New Kid
Perfect for fans of Raina Telgemeier and Gene Luen Yang, New Kid is a timely, honest graphic novel about starting over at a new school where diversity is low and the struggle to fit in is real, from award-winning author-illustrator Jerry Craft.Seventh grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade.As he makes the daily trip from his Washington Heights apartment to the upscale Riverdale Academy Day School, Jordan soon finds himself torn between two worlds—and not really fitting into either one. Can Jordan learn to navigate his new school culture while keeping his neighborhood friends and staying true to himself?

New Kid Details

TitleNew Kid
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction

New Kid Review

  • Cassie Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    This is going to be THE most talked about graphic novel in the new year. This is a story that needs to be read and then talked about. Every single chapter had me shaking my head yes. Swipe right to see just two pages of serious truth that readers and teachers alike need to be reading. Out February 2019
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  • Anmiryam
    January 1, 1970
    A pitch perfect look at a life as a minority kid straddling cultures -- his neighborhood, his family and his tony new school environment. I want to hand this out to every kid (and every parent) heading into middle school at the many independent schools in my community. Fun and moving.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    An outstanding middle grade graphic novel about not only being the new kid in a new school, but about the ways privilege, bias, and racism -- both overt and subtle -- play out. Jordan attends a wealthy school on financial aid and is one of the few kids of color there; he experiences incredible micro and macro aggressions, and as a light skinned black boy, he sees racism play out in a variety of horrifying ways. The art in this is fantastic, and Craft imbues so much pop culture in this book in fu An outstanding middle grade graphic novel about not only being the new kid in a new school, but about the ways privilege, bias, and racism -- both overt and subtle -- play out. Jordan attends a wealthy school on financial aid and is one of the few kids of color there; he experiences incredible micro and macro aggressions, and as a light skinned black boy, he sees racism play out in a variety of horrifying ways. The art in this is fantastic, and Craft imbues so much pop culture in this book in fun and funny ways. Each chapter references a movie in some capacity and puts Jordan into it (The Hunger Games and West Side Story and Fight Club, etc). Interspersed throughout the narrative are panels from Jordan's own art, which showcase more of his internal experience than we're privy to otherwise; he's an artist and we get to see that play out. One of the most moving moments in the story is when Jordan is forced to sit with "the weird puppet girl" and finally learns why it is she's always wearing a weird puppet and doing weird things. He has a reckoning about his own judgements and biases, and he uses this as an opportunity to destigmatize her experiences. He also learns to stand up and be a leader, calling out injustices where he sees them, even when it makes him sick to do so.A smart book for the middle grade set and one that'll resonate deeply with kids of color who see themselves in Jordan and for white kids who'll see themselves in those positions of privilege. There's also a lot of spot-on commentary here about financial privilege, on gifting, and on judgement of those who are in the haves and those who are in the have nots. Hand to fans of Raina Telgemeier or Gene Luen Yang.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Besides just being a pitch perfect middle school story of growing up, fitting in, and dealing with bullies, NEW KID is also a perfect book to hand off to any tween (or adult) who struggles to understand the impact of bias and privilege on students and families of color who live and work in predominantly white spaces. Craft smooths this additional layer of social and emotional anxiety into the story in such a seamless way that no reader will leave the page without a new understanding of the "new Besides just being a pitch perfect middle school story of growing up, fitting in, and dealing with bullies, NEW KID is also a perfect book to hand off to any tween (or adult) who struggles to understand the impact of bias and privilege on students and families of color who live and work in predominantly white spaces. Craft smooths this additional layer of social and emotional anxiety into the story in such a seamless way that no reader will leave the page without a new understanding of the "new kid."
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  • Kelli Gleiner
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable graphic novel, full of smart humor and bite-sized, accessible social commentary for the middle-grade crowd. Loved the comics within the comics.
  • Casey Jo
    January 1, 1970
    OMG! So good!!! Funny as heck, without shying away from the awkwardness of being one of a few Black kids at a private academy. The friendships are heartwarming, and the privilege is acrid. And the artwork by the MC is delightful.Note: This is a review of an Advance Reader Copy. The comment below references a fat joke that was taken out of the final version. Yay for thoughtful editing!!!
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Young Adult Books CentralJordan is not thrilled to be going to a private school several neighborhoods away from his home in Washington Heights, New York City, since it means leaving his best friend and having to deal with a whole new social class of peers. Also, if he has to go to a new school, he wishes it were an art school instead, since drawing comics is one of his favorite things to do. He is picked up the first day by his student guide, Liam, who is fairly uncommunicative, ARC provided by Young Adult Books CentralJordan is not thrilled to be going to a private school several neighborhoods away from his home in Washington Heights, New York City, since it means leaving his best friend and having to deal with a whole new social class of peers. Also, if he has to go to a new school, he wishes it were an art school instead, since drawing comics is one of his favorite things to do. He is picked up the first day by his student guide, Liam, who is fairly uncommunicative, and is thrown into a sea of mainly white faces. There is a boy who is Nicaraguan, although classmates give him a hard time about being Mexican, and a few African-American students. The teachers seem to have no idea how to deal with students who are not white, frequently calling Jordan and Drew the names of other students, to the point where the two make a joke of calling each other things like Ja'vion and Darius. Jordan not only feels like he doesn't fit in at his new school, but he also feels that being in the new school disconnects him from his Washington Heights crowd. He does manage to make a few friends, including the nice but super annoying Alex, who wears a hand puppet and talks in puppet voices. Eventually, Jordan learns to embrace his pink-short wearing new community and realizes he can make his two worlds work together. Having taught at an expensive private school, I can certainly commiserate with Jordan's experiences. Unless you are born into extreme wealth, being thrust into a world where people take skiing vacations during Thanksgiving and have win at PTA meetings is bewildering! Add the lack of cultural diversity at the school, and it's little wonder that Jordan spends most of the year hiding inside his hoodie. (Because 50% of all middle schoolers hide in their hoodies!)The other characters are also realistic. I loved that Liam was embarased enough by his wealth that Jordan occasionally thought he might be a scholarship student, too. Alex is absolutely a very common middle school type as well, although the addition of a reason for her to be quirky and odd was novel-- I've had a lot of cat-ear-wearing students whom other students think are odd who act this way for no reason at all! It's nice that there are a number of different reactions to cultural differences at the school, some of which are nice and some of which aren't. The students all have their reasons for acting the way they do, and most are understanding. I just wish the same could be said of the teacher characters, who were rather mean or misguided with no motivation to be so. The illustrations are unique, pleasantly colored (love the use of "salmon"!) and highly expressive. Like the work of Victoria Jamieson or the Holm's this is both easy to read but also has some meat to the plot, which is sometimes not the case in graphic novels. I've been waiting a long time for more graphic novels with African-American main characters. Robinson's Jake the Fake and Patterson's Public School Super Hero are a good starting point (I still want to see Robb Armstrong do one!), and Craft's work illustrating other writer's work is good, but this whole graphic novel is well-balanced and fun for any middle school reader who likes this medium.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed a lot--so many Black (and general POC!) inside jokes :D
  • Nichole
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first graphic novel I've ever read and I loved it. Fun, funny, and important, you'll finish this, put it down, and exclaim "wait a minute, I've learned something :)"
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Jordan has been doomed to the status of "new kid" when he begins seventh grade at a private school; sure, he has a scholarship and his parents are in love with the academic "prestige" that comes with the fancy school, but this is nothing like the art school he had his heart set on. His commute from Washington Heights into the wealthy, primarily white side of New York only serves to highlight his feelings of being an outsider. With his trusty pencil and comics, along with some good friends, Jorda Jordan has been doomed to the status of "new kid" when he begins seventh grade at a private school; sure, he has a scholarship and his parents are in love with the academic "prestige" that comes with the fancy school, but this is nothing like the art school he had his heart set on. His commute from Washington Heights into the wealthy, primarily white side of New York only serves to highlight his feelings of being an outsider. With his trusty pencil and comics, along with some good friends, Jordan hopes to find somewhere he truly fits.Craft takes the well-known and popular story of the "outsider" and casts it in a new light to appeal to a diverse audience and to reach out and tell an entire generation that they're not alone in feeling alone. This graphic novel touches on several topics of "otherness" that kids become more aware of as they grow up including race, financial disparities, and power imbalances in its many forms. Adults and kids alike are shown to have their strengths and flaws and, most notably, are called out on their behavior or assumptions.Despite tackling big issues, this title also has a light-hearted side that most often appears in Jordan's talented drawings, showing an exaggerated view of his dilemmas that are silly but will ring true to many young readers. For example, when Jordan's parents begin discussing his "future plans" in front of him (without acknowledging his presence, of course), Jordan de-ages in each panel until we finally see him as a small baby; this metaphor will easily get a laugh and a, "I know how that feels," reaction from its audience.The illustrations in this ARC are in black and white with a brief 8 page preview of how the final product will look with color. This gave me a better idea of the author's vision for the scenes and characters and will undoubtedly bring in more readers when they see a book of glossy, colorized illustrations. Even with black and white pages, the author's talent shines through with realistic character and scene depictions and shading that hints at panels to be filled with colors.
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  • Christina Carter
    January 1, 1970
    Please Note: This is a review of an advance reader’s edition | New Kid is scheduled to release February 2019. Thank you to Jerry Craft & HarperCollins Children’s Books for sending New Kid on a #BookExcursion.Jordan Banks is the new kid at one of the best private schools in the state that offers a wealth of academic and extra-curricular opportunities and experiences for its students and while its prestige is praiseworthy, it is woefully lacking in diversity. Jordan is one of a small number of Please Note: This is a review of an advance reader’s edition | New Kid is scheduled to release February 2019. Thank you to Jerry Craft & HarperCollins Children’s Books for sending New Kid on a #BookExcursion.Jordan Banks is the new kid at one of the best private schools in the state that offers a wealth of academic and extra-curricular opportunities and experiences for its students and while its prestige is praiseworthy, it is woefully lacking in diversity. Jordan is one of a small number of students of color at the school but just like every other twelve-year-old middle school student has to navigate making new friends, avoiding awkward crushes, getting good grades, and making time to do what he loves most-drawing cartoons. His art is embedded throughout the text and gives the reader an inside look at Jordan’s thoughts on well, just about everything. His drawings are informative, oftentimes laugh-out-loud hilarious, and honest. This book is sure to be a hit and I cannot wait for its release in early 2019.There’s a gaping void as it concerns the representation of African American youths in books in general across all genres but especially in graphic novels. Jerry Craft expertly enters into this space and gifts us with New Kid. It is a relevant read. A cool, down-to-earth middle school story for everyone. I want to hug this book! I want to read it over and over and then wrap it up and give a copy to every child I know. No doubt that Jerry Craft upholds his mission to “write the books he wishes he had when he was a kid” because this is the sort of book I wish I’d had as a child. No offense to The Baby-Sitters Club series from back in my day, but what about books with characters that look like me and share in my experiences? I would have loved a book like this!If it were possible, I would travel back in time to 1988 and give this book to my 11-year-old self, specifically right before I moved from Long Island to Buffalo. The year I became the New Kid. I didn’t attend a private school but I was that Black adolescent girl navigating a new school in a predominantly White neighborhood. I can relate to feeling out of place and awkward in both Black and White circles, thinking that I had to try and figure out how not to “act White” while at the same time maintaining my street cred and the cool factor that my Long Island accent earned me. Seriously! Code-switching is a reality that I only began to understand in adulthood. It was (and still is) a means of fitting in with the majority but over the last decade or so I’ve learned that I will always and forever be authentically and unapologetically me. A Black woman who follows after the heart of God. Professional. Intelligent. Quirky. Fun-loving. Me. I hope this book will show all students that it is okay to stay true to themselves too. That they can make and maintain friendships just by being who they are.I would recommend this book for intermediate elementary students (4th-5th grade), middle school and high school too. I honestly think it will have a wide range of interest much like books like Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Amulet, Sisters, and Drama that are read from elementary school straight through high school. Just go ahead and pre-order it. You’ll be glad you did!
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel will be a great addition to any middle school classroom! There are parts that are funny, some very relatable for middle schoolers and other parts that will allow themselves to know they’re not alone. Jordan is thrust into a private school by his parents and isn’t thrilled when he wants to go to art school instead. Jordan must deal with differences in race and economic backgrounds all while trying to navigate middle school. I appreciate that Craft did not “sugar coat” these iss This graphic novel will be a great addition to any middle school classroom! There are parts that are funny, some very relatable for middle schoolers and other parts that will allow themselves to know they’re not alone. Jordan is thrust into a private school by his parents and isn’t thrilled when he wants to go to art school instead. Jordan must deal with differences in race and economic backgrounds all while trying to navigate middle school. I appreciate that Craft did not “sugar coat” these issues and addresses them in numerous ways throughout the book. A needed read for any middle school classroom!
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  • Teresa Bateman
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this graphic novel, that was mostly in black and white though the final edition will be in color. Jordan loves to draw, but his parents are sending him to a private school, not the art school her desires. It's bad enough entering 7th grade at a new school, but it's even harder when most of the school is white, and you are black. The few other kids of color face similar problems fitting in--teachers who don't remember their names, kids who make assumptions, and some alienatio I received an ARC of this graphic novel, that was mostly in black and white though the final edition will be in color. Jordan loves to draw, but his parents are sending him to a private school, not the art school her desires. It's bad enough entering 7th grade at a new school, but it's even harder when most of the school is white, and you are black. The few other kids of color face similar problems fitting in--teachers who don't remember their names, kids who make assumptions, and some alienation from their peers in the neighborhood. It's a hard year adjusting, but Jordan and his friends learn some valuable lessons about standing up for themselves, not leaping to conclusions, and not making the same mistakes about others that are made about them. Graphic novels are all the rage, and this is sure to find a ready audience that might be interested in its perspective.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fantastic delve into middle grade. It's been a minute since I've read middle grade, but this was a welcome change. It also handles diversity and microaggressions really well; when people use a different name for a student because of their race (and saying they "look similar"), it's discussed why that is frustrating. It opened my eyes a lot about how much more difficult moving to a new school can be for a kid of color.
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  • Bonnie Grover
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to #BookPosse for the opportunity to read and review this graphic novel. New Kid will be a great addition to any upper elementary or middle school library. This book tackles a lot of social issues in a very conscientious way. Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade. Throughout the book Jordan struggles between two different worlds, not really fitting in to either one. This graphic novel will speak to any kid who has faced the challenges of middle school. I think stud Thank you to #BookPosse for the opportunity to read and review this graphic novel. New Kid will be a great addition to any upper elementary or middle school library. This book tackles a lot of social issues in a very conscientious way. Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade. Throughout the book Jordan struggles between two different worlds, not really fitting in to either one. This graphic novel will speak to any kid who has faced the challenges of middle school. I think students are going to enjoy the story as well as the artwork.
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  • Emma (Miss Print)
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't connect with the artwork here (I'm picky with comics) but this is such a fun, refreshing story. May you all be able to hear Jerry Craft talk about it himself because he's delightful. I think this is a great counterpoint to stories like Real Friends or Smile but from a perspective that we haven't really had a chance to see yet in comics for young readers.
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    A FANTASTIC middle grade graphic novel. A necessary addition for any school/classroom library. Approaches subtle & overt racism in an accessible & understandable way for the audience, while not holding back, through the lens of the new kid at school.
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  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    I don't care for the art style and the first 2-2 1/2 chapters were slow to get into. Bu after you get through the story, it's interesting and a good look at a kid who has to navigate a world that doesn't always recognise that it's prejudice against the kid. It also looks at the importance of standing up for yourself and for your friends. This was an ARC and the official book will be in colour. Maybe the art style won't seem so off in colour but it doesn't work well in black and white as its too I don't care for the art style and the first 2-2 1/2 chapters were slow to get into. Bu after you get through the story, it's interesting and a good look at a kid who has to navigate a world that doesn't always recognise that it's prejudice against the kid. It also looks at the importance of standing up for yourself and for your friends. This was an ARC and the official book will be in colour. Maybe the art style won't seem so off in colour but it doesn't work well in black and white as its too cartoony for grayscale.
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  • Shannon A
    January 1, 1970
    Read it, loved it. This graphic novel is an amazing, pitch-perfect book so important and well done it opens up the hard conversations we all need to have right now, and brings to light conversations never thought of. A friend's kid noticed the book was in my bag when I was visiting and after he finally got over his shyness to ask if he could read it "If I promise to give it back after?" I let him know that it was an early holiday gift, he hugged the book and the smile after he heard he could kee Read it, loved it. This graphic novel is an amazing, pitch-perfect book so important and well done it opens up the hard conversations we all need to have right now, and brings to light conversations never thought of. A friend's kid noticed the book was in my bag when I was visiting and after he finally got over his shyness to ask if he could read it "If I promise to give it back after?" I let him know that it was an early holiday gift, he hugged the book and the smile after he heard he could keep it? Priceless. My personal thank you to Jerry Craft, this book is amazing.
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  • Deni
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked the style of the book, and the story line is relatable to anyone that's ever been the new kid! I really liked this book, and my daughter does as well. Keep up the great work!
  • Joanna (BookandPages)
    January 1, 1970
    Super fun! Not something I'd read over and over but I liked it. I think kids are really going to like this one! It tackles so many important topics, with a great cast of dynamic characters!
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Really fun and thoughtful middle grade graphic novel that explores the experience of being the "new kid" in differences of class and race. What I love most are the humorous and touching parts with family and friends as well as the deft way that Craft showcases the different types of Black kids that can inhabit a space and how, to some, Black is all that's seen. This isn't preachy at all but really flows well and allows you to occupy Jordan's space and see his and others' humor. HIGHLY recommend Really fun and thoughtful middle grade graphic novel that explores the experience of being the "new kid" in differences of class and race. What I love most are the humorous and touching parts with family and friends as well as the deft way that Craft showcases the different types of Black kids that can inhabit a space and how, to some, Black is all that's seen. This isn't preachy at all but really flows well and allows you to occupy Jordan's space and see his and others' humor. HIGHLY recommend this for young and older readers!
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  • Jen McGraw
    January 1, 1970
    My students are going to love this! I laughed so much!
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Middle school students are going to love this one. Jordan Banks has artistic talents, but his mom signed him up for the fabulous (and not-so-diverse) private school instead. Jordan makes the best of things as the new kid, and tries to see the positive side of life. Due February 2019.
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  • Kath
    January 1, 1970
    This was awesome! Smart, funny, honest, refreshing - I'll totally be recommending it to all the graphic novel obsessed kids who need something with a bit more depth than the babysitter's club :)
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    A smart, funny, and fresh voice on the middle grade graphic novel scene.
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Just devoured this graphic novel. I had to wait for my son to read it, and it was 100% worth the wait. It’s honest, full of real moments, and an excellent commentary on you and you and you and me.Full review coming in January.
  • Meredith Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this. An excellent new addition to the middle grade graphic novel world. Can't wait to add this one to my library's collection!
  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    I am really excited to see a story that has characters dealing with the topic of racism is in a graphic novel format. Excited to see what conversations develop among young readers.
  • Mary Librarian
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent graphic novel that touches on being the new kid in a fancy new school where race and class play a role in the social structure. Love the playful chapter titles and artwork panels. From advance reader copy.
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