Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live
Avi Cantor Has Six Months To LiveAvi comes across these foreboding words scrawled on the bathroom mirror, but what do they mean? Is this a curse, a prediction, or a threat from Avi's emboldened bullies? And how to they know his real name when he hasn't even told his mother yet?Then there is Ian—the cool new guy at school, who is suddenly paying attention to Avi. Ian is just like Avi, but he is also all sunshine, optimism, and magic. All the things that Avi doesn't know how to deal with...yet.A romantic, #ownvoices fairy tale for trans boys.

Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live Details

TitleAvi Cantor Has Six Months to Live
Author
ReleaseAug 22nd, 2017
PublisherBook Smugglers Publishing
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, LGBT, GLBT, Queer, Short Stories, Transgender, Romance

Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live Review

  • Nina ✿ Looseleaf Reviews ✿
    January 1, 1970
    How was such a short story such a trip? Cause let me tell you, in 70 pages, I had feelings.Avi Cantor is a quasi-magical story of a high-schooler mid-transition. While he has told no one his name--Avi--the words, "Avi Cantor has six months to live" appear on the bathroom mirror at school. What Avi assumes is an uncanny new bullying technique turns out to be a lot more complicated.Without spoiling this beautiful story, let me tell you, that summary, while accurate, is not what the story is about. How was such a short story such a trip? Cause let me tell you, in 70 pages, I had feelings.Avi Cantor is a quasi-magical story of a high-schooler mid-transition. While he has told no one his name--Avi--the words, "Avi Cantor has six months to live" appear on the bathroom mirror at school. What Avi assumes is an uncanny new bullying technique turns out to be a lot more complicated.Without spoiling this beautiful story, let me tell you, that summary, while accurate, is not what the story is about. It's not about bullying; it's about self-loathing. It's not about avoiding death; it's about facing life.I'm hesitant to call this magical realism, but it has a beautifully surreal and sardonic prose that fans of The Raven Boys--or even Marquez--would love. And I'll be damned if this isn't one of the most poignant books about depression that I've ever read!P.S. If there is a movie/tv adaptation and Ian Alexander isn't Ian, I will consider the world ROBBED.Read this review at:
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  • Shira Glassman
    January 1, 1970
    Trans author Sacha Lamb shows us a love story between two trans teenage boys, with elements of magical realism. The main character is Jewish, depressed, and not out to school or mom yet, and speaks to us through a series of highly relatable confessions that feel like he's snuck inside your head and saying what you'd say if you were in his place. I'll let Avi's narrative voice provide their own testimony to the prose's strength: (This paragraph made my heart do somersaults through so many emotion Trans author Sacha Lamb shows us a love story between two trans teenage boys, with elements of magical realism. The main character is Jewish, depressed, and not out to school or mom yet, and speaks to us through a series of highly relatable confessions that feel like he's snuck inside your head and saying what you'd say if you were in his place. I'll let Avi's narrative voice provide their own testimony to the prose's strength: (This paragraph made my heart do somersaults through so many emotions) Looks just brown enough that you’re not sure where he’s from. Skips school for weird holidays even though his mom has to work all the time, so he just sits in his room, alone, and eats frozen food from the kosher section. Dresses like a boy, which is a problem, because none of us have any imagination. The first moment when he meets the other boy, he catastrophizes and it's so relatable; it's pretty literally how I spent my morning yesterday, in fact.Of boyfriend's family, composed of a cis mom, a trans mom, and a sister who plays violin (hurray!):They just act like it’s normal, like a boy can be any old shape he wants and all they see when they look at him is the boy that he is.Another line about the boyfriend's family that felt totally relatable to me in my darker moods:Apparently nothing I do is a problem for them. I’m not sure I like it. It makes me feel unsettled, like I don’t quite know what shape I am anymore. (Caveat that I do like being treated kindly by brand new friends; I can just relate to the "unsettled" feeling! I think it might come from a fear that we're not adequately reciprocating the kindness since it can be hard to reach out from inside depression. But that's up to Lamb, in this case.)Another well-phrased line:They don’t mind me staying in his room, even. In his bed. I don’t know what to think of the idea that they’re ok with all the things we aren’t actually doing. This line gave me so many cultural feelings, and also made me feel warm and squishy inside because it's so validating for parents to cooperate with our queer identities:My mom texts me in the middle of the night. I like that you chose your grandfather’s name. And this line, for the same reason (tw: deadname at the end)“Avraham,” mom says, behind me, as if she’s been saying it that way my entire life. The same tired tone she used to use for April.I did get a little confused with the more magical-realismy elements, but that's because it's not a genre in which I'm terribly fluent. The likeability of the characters and their setup pretty much made up for that so even if magical realism confuses you, too, there's room for you here.The references to Judaism and Jewishness were soothing and not presented in opposition to anyone's queerness, which as someone who looks to our traditions for comfort, I found soothing. (This is not to contradict those who have negative experiences; I'm just speaking for myself.)FYI, this story does have deadnaming and misgendering, from characters the MC isn't out to yet, but the author is trans and trans people are allowed to write their own experiences. I'm including this warning for two reasons: first, to give trans readers a heads up, and secondly so cis readers who are also writers understand that just because Lamb did it doesn't mean we should. Additional TW for suicidal ideation.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    "Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live": words written on a bathroom mirror using a name no-one is supposed to know. Avi hasn't come out yet and is still living his life as April, but people seem to know the message is about him. Depressed, a bit strange and a loner with problems at home, it's easy to believe. But then Avi meets Ian, another trans teenager and his wonderful and magical family. But despite the brightness that he brings into Avi's life there's still a countdown.Two trans boys falling "Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live": words written on a bathroom mirror using a name no-one is supposed to know. Avi hasn't come out yet and is still living his life as April, but people seem to know the message is about him. Depressed, a bit strange and a loner with problems at home, it's easy to believe. But then Avi meets Ian, another trans teenager and his wonderful and magical family. But despite the brightness that he brings into Avi's life there's still a countdown.Two trans boys falling in love with diverse and loving families as well as an element of the supernatural all makes for a wonderful YA story that makes the most of its premise and its fantastic elements. A short and wonderful read.
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  • anna (readingpeaches)
    January 1, 1970
    this was so sweet & soft & quite possibly introduced the gayest family i have ever known
  • Xan West
    January 1, 1970
    The publisher gave me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.I loved this so much. I don't know how its possible that a book centering a trans boy getting bullied & feeling suicidal can actually feel appropriately light and warm & hopeful but this book totally manages it. There are so many good people on Avi's side, caring about him and wanting him to survive and seeing him for who he is, throughout the story, that even with the difficult content, it still felt so hopeful The publisher gave me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.I loved this so much. I don't know how its possible that a book centering a trans boy getting bullied & feeling suicidal can actually feel appropriately light and warm & hopeful but this book totally manages it. There are so many good people on Avi's side, caring about him and wanting him to survive and seeing him for who he is, throughout the story, that even with the difficult content, it still felt so hopeful and warm to read. It doesn't minimize or handwave the bullying or suicidality away, it just...balances them. With this beautifully precise touch. The writing is gorgeous and feels so deliberate and careful. I felt safe in it, even with this story that cuts so close to the bone for me. I loved that Avi was surrounded by queer & trans characters, that Lilit was on his side too, that his boyfriend got to be fully himself and in his femmeness at home. I adored how deeply Jewish this story was; it was definitely part of what made it feel like I was wrapping myself in a cozy blanket. As a Jewish trans reader, it means so much to me to have this story. It's the first contemporary story I have read with a Jewish trans MC, and it resonated so deeply, in so many ways. I would gladly read a lot more about these characters, but this story worked for me at the length it was. It felt very much like it was written for trans readers, and for Jewish readers. It was for us first, and didn't cater to folks who wanted more explanation or more time in certain beats of the story because that's what they are used to getting. For example, many trans MG & YA stories would center Avi's coming out to his mom, give that moment in the story a lot of space & room & angst. This story held that experience in a way that really worked for me as a trans reader: one that focused on moments of choice and acceptance and care and love, without also making it a huge deal or even the biggest thing Avi is grappling with. This isn't a coming out as trans story, it's a story that includes Avi coming out, that's about other things. I loved that. I struggled a bit with Avi getting outed, the origins of the intensification of him getting bullied. It was a hard moment in the story for me, as a reader. I hurt for Avi so much. In the end, I think it worked, and makes sense, and feels so real that it would unfold this way, that of course attempts to help go awry and this character is flawed and imperfect. The other aspects of the character felt more real, because of the flaws that are uncovered. So I do really think it worked and made the story better. Avi gets outed but it doesn't really get understood by the folks at school; that aspect felt so real and painful and complicated, like this encapsulation of the complexities of trans life. The trans rep is wonderful. It is deeply real, resonated so much for me, has all these lovely details and references, and feels like it was written for trans readers. I especially liked the moment where one of the boys warns the other about the risks of sleeping in his binder, and he does it anyway. That felt so right to me. Yes, let young trans readers know it's not safe but also...let him be a boy who is reckless in that way, too. I loved the (view spoiler)[ magical transition element of the story. It really worked for me. (hide spoiler)] I loved that one of the adults was also trans and the reader finds this out with no fanfare. I highly recommend this novelette; it's beautiful and heartwrenching and hopeful and cozy and gave me so many feels. The romance is sweet and lovely. I am so glad I got to read it, and that it is out in the world. This story is a lovely ex of how its v possible to tell stories abt hard aspects of being a trans kid that aren't bleak & full of despair. For that reason alone it is so deeply necessary.Trigger Warnings (view spoiler)[ Suicidality. Bullying, including suicide baiting, ableism, queer hatred, HIV stigma and sexual harassment. Trans character gets outed as trans. Trans character gets misgendered, references being deadnamed by using the name. (hide spoiler)]
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  • TheBookSmugglers
    January 1, 1970
    The latest - and final - novelette in our Gods and Monsters season. This is Gay YA, about a Jewish trans boy who is struggling with depression and bullying, finding acceptance and love with another trans boy - it features awesome lesbian moms, a super great friendly demon, hilarious kisses and a happy ending.Goodreads reviewers who want a review copy, send me a message!
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  • Justine
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful story about two trans boys falling in love. I loved the way the story touched on the emotional processes of recovery from depression, of finding and feeling worthy of love and life, and the myriad emotional complexities of transition. The added fantastical element was a lovely touch.Deftly written with an endearing humour, this is a gem of a read.“Neither of my moms are technically witches,” he says, primly. “We are just a highly intuitive family. With, uhh, an especially fine-tuned A wonderful story about two trans boys falling in love. I loved the way the story touched on the emotional processes of recovery from depression, of finding and feeling worthy of love and life, and the myriad emotional complexities of transition. The added fantastical element was a lovely touch.Deftly written with an endearing humour, this is a gem of a read.“Neither of my moms are technically witches,” he says, primly. “We are just a highly intuitive family. With, uhh, an especially fine-tuned sense of impending doom.” “Mine too,” I tell him. “It’s called being Jewish. Doesn’t make me magic.”
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  • Kuzu
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote this and I think it's pretty good!! Maybe you will like it too!! 💖✨🌈✡✨💖 I wrote this and I think it's pretty good!! Maybe you will like it too!! 💖✨🌈✡️✨💖
  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    The magic in this one is not my personal thing, but I loved the writing so, so much and immediately tweeted at the author to make sure he has more trans boy YA coming, because lord knows we need it and I think his voice is just A+.
  • Dov Zeller
    January 1, 1970
    Something about this book. The tensions between controlled and careful prose and storytelling and absolute conversational ease--and a poetry that comes not from one or the other, but from the places they meet and the places they wrestle. I couldn't put Avi Cantor down and though it hurt a bit too much in moments, because of all the emotional intelligence, and a touch of cruelty between people who care for each other, the vivid portrayal of a relationship in which there is a great need for tread Something about this book. The tensions between controlled and careful prose and storytelling and absolute conversational ease--and a poetry that comes not from one or the other, but from the places they meet and the places they wrestle. I couldn't put Avi Cantor down and though it hurt a bit too much in moments, because of all the emotional intelligence, and a touch of cruelty between people who care for each other, the vivid portrayal of a relationship in which there is a great need for treading carefully, with Ian trying to find ways to connect with Avi in and through and around brokenness. All of the ways we push each other away to protect ourselves...There was a lot of emotional pain in here I could relate to, more than I was exactly comfortable with, and yet I'm so glad I found this book and grateful to have read it. I laughed, I cheered, I worried. I wondered.Other considerable tensions: between sweetness and intimacy and bitterness and/or prickliness; between self care and care for others...What if, taking care of ourselves means hurting others? What if someone else's desire to take care of us feels puzzling and dangerous, because it's unfamiliar, and because it is an invitation to a kind of intimacy that feels terrifying, or because sometimes taking care of someone else is an act of seeing and deep compassionate connection, and at other times, it's a way of looking past or through, a form of objectification or condescension or belittlement. So how do we parse all the new signals we're getting, particularly given that all information is filtered through synapses that have already been firing in very specific patterns for a good long time. (How do we shift patterns that have become, to a degree, ingrained?) And what if the borders of everything aren't exactly clear? Particularly when we enter into new social and emotional territory. This book explores all these questions and it's magnificent in all that says and all that it leaves to the reader and to the characters' private lives. It is equally compelling in its focus and its unfocus. It's a love story, a fairy tale, a tale of magic, but in a way, it's about the magic we hold within ourselves... Queer magic in Jewish time. Here are some quotes that I love. This is Avi's first person narration:They [Ian's family] just act like it’s normal, like a boy can be any old shape he wants and all they see when they look at him is the boy that he is.[Ian] looks at me. His eyes are deep, deep, deep. Why did I think he was so easy to read, the first time I met him?I wonder if they talk about how their son picked me up out of nowhere, and now I’m here all the time. I wonder if they ask each other what my home life is like, why I never have to call a parent to ask for permission for anything, ever. I wonder if when they keep refilling my plate without asking, it’s on purpose. I wonder if they want to adopt me, add me to their collection of mismatched children.Apparently nothing I do is a problem for them. I’m not sure I like it. It makes me feel unsettled, like I don’t quite know what shape I am anymore.There’s an extra month in the Hebrew calendar this year, and the High Holy Days don’t come until October, and it’s cold. Ian asks me about Rosh Hashanah, the week before. Do you have plans? I never talk about my family. I can tell from the way he looks at me that he’s worried he isn’t allowed to ask.It’s magic, their house. The way they’re all obsessed. Rosa with her cooking. Alice and Gabriella with their music, Gabriella’s plants and frogs.I sleep with my head on his shoulder and I dream that I’m on a soft, green planet where no one exists who can hurt me.The thing about a crossroads. It’s just an intersection, that’s what we call it now. I go to the one by the cafe, where Ian always takes me for cider. At the middle of that intersection, at the crossroads, there’s a tiny island of withered grass and a bench where no one ever sits, because who wants to sit in the middle of traffic? I sit there now and light my candle, hunching over to protect it from the wind. Wax drips onto my fingers and snow collects in my hair, on my shoes, on the road around me. There’s not much traffic, because of the snow, and everything sounds hushed. I don’t have a real winter coat, and I’m shivering. I sit and stare at the candle and it occurs to me that I don’t know if there are words one is supposed to say to summon a demon. Ian’s instructions have gone out of my head. If I try to picture the file he sent me, all I see is the look on his face when I told him we’re not the same.He acts all confident, but he still has secrets. Parts of himself he feels he has to shut away. As if the ease with which he passes makes it harder for him to break trivial boundaries.“Huh?” he says. “What?” He blinks at me, owlish, behind the glasses he almost never wears. I have a strange urge to lean over, take them off him, and poke out his eyeballs so he can never look at me with that expression of baffled concern again.We sit side-by-side on Ian’s bed, legs under the covers, watching cartoons. He’s taken off his wholesome costume and he’s wearing a Tinkerbell tank top and no binder, out of gender-conforming camouflage. We forgot to ask Lilit about magic top surgery.From the afterward by the author: The emotional atmosphere of the story hinges on the ideas of cold/warmth, loneliness/togetherness, fear/safety and touch starvation/affection, the contrast between, and eventual coming together of, Ian’s warm, comfortable world and Avi’s cold, isolated one.
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  • Skye Kilaen
    January 1, 1970
    A dark but ultimately hopeful YA novella about suicidal gay trans Jewish boy Avi and how his life changes when he meets sunny, optimistic gay trans classmate Ian. Avi is deeply unhappy, prickly, often cruel as a way to protect himself, but he also desperately needs the completely different world Ian offers him access to, with warmth and family acceptance and love. Not a spoiler: having these things offered to you doesn't mean you can immediately reach out and take them. Loved the magical (and ot A dark but ultimately hopeful YA novella about suicidal gay trans Jewish boy Avi and how his life changes when he meets sunny, optimistic gay trans classmate Ian. Avi is deeply unhappy, prickly, often cruel as a way to protect himself, but he also desperately needs the completely different world Ian offers him access to, with warmth and family acceptance and love. Not a spoiler: having these things offered to you doesn't mean you can immediately reach out and take them. Loved the magical (and other) realism, definitely looking forward to reading more of Lamb's work in the future.
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  • Cameron Van Sant
    January 1, 1970
    UHHH did you all know that you can read this for free here??? https://www.thebooksmugglers.com/2017...Because I did not!You can tip the author here! https://ko-fi.com/eggrabbiAlso at the beginning of the story the trans guy hits on the protagonist all like, "Hey, you're trans too, let me buy you coffee," and I'm like "wow rude" but I'm also like "I've probably totally done that at some point in my life"Also I'm totally here for trans for trans stories
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  • ayşe
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars!“It’s better to make life out of life, right?” I knew nothing about this story before I read it, two friends mentioned it to me, so I thought it was about time I read it, and I'm so glad I did.Avi is a high school student who one day finds the words "Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live" written in the school bathroom. It could be more pointless cruel bullying he receives, or it could be a warning. The message also brings the kind and beautiful Ian into his life. It's as it describes: "A ro 4 stars!“It’s better to make life out of life, right?” I knew nothing about this story before I read it, two friends mentioned it to me, so I thought it was about time I read it, and I'm so glad I did.Avi is a high school student who one day finds the words "Avi Cantor Has Six Months to Live" written in the school bathroom. It could be more pointless cruel bullying he receives, or it could be a warning. The message also brings the kind and beautiful Ian into his life. It's as it describes: "A romantic, #ownvoices fairy tale for trans boys."This really is such a kind and wonderful story, the plot is amazing, the voice is strong and makes you care so much for these boys, and it's a short and sweet read. I totally fell in love with Avi and along with him too, his story is really special, and I loved to see him grow, gain agency and feel self-worth.It's really hard to 1) find LGBT books that can just be a nice read (often they deal with darker themes/get explicit - which is fine and we need those stories too, I would just like as much diversity as het books get) 2) a LGBT story that features a trans lead !!! - So I'm really glad this story exists, and you should 100% read it! I don't want to say too much about the story ( I think it's even better going in expecting nothing cause it will definitely pleasantly surprise you) but it's good, believe me.Recommended for: anyone looking for a short and GOOD read, especially if you want good LGBT (with the main focus on trans) representation.
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  • Em
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a lovely surprise. The Jewish rep, the trans rep, the depression rep in general was so delicious and enchanting. This has magic tied up with transgender identity mixed with family and belonging and makes you ceave so many hugs. Just. The best thing I've read recently with any trans rep. Also it has a really cute (if a bit messy) mlm romance.
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  • Claudie Arseneault
    January 1, 1970
    tw for suicide ideation, school bullying, transphobiaI've meant to read this for ages, and it turns out it was much shorter than I thought, so I just binged it! For all that it deals with heavy subjects, AVI CANTOR is a super sweet and hopeful YA romance between two trans boys and I really enjoyed it. Definitely recommended. <3
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  • sarah y
    January 1, 1970
    i read the first three paragraphs of this and IMMEDIATELY texted it to everyone that i know. if i were to give this an endorsement i would say it's mandatory reading! for everybody! so so good.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This lovely short story is free here. I'd highly recommend giving it a read
  • Fabulitas
    January 1, 1970
    It's very sweet, pity that the magic stuff isn't as well done as the teenage stuff.
  • Helena Summers
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a cute read and here's a list of reasons to read it:- It features two cute trans boys in love- The mc is Jewish and there are lots of jokes about it- One of the boys has two mums, one of them who's also trans and the other is Latinx (I think?), and a black sister. They're the softest family ever and I want them to adopt me and give me cookies.- There's magic!!!! And nice demons that give you cupcakes- FEELINGS EVERYWHERE- This sole dialogue: “Neither of my moms are technically witc This was such a cute read and here's a list of reasons to read it:- It features two cute trans boys in love- The mc is Jewish and there are lots of jokes about it- One of the boys has two mums, one of them who's also trans and the other is Latinx (I think?), and a black sister. They're the softest family ever and I want them to adopt me and give me cookies.- There's magic!!!! And nice demons that give you cupcakes- FEELINGS EVERYWHERE- This sole dialogue: “Neither of my moms are technically witches,” he says, primly. “We are just a highly intuitive family. With, uhh, an especially fine-tuned sense of impending doom.”“Mine too,” I tell him. “It’s called being Jewish. Doesn’t make me magic.”He smiles at me, soft. “But you are magic, though.”“Wow, Ian. Gay.”“You’re gay,” he says.“Your mom.”“I mean, yeah.” You can read it for free here
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  • Max
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this so much I almost made myself late for work reading it. I loved it so much I immediately went and bought a copy for Kindle so I could have it on my phone for whenever I want to reread. I loved it A LOT.
  • Morgan Goolsby
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book between the hours of midnight and 3 in the morning, and absolutely loved it. Then I read it again the next day when I'd had more than two hours of sleep in three days, and I loved it even more. Avi is a well written character who I liked at the start of the story and loved by the end of it. I will say I had a fondness for Avi already as I'd been able to see the author post about him online some, but the story itself and being able to see Avi in action really solidified that.And I read this book between the hours of midnight and 3 in the morning, and absolutely loved it. Then I read it again the next day when I'd had more than two hours of sleep in three days, and I loved it even more. Avi is a well written character who I liked at the start of the story and loved by the end of it. I will say I had a fondness for Avi already as I'd been able to see the author post about him online some, but the story itself and being able to see Avi in action really solidified that.And Ian. Oh my god, Ian. He is adorable and sweet and honestly the bit where Avi talks about him doing his nails in the privacy of his home is so relatable re/ gender. He's really sunshiney and wonderful and I love him also. There was one point during my initial reading, where Avi is talking about how when he's scared he wants Ian, whereas he used to want his room. I sent it to my girlfriend and told her "It's you. I love you." This book is wonderfully gay and made me want to let my girlfriend know I loved her, so that's always a plus.I really loved the amount of moms in this story also. I love fictional moms, and this book is full of them. Ian's moms are wonderful and helpful, positive presences that just add to the light that Ian already brought to the book. Avis mom was nice as well and I wish we could have seen more of her, though given the length of the story it makes sense that we didn't. Hmmm this is really long and I have other thoughts. I really liked how the magic worked in the world, Lillit was also a very good mom, and the book represented depression in a wonderful way. I was very excited when this book came out, and the excitement was well worth it. I can't wait to read more by this author. 🎉✨✨🎉
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  • Alpacapanache
    January 1, 1970
    This is an optimistic story about trans boys, a demon, and so many fantastic moms. Read it. It's free. You have no excuses. And you don't even have to worry about thanking me for it. It's worth an hour of your time. <3You can read my review here.
  • Lulu (the library leopard)
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent voice and wonderful balance between heartbreaking and uplifting!
  • Nicole Field
    January 1, 1970
    This story blew me away. It's such an important short piece of writing, and it has so much going on. For starters, there are teens who are transgender, one of whom is getting significantly bullied at school.There are also alternative family dynamics. Avi gets brought quickly into Ian's family, which is made up of two mums (one cis, one trans) and a younger sister. Some of these characters are people of colour, but not all. Avi basically becomes a second son, but it quickly becomes clear that thi This story blew me away. It's such an important short piece of writing, and it has so much going on. For starters, there are teens who are transgender, one of whom is getting significantly bullied at school.There are also alternative family dynamics. Avi gets brought quickly into Ian's family, which is made up of two mums (one cis, one trans) and a younger sister. Some of these characters are people of colour, but not all. Avi basically becomes a second son, but it quickly becomes clear that this isn't done without communication with Avi's mum.And then there's a demon, and magic. And Ian's kinda magic. And at no point did any of these things not mesh, or become too triggering to keep on reading. It was this almost perfectly crafted piece of writing, with characters I loved and who will stay with me till far beyond the finishing of this story. The only thing that brought down the stars for me was that I felt the story glossed over too many things that I wanted lingered on. It was a constantly moving piece of writing. I very rarely, if ever, felt like time wasn't passing faster than I could see it.Story can be found here, at the bottom of which there are also buy links available.
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  • Tani
    January 1, 1970
    This was absolutely lovely. Read for free here.I loved this for a couple of reasons. The biggest was the very strong emotional connection that I felt with Avi, almost from the very first sentence of the story. He's a very wounded character, and for me, that always make me want to wrap that character up in a blanket and soothe them. Since I can't actually do that, I am left with simply reading obsessively. The second big draw for me ended up being the romance. I thought it was incredibly sweet, a This was absolutely lovely. Read for free here.I loved this for a couple of reasons. The biggest was the very strong emotional connection that I felt with Avi, almost from the very first sentence of the story. He's a very wounded character, and for me, that always make me want to wrap that character up in a blanket and soothe them. Since I can't actually do that, I am left with simply reading obsessively. The second big draw for me ended up being the romance. I thought it was incredibly sweet, and it just gave me a warm and fuzzy feeling inside. Neither Avi nor Ian was perfect, but they were lovely together. The magical realism element was another draw for me, surprisingly. Magical realism isn't usually my thing, but in this case, it added the perfect note to the story.Lastly, I actually really liked the way that faith was such an important part of Avi's life. I felt like it added a lot of depth to his character, and was just a nice touch. I don't really see a lot of religion in my reading, probably because of my emphasis on fantasy, and I enjoyed it a lot.
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  • Rhys
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this story.A fairy-tale-like romance between two trans boys - one not out yet, the other passing - with a very sweet ending. The mix between magic and reality was done so well.One thing that I really like is stories about depressed kids/teenagers who are not 100% agreeable, who are angry and bitter and frustrated (think A Monster Calls). Avi Cantor is all of these things, and he is also kind and a good kid. And I really, really liked that. Depression can be angry, and this is especially I loved this story.A fairy-tale-like romance between two trans boys - one not out yet, the other passing - with a very sweet ending. The mix between magic and reality was done so well.One thing that I really like is stories about depressed kids/teenagers who are not 100% agreeable, who are angry and bitter and frustrated (think A Monster Calls). Avi Cantor is all of these things, and he is also kind and a good kid. And I really, really liked that. Depression can be angry, and this is especially common in adolescents. I like that Avi is allowed to hate those that hurt him and bully him. I also really liked that Avi and Ian both have such different experiences as trans guys, with their families and with their classmates, and how that is explored. I also really loved a sympathetic demon character, who is more complex than just an agent of evil.The ending felt a little too simple in some ways, hence the 4 stars, but I might bump that up because I really was glad that Avi and Ian got their happy ending.
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  • Cai
    January 1, 1970
    I was only a few pages into reading this book when I said to myself, "I think this is going to be my new favourite story." I wasn't wrong! I mean really, a story about gay trans boys, with interesting family dynamics and a dash of magic? What more could a guy ask for! I read the whole thing in one sitting—with a quick break to go get tissues, because I started crying in the middle. My only complaint is that I didn't get to spend more time with these characters!I should note, however, that this s I was only a few pages into reading this book when I said to myself, "I think this is going to be my new favourite story." I wasn't wrong! I mean really, a story about gay trans boys, with interesting family dynamics and a dash of magic? What more could a guy ask for! I read the whole thing in one sitting—with a quick break to go get tissues, because I started crying in the middle. My only complaint is that I didn't get to spend more time with these characters!I should note, however, that this story does deal with depression and suicidal ideation, so be prepared for that and take care of yourselves. There's also a bit of misgendering and deadnaming, from and around people Avi isn't out to. On a lighter note, I just realized that Avi's last name is Cantor, as in the person who leads the singing in a synagogue.
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  • Lissette
    January 1, 1970
    TW : suicidal thoughts and depression. Avi the main character has suicidal thoughts and depression throughout the novella. Also, there is a small scene where a teacher and a classmate misgenders Avi. #own voices novella for trans boys.Both mcs are trans boys Avi is Jewish and there are scenes that reference it. In one scene, he mentions Teshuvah which means repenting for a sin in the Jewish religion and other Jewish holidays.Ian has two moms. One of his moms is a transwoman Ian being the best b TW : suicidal thoughts and depression. Avi the main character has suicidal thoughts and depression throughout the novella. Also, there is a small scene where a teacher and a classmate misgenders Avi. #own voices novella for trans boys.Both mcs are trans boys Avi is Jewish and there are scenes that reference it. In one scene, he mentions Teshuvah which means repenting for a sin in the Jewish religion and other Jewish holidays.Ian has two moms. One of his moms is a transwoman Ian being the best boyfriend ever. He looked up the Torah, memorized Hebrew, and looked up unforgivable sins in Judaism all for Avi.Magic, a deal, and summoning a demon This novella is quick. It was so short but it packed many things into it.
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  • a
    January 1, 1970
    There is nothing unnecessary in this book. Every single word is where it should be.It is the first time in my entire life I read fiction containing characters that are so much like me. They feel extremely real. Avi is real. It was a very painful story to read, and I will probably read it again soon in order to fully realise it ends well. I will also have to make a better review next time.Thank you for this book. It is important.
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  • Yaiza
    January 1, 1970
    Estaba buscando esto para mi lista de YA trans #ownvoices y resulta que lo he encontrado online y me lo he terminado leyendo. Es un poquito raro en términos de narración y de plot, una de esas historias cortas que habrían dado mucho más juego como libro completo, pero también es super triste y bonito y tiene unos toques raros de fantasía muy guays
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