Saving Winslow
Perfect for fans of Charlotte’s Web and The One and Only Ivan, Saving Winslow is an uplifting modern classic in the making about a young boy who befriends an ailing newborn donkey and nurses him back to health, from New York Times bestseller and Newbery Medal winner Sharon Creech.Louie doesn't have the best luck when it comes to nurturing small creatures. So when his father brings home a sickly newborn mini donkey, he's determined to save him. He names him Winslow. Taking care of him helps Louie feel closer to his brother, Gus, who is far, far away in the army.Everyone worries that Winslow won't survive, especially Louie’s quirky new friend, Nora, who has experienced loss of her own. But as Louie's bond with Winslow grows, surprising and life-altering events prove that this fragile donkey is stronger than anyone could have imagined.Written in the spirit of Creech favorites Moo and Love That Dog, this standout tale about love and friendship and letting go will tug at the heartstrings.

Saving Winslow Details

TitleSaving Winslow
Author
ReleaseSep 11th, 2018
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780062570734
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Animals

Saving Winslow Review

  • Paul Hankins
    January 1, 1970
    Review closer to release date, but. . .this is Sharon Creech. You're already heading away from this post to pre-order. I won't keep you any longer.
  • Heidi Burkhart
    January 1, 1970
    A tender story about a boy who raises a tiny donkey. Perfect for elementary students.
  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    So great to have a new Sharon Creech novel out in the world. Sweet, heart-felt story.
  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    A heartwarming story of a young donkey, the boy who is determined to save him, and the way in which small things can sometimes have the biggest impact. Lyrical and sweet, Saving Winslow is a simple but touching story for young and middle-grade readers. When Louie is given another of his Uncle Pete’s orphan animals, a newborn donkey, everyone warns him not to get too attached, as it will probably die anyway. But there is something about the tiny, grey bundle that whispers to Louie that here is an A heartwarming story of a young donkey, the boy who is determined to save him, and the way in which small things can sometimes have the biggest impact. Lyrical and sweet, Saving Winslow is a simple but touching story for young and middle-grade readers. When Louie is given another of his Uncle Pete’s orphan animals, a newborn donkey, everyone warns him not to get too attached, as it will probably die anyway. But there is something about the tiny, grey bundle that whispers to Louie that here is an animal who wants to survive, and Louie is determined to be the one to save him. So, Louie names him Winslow and begins raise him. Short chapters, some no longer than half a page, make Saving Winslow a quick and easy book to fall into the rhythm of reading. These little chapters piece together a heartwarming story. Winslow and his gentle, bumbling antics can soften anything - the sadness and perpetual worry of Nora, Louie’s neighbour, who has faced her own losses and grief and is scared to form attachments, the girl troubles of Louie’s older friend, Mack, and especially the aching feeling Louie has when missing his brother, who is serving in the army. These intertwining stories of friendship and family are perfectly offset against the story of a brave young donkey and the boy who cares for him. The prose is simple and the setting almost timeless, and so it is easy to see Saving Winslow becoming a much-loved favourite, sitting nicely alongside the writing of Kate DiCamillo and Katherine Applegate. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library
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  • Jillian Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    What a sweet read! Sharon Creech has done it again. Louie’s Dad brings home an orphaned donkey and Louie volunteers to raise it despite everyone telling him that the donkey may not make it. Nora, a neighbor girl, won’t even touch the donkey because she is afraid Winslow is in for a short life. But slowly Winslow makes his way into the hearts of Louie’s family and neighborhood. The way Louie believes in this spindlely Winslow is admirable.
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  • Cristina Quattrone
    January 1, 1970
    I know some reluctant readers who would be smitten by this story
  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    I find it nothing short of incredible that Sharon Creech continues to pack so much heartfelt emotion and incredible life lessons into a short-ish space. I have fallen in love with Winslow, Louie, and Nora and I know my students will, too. What a pleasure to read this summer morning.
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  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    Sharon Creech is always able to pack so many things to talk about in her books in a smaller number of pages than most. She's that wonderful with words.
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Sigh! Louie and Winslow won my heart. Lovely!
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusWhen his somewhat irresponsible Uncle Pete's miniature donkey is ailing and gives birth prematurely, Louie's mother and father let Louie try to nurse the baby back to health, warning him the whole time that it is likely the animal won't make it. Since Louie is missing his brother Gus, who is in the army, and feels like his track record with keeping animals alive isn't great, Louie does his best. Louie hangs out with his best friend, Mack, a lot, and Mack has a huge crush E ARC from Edelweiss PlusWhen his somewhat irresponsible Uncle Pete's miniature donkey is ailing and gives birth prematurely, Louie's mother and father let Louie try to nurse the baby back to health, warning him the whole time that it is likely the animal won't make it. Since Louie is missing his brother Gus, who is in the army, and feels like his track record with keeping animals alive isn't great, Louie does his best. Louie hangs out with his best friend, Mack, a lot, and Mack has a huge crush on Claudine, who has just moved to town. Her sister Nora is a little younger, and when Nora meets the donkey (named Winslow), she doesn't want much to do with it, since her baby brother was also premature but didn't make it. Louie was a preemie and DID, so he has every confidence in Winslow. The donkey has some rough patches, but pulls through and starts to grow and become a bit more rambunctious, which doesn't please some of the neighbors, especially Mrs. Tooley, who claims that Winslow keeps her baby awake. Louie and Nora become friends, and when it is eventually clear that Winslow must move along, Nora helps Louie to find the best place for Winslow to belong. Strengths: This is one of those heart-tugging books that would make a great read aloud. Creech uses a lot of rich, figurative language, and with a cute cover like this, who would NOT root for Winslow?Weaknesses: This was slow moving and introspective, and something about the style reminded me of 1980s Patricia MacLachlan books. What I really think: I'm sure the public library will have a copy of this, so I think I will wait to purchase until I get a feel for my readers this year. The ones in the past would not have cared for this.
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  • Karen Parisot
    January 1, 1970
    When Louie’s dad brings home a newborn orphaned donkey, Louie is immediately smitten and volunteers to take care of him. The thing is though, Louie has a terrible track record when it comes to caring for small creatures. As in a zero percent success rate. He’s an enthusiastic and loving young caregiver though and is determined to save the baby donkey he names Winslow.An excellent book for middle grade readers. It’s all about responsibility and friendship. Ms. Creech is an award winning author an When Louie’s dad brings home a newborn orphaned donkey, Louie is immediately smitten and volunteers to take care of him. The thing is though, Louie has a terrible track record when it comes to caring for small creatures. As in a zero percent success rate. He’s an enthusiastic and loving young caregiver though and is determined to save the baby donkey he names Winslow.An excellent book for middle grade readers. It’s all about responsibility and friendship. Ms. Creech is an award winning author and after reading this book I can see why. The story just flows, it’s so well written. I think the ending is absolute perfection. I was really charmed by this one and I positively recommend it for all young readers especially the animal smitten ones. It is a wonderful story.
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  • Elly Swartz
    January 1, 1970
    Saving Winslow by Sharon Creech is a heartprint book that is masterfully told. And, while this is a story about saving a donkey, Creech has woven in so much more. It is a tale about a boy who struggles to find his purpose, a girl who’s afraid to love for fear of loss, and a family who misses a son who’s away serving our country. This is a story of believing and loving and finding ourselves. I highly recommend.
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  • Melissapalmer404
    January 1, 1970
    Book #74 Read in 2018Saving Winslow by Sharon CreechThis is a sweet, cute read, geared towards middle school readers. Louie takes over the care of a poor, pitiful donkey that he names Winslow. He bottle feeds him, takes care of him, sleeps by him and hopes that Winslow will make it. This book shows the effect that a sweet animal can have on people...both young and old. I borrowed this book from the library.
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  • Amanda Williams
    January 1, 1970
    Always a fan!
  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Adorable.
  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Sharon has such a way with words. This is a sweet story that means so much more than just taking care of a donkey. There's grit, love, understanding, and compassion. Students will love to read this and will be rooting for Winslow and Louie from start to finish, and by the end, they will be rooting for Nora, too.
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  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my! My children’s lit lovin’ peeps! This! This book! Sharon Creech! It’s perfect! I need to read it again when I stop crying. Honestly! I was cackling my head off in the airport on the way here and crying my eyes out with love on the way out! What a mess I am! Review later!
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  • Richie Partington
    January 1, 1970
    Richie’s Picks: SAVING WINSLOW by Sharon Creech, HarperCollins/Joanna Cotler, September 2018, 176p., ISBN: 978-0-06-257070-3“Me donkey hee, me donkey hawMy donkey sleep in a pile of straw”-- from the Raffi version of the traditional song Tingalayo“Louie knelt beside the basket. A small gray head with black eyes and feathery eyelashes and sticking-up ears emerged. Attached to the head was a trembling thin body and four long spindly legs, all of it covered in splotchy gray fur scattered with brown Richie’s Picks: SAVING WINSLOW by Sharon Creech, HarperCollins/Joanna Cotler, September 2018, 176p., ISBN: 978-0-06-257070-3“Me donkey hee, me donkey hawMy donkey sleep in a pile of straw”-- from the Raffi version of the traditional song Tingalayo“Louie knelt beside the basket. A small gray head with black eyes and feathery eyelashes and sticking-up ears emerged. Attached to the head was a trembling thin body and four long spindly legs, all of it covered in splotchy gray fur scattered with brown freckles.It was not a dog or a cat. It was a pitiful-looking thing and it was gazing at Louie. He felt a sudden rush, as if the roof had peeled off the house and the sun had dived into every corner of the kitchen.‘A goat?’ he asked, kneeling beside the basket.‘No, a donkey,’ his father said. ‘A mini donkey, born last night.’‘A mini donkey?’ Louie’s hand cupped the donkey’s head, patting it gently. The donkey seemed too weak to move. ‘Something wrong with it?’‘The mother is sick, can’t take care of it.’‘Poor mama,’ Louie said. What will happen to it?’‘Probably go downhill fast. Might last a day or two.’‘No!’‘So,’ his mother said, ‘why do you have the donkey? Why did you bring it home if it might just die in a day or two?’‘I don’t know,’ his father said. ‘I felt sorry for it. I thought maybe we could at least watch it unit it--you know--until it dies.’ He whispered that last word.The donkey made a small noise that sounded like please.Louie lifted the donkey from the basket and held it close. It smelled of wet hay. It put its face against Louie’s neck and made that noise again. Please.‘Okay,’ Louie said. ‘I accept the mission.’‘What mission?’‘To save this pitiful motherless donkey.’”Ten year-old Louie knows about surviving. While he cannot remember being born prematurely, he’s often heard the stories about how he made it against the odds. And while he hasn’t had the best of luck with the small creatures he’s cared for in the past, there’s something about this moment and this critter that causes him to focus, learn, and be determinedly optimistic.Louie has been practicing determined optimism. Gus, the big brother Louie idolizes, is away in the army. Maybe he’s serving in the midst of one of those interminable wars. The communications from Gus are short, terse, and precious to Louie and his parents. Perhaps, down inside, Louie believes that saving Winslow will somehow mean that Gus will also be okay.Into this dynamic steps Nora who is the new girl in town. Nora, a tenaciously memorable character, is the perfect foil to Louie. Nora has personally experienced grievous losses. Her first appraisal of Winslow is that he looks like a possum-goat. Nora is a terminal pessimist. She keeps the story real. But being around Winslow will also change Nora as it changes Louie.In third and fourth grades, I’d frequently stop by the school library after the dismissal bell, borrow a book, and finish it before bedtime. SAVING WINSLOW is the type of book a kid could gobble up. Richie Partington, MLISRichie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.comhttps://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/[email protected]
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  • Joan Marie
    January 1, 1970
    This quiet read from Creech touches the heart of any animal lover. 10-year-old Louie was a premie. Just like Winslow, the miniature donkey. Louie takes right away to Louie, and nurses him to health. Only to have to make a decision he'd rather not have to make. Two side stories add depth to primary story; each side story offers opportunities for additional insights, perspectives, and compassion. And I love how she wove an image of one of Winslow Homer's painting into the story. But I won't reveal This quiet read from Creech touches the heart of any animal lover. 10-year-old Louie was a premie. Just like Winslow, the miniature donkey. Louie takes right away to Louie, and nurses him to health. Only to have to make a decision he'd rather not have to make. Two side stories add depth to primary story; each side story offers opportunities for additional insights, perspectives, and compassion. And I love how she wove an image of one of Winslow Homer's painting into the story. But I won't reveal the significance now.Saving Winslow would make a great read-aloud for classrooms, too!Some of my favorite passages: "Louie urged the donkey to take more milk. 'Please, Winslow, please?'" And he wondered, had his parents begged him to stay alive? Did they hover over him like he was hovering over Winslow? Did they urge him to keep breathing? Did they pat him and talk to him? And did that help him?" p. 21
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  • Jeanell
    January 1, 1970
    #Partner #KLE ✨BookReview✨Thank you @KidLitExchange for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ In Sharon Creech’s new middle grade novel (debuts 9/18), a young boy named Louie finds himself alone. His older brother Gus has gone off to war, his best friend seems to have new middle school concerns, and everything he’s ever cared for has either died or run away. Things change when Louie’s parents receive a newborn donkey that isn’t expected to make it through the night. Without #Partner #KLE ✨BookReview✨Thank you @KidLitExchange for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ In Sharon Creech’s new middle grade novel (debuts 9/18), a young boy named Louie finds himself alone. His older brother Gus has gone off to war, his best friend seems to have new middle school concerns, and everything he’s ever cared for has either died or run away. Things change when Louie’s parents receive a newborn donkey that isn’t expected to make it through the night. Without hesitation Louie finds himself doing everything in his power to keep Winslow alive. In this short novel, Sharon Creech tells the story of friendship in a simple, yet powerful way. She brings together characters by connecting their fears and losses – even when they don’t see it coming. Laced with themes of persistence, perspective, and positive thinking, Saving Winslow will have you rooting for a donkey while filled with hope for a boy.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Edelweiss provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.I was really excited to get an DRC of this one, because I loved last year's Moo. I adored the story of a girl and a cow, so I thought the story of a boy and a donkey would be just as enjoyable.And while the story is cute, and there are some great issues addressed (loss and grief, friendship, responsibility), this one just didn't pack the same emotional punch for me. I wish Louie's relationship with his enlisted brother Gus Edelweiss provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.I was really excited to get an DRC of this one, because I loved last year's Moo. I adored the story of a girl and a cow, so I thought the story of a boy and a donkey would be just as enjoyable.And while the story is cute, and there are some great issues addressed (loss and grief, friendship, responsibility), this one just didn't pack the same emotional punch for me. I wish Louie's relationship with his enlisted brother Gus had been explored more, and I wish that Nora's character had gotten more depth--she was just starting to be interesting instead of annoying and the story was over.Young readers who love animals will love the story (and want a baby donkey for their very own), but I guess needed a little more.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    SAVING WINSLOW is a truly heart-warming story of a boy befriending a sick mini donkey. Louie is used to his father bringing home fatally ill animals from his uncle’s farm. But when he father brings home a scrawny little donkey Louie is determined that Winslow (as Louie names him) will NOT die. Louis misses his brother Gus who is away serving in the military but he finds that caring for Winslow helps Louie somehow feel closer to his brother.Everyone is so sure that Winslow won't survive, especial SAVING WINSLOW is a truly heart-warming story of a boy befriending a sick mini donkey. Louie is used to his father bringing home fatally ill animals from his uncle’s farm. But when he father brings home a scrawny little donkey Louie is determined that Winslow (as Louie names him) will NOT die. Louis misses his brother Gus who is away serving in the military but he finds that caring for Winslow helps Louie somehow feel closer to his brother.Everyone is so sure that Winslow won't survive, especially Louie’s classmate Nora. After the deaths of a baby brother and her dog, Nora is reluctant to get close to anything or anyone. But how can anyone turn away from cute little Winslow!This is a beautifully written uplifting story of friendships and love. Perfect for ages 8-12.Thank you to HarperCollins Children’s Books and Joanna Cotler Books for the advance copy to review.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Louie sounds older than his 10 years (it’s an unusual kid to use the word ‘unkempt’) but this is forgotten as you fall for him and his LGD, little gray donkey. Creech’s writing is straight forward, yet poetic at times. The undercurrent of the story—why care for something that will go away or die—is gently shared through Louie missing his older brother, who’s in the military, and a new neighbor and friend Nora who grieves for a baby brother born premature and who died. Caring for Winslow the donk Louie sounds older than his 10 years (it’s an unusual kid to use the word ‘unkempt’) but this is forgotten as you fall for him and his LGD, little gray donkey. Creech’s writing is straight forward, yet poetic at times. The undercurrent of the story—why care for something that will go away or die—is gently shared through Louie missing his older brother, who’s in the military, and a new neighbor and friend Nora who grieves for a baby brother born premature and who died. Caring for Winslow the donkey provides them with an opportunity to make a decision to have Winslow go elsewhere without feeling he’s lost to them. As Louie says, he worries about the worst and hopes for the best. The size, white space and number of pages give the impression of a quick read, which it is, but you linger some and hope for the best for them all.
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  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Readers of animal rescue books or sad-happy heart warmers by authors like Lisa Graff and Cynthia Lord will need to read Sharon Creech’s newest. With its short chapters and non threatening length, almost any 3rd-6th grader should be able to read this story of Louie and his big heart. Even with less than 125 pages, readers will get to know Louie as he struggles to nurse a frail mini-donkey to health and Nora who tries so hard to avoid getting close to anyone or anything out of her fear of more los Readers of animal rescue books or sad-happy heart warmers by authors like Lisa Graff and Cynthia Lord will need to read Sharon Creech’s newest. With its short chapters and non threatening length, almost any 3rd-6th grader should be able to read this story of Louie and his big heart. Even with less than 125 pages, readers will get to know Louie as he struggles to nurse a frail mini-donkey to health and Nora who tries so hard to avoid getting close to anyone or anything out of her fear of more loss in her life. Other supporting characters like Gus, the absent brother, loud-mouth Uncle Pete, and neighborhood friends Claudine and Mack round out this wonderful story. Highly recommended with absolutely zero content warnings. Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I love Sharon Creech's writing... and this may be the book for all those kids who have lost pets .. I'm so on Louie's side since he tries to remain positive in 'nursing' Winslow back to health.. and for picking an animal like a 'mini' donkey as the animal of the book.. I really would have liked to have a little more character development for Nora.. we kind of get a glimpse of why she wants nothing to do with Winslow but her family was kind of an enigma... and even more about Gus.. the brother se I love Sharon Creech's writing... and this may be the book for all those kids who have lost pets .. I'm so on Louie's side since he tries to remain positive in 'nursing' Winslow back to health.. and for picking an animal like a 'mini' donkey as the animal of the book.. I really would have liked to have a little more character development for Nora.. we kind of get a glimpse of why she wants nothing to do with Winslow but her family was kind of an enigma... and even more about Gus.. the brother serving in the army... but all in all a story with a happy ending..
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partnerThank you to the #kidlitexchange network for the free review copy of Saving Winslow by @creechauthor•Animal lovers unite! A sweet, sweet boy tries to save a baby donkey in this one. Dad brings home a baby donkey whose mother has died and the baby likely will too. Louie, however, is determined to save him. Naming him Winslow, the boy and donkey soon have a deep bond.•This book is so charming because young Louie is learning new skills, developing a friendship, and navigatin @kidlitexchange #partnerThank you to the #kidlitexchange network for the free review copy of Saving Winslow by @creechauthor•Animal lovers unite! A sweet, sweet boy tries to save a baby donkey in this one. Dad brings home a baby donkey whose mother has died and the baby likely will too. Louie, however, is determined to save him. Naming him Winslow, the boy and donkey soon have a deep bond.•This book is so charming because young Louie is learning new skills, developing a friendship, and navigating a baby animal all at the same time. This is a must read for young middle grade readers!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Joining Eeyore in books about donkeys is Winslow, a sickly baby donkey that comes into Louie's life right after his brother has gone off into military service. Louie and Winslow need each other, but it's also the effect a little gray donkey can have on a community. Creech is a masterful writer, creating in the reader feelings of sympathy and fondness for a creature without getting maudlin. Anxiety over Winslow's situation is just enough to create conflict without scaring young readers.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Love That Dog is a favorite, and I enjoyed Moo as well. This one didn't have quite the emotional resonance for me, but it also seems to be for a little younger audience. A sweet story of a boy and his pet donkey. I liked the quirky neighbor (more so than the main character) but found everyone's expectation and preoccupation with what they all assumed was an inevitable demise a little puzzling. Would you really be constantly asking a little kid if his pet was dead yet?
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  • Bekka
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Edelweiss and Harper Collins for early access to this title.What a sweet story! This is a gentle, realistic read for the tween-agers, or maybe a bit younger, about family and friendship and neighbors and a cute little grey donkey named Winslow. I can see this being a great read aloud in a family or classroom setting. Its a simple story with a lot of depth that can foster conversations about some tough situations kids may be going through. I thoroughly enjoyed this read!
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  • Cara Newman
    January 1, 1970
    Heartwarming story including themes of hope, friendship, and love. Immediately felt drawn to Louie and Nora. Loved their friendship and the hope they showed in Saving Winslow. Creech did a wonderful job developing Winslow’s character as well, readers can’t help falling in love with him and perhaps wanting to own a donkey as a pet as well. The book contains short chapters and is fast paced making it a perfect addition to all libraries!
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