in work. When M.J. gets screwed on a promotion she's been waiting on, she moves suddenly with her boyfriend to his beach cottage in California. M.J. has a hard time coping with lack of employment to keep her mind busy so she has to face her demons. M.J. is relieved to meet her free spirited and elderly next door neighbor Gloria. Shortly after M.J. receives a mysterious invitation to join the "DBC" and her curriosity gets the best of her and she attends. M.J. is shocked to find out it is a dirty book club and has been around for more than 40 years. M.J. and 3 other reluctant members give the club a test run but have to follow the club rules. Is M.J. able to cope and maintain friendships? Do these women find inner peace and love? Can they let their guards down and trust each other? Read The Dirty Book Club by Lisi Harrison to find out!Review: I loved this book! This book made me laugh, smile and cry(good cry)! I really enjoyed the characters and felt that I could connect with them. I recommend this book to someone who is more open minded sexually and in general. I am a very open minded person and felt I could relate to a lot of what the girls discussed in this book. This book had me turning pages like crazy. I loved seeing the bond of friendships in this book and it was just what the doctor ordered for me! This book makes you want to have your own Dirty Book Club! Highly recommended!
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  • Lauren R.
    January 1, 1970
    I was champing at the bit (read the book and you'll know why I said that) for this book since I first saw it on Goodreads years ago. I was incredibly intrigued by one of my favorite authors from when I was younger writing something that sounded completely opposite. I laughed a lot at the antics of this friend group, especially the scene in the hotel room. I loved the connections to the original DBC and how they chose these girls. Just a really enjoyable book for me! So glad I didn't wait to read I was champing at the bit (read the book and you'll know why I said that) for this book since I first saw it on Goodreads years ago. I was incredibly intrigued by one of my favorite authors from when I was younger writing something that sounded completely opposite. I laughed a lot at the antics of this friend group, especially the scene in the hotel room. I loved the connections to the original DBC and how they chose these girls. Just a really enjoyable book for me! So glad I didn't wait to read it.
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  • Gaele
    January 1, 1970
    Told in 3rd person past, this tale focuses on the lives of the women in the DBC, a group that has been together some forty odd years, and has used the member’s unwillingness and struggles with society’s expectations of what they should be, as they work toward the women they want to be. Few rules are set in stone, but they are all expected to trust one another on their journey to inner peace and love, and that means maintaining friendships and coping with difficulties. Of course, they must be ope Told in 3rd person past, this tale focuses on the lives of the women in the DBC, a group that has been together some forty odd years, and has used the member’s unwillingness and struggles with society’s expectations of what they should be, as they work toward the women they want to be. Few rules are set in stone, but they are all expected to trust one another on their journey to inner peace and love, and that means maintaining friendships and coping with difficulties. Of course, they must be open-minded and willing to let go of the conventional and accepted norms for behavior, allowing their true selves to shine. And what a shine this is!I’ll admit, the story was a bit slow to start for me: we meet MJ who has just been passed over for a promotion that she wanted and was more than able to handle. She’s frustrated and hurt, and decides that now is the time to move with her boyfriend to California from the East, and take the time to decide what she really wants from life. Early on, she meets a neighbor, Gloria, and the two appear to hit it off. And then, a mysterious invitation to join the DBC arrives, and MJ decides to ‘see’ what it is all about. Here, the story took flight and added some mention (although little traditional discussion) of titles like Fear of Flying, Fifty Shades of Grey, and How to Make Love Like a Porn Star: none particularly shameful if one is a voracious reader, but still eyebrow raising in some circles. But far from discussing books, these women are sharing their lives, their struggles and good times, all on the way to redefining their lives and expectations, and finding that simple balance. Each of the four women in the DBC are at different places in their lives, and as we get to know them, we start to see the reasons they were brought together, and just how much the friendships: open, honest and supportive, can serve to enhance all parts of their lives. While mostly focused on Gloria and MJ’s story, the friendships, the history of the club and how it helped and enhanced the lives of all who participated in the DBC. Heartfelt and wonderfully complex, the concepts of supportive friendships enhancing all aspects of your life, and finding the people who are vastly different coming together in a singular purpose of support and openness is a wonderfully strong message throughout. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed
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  • Kimberley
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of The Dirty Book Club from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Though the title may turn some away, or draw others to it as it were, for very different reasons, there is nothing "dirty" about this book. It's a book about female friendship: its purpose, its benefit, and its place within a very male-centric world. M.J. is at an impasse after an expected promotion takes an unexpected turn. Feeling lost and confused, and still emotionally reeling from familial tragedy, she I received an ARC of The Dirty Book Club from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Though the title may turn some away, or draw others to it as it were, for very different reasons, there is nothing "dirty" about this book. It's a book about female friendship: its purpose, its benefit, and its place within a very male-centric world. M.J. is at an impasse after an expected promotion takes an unexpected turn. Feeling lost and confused, and still emotionally reeling from familial tragedy, she decides to put her career/life on hold and move in with her, to that point, long-distance boyfriend, Dan. He's recently purchased a quaint little beach cottage in Southern California, and is setting down roots. When M.J.'s promotion goes south, Dan is more than happy to whisk M.J. away from her now unfulfilling life, and help her fix whatever is still broken within her troubled psyche. Not long after arriving in Cali, M.J. befriends an elderly woman named Gloria. Unbeknownst to M.J., that meeting will become the catalyst for her discovering who she is, what she's made of, and what she wants.Each character in this book is central to what makes the story Lisi Harrison weaves work so well: Addie is the free-spirit who's looking for a place to land. Jules is the do-gooder, with the big heart, whose desire to do the right thing gets in the way of her seeing things as they are. Britt is the most seemingly "put together", but she's struggling to figure out how to navigate her inner Superwoman without succumbing to life's plethora of kryptonite.All of them come together to form a bond that seems unlikely from the start, but totally believable given the circumstances. It's a quick, delightful, read with plenty of humor to break up the emotional angst, and unavoidable drama, but it's also a book that speaks to the power of friendship--no matter where, or how, you find it.
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  • Kristi Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Read all my reviews at: https://brainfartsandbooks.wordpress.comWhen I first got my hands on this book, I was ready to get taken away on a kinky 50 Shades of Fantasy kind of ride. Little did I know, this book would really be a book about friendships, new and old, and the togetherness that help to heal two separate groups of women. M.J. is a magazine editor who moves to California to live with her doctor boyfriend. She meets a spunky older lady named Gloria who turns out to be her next door neigh Read all my reviews at: https://brainfartsandbooks.wordpress.comWhen I first got my hands on this book, I was ready to get taken away on a kinky 50 Shades of Fantasy kind of ride. Little did I know, this book would really be a book about friendships, new and old, and the togetherness that help to heal two separate groups of women. M.J. is a magazine editor who moves to California to live with her doctor boyfriend. She meets a spunky older lady named Gloria who turns out to be her next door neighbor AND the leader of a secret book club called The Dirty Book Club. The book club starts over again with a whole new group of women including M.J. and the unexpected friendships that ensue are so endearing and real that I could imagine each and every scene as it happened in this book. There is so much more to this book than a group of women reading the same "dirty" book each month. From relationships to jobs to just needing a friend to cry on, this book covers all the wonderful emotions in life. I really loved how the author integrated the lives of the founding members into the lives of the new generation. Geniously done. I would pick up this book and read it again.Thank you to Netgalley,  Lisi Harrison, and Gallery Books for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lauri Rottmayer
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of Lisi Harrison's YA series, The Clique, and was excited to be able to read her first foray into adult fiction.Not disappointed! I loved this book. MJ is a New York gal who finds herself living in California with her boyfriend after her boss shares her big promotion with another employee. MJ wasn't willing to share and decided to stop living on the opposite coast of her boyfriend. He lives next door to Gloria whom MJ becomes friends with. Gloria and her three best friends have be I am a big fan of Lisi Harrison's YA series, The Clique, and was excited to be able to read her first foray into adult fiction.Not disappointed! I loved this book. MJ is a New York gal who finds herself living in California with her boyfriend after her boss shares her big promotion with another employee. MJ wasn't willing to share and decided to stop living on the opposite coast of her boyfriend. He lives next door to Gloria whom MJ becomes friends with. Gloria and her three best friends have been part of a book club their whole lives. Once Gloria's husband dies, they pass the baton on to four new girls, MJ being one. MJ wants the club to work badly because she hasn't been able to make many friends in her new home.This is a great story of friends and secrets and I highly recommend it!
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  • Abigail (Read. Sleep. Rave. Repeat.)
    January 1, 1970
    Just a thought. That's the most simple cover I've ever seen.A paper bag and a card written the title of the book and its author on it. Effortless.
  • Dana Aprigliano (TheVaguelyArticulateReader)
    January 1, 1970
    *I would like to thank NetGalley and Gallery Books for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review.*I haven’t read any books from NetGalley in a while, so I requested this book, The Dirty Book Club by Lisi Harrison, about two weeks ago as a “get me back into reading ARCs” type of read. The Dirty Book Club is a 320-page women’s fiction novel that alternatively flashes back to the 1960s and primarily uses a modern-day narration. I give this book 2/5 stars.But before I review this book, *I would like to thank NetGalley and Gallery Books for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review.*I haven’t read any books from NetGalley in a while, so I requested this book, The Dirty Book Club by Lisi Harrison, about two weeks ago as a “get me back into reading ARCs” type of read. The Dirty Book Club is a 320-page women’s fiction novel that alternatively flashes back to the 1960s and primarily uses a modern-day narration. I give this book 2/5 stars.But before I review this book, I’ll take this time to give you a little synopsis of the book. The main character M.J., after leaving the magazine she’s working for due to an insulting snub, moves from New York to California to live with her boyfriend of eight months. Almost immediately after getting to the beach cottage that her boyfriend had just bought, M.J. meets her next-door-neighbor Gloria and her husband. She hits it off with Gloria, but before long, Gloria’s moved away, and M.J. finds a mysterious key that unlocks the proverbial door for her to attend the first meeting of a small, secret book club of women who only read erotic books. As the women read more and become closer to one another, they begin to read accounts of the previous members’ lives and how they connected to the books they read. Their own bonds tighten and transform into lasting friendships that change the way they see the world as well as their places in the world.I have no idea why this is the book that I chose to read as my big return to reading ARCs. Maybe it’s because at the time I requested it, I was applying to be an Editorial Intern for a romance publisher. Maybe it’s because of Lisi Harrison’s name; she’s pretty famous for her middle-grade Clique series. Or maybe it’s because I forgot that I’ve been disappointed lately with pretty much all of the women’s fiction I’ve been reading for whatever reason. I wasn’t actually disappointed by this book, though. Just not wowed.I love books about secret cults and clubs or what have you. But it is hard to write a good book about a secret cult or club or what have you without making it cheesy. This book read a lot more like The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants than a book about how dangerous it was for women to read erotica and be sexually liberated in the 60s, or even a book about the conflicts that can arise in people’s lives with changes of lifestyle. This book didn’t have a lot of depth to it. Conflicts seemed either glossed over or only mentioned briefly, and whatever conflicts there are seem to have been solved happily; almost too happily to have been solved realistically.I also found it pretty much impossible to relate to any of the characters. I don’t know if this is because Harrison has written so much middle-grade, but I found all the main characters to have very immature voices. And when the characters were trying to sound adult-like, especially in the context of M.J.’s magazine job and her conversations with her boss Gayle, it seemed as though their words were very artificial and falsely professional. Think of the most stereotypical business conversations you’ve heard in movies, tv shows, books… That was pretty much every single “adult” conversation in this book. During the very last conversation between Gayle and M.J., the contents of which I’ll not describe here since it’s pretty spoiler-y, I was actually laughing at some of the things M.J. was saying. Out loud. In public, at a Starbucks. That’s how ridiculous her lines were.Keeping all this criticism in mind though, there were one or two things I liked about this book. The pacing was very well-planned, and the writing style made this book a quicker read than it otherwise would have been. But I even found fault with the writing style in some places… for example, those similes! I’m sure it would have been entertaining to count how many times similes are used throughout this book; there had to have been at least one or two on each page. They were witty for the first few times they appeared in the first chapter, but after that they got annoying very quickly. The similes alone really sucked me out of the story and distracted me.I do not recommend this book, I am sorry to say. It’s not truly that I regret reading The Dirty Book Club; well, I do, but that’s not the point, it’s just that I want to save you from wasting your time on this book.Editor’s Note: Also, I can’t believe the main character, M.J., implied that Pink Floyd is unsophisticated? And that she said it only three chapters into this book? Well, I mean, I actually can believe it, and that’s probably part of the reason why I didn’t like M.J.Originally posted on The Vaguely Articulate Reader blog: https://wordpress.com/post/thevaguely...
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  • Fee96
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first read of Lisi Harrison. I requested this arc on NetGalley because I loved the premise of the book club and multiple generations of friendship. So refreshing to find a book in romance about friendships. Sounded like a fun read. Definitely intrigued me.The witty banter between characters was fantastic. Seriously my favorite thing about the book. And the purring...so funny. The flash between the original DBC members and the current day main character M.J. was really well written. On This is my first read of Lisi Harrison. I requested this arc on NetGalley because I loved the premise of the book club and multiple generations of friendship. So refreshing to find a book in romance about friendships. Sounded like a fun read. Definitely intrigued me.The witty banter between characters was fantastic. Seriously my favorite thing about the book. And the purring...so funny. The flash between the original DBC members and the current day main character M.J. was really well written. Once I got a grasp on who was who, I was able to follow along and remember details and memories. Sometimes that type of thing is hard to follow. However these ladies were fantastic. Each character was so well developed and intriguing. Little light bulb moments held big clues to understand M.J., what she's been through and how it has impacted the way she lives now. Heartbreaking really. Luckily her journey gets the best detour when she meets Gloria. Sometimes the best things in life happen unexpectedly. Thank goodness for that. This books deals with healing after loss, friendship and women being strong for each other.Give this fun story a chance. There is a lot of background to read the first third or so of the book. Then it picks up. Lisi has a special talent with adjective use and comparisons. Kept the story entertaining for sure.
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  • Darcysmom
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review.The Dirty Book Club was the perfect antidote for a humdrum day. Lisi Harrison has written a book about friendship that made me giggle and wish that I could hang out the with ladies (both old and young) of the Dirty Book Club. The original members of the Dirty Book Club were four women who had been friends since high school and knew each other better than anyone else knew them. The revamped Dirty Book Club is I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review.The Dirty Book Club was the perfect antidote for a humdrum day. Lisi Harrison has written a book about friendship that made me giggle and wish that I could hang out the with ladies (both old and young) of the Dirty Book Club. The original members of the Dirty Book Club were four women who had been friends since high school and knew each other better than anyone else knew them. The revamped Dirty Book Club is comprised of four women who don't have that deep history but need each other more than they ever imagined. No topic is off limits within the confines of the Dirty Book Club. The only rule that matters is that there are no secrets in the book club. I thoroughly enjoyed every moment I spent devouring this book.
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  • Reeca Elliott
    January 1, 1970
    M.J. leaves her stressful job, which she has given all of her time and energy, and follows her boyfriend to California. She ends up being bored out of her mind and she befriends her elderly neighbor. This neighbor has a secret!Well, this book is exactly what it says. It is about a secret book club. This book club is unique in that it only reads dirty books and it is as funny as it sounds. The club also comes complete with a secret key, secret rituals and anonymity.For this to be the author’s deb M.J. leaves her stressful job, which she has given all of her time and energy, and follows her boyfriend to California. She ends up being bored out of her mind and she befriends her elderly neighbor. This neighbor has a secret!Well, this book is exactly what it says. It is about a secret book club. This book club is unique in that it only reads dirty books and it is as funny as it sounds. The club also comes complete with a secret key, secret rituals and anonymity.For this to be the author’s debut adult novel, I am very impressed! So many great things occur in this read. I love that the author incorporates how woman were in the past to how they are now. Also, how relationships have changed, yet have stayed the same, for the most part.I throughly enjoyed the characters and their affect on each other. Some of the new members of the book club start off on the wrong foot. But, life or maybe it’s the book club tends to pull them together and make them stronger. The insertion of humor makes this a must read. It is the perfect blend of seriousness and flippancy!These ladies solve all the worlds’ problems, plus a few of their own. Through many trials and hardships, these women come together and create a bond they never expected. This is a read about overcoming society’s expectations, friendships and the strength of women.I received this novel from Netgalley for a honest review.
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  • Violet Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    It took me less than two hours to read this one because I truly enjoyed it - and I'm an obscenely quick reader. I wonder how my life would be if I had female friends like these.
  • Dlmrose
    January 1, 1970
    2.5
  • Jodi
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book free of charged from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.At first I was a little unsure of this book. I thought that this was going to be another 50 Shares of Grey type of book. It wasn't! The book starts out in 1962 with four young women who get together for their secret book club. Every month they read another dirty book. Fast forward to the present day, M.J. Is a magazine editor in New York City. She moves to California for a man. She befriends her elderly neighbor I received this book free of charged from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.At first I was a little unsure of this book. I thought that this was going to be another 50 Shares of Grey type of book. It wasn't! The book starts out in 1962 with four young women who get together for their secret book club. Every month they read another dirty book. Fast forward to the present day, M.J. Is a magazine editor in New York City. She moves to California for a man. She befriends her elderly neighbor Gloria. When Gloria's husband dies, she moves to France with her friends.One day M.J. gets an invitation to join Gloria's secret book club. There are three other women who are also invited by the club's original members. They have rules to follow. They meet once a month on the full moon and if one person drops out the club disbands. Each of the books they reads also give us more back story into the four original members and their lives.I loved how the author wove the stories together. The characters sucked me in. The only thing I wish is that we got to hear more about the original members. I think that could have been a book on its own.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful story about four friends, who despite their busy lives, make time every month to meet for a very secret book club. The girls have so many secrets, but none that they keep from each other. Fast forward and the girls pass the baton to four new girls, who they hope can carry on their legacies. I enjoyed getting to know each character, all so different but bound together buy their dirty book club.
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  • Patricia Romero
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted this book as soon as I saw it on Netgalley! Dirty Book Club? Were we all going to read Fifty Shades and then talk about it?This group of women started in the 60's. Reading banned or dirty books hidden behind the oh so prim cover of a domestic how to book. They are unfiltered and learn more about themselves and their sexuality than any book club I have ever been a part of!And along the way they are there for each other through everything. Thick or thin, they take care of each other.When I wanted this book as soon as I saw it on Netgalley! Dirty Book Club? Were we all going to read Fifty Shades and then talk about it?This group of women started in the 60's. Reading banned or dirty books hidden behind the oh so prim cover of a domestic how to book. They are unfiltered and learn more about themselves and their sexuality than any book club I have ever been a part of!And along the way they are there for each other through everything. Thick or thin, they take care of each other.When it's time to pass on the key to the club, the four of them hand over the reigns of the book club to four women who couldn't be more different. Or are they?This was such a fun read! You really must read it! Now I'm off to start my own DBC!Thank you Netgalley/Gallery
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  • Rebecca Atkins
    January 1, 1970
    A fun read that reminds you of all the reasons why best friends are the best part of life. The book tells two stories - that of the past and of the present. Unlike some books, I enjoyed both tales. Great summer feel good read.
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    The idea sounded good, but the characters were so lame that I couldn't like any of them, let alone even care about them. Basics: 4 women are drawn together by the former Dirty Book Club members and are to carry on the tradition of monthly dirty books for their meetings. Even the characters didn't want to be there. One thing annoyed me from the start and that was that it took until chapter 9 before we even got to the book club.All the women and most of the men had such shallow development that I The idea sounded good, but the characters were so lame that I couldn't like any of them, let alone even care about them. Basics: 4 women are drawn together by the former Dirty Book Club members and are to carry on the tradition of monthly dirty books for their meetings. Even the characters didn't want to be there. One thing annoyed me from the start and that was that it took until chapter 9 before we even got to the book club.All the women and most of the men had such shallow development that I finally skipped to the end to see how it resolved rather than continue waiting and waiting for it to get good.Thank you NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read an advance copy in exchange for an honest opinion.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't expecting this to have the emotional resonance it did! I had a hard time putting it down, and I'm definitely holding onto my copy of this. The only reason it lost a star was because the ending felt a bit abrupt. (I could have used a little more happy in the ending, but there was enough hope to keep me going.)
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  • Dana Aprigliano (TheVaguelyArticulateReader)
    January 1, 1970
    *I would like to thank NetGalley and Gallery Books for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review.*I haven’t read any books from NetGalley in a while, so I requested this book, The Dirty Book Club by Lisi Harrison, about two weeks ago as a “get me back into reading ARCs” type of read. The Dirty Book Club is a 320-page women’s fiction novel that alternatively flashes back to the 1960s and primarily uses a modern-day narration. I give this book 2/5 stars.But before I review this book, *I would like to thank NetGalley and Gallery Books for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review.*I haven’t read any books from NetGalley in a while, so I requested this book, The Dirty Book Club by Lisi Harrison, about two weeks ago as a “get me back into reading ARCs” type of read. The Dirty Book Club is a 320-page women’s fiction novel that alternatively flashes back to the 1960s and primarily uses a modern-day narration. I give this book 2/5 stars.But before I review this book, I’ll take this time to give you a little synopsis of the book. The main character M.J., after leaving the magazine she’s working for due to an insulting snub, moves from New York to California to live with her boyfriend of eight months. Almost immediately after getting to the beach cottage that her boyfriend had just bought, M.J. meets her next-door-neighbor Gloria and her husband. She hits it off with Gloria, but before long, Gloria’s moved away, and M.J. finds a mysterious key that unlocks the proverbial door for her to attend the first meeting of a small, secret book club of women who only read erotic books. As the women read more and become closer to one another, they begin to read accounts of the previous members’ lives and how they connected to the books they read. Their own bonds tighten and transform into lasting friendships that change the way they see the world as well as their places in the world.I have no idea why this is the book that I chose to read as my big return to reading ARCs. Maybe it’s because at the time I requested it, I was applying to be an Editorial Intern for a romance publisher. Maybe it’s because of Lisi Harrison’s name; she’s pretty famous for her middle-grade Clique series. Or maybe it’s because I forgot that I’ve been disappointed lately with pretty much all of the women’s fiction I’ve been reading for whatever reason. I wasn’t actually disappointed by this book, though. Just not wowed.I love books about secret cults and clubs or what have you. But it is hard to write a good book about a secret cult or club or what have you without making it cheesy. This book read a lot more like The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants than a book about how dangerous it was for women to read erotica and be sexually liberated in the 60s, or even a book about the conflicts that can arise in people’s lives with changes of lifestyle. This book didn’t have a lot of depth to it. Conflicts seemed either glossed over or only mentioned briefly, and whatever conflicts there are seem to have been solved happily; almost too happily to have been solved realistically.I also found it pretty much impossible to relate to any of the characters. I don’t know if this is because Harrison has written so much middle-grade, but I found all the main characters to have very immature voices. And when the characters were trying to sound adult-like, especially in the context of M.J.’s magazine job and her conversations with her boss Gayle, it seemed as though their words were very artificial and falsely professional. Think of the most stereotypical business conversations you’ve heard in movies, tv shows, books… That was pretty much every single “adult” conversation in this book. During the very last conversation between Gayle and M.J., the contents of which I’ll not describe here since it’s pretty spoiler-y, I was actually laughing at some of the things M.J. was saying. Out loud. In public, at a Starbucks. That’s how ridiculous her lines were.Keeping all this criticism in mind though, there were one or two things I liked about this book. The pacing was very well-planned, and the writing style made this book a quicker read than it otherwise would have been. But I even found fault with the writing style in some places… for example, those similes! I’m sure it would have been entertaining to count how many times similes are used throughout this book; there had to have been at least one or two on each page. They were witty for the first few times they appeared in the first chapter, but after that they got annoying very quickly. The similes alone really sucked me out of the story and distracted me.I do not recommend this book, I am sorry to say. It’s not truly that I regret reading The Dirty Book Club; well, I do, but that’s not the point, it’s just that I want to save you from wasting your time on this book.Editor’s Note: Also, I can’t believe the main character, M.J., implied that Pink Floyd is unsophisticated? And that she said it only three chapters into this book? Well, I mean, I actually can believe it, and that’s probably part of the reason why I didn’t like M.J.
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  • RoloPoloBookBlog
    January 1, 1970
    The Dirty Book Club by Lisi HarrisonSource: NetgalleyMy Rating: 4/5 starsIn the wake of her family’s deaths, M.J. Stark has buried herself in her work. To be sure, she has risen to the top of her field and is in line for a HUGE promotion, but there’s more to life than just work. Or so her seriously long-distance boyfriend keeps telling her. With no intentions of significantly altering her life beyond the promotion, M.J. is blown away when the promotion offer is not at all what she expected or wo The Dirty Book Club by Lisi HarrisonSource: NetgalleyMy Rating: 4½/5 starsIn the wake of her family’s deaths, M.J. Stark has buried herself in her work. To be sure, she has risen to the top of her field and is in line for a HUGE promotion, but there’s more to life than just work. Or so her seriously long-distance boyfriend keeps telling her. With no intentions of significantly altering her life beyond the promotion, M.J. is blown away when the promotion offer is not at all what she expected or worked for. In a moment of pure rage, M.J. quits her job and leaves he beloved NYC for a sunny beach town in California. Domesticity isn’t all M.J. thought it would be, and though she enjoys (not loves!) being with her boyfriend, she doesn’t enjoy being bored and having to face her real life when she’s alone. As she is struggling to adjust to her new reality, M.J. meets her somewhat eccentric neighbor, Gloria who opens up almost instantly about her life and best friends. With Gloria nearby, M.J. is certain she can make her new life work, and then, one day, with nothing more than a note, Gloria is gone and M.J. is utterly lost. Except, Gloria’s note came with more than an abrupt goodbye, it also came with an invitation to join an exclusive club, a club that has, over the decades saved Gloria’s life and sanity on more than one occasion. To have a club, there has to be more than one member and M.J. quickly finds herself in a private room with three other somewhat lost ladies, each hand-picked by one of the original club members. The rules of the club are simple, be open, honest, and supportive of one another, tell no one outside of the club about the club, and be prepared to read and discuss a dirty book at each month’s meeting. While the rules seem simple and clear, the women chosen to carry on this next version of the club are anything but simple. M.J. is floundering in both her personal and professional life, Britt is a highly successful real estate agent stuck in a marriage she isn’t sure is at all viable any longer, Jules is a supremely naïve matchmaker whose husband is absent more than he’s present, and Addie is a bold and brash nurse who wants nothing more than to get the hell out of town. Their personalities are disparate, their lives are complicated, and they each have no idea if they can trust the others gathered. All that’s left to do is follow the rules and choose a dirty book to read 😊 As the weeks and months go by, each woman is profoundly affected by her individual and club life. As individuals, the women experience a huge range of ups and downs, betrayals and successes. As club members, they learn to trust one another with their fears and troubles, hopes and dreams. While the friendships don’t necessarily form quickly, they are strong friendships designed to last a lifetime. As each new book is read and discussed, the new members/friends are also directed to read a letter left by one of the original club members. The letters as much as the secrets and books bond the new club members, and help them to truly understand the history and intention of The Dirty Book Club. Turns out, their predecessors were right . . . . about a lot of things!The Bottom Line: The Dirty Book Club had such an intriguing synopsis, I immediately wanted to read it, and then I damn-near DNF’d it thanks to how truly unlikeable M.J. is. Though I never changed my opinion of M.J., I am so glad I didn’t give up on this book. The other three women, Addie, Britt, and Jules more than made up for M.J. and I became completely invested in the story. Each woman has so many issues, issues that would likely crush an individual, but are more easily dealt with when there are friends to support you. The Dirty Book Club is about so much more than a group of women reading erotic novels. The Dirty Book Club is about friendship, trust, companionship, strength, love, the trials and tribulations of life, and the successes that come when there is a strong support system in place. While the lives of the new generation are certainly interesting, it is in the letters of the original members that I found the most enjoyment in this read. The weaving of the past and present is one of my favorite tropes, and The Dirty Book Club certainly delivers on this front. There are a few surprises along the way that really liven up the story and keep the reader guessing. In all, a delightful standalone!
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  • Becky Hutchison
    January 1, 1970
    THE DIRTY BOOK CLUB, by Lisi Harrison, is an awesome story, and one I had to keep reading till the very last page. It’s funny, witty, poignant and inspiring.The point of view varies among several characters but is mostly through M.J., short for May-June, who faces a career crisis while navigating a young relationship with adventurer Dan. She’s floundering, trying to decide what to do in her life. All she’s done since her family died three years before is work. She has no friends and a non-existe THE DIRTY BOOK CLUB, by Lisi Harrison, is an awesome story, and one I had to keep reading till the very last page. It’s funny, witty, poignant and inspiring.The point of view varies among several characters but is mostly through M.J., short for May-June, who faces a career crisis while navigating a young relationship with adventurer Dan. She’s floundering, trying to decide what to do in her life. All she’s done since her family died three years before is work. She has no friends and a non-existent social life, so she flees New York City to try out a new life with Dan in Pearl Beach, California.Jules plays the perfect wife while working as an event planner at a cushy resort in Pearl Beach. She enjoys her job and the nice villa provided as part of her employment, but it’s an hour away from her husband. She doesn’t like being put into the position of single mom to their difficult 15-year-old daughter Destiny.Britt is frustrated with her slacker husband Paul, who lays around all day smoking weed and watching TV. She’s tired of putting in long hours as a realtor to support him and their twins. Wanting a more exciting life, she considers having an affair. Sexpot Addie wants to travel anywhere away from Pearl Beach. She’s tired of the day to day monotony of her existence, using sex as a temporary reprieve from her unfulfilled wanderlust. They are all invited to join the Dirty Book Club, started in the 1960’s by four women who were desperate to spice up their lives. The original book club ladies read books considered salacious in their time (think milder versions of Fifty Shades of Grey), met once a month to discuss how the stories could improve their lives, and shared their problems and joys. Now widows, they’ve all moved to France. They hope the younger four women continue the club and form the close bonds of friendships they still rely on.Pros: This is a well-written story with themes of love, abandonment, commitment, unfulfilled dreams, and friendship. Though there are some stereotypical situations, they are presented in a fresh way. The characters are interesting with unique quirks, and there’s a good balance of dialogue and description.Cons: The book starts a little slow but definitely picks up by the third chapter. And though some readers may not mind, I’m not too keen on more than two points of view to tell a story.Summary:THE DIRTY BOOK CLUB is an entertaining and engrossing story primarily about love and friendship. If you like character driven stories, then this one’s for you. It’s perfect for the beach, on a weekend getaway, or anytime at all. I recommend it for ages 17 and up. If You Like This, You Might Like: THE CLIQUE SERIES and PRETENDERS by Lisi Harrison, SUGAR by Kimberly Stuart, LOST ALONG THE WAY by Erin Duffy, THE DIRTY GIRLS SOCIAL CLUB by Alisa Valdes-RodriguezAn e-copy was provided by Gallery Books and Edelweiss for an honest review.** See more of my book reviews on Blue Moon Mystery Saloon website.
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  • Niamh
    January 1, 1970
    Star Rating: 2.5 starsThis proof copy was very kindly sent to me through NetGalley by Simon & Shuster. I think three stars is me being generous. Maybe because the first quarter of this book had so much potential that was eventually just building up to…nothing. This novel starts off explaining the existence of the DBC- aka The Dirty Book Club- started by four housewives in the 1950s in an attempt to read the racy and scandalous literature of the day without being cast out by the rest of polit Star Rating: 2.5 starsThis proof copy was very kindly sent to me through NetGalley by Simon & Shuster. I think three stars is me being generous. Maybe because the first quarter of this book had so much potential that was eventually just building up to…nothing. This novel starts off explaining the existence of the DBC- aka The Dirty Book Club- started by four housewives in the 1950s in an attempt to read the racy and scandalous literature of the day without being cast out by the rest of polite society. They hide their books in covers for etiquette manuals, so they can explore the sexual texts they pick for their club. Sounds like a good premise, right? Except we don’t stick with that. After twenty or so pages, the plot changes completely to follow four DIFFERENT women in the present day, who are presented with this book club after one of the older members leaves the country and decides to pass on the tradition to a group of younger women. The books that they read really does not effect the plot at all, with the exception to providing a location for these women to have conversations over alcohol. My main problem was this book was there was so much set up and zero pay off. So many plots were started and explored over the course of a few pages, but they either receded into the background to make way for a completely different kind of plot, or were solved within a matter of seconds. Expositional dialogue a-go-go for the latter. This novel seemed to be the written equivalent of the daytime soap opera. You couldn’t go a few pages without a couple having a fight, or someone ending up in the hospital, or someone thinking they were pregnant, or something horrendous happening, which in a few pages we discover wasn’t actually the truth. If books could have commercial breaks- this would be the coup de gras. This is the issue with multiple perspectives; we never truly get to envelop ourselves in the story because we’re pinging back between different characters, unsure of exactly what they’re doing and what their situation is in. I think as a story I’d be much more interested in hearing about the women in the 1950s and how the book club affected their lives, rather than these four random women in the present who have little in the way of a connection with the actual book club. That might have been bad advertising in that sense. ‘The Dirty Book Club’ is not written badly. It’s structure is poor, however, and that means this book kind of trips at the first hurdle and doesn’t even get to transform into something good. At the end of the book, Lisi Harrison asks us if we love or hate the book- no matter the outcome, she wants us to blame the editor. And yeah, I do blame the editor. This book needs a lot of work. It seems to be trashy fiction with very little substance, attempting to be risqué with its mentions of sex, but really accomplishing very little. Not the best. Disappointing, really.
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  • Becky Baldridge
    January 1, 1970
    When I read the blurb for The Dirty Book Club, I was intrigued by the premise, and when I started reading, I found the beginning both engaging and promising. Sadly, that fizzled quickly as I found less and less to like about main character, MJ. Let me add that each of the characters have their flaws and that's okay. I didn't expect them to be perfect and several times, I've found the flawed characters in a story the most endearing. That was the case with the 1960's book club. Not so much with th When I read the blurb for The Dirty Book Club, I was intrigued by the premise, and when I started reading, I found the beginning both engaging and promising. Sadly, that fizzled quickly as I found less and less to like about main character, MJ. Let me add that each of the characters have their flaws and that's okay. I didn't expect them to be perfect and several times, I've found the flawed characters in a story the most endearing. That was the case with the 1960's book club. Not so much with the modern day club. MJ is rather disconnected from living life and that's understandable considering the the loss she's suffered. She throws herself into her career to keep from dwelling on that loss, which is also something the reader can empathize with and understand. As time goes on, MJ's long distance love interest, Dan, tries to convince her to move across the country so they can be together. This is where my problem with this character began. Things don't go as she's planned in her career, so she heads to California and to Dan. She then spends most of the story waffling between wanting to be with Dan and wanting to run back to New York and her job. Indecision, I can understand. She's spent considerable time on her career, but it came across like Dan was nothing more than a backup plan, the second choice. More than once, she asserts that she gave up her career and sacrificed for Dan, when that isn't the case. She gave up her career because things didn't go her way. She didn't get what she wanted, so she fell back on the second choice. Basically, I found her whiny and petulant, and I spent most of her story wishing Dan would wake up and send her packing. The other characters in the modern day book club weren't exactly likable, but at least they did have some wit and even some charm about them. By the end of this journey, I found the letters from the 1960's book club to be the most interesting parts of the story and the only modern day character that I really liked or rooted for was the good and giving doctor, Dan.I will say the the author is talented and writes well, but this one completely missed the mark for this reader.
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