New Kid
Perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier and Gene Luen Yang, New Kid is a timely, honest graphic novel about starting over at a new school where diversity is low and the struggle to fit in is real, from award-winning author-illustrator Jerry Craft.Seventh grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade.As he makes the daily trip from his Washington Heights apartment to the upscale Riverdale Academy Day School, Jordan soon finds himself torn between two worlds—and not really fitting into either one. Can Jordan learn to navigate his new school culture while keeping his neighborhood friends and staying true to himself?

New Kid Details

TitleNew Kid
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Fiction

New Kid Review

  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    This is a must have in all upper elementary and above classrooms. This book is packed with bias and micro aggressions that are important for kids to read and understand -especially kids that live in areas with little to no racial diversity. I cannot wait to hand this off to my students and see what they think.
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Gaps. Sometimes they’re all that I can see.Imagine you have a brain that allows you to retain information in compartmentalized slots. You have chosen the field of “librarian” so this trait is useful in your day-to-day work. As you read children’s books over the course of a year, you categorize each one. You note similarities, differences, and books that don’t strike you as like anything else out there. And you continue to keep track year after year, building up your knowledge, tracking what you’ Gaps. Sometimes they’re all that I can see.Imagine you have a brain that allows you to retain information in compartmentalized slots. You have chosen the field of “librarian” so this trait is useful in your day-to-day work. As you read children’s books over the course of a year, you categorize each one. You note similarities, differences, and books that don’t strike you as like anything else out there. And you continue to keep track year after year, building up your knowledge, tracking what you’ve seen. Now I’ve been in the children’s librarianship business for quite a while. Along the way, I’ve identified the areas that I really prefer to read. Comics, for example, are great. I’m a big time fan. Better still, comics are seeing a real Renaissance lately. Publishers of every stripe are stepping up to the challenge, providing graphic literature for the hungry young masses. It’s an amazing time to be a comic reader or creator. So tell me this. All those comics out there. All that time. All that energy. Why is it, then, that I cannot come up with a single comic out there for kids that stars a contemporary black boy who doesn’t have super powers? Oh, I can think of the superpowered comics of Miles Morales or the highly charming Sci-Fu. I can think of comics where the black kid is paired with someone else (Lost in NYC) or is part of a large group (“Cardboard Kingdom”). Honestly only one book comes to mind and that’s Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty by Greg Neri and, let me tell you, even though he’s the title character, practically the first thing you learn about Yummy is that he’s dead. Do you see, then, why New Kid is such a rarity? Into this gaping void comes a book with a simple fish out of water premise. What sets it apart, though, is how it chooses to realistically deal with all the crap a kid like Jordan Banks has to contend with in his day-to-day life. Blisteringly honest with a respect for young readers that is sadly uncommon, Jerry Craft has created something revolutionary: An everyday black boy in a comic for kids. Middle school is hard. Switching schools is hard. Now imagine switching to a private middle school where you’re one of the few black kids there. Jordan Banks is a seventh grader with a dream. He wants to go to art school where he can let his drawings soar. Instead, he finds himself at hoity-toity Riverdale Academy Day School. It’s okay and the kids are generally pretty nice (with some notable exceptions) but Jordan can’t help noticing things. Teachers who get the black kids' names mixed up. Classmates that get away with murder. Privilege privilege privilege. The longer he stays, the more he sees. The more he sees, the more he understands. And the more he understands, the better prepared he’s going to be for the real world out there.It was only a few years ago that I learned the term “microaggression”. Basically it means, “everyday verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults, whether intentional or unintentional, which communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages to target persons based solely upon their marginalized group membership.” With that definition in hand, New Kid can feel like a crash course in how to make someone feel bad. Like a composer of a symphony, Craft gathers together every possible microaggression in his arsenal and weaves them into a comprehensive story. To do this, Craft assembles a crack team of awful people. You have the well-meaning teacher who’s threatened by any student of color raising issues with her (she calls Jordan’s comics a polemic, “against everything this school stands for. And me!”). You have the white kid that makes everyone’s life a misery but never gets called out on it. There are teachers that call the other black teachers “coach” even though they’ve known them for years. A librarian who only hands the black kids books about struggle and hardship (starring other black kids, naturally). With great care, Craft filters these people and moments throughout the book, managing to balance the heavy moments with lighter ones. Even when the story is serious, though, it manages to lighten the tension with ease. The end result is that a kid doesn’t feel like they’re getting info on the state of the world today, but they are. Oh boy howdy, they are.Truth be told, I wouldn’t necessarily call this a plot forward comic. There’s no overarching goal that Jordan’s reaching for the whole time. Basically, he’s trying to survive middle school in the day-to-day, and we’re just surviving there alongside him. I was a little surprised, since I assumed Craft was going to make this center on Jordan’s struggle with his desire to go to art school. Instead, that dream just sorta peters out, though he retains his love of drawing. The end result is a book with form but no drive. Looking back on it, the climax comes when Jordan stands up to some of those people that have made him feel awful. He confronts what’s wrong with the system and, if he doesn’t dismantle it, he at least takes it down a peg. In light of that, I didn’t mind so much the book’s easygoing plotting. Sometimes, though, I did yearn for more clarification. For example, there’s an odd plot point where one of the kids at school is kicked out because he’s on financial aid, but the school found out he accompanied another student to Hawaii over break. It’s a throwaway moment, and maybe things like that happen with real private schools, but I found it a bit confusing and it was never really visited again after the initial discovery. And then I started thinking about what I could possibly compare this book to. For a lot of kids, comics used to be pure escapism and nothing else. What changed? On the adult side of the equation you had Maus talking about the Holocaust (albeit with mice). On the kids’ side? I think of some of the most popular authors of graphic novels for middle grade readers these days. Cece Bell, Raina Telgemeier, Jeff Kinney (if you count Wimpy Kid), Vera Brosgol, Victoria Jamieson, Shannon Hale, etc. What all these folks have in common is their willingness to tell stories about real kids (often themselves) dealing with real problems. What else do they have in common? They’re all white. We know from the We Need Diverse Books movement that a lack of diverse points of view has always been a problem in children’s literature, but it seems to have been taken to an extreme case in comics. What do I compare this book to? Itself. And let me tell you, it would be noteworthy, interesting, fun, and thought provoking even if there were hundreds of books out there starring historically marginalized kids. More than just the sum of its parts, Craft has created a book with guts, that kids will want to read multiple times. Funny, whip smart stuff.For ages 9 and up.
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  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Jordan is the new kid in seventh grade. And he's not going to art school like he wanted—he's going to a fancy new private school where he's one of a handful of students of color. He's not sure if he's going to fit in...but he's going to try.This was such fun to read. Jordan's world-view and how he frames things are hilarious and introspective, and his drawings are just the cutest things on the planet. I loved that he was able to expand his mind, and even though he still wanted to go to art schoo Jordan is the new kid in seventh grade. And he's not going to art school like he wanted—he's going to a fancy new private school where he's one of a handful of students of color. He's not sure if he's going to fit in...but he's going to try.This was such fun to read. Jordan's world-view and how he frames things are hilarious and introspective, and his drawings are just the cutest things on the planet. I loved that he was able to expand his mind, and even though he still wanted to go to art school and pursue his passion at the end of the novel, he realized that he really was able to enjoy all three of his favorite Chinese foods (it's a metaphor, I promise!) and not just have to stick to only one. He could enjoy private school and his private school friends, and he could stay true to his Washington Heights roots.It was also uncomfortable, because it highlights how problematic good intentions can be. Jordan faces a thousand and one micro-aggressions from his white liberal-minded teachers who get so caught up on race that they fail to see the person behind the color—and get upset when they are called out on their prejudice.And then there's the massive shout-out against kidlit geared towards children of color, particularly black children. White kids get fantasy stories of Riordian proportions. Black kids? Get issue books, filled with gritty urban kids doing gritty things in their gritty lifestyle.How depressing.And how utterly frustrating.In addition to racism (both overt and covert) there is colorism, as Jordan has light skin—and he gets to deal with his richer white classmates teasing him for their darker tans when they return from fancy trips abroad during the various school breaks. With that, there's a good deal of classism involved, with the rich students flaunting their wealth and the poor students (who are often from marginalized communities—save Maury, who gets lumped in with the "poor" kids because he is black even though his dad runs a Fortune 500 company) being targeted for having financial aid (and getting penalized for getting too uppity, like going on a vacation that they shouldn't be able to afford if they couldn't pay for the full costs of the school).But like everything else in this graphic novel, there is nuance to the classism. Liam, for example, just wants to be an ordinary student. Not a legacy. Not a rich kid. Not pretentious. He wants to be judged for himself and not his family's extravagant wealth.Jordan is on financial aid, and able to attend the prestigious school because he's smart—and he's forced to go to the school because his mother wants to ensure that he has every advantage he can possibility have to get a leg up in life.And there is Drew, labeled the aggressive black student because he stood up to a racist teacher, even though he made the honor roll each semester and was the starting quarterback.And finally, there is Alexandra, who proves that first impressions (and third, and fourth, and fifth) really don't tell you everything about a person.If you enjoy Raina Telgemeier or Svetlana Chmakova, this is a definite win.
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  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    This is going to be THE most talked about graphic novel in the new year. This is a story that needs to be read and then talked about. Every single chapter had me shaking my head yes. Swipe right to see just two pages of serious truth that readers and teachers alike need to be reading. Out February 2019
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    A FANTASTIC middle grade graphic novel. A necessary addition for any school/classroom library. Approaches subtle & overt racism in an accessible & understandable way for the audience, while not holding back, through the lens of the new kid at school.
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  • Lynn Plourde
    January 1, 1970
    NEW KID is fun and funny at the same time it portrays serious "fitting in at school" issues. Mega kid-appeal!
  • Nilah
    January 1, 1970
    There's so much like to like about NEW KID. The terrific art, supplemented by main character Jordan's own comic journal-style observations. The journey through navigating a new school, new friendships, and new conflicts. The theme of not judging a book by its cover woven throughout. And I found the perspective of a Black kid in an environment that's not used to Blackness, where teachers constantly confuse you with That Other Black Kid They Remember and push critically-acclaimed stories of Black There's so much like to like about NEW KID. The terrific art, supplemented by main character Jordan's own comic journal-style observations. The journey through navigating a new school, new friendships, and new conflicts. The theme of not judging a book by its cover woven throughout. And I found the perspective of a Black kid in an environment that's not used to Blackness, where teachers constantly confuse you with That Other Black Kid They Remember and push critically-acclaimed stories of Black Struggle™ off on you, and only you, to be particularly relatable. But I was not prepared for how FUNNY the story is! Craft employs visual gags to heighten Jordan's comical observations on his new school, playing soccer for the first time, quality time with his grandfather, and his keen desire for a growth spurt. Craft even sneaks humor into the chapter breaks. This graphic novel is a hefty 250 pages which offers plenty of story to read and re-read.
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  • Georgia
    January 1, 1970
    This was so good!
  • Katie Reilley
    January 1, 1970
    Necessary graphic novel that deals with the topic of racism in middle school. I'll be curious to hear what my students notice and the conversations that will come because of the reading.
  • Jordan Henrichs
    January 1, 1970
    There's a lot to like about NEW KID...First off, there's more substance than your typical middle grade graphic novel. Reminds me of Victoria Jamieson's work. Jordan was a really strong character. He's thoughtful and creative and I appreciated how positive he remained despite questioning some of his feelings and friendships. And his questions felt so realistic. He was definitely a character that many kids will probably relate to. I will say, this is an interesting take on race, in that often time There's a lot to like about NEW KID...First off, there's more substance than your typical middle grade graphic novel. Reminds me of Victoria Jamieson's work. Jordan was a really strong character. He's thoughtful and creative and I appreciated how positive he remained despite questioning some of his feelings and friendships. And his questions felt so realistic. He was definitely a character that many kids will probably relate to. I will say, this is an interesting take on race, in that often times Jordan and Drew were the ones who jumped to incorrect conclusions about people at their school. Sure, there were people they encountered that were either ignorant (Andy) or rude (Mrs. Rawle) and I'm not sure how much those two particular characters learned in the end, but those characters were in the minority. In fact, Jordan didn't really struggle to fit in as much as I expected him to. All in all, I don't expect this book to sit on shelves very long, because kids will be swiping it left and right.
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  • Thomas Bell
    January 1, 1970
    This was an exceptionally good book. Dealt a lot with life in general for a kid. A lot of people are calling it a book about race, and it definitely dealt with that, but I think it is a lot more than that.So Jordan got a scholarship to go to a fancy-pants private middle-school. He learns about life as a middle-schooler, and not only that but being the new kid as well. Many of the students already knew each other. And he deals with people not understanding him (and him not understanding them) for This was an exceptionally good book. Dealt a lot with life in general for a kid. A lot of people are calling it a book about race, and it definitely dealt with that, but I think it is a lot more than that.So Jordan got a scholarship to go to a fancy-pants private middle-school. He learns about life as a middle-schooler, and not only that but being the new kid as well. Many of the students already knew each other. And he deals with people not understanding him (and him not understanding them) for a whole bunch of reasons. But on the way, he makes a bunch of friends and helps some of them to be friends with each other. And by the end of the book he is a 'new' kid. :-)I can definitely see the problem with stereotyping all white people as racist and committing 'microagressions' constantly by our nature as being white. It did kind of feel that way at first, but we must remember that the author is only putting in the most memorable experiences, naturally with the one idiot teacher who kept getting his name wrong. We also must see the art teacher, and Jordan's friends Alexandria and Laim - all whiter than white characters who didn't give a darn what color anyone was.And of course, the book is funny. It's very funny. You should read it!
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    An outstanding middle grade graphic novel about not only being the new kid in a new school, but about the ways privilege, bias, and racism -- both overt and subtle -- play out. Jordan attends a wealthy school on financial aid and is one of the few kids of color there; he experiences incredible micro and macro aggressions, and as a light skinned black boy, he sees racism play out in a variety of horrifying ways. The art in this is fantastic, and Craft imbues so much pop culture in this book in fu An outstanding middle grade graphic novel about not only being the new kid in a new school, but about the ways privilege, bias, and racism -- both overt and subtle -- play out. Jordan attends a wealthy school on financial aid and is one of the few kids of color there; he experiences incredible micro and macro aggressions, and as a light skinned black boy, he sees racism play out in a variety of horrifying ways. The art in this is fantastic, and Craft imbues so much pop culture in this book in fun and funny ways. Each chapter references a movie in some capacity and puts Jordan into it (The Hunger Games and West Side Story and Fight Club, etc). Interspersed throughout the narrative are panels from Jordan's own art, which showcase more of his internal experience than we're privy to otherwise; he's an artist and we get to see that play out. One of the most moving moments in the story is when Jordan is forced to sit with "the weird puppet girl" and finally learns why it is she's always wearing a weird puppet and doing weird things. He has a reckoning about his own judgements and biases, and he uses this as an opportunity to destigmatize her experiences. He also learns to stand up and be a leader, calling out injustices where he sees them, even when it makes him sick to do so.A smart book for the middle grade set and one that'll resonate deeply with kids of color who see themselves in Jordan and for white kids who'll see themselves in those positions of privilege. There's also a lot of spot-on commentary here about financial privilege, on gifting, and on judgement of those who are in the haves and those who are in the have nots. Hand to fans of Raina Telgemeier or Gene Luen Yang.
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  • Sam Bloom
    January 1, 1970
    The MG graphic novel field is whiter than most kidlit formats, so this book is a HUGE deal. And there's really nothing better than a book with kid appeal through the roof that is also top-notch quality. Hooray for this book!!!
  • Donna Gephart
    January 1, 1970
    This book will mean the world to so many kids, who will see themselves on the page, who will feel less alone, who will feel validated. It's an honest look at what it feels like to be "other" in a space that is mostly white, mostly wealthy. It's got so much heart and moments of great humor. This one will be read and re-read and re-read again.
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  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so darn clever. A young person of colour has a scholarship for a fancy school and his day to day experiences with micro-aggressions are faithfully documented. It's smart and funny and totally hits the target. We need more books like this - like one for girls as well. I have just the incident for the girls one - a teacher in assembly last week saying "well done boys" to the robotics team - that included a girl.
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  • Casey Jo
    January 1, 1970
    OMG! So good!!! Funny as heck, without shying away from the awkwardness of being one of a few Black kids at a private academy. The friendships are heartwarming, and the privilege is acrid. And the artwork by the MC is delightful.Note: This is a review of an Advance Reader Copy. The comment below references a fat joke that was taken out of the final version. Yay for thoughtful editing!!!
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  • Anmiryam
    January 1, 1970
    A pitch perfect look at a life as a minority kid straddling cultures -- his neighborhood, his family and his tony new school environment. I want to hand this out to every kid (and every parent) heading into middle school at the many independent schools in my community. Fun and moving.
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  • Kelli Gleiner
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable graphic novel, full of smart humor and bite-sized, accessible social commentary for the middle-grade crowd. Loved the comics within the comics.
  • Mrs. Krajewski
    January 1, 1970
    7th grader Jordan Banks wants to go to art school, but his parents have other ideas. They decide to enroll him in a private school that focuses on academics, and it’s nowhere near his Washington Heights home. When Jordan starts there, he realizes he is one of the only kids of color in his grade. He immediately believes going to this school is a mistake. He misses his old friends from the neighborhood, and he’s not really sure how to fit in with his new classmates. Thankfully Jordan has his sketc 7th grader Jordan Banks wants to go to art school, but his parents have other ideas. They decide to enroll him in a private school that focuses on academics, and it’s nowhere near his Washington Heights home. When Jordan starts there, he realizes he is one of the only kids of color in his grade. He immediately believes going to this school is a mistake. He misses his old friends from the neighborhood, and he’s not really sure how to fit in with his new classmates. Thankfully Jordan has his sketchbook to document it all. What a gorgeous graphic novel! So many kids will connect with Jordan’s story, no matter if they’re in elementary, middle, or high school. I plan to share this widely.
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  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this graphic novel was spot on and perfect for addressing racism and bias drawing from the lens of students of color. Very powerful #ownvoices story. I’m anxious to get this in the hands of my students and to hear their thoughts.
  • Aliza Werner
    January 1, 1970
    More than 5 stars!!! This #OwnVoices graphic novel is deeply authentic and richly layered in its themes of friendship, assimilation, identity, and more. This would be fascinating to use in teacher training programs and with current teachers in regard to discussing microaggressions, inherent bias, deficit mindsets, assumptions, power structures, and racial identity. This book is perfection and can’t wait to see more from author Jerry Craft.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Young Adult Books CentralJordan is not thrilled to be going to a private school several neighborhoods away from his home in Washington Heights, New York City, since it means leaving his best friend and having to deal with a whole new social class of peers. Also, if he has to go to a new school, he wishes it were an art school instead, since drawing comics is one of his favorite things to do. He is picked up the first day by his student guide, Liam, who is fairly uncommunicative, ARC provided by Young Adult Books CentralJordan is not thrilled to be going to a private school several neighborhoods away from his home in Washington Heights, New York City, since it means leaving his best friend and having to deal with a whole new social class of peers. Also, if he has to go to a new school, he wishes it were an art school instead, since drawing comics is one of his favorite things to do. He is picked up the first day by his student guide, Liam, who is fairly uncommunicative, and is thrown into a sea of mainly white faces. There is a boy who is Nicaraguan, although classmates give him a hard time about being Mexican, and a few African-American students. The teachers seem to have no idea how to deal with students who are not white, frequently calling Jordan and Drew the names of other students, to the point where the two make a joke of calling each other things like Ja'vion and Darius. Jordan not only feels like he doesn't fit in at his new school, but he also feels that being in the new school disconnects him from his Washington Heights crowd. He does manage to make a few friends, including the nice but super annoying Alex, who wears a hand puppet and talks in puppet voices. Eventually, Jordan learns to embrace his pink-short wearing new community and realizes he can make his two worlds work together. Having taught at an expensive private school, I can certainly commiserate with Jordan's experiences. Unless you are born into extreme wealth, being thrust into a world where people take skiing vacations during Thanksgiving and have win at PTA meetings is bewildering! Add the lack of cultural diversity at the school, and it's little wonder that Jordan spends most of the year hiding inside his hoodie. (Because 50% of all middle schoolers hide in their hoodies!)The other characters are also realistic. I loved that Liam was embarased enough by his wealth that Jordan occasionally thought he might be a scholarship student, too. Alex is absolutely a very common middle school type as well, although the addition of a reason for her to be quirky and odd was novel-- I've had a lot of cat-ear-wearing students whom other students think are odd who act this way for no reason at all! It's nice that there are a number of different reactions to cultural differences at the school, some of which are nice and some of which aren't. The students all have their reasons for acting the way they do, and most are understanding. I just wish the same could be said of the teacher characters, who were rather mean or misguided with no motivation to be so. The illustrations are unique, pleasantly colored (love the use of "salmon"!) and highly expressive. Like the work of Victoria Jamieson or the Holm's this is both easy to read but also has some meat to the plot, which is sometimes not the case in graphic novels. I've been waiting a long time for more graphic novels with African-American main characters. Robinson's Jake the Fake and Patterson's Public School Super Hero are a good starting point (I still want to see Robb Armstrong do one!), and Craft's work illustrating other writer's work is good, but this whole graphic novel is well-balanced and fun for any middle school reader who likes this medium.
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  • Marjorie Ingall
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Such an ambitious and accomplished first graphic novel, and I love the drawing style (reminds me of Mimi Pond). This is pretty much a book about microaggressions. The story of future-cartoonist Jordan's first year at a ritzy private school can be distressing, but it's also hilarious and hopeful, with a huge cast. My 14-year-old (who tends to like books with younger protagonists and is a huge graphic novel fan) adored it too; as soon as she finished she started again. She's read it 4 or 5 ti Wow. Such an ambitious and accomplished first graphic novel, and I love the drawing style (reminds me of Mimi Pond). This is pretty much a book about microaggressions. The story of future-cartoonist Jordan's first year at a ritzy private school can be distressing, but it's also hilarious and hopeful, with a huge cast. My 14-year-old (who tends to like books with younger protagonists and is a huge graphic novel fan) adored it too; as soon as she finished she started again. She's read it 4 or 5 times in a couple of weeks. I read it two days after the Operation Varsity Blues story broke (wealthy white parents bribing their spawn's way into college, I preemptively remind the Ghost of Goodreads Future) and I kept thinking this book would be a great way to help explain the news to a 10- to 14-year-old reader. The salmon-shorts-wearing white kid in Jordan's class with a building named after his grandfather and the teacher who thinks she's liberal but keeps mixing up the names of two black students who look and act nothing alike (and her immediate willingness to believe a wealthy white student when there's a conflict) feel pretty resonant. Also, I loved the twisting of familiar brand names: Those salmon shorts that all the rich kids wear come from "Grapevine Groves."(Also LOL'd at the snarky depiction of contemporary kidlit with African-American protagonists, like "Gritty: A gritty, urban reminder of the grit of today's urban grittiness.")
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars, rounded up.LOVE the clever chapter titles. And the pink shorts. And Jordan's art. And the unflinching look at micro- and macro-aggressions.
  • Heather Taake
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it! I think it would pair well with The Hate You Give, in that it explores the character's struggle to fit in to different cultures at school and in their neighborhood.
  • Suad Shamma
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really interesting take on race, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved the artwork, I liked the storyline, and I liked the characters. I found Jordan to be a really cool kid, with good parents. I loved the differing perspectives of his mom and dad, and how even thought, at first, you are inclined to stand with the dad against the mom, at the end you realize that his mom had the hindsight that the rest of us were missing.I will say going into it, I expected a little more conflict from t This was a really interesting take on race, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved the artwork, I liked the storyline, and I liked the characters. I found Jordan to be a really cool kid, with good parents. I loved the differing perspectives of his mom and dad, and how even thought, at first, you are inclined to stand with the dad against the mom, at the end you realize that his mom had the hindsight that the rest of us were missing.I will say going into it, I expected a little more conflict from the plot. A little more hardship maybe. It didn't feel to me like Jordan had such a hard time adjusting, to tell you the truth. Also, going into it, I didn't realize that this was a graphic novel targeted towards middle grade, didn't take much from my enjoyment of it though.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't really planning on picking this up, but I found it as an ebook and graphic novels never take too long to read. I really liked that it tackled so many aspects of racism (especially getting into specifics given that the protagonist, Jordan, is light-skinned - you can tell Craft really knows how to write about race and convey more than the minimum), mostly for black communities but there were students from other backgrounds.I wasn't a fan of the art - it really reminded me of 00s webcomics I wasn't really planning on picking this up, but I found it as an ebook and graphic novels never take too long to read. I really liked that it tackled so many aspects of racism (especially getting into specifics given that the protagonist, Jordan, is light-skinned - you can tell Craft really knows how to write about race and convey more than the minimum), mostly for black communities but there were students from other backgrounds.I wasn't a fan of the art - it really reminded me of 00s webcomics and looked sloppy at points. Also, while this is aimed at a younger audience, the storyline was pretty basic. I think it's a good introduction for a more complex conversation about racism, but there's a lot out there that does it better.Overall, this was fine, but it didn't blow my mind.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Besides just being a pitch perfect middle school story of growing up, fitting in, and dealing with bullies, NEW KID is also a perfect book to hand off to any tween (or adult) who struggles to understand the impact of bias and privilege on students and families of color who live and work in predominantly white spaces. Craft smooths this additional layer of social and emotional anxiety into the story in such a seamless way that no reader will leave the page without a new understanding of the "new Besides just being a pitch perfect middle school story of growing up, fitting in, and dealing with bullies, NEW KID is also a perfect book to hand off to any tween (or adult) who struggles to understand the impact of bias and privilege on students and families of color who live and work in predominantly white spaces. Craft smooths this additional layer of social and emotional anxiety into the story in such a seamless way that no reader will leave the page without a new understanding of the "new kid."
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  • Vicki
    January 1, 1970
    I always feel a little weird when it comes to writing reviews for middle grade books, so I rarely do it or if I do, I keep it to a minimum, which I will endeavor to do here and now. It's one thing for a 30-something to be reading YA, but for her to read MG too? Idk, maybe it's all in my head.But New Kid is a phenomenal read no matter your age, and an important one. It's not a gritty tale of a young 12-year-old boy being the new kid, and one of the very few kids of color, at a prestigious mostly I always feel a little weird when it comes to writing reviews for middle grade books, so I rarely do it or if I do, I keep it to a minimum, which I will endeavor to do here and now. It's one thing for a 30-something to be reading YA, but for her to read MG too? Idk, maybe it's all in my head.But New Kid is a phenomenal read no matter your age, and an important one. It's not a gritty tale of a young 12-year-old boy being the new kid, and one of the very few kids of color, at a prestigious mostly white school; it's light, but also deals with many important issues, and does so honestly, too. And in fact, the expectation that any work of fiction dealing with black issues, or targeted at a black audience, must be "gritty" is something that's touched upon in this graphic novel as well. And that's one of many. Microaggressions, immediately assuming Things about a black student because of the color of their skin for better or for worse, trying so hard not to be offensive that you're kind of offensive, overcoming prejudices across the board for all of our characters... it's all handled brilliantly.
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  • Cortney (cortingbooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Mini Me Rating and Review: the chapter names were interesting.
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