And Now We Have Everything
Operating Instructions for the Millennial set: a fiercely honest account of becoming a mother before feeling like a grown up.Meaghan O'Connell always felt totally alienated by the cutesy, sanctimonious, sentimental tone of most writing about motherhood. After getting accidentally pregnant in her twenties, she realized that the book she needed--a brutally honest, agenda-less take on the emotional and existential impact of motherhood--didn't exist. So she decided to write it herself.And Now We Have Everything is O'Connell's brave exploration of transitioning into motherhood as a fledgling young adult. With her dark humor and hair-trigger B.S. detector, O'Connell addresses the pervasive imposter syndrome that comes with unplanned pregnancy, the second adolescence of a changing postpartum body, the problem of sex post-baby, the weird push to make "mom friends," and the fascinating strangeness of stepping into a new, not-yet-comfortable identity. Most unforgettably, O'Connell brings us into the delivery room as no writer has before, rendering childbirth in all its feverish gore and glory, and shattering the fantasies of a "magical" or "natural" experience that warp our expectations and erode maternal self-esteem.Channeling fears and anxieties that are, shockingly, still taboo and often unspoken, And Now We Have Everything is an unflinchingly frank, funny, and intimate motherhood story for our times, about needing to have a baby in order to stop being one yourself.

And Now We Have Everything Details

TitleAnd Now We Have Everything
Author
ReleaseApr 10th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316393843
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Parenting, Feminism, Biography

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And Now We Have Everything Review

  • Adrienne
    January 1, 1970
    I related to this book very deeply, which is maybe odd, because I don't actually have children. But I'm trying to decide if I want to, and reading this memoir allowed me to feel like I was sitting inside a close friend's mind while she experienced everything for me. (Convenient! Except the body horror.)The writing is inviting, especially for a child of the internet like me: at turns bitingly sarcastic, deeply self-reflective, and breathtakingly vulnerable. This book is a must-read for anyone int I related to this book very deeply, which is maybe odd, because I don't actually have children. But I'm trying to decide if I want to, and reading this memoir allowed me to feel like I was sitting inside a close friend's mind while she experienced everything for me. (Convenient! Except the body horror.)The writing is inviting, especially for a child of the internet like me: at turns bitingly sarcastic, deeply self-reflective, and breathtakingly vulnerable. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in what it's like to suddenly create a whole person out of tiny cells...and really, it's a valuable primer on being a woman, generally. (I'm having my husband read it now, and we've had such illumination conversations as "Wait, what's an episiotomy?" and "But I thought PMS was just mood swings?") I loved it.
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  • Annie Hartnett
    January 1, 1970
    Compulsively readable, honest, & raw. Finished in one sitting and am glad to have read it.
  • Cynthia Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    I'm the kind of person who likes to prepare for the worst-case scenario. If I know what the worst possible outcome might be then I can mentally prepare myself for that and be positively surprised if it's not as bad as I thought it would be. This book does exactly that and it's finally a book that doesn't gloss over the awful parts of early motherhood and giving birth (I was holding my breath through the whole birthing chapter. Everything that can goes wrong goes wrong for her). This book is just I'm the kind of person who likes to prepare for the worst-case scenario. If I know what the worst possible outcome might be then I can mentally prepare myself for that and be positively surprised if it's not as bad as I thought it would be. This book does exactly that and it's finally a book that doesn't gloss over the awful parts of early motherhood and giving birth (I was holding my breath through the whole birthing chapter. Everything that can goes wrong goes wrong for her). This book is just one woman sharing her story and though it had its faults it's a refreshingly honest account of the challenges and conflicting emotions about motherhood (and everything the world make you feel guilty AF about). I do hope the author plans on writing an update to this story when her kid becomes a teenager...
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  • Sarah Krammen
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, that was everything. That was three years of my life wrapped up in 150 pages of words more beautiful and pointed and honest and vulnerable than I could find. I'm going to go wipe peanut butter off my son's face now, and focus on the joy.
  • Alaina
    January 1, 1970
    Holy crap, this is graphic. The details of the epidural were enough to make me woozy, so I skipped through the rest of the birth scene.
  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so wonderful. A clear-eyed and honest look at becoming a mother, beautifully written and a real pleasure to read.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    A few weeks after getting engaged to her partner, Meaghan finds herself unexpectedly pregnant. What follows is her no holds barred account of pregnancy and the eventual traumatic birth of her son. I liked this book because I feel like sometimes women make it sound like your babies will just stroll right out of you and it will be this majestic experience that you will treasure forever. Really - I once read about some birthing method that claims you will orgasm while giving birth (lol lol AWKWARD) A few weeks after getting engaged to her partner, Meaghan finds herself unexpectedly pregnant. What follows is her no holds barred account of pregnancy and the eventual traumatic birth of her son. I liked this book because I feel like sometimes women make it sound like your babies will just stroll right out of you and it will be this majestic experience that you will treasure forever. Really - I once read about some birthing method that claims you will orgasm while giving birth (lol lol AWKWARD). In reality, some times things don't go as planned as the birth is TERRIBLE. But luckily you end up with a cute baby in the end. I also liked her description of feeling trapped by the love of her son. I think a lot of women can relate to this. This book was so, so funny and it's one of the first things I've read that has made me feel like I can be a mom one day. If you read the book you'll know why this is ridiculous because she is very upfront about how hard it is. But it made me feel like okay here is a woman who kept it really real and she still survived and has a baby and is now having a second baby so she must not have regretted her decision. I'm sort of like - if she can do it, so can I! Now I made this about me. Just read the book it's very funny.
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  • Sara Leonard
    January 1, 1970
    When reading motherhood narratives, I feel I usually connect from afar - I enjoy the story without really feeling like I'm a part of it. And Now We Have Everything completely changed that. O'Connell's stories of anxiety, triumph, and terror, both set before and after her son's birth, are meant for mothers, partners, and women who still see the idea of motherhood as a possibility far down the road. These brutally honest essays should be required reading for anyone with a mother in their lives - w When reading motherhood narratives, I feel I usually connect from afar - I enjoy the story without really feeling like I'm a part of it. And Now We Have Everything completely changed that. O'Connell's stories of anxiety, triumph, and terror, both set before and after her son's birth, are meant for mothers, partners, and women who still see the idea of motherhood as a possibility far down the road. These brutally honest essays should be required reading for anyone with a mother in their lives - which basically means, I'm going to make everyone read it,
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    She documents getting pregnant unexpectedly and how her and her fiance choose to keep the baby. Not something I felt compelled to read entirely, but young moms or women wanting to have their first baby would enjoy this book.
  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book because I don't have kids, but I could easily see myself in Meaghan's writing as someone who wants things but is afraid I'm not allowed to want them. This book felt so true, so helplessly honest, introspective and open. Ah! I just really liked it.
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  • María Isabel
    January 1, 1970
    Insightful, unapologetic, but a bit whiny at times. I was most enthralled by the author's poignant descriptions of post-partum depression. This is a very vulnerable book, and reads much like an expose on all things pregnancy and birth, but at times I was left feeling hollow and unsympathetic because the narrator's voice read hollow and unsympathetic. I recommend this book to any woman wanting serious insight without the sugar-coating.
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  • Nona
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting memoir of author Meaghan O'Connell's arrival at pregnancy and motherhood. Very honest about her conflicting feelings as pretty much every new mother is! Really loved following her story, so much reminded me of early motherhood!
  • Lexie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC.Man, this book spoke to me. She spoke to a lot of the feelings I had as a new mother. I appreciated her brutal honesty and knowing that I wasn’t alone.
  • Rhonda Lomazow
    January 1, 1970
    Open honest raw real look at becoming a mother every mother will relate its funny scary your life completely taken over .
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