Chasing New Horizons
Alan Stern and David Grinspoon take us behind the scenes of the science, politics, egos, and public expectations that fueled the greatest space mission of our time: New Horizons' misison to Pluto.On July 14, 2015, something amazing happened. More than 3 billion miles from Earth, a small NASA spacecraft called New Horizons screamed past Pluto at more than 32,000 miles per hour, focusing its instruments on the long mysterious icy worlds of the Pluto system, and then, just as quickly, continued on its journey out into the beyond.Nothing like this has occurred in a generation--a raw exploration of new worlds unparalleled since NASA's Voyager missions to Uranus and Neptune--and nothing like it is planned to happen ever again. The photos that New Horizons sent back to Earth graced the front pages of newspapers on all 7 continents, and NASA's website for the mission received more than 2 billion hits in the days surrounding the flyby. At a time when so many think our most historic achievements are in the past, the most distant planetary exploration ever attempted not only succeeded but made history and captured the world's imagination.How did this happen? Chasing New Horizons is the story of the men and women behind the mission: of their decades-long commitment; of the political fights within and outside of NASA; of the sheer human ingenuity it took to design, build, and fly the mission; and of the plans for New Horizons' next encounter, 1 billion miles past Pluto. Told from the insider's perspective of Dr. Alan Stern--the man who led the mission--Chasing New Horizons is a riveting story of scientific discovery, and of how far humanity can go when people focused on a dream work together toward their incredible goal.

Chasing New Horizons Details

TitleChasing New Horizons
Author
ReleaseMay 1st, 2018
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250098962
Rating
GenreScience, Nonfiction, Space, History, Astronomy

Chasing New Horizons Review

  • Stuart Rodriguez
    January 1, 1970
    In July 2015, the New Horizons space probe reached Pluto after a 10-year voyage and sent back the first clear pictures of our Solar System’s outermost neighbor. This is the inside story of how it happened, written by the scientists involved—but you don’t need to be an astronomer to enjoy this story. This book is exceptionally easy to read and understand, and provides fantastic insight into what it actually took to get this unlikely space mission off the ground. A must-read for fans of space expl In July 2015, the New Horizons space probe reached Pluto after a 10-year voyage and sent back the first clear pictures of our Solar System’s outermost neighbor. This is the inside story of how it happened, written by the scientists involved—but you don’t need to be an astronomer to enjoy this story. This book is exceptionally easy to read and understand, and provides fantastic insight into what it actually took to get this unlikely space mission off the ground. A must-read for fans of space exploration!
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  • Cherei
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating insider's experience from the mission conception to reaching Pluto! I totally enjoyed reading 'Chasing New Horizons: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto' by Alan Stern. I learned so much about NASA and how missions come about within the committee red-tape. They managed to bypass the usual pat on the head to actually getting folks excited about the need to explore the remainder of the planets in our solar system. It is somewhat fascinating how when the concept was first developing Fascinating insider's experience from the mission conception to reaching Pluto! I totally enjoyed reading 'Chasing New Horizons: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto' by Alan Stern. I learned so much about NASA and how missions come about within the committee red-tape. They managed to bypass the usual pat on the head to actually getting folks excited about the need to explore the remainder of the planets in our solar system. It is somewhat fascinating how when the concept was first developing that Pluto was considered a planet. Irregardless that Pluto has been reclassified.. man was finally able to visually see this enigmatic rock within reach of Earth!I'm hopeful that others will be inspired as I am after reading Alan Stern's compelling argument that mankind must continue to explore and hopefully.. begin sending humans beyond our moon. At this point.. I'd just love to see the moon with permanent inhabitants.
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  • nukie19
    January 1, 1970
    As a lifelong space geek, I wanted so badly to absolutely love this book and read about the Pluto mission. However, while the subject was so fantastically interesting, the writing left something to be desired. The first half of the book - before the mission launched into space - reads like just lists of names and job descriptions. And throughout, the switching between third and first person story telling is disjarring, as the layout doesn't always make it clear who talking. It does pick up a lot As a lifelong space geek, I wanted so badly to absolutely love this book and read about the Pluto mission. However, while the subject was so fantastically interesting, the writing left something to be desired. The first half of the book - before the mission launched into space - reads like just lists of names and job descriptions. And throughout, the switching between third and first person story telling is disjarring, as the layout doesn't always make it clear who talking. It does pick up a lot as the book gets closer to the Pluto flyby and its easy to get caught up in the excitement of mission success - but it wasn't enough to lift the entire book up in rating for me.Thanks to the publisher for providing an ARC through Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    A fascinating dive into the history of the New Horizons mission to Pluto. How it was conceived, planned, executed and much more. It’s a very interesting and engaging read and I found myself wishing I had been part of the mission team too. It is a book charting the history of Pluto’s discovery and all the steps to get a mission accepted, planned and on it’s way. What was missing, for me, was more information on the planetary geology. I wanted to know more about how Pluto formed, its orbital chara A fascinating dive into the history of the New Horizons mission to Pluto. How it was conceived, planned, executed and much more. It’s a very interesting and engaging read and I found myself wishing I had been part of the mission team too. It is a book charting the history of Pluto’s discovery and all the steps to get a mission accepted, planned and on it’s way. What was missing, for me, was more information on the planetary geology. I wanted to know more about how Pluto formed, its orbital characteristics and more in depth discussion on the theories of what’s going on. It’s a must read for any space fan though and you will enjoy it.
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  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    The recent excitement about space has sent me on a quest to devour all of the books about the subject currently being published. This one follows the proposal, development and travel of the New Horizons ship that initiated the first flyby of Pluto. Managing to be both full of science yet exciting and easy to read, this book proves that space exploration is still completely worth the large budgets and long hours. I received a digital ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Scott Kardel
    January 1, 1970
    Chasing New Horizons is the tale of how the New Horizons mission to Pluto came about and was flown. It wonderfully shows off just how difficult the mission was to pull off, not just technically, but in dealing with financial and bureaucratic challenges too. I very much enjoyed this history, not just for the inside look at how it all happened, but in giving an inspirational story that shows that with hard work and perseverance we can achieve great things.
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  • Book Swap
    January 1, 1970
    This book was full of science yet exciting and easy to read & understand. Fascinating look inside NASA.
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