Pandora's Boy (Flavia Albia Mystery #6)
Flavia Albia is a private investigator, always drawn to an intriguing puzzle - even if it is put to her by her new husband's hostile ex-wife. On the Quirinal Hill, Clodia Volumnia, a very young girl with stars in her eyes, has died, amid suggestions that she was poisoned by a love-potion. It will have been supplied by a local witch, who goes by the name of Pandora, though Albia learns that Pandora carries on a trade in herbal beauty products while hiding much more dangerous connections. Pandora's beloved grandson, a trainee hack lawyer, is one of the dead girl's empty-headed friends; can this be relevant?As she homes in on the truth, Albia has to contend with the occult, organised crime, an unusual fertility symbol, and celebrity dining. She discovers the young girl was a handful; her father mediates in disputes, yet has divorced his grief-stricken wife and is now suing his own mother-in-law; Clodia's so-called friends were none too friendly. The supposedly sweet air of the Quirinal hides the smells of loose morality, casual betrayal and even gangland conflict. When a friend of her own is murdered, Albia determines to expose as much of this local sickness as she can - beginning with the truth about the death of little Clodia.'Davis's prose is a lively joy, and Flavia's Rome is sinister and gloriously real.' The Times on Sunday

Pandora's Boy (Flavia Albia Mystery #6) Details

TitlePandora's Boy (Flavia Albia Mystery #6)
Author
ReleaseApr 5th, 2018
PublisherHodder & Stoughton
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Historical Mystery, Fiction

Pandora's Boy (Flavia Albia Mystery #6) Review

  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I love the ancient Rome that Lindsey Davis evokes. This is one of my favourites of the series, not for the mystery at its heart, but for its portrait of life and society in Rome, especially for women and young people. The relationship between Flavia Albia and her husband is so wonderfully drawn here. Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for a review copy of Pandora's Boy, the sixth novel to feature Flavia Albia, the first century Roman informer.When Laia Gratiana, ex wife of Albia's husband Tiberius, comes to Albia with the offer of a new case she isn't interested until Tiberius goes missing and then she takes it on to stay busy. A 15 year old, Clodia, has been found dead in her bed. Her father accuses her mother and grandmother of giving her a love potion that kills he I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for a review copy of Pandora's Boy, the sixth novel to feature Flavia Albia, the first century Roman informer.When Laia Gratiana, ex wife of Albia's husband Tiberius, comes to Albia with the offer of a new case she isn't interested until Tiberius goes missing and then she takes it on to stay busy. A 15 year old, Clodia, has been found dead in her bed. Her father accuses her mother and grandmother of giving her a love potion that kills her, they deny all knowledge. The investigation leads Albia into murkier waters than she had anticipated.This is the first novel in this series that I have read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The plot is satisfactorily complicated and Albia's sarcastic take on events, just like her father's, makes for an amusing read. The novel is preceded by an intimidatingly long cast list but it is easy to slot all the characters in place and not get lost, always an issue in novels with unfamiliar names. Ms Davis does an excellent job of introducing her characters, situating them in the plot and making them memorable so that the reader knows exactly what's what. Albia's voice and general take on events makes it all possible.The plot, despite the setting, is suitably modern with gangsters, cons and dissolute youth. I liked seeing these perennial problems and how they're dealt with in another setting. It would seem that nothing much changes over the centuries. I followed Albia's investigation with interest as she interviewed and re-interviewed her suspects and witnesses, sorting the lies and wishful thinking from the truth. The heart of the plot, Clodia's death, is fairly simple but, then, it's not the main point of the novel which is these interviews, human frailty and nature, Roman life and a good dollop of humour. Plus ça change etc..Pandora's Boy is an entertaining read which I have no hesitation in recommending.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    Probably the best of the Flavia Albia mysteries so far.Lindsey has got into her stride and the characters are now as rounded and believable as the ones she created in the Falco series. Speaking of Falco, he makes a cameo appearance in this book.A girl is found dead in bed. Her father insists she has been poisoned with a love potion supplied by a witch named Pandora. Albia is engaged to find out exactly what happened. As with any Lindey Davis mystery, things are never simple, and the outcome is n Probably the best of the Flavia Albia mysteries so far.Lindsey has got into her stride and the characters are now as rounded and believable as the ones she created in the Falco series. Speaking of Falco, he makes a cameo appearance in this book.A girl is found dead in bed. Her father insists she has been poisoned with a love potion supplied by a witch named Pandora. Albia is engaged to find out exactly what happened. As with any Lindey Davis mystery, things are never simple, and the outcome is never going to be what you suspect.Brilliantly written and engaging.A rare 5 stars from me.
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  • Breakaway Reviewers
    January 1, 1970
    Flavia Albia is an ancient Roman version of Miss MarpleFlavia Alba was born in Britannia and adopted by Marcus Didius Falco (of Falco novel series) who became a famous private investigator during the reign of Emperor Vespasian. Flavia became the new sleuth during the reign of Emperor Domitian.Flavia Alba was hired by Dolumnius Firmus and Sentia Lucretia to investigate the death of their daughter, Clodia, when she heard the big fight between Clodia’s grandmothers in an atrium.The love potion from Flavia Albia is an ancient Roman version of Miss MarpleFlavia Alba was born in Britannia and adopted by Marcus Didius Falco (of Falco novel series) who became a famous private investigator during the reign of Emperor Vespasian. Flavia became the new sleuth during the reign of Emperor Domitian.Flavia Alba was hired by Dolumnius Firmus and Sentia Lucretia to investigate the death of their daughter, Clodia, when she heard the big fight between Clodia’s grandmothers in an atrium.The love potion from Pandora was thought to be the poison, but there was no poison, no off-colour and no vomit syndromes on Clodia’s corpse, according to the doctor’s autopsy report.Flavia Albia interviewed the suspects including Clodia’s lover, Vincentius Theo, and her brother, Volumunius Auctus, who arrived in Rome from the army in North Africa. Flavia got some clues and then assembled all the interviewed suspects including Clodia’s family, like Miss Marple, who had the final answer to the death of the victim.I still enjoy this ancient Roman historical detective novel series as I compare Falco and Flavia to Poirot and Miss Marple from Agatha Christie.Caesar 13Breakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review
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  • Breakaway Reviewers
    January 1, 1970
    Flavia Albia is an ancient Roman version of Miss MarpleFlavia Alba was born in Britannia and adopted by Marcus Didius Falco (of Falco novel series) who became a famous private investigator during the reign of Emperor Vespasian. Flavia became the new sleuth during the reign of Emperor Domitian.Flavia Alba was hired by Dolumnius Firmus and Sentia Lucretia to investigate the death of their daughter, Clodia, when she heard the big fight between Clodia’s grandmothers in an atrium.The love potion from Flavia Albia is an ancient Roman version of Miss MarpleFlavia Alba was born in Britannia and adopted by Marcus Didius Falco (of Falco novel series) who became a famous private investigator during the reign of Emperor Vespasian. Flavia became the new sleuth during the reign of Emperor Domitian.Flavia Alba was hired by Dolumnius Firmus and Sentia Lucretia to investigate the death of their daughter, Clodia, when she heard the big fight between Clodia’s grandmothers in an atrium.The love potion from Pandora was thought to be the poison, but there was no poison, no off-colour and no vomit syndromes on Clodia’s corpse, according to the doctor’s autopsy report.Flavia Albia interviewed the suspects including Clodia’s lover, Vincentius Theo, and her brother, Volumunius Auctus, who arrived in Rome from the army in North Africa. Flavia got some clues and then assembled all the interviewed suspects including Clodia’s family, like Miss Marple, who had the final answer to the death of the victim.I still enjoy this ancient Roman historical detective novel series as I compare Falco and Flavia to Poirot and Miss Marple from Agatha Christie.Caesar 13Breakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review
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  • margaret chalmers
    January 1, 1970
    Unrequited love/Requited excitement. Albia gets better and better. Just as her fondly missed daddy Falco was greatly helped by his wife, Helena , so too is Albia by her wonderful husband., Tiberius. Albia has a great adventure solving the sad death of a young girl whose friends would fit in with today's teenagers, no bother. Old enemies rear their ugly heads which hides well for future stories. At the end Albia manages to staff her new home and acquire a new four footed friend (whether she likes Unrequited love/Requited excitement. Albia gets better and better. Just as her fondly missed daddy Falco was greatly helped by his wife, Helena , so too is Albia by her wonderful husband., Tiberius. Albia has a great adventure solving the sad death of a young girl whose friends would fit in with today's teenagers, no bother. Old enemies rear their ugly heads which hides well for future stories. At the end Albia manages to staff her new home and acquire a new four footed friend (whether she likes it or no). The stories are a great read, both informative of an ancient time, witty, exciting, moving....and leaving you panting for more.
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  • James Miller
    January 1, 1970
    Davis always constructs a compelling vision of Rome and this book is no exception. The historical details of laws on witchcraft, topography etc. serve to give a sense of (fictional) truth to the events.The plot itself seems quite convincing with Davis', frequently gently comic, narration moving us through the streets of Rome.I have a hankering still for Falco, but Flavia certainly carries things off with aplomb.
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  • Sally Lake
    January 1, 1970
    Another excellent installment in the seriesThis book introduces us to the denizens of the Quirinal Hill, middle class, spoilt, rowdy youngsters and complicated families, some of whom are members of a certain set of mobsters that long-time readers of the Falco and Flavia Albia stories will know well. The ending also sets up a possible plot or background for the next book. Very enjoyable.
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  • Mark Iliff
    January 1, 1970
    Davis seems to have really hit her stride with the Albia series now, so much so that she can give Falco a couple of lines of direct speech. Beyond that, this is an excellent tale: vivid in its painting of Domitian’s Rome, clever in the plotting and deft in its telling. As with Falco & Helena before them, Flavia & Tiberius are emerging as a couple one would love to spend time with. A lovely job all round.Already impatient for the next instalment…
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  • Ann Morrill
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful story well toldThis is one of the best Flavia Alba stories so far. I really enjoyed the characters and the atmosphere of ancient Rome and the story was strong with an interesting sub plot.
  • Mrs Janet S Howard
    January 1, 1970
    Pandora s boyLindsey Davis is so dependable. Starting with Falco his family continues to serve and give value for all who employ them
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Another enjoyable case for Flavia Albia, this time looking into the death of a teenage girl. Lots of details about life in ancient Rome, and lots of teenagers, who will be teenagers whatever the era.
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