Rookie on Love
A single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Featuring exclusive, never-before-seen essays, poems, comics, and interviews from contributors like Jenny Zhang, Emma Straub, Hilton Als, Janet Mock, John Green, Rainbow Rowell, Gabourey Sidibe, Mitski, Alessia Cara, Etgar Keret, Margo Jefferson, Sarah Manguso, Durga Chew-Bose, and many more!

Rookie on Love Details

TitleRookie on Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 2nd, 2018
PublisherRazorbill
ISBN-139780448493992
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Anthologies, Poetry

Readers also enjoyed


Rookie on Love Review

  • Nat
    January 1, 1970
    “My memory of men is never lit up and illuminated like my memory of women.”― Marguerite DurasA single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Touching upon love in all its different variations, from “a devotional to dogs” (Durga Chew-Bose) to unrequited love to accepting your self-worth to experiencing intimate friendships with women.“Love is all around, but its holding place is not always another person. Sometimes you find the best companion in yourse “My memory of men is never lit up and illuminated like my memory of women.”― Marguerite DurasA single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Touching upon love in all its different variations, from “a devotional to dogs” (Durga Chew-Bose) to unrequited love to accepting your self-worth to experiencing intimate friendships with women.“Love is all around, but its holding place is not always another person. Sometimes you find the best companion in yourself, or the fun of worshipping a teen idol, or the challenge of trying to understand love in its various forms. ”Before starting, I casually browsed through the table of contents and saw a stellar piece titled “Do Sisters Actually Love Each Other?” by Jazmine Hughes, which I hurried on to read because it was something I really needed. And it was just as spectacular as the title conveys, featuring a group text between a bunch of sisters.“JAVONNE I came back to, like, eighty messages to read and I will not.Someone fill me in if you want an answer from me.”When I then saw that Tavi Gevinson had shared a live reading of this hilarious and touching piece, I was over-the-moon.All I need now is the return of the Rookie podcast, which I raved about back in April of 2017.Rookie on Love, however, didn't quite embody the expectations I had in mind before starting. More than once I experienced the feeling of really enjoying how a story builds up but then, almost without fail, it would veer off downhill, destroying what it had created in its small space, and end on a completely unsatisfying note. And because of the short length, there wasn't even a redeeming moment that could've saved the narrative.It also didn't help the collection of hitting a rough patch in the middle, where none of the essays held my attention and consequently failed to raise any emotion out of me (I mean, other than bitter rage at a certain line in Collier Meyerson's piece I landed upon while randomly flipping through the collection)... Thankfully though, when I finally reached Victoria Chiu's written piece, which came in to save the day, as she touches upon her choice to abstain from "(penetrative) sex." As well as other standout pieces in here that I'd like to feature, such as:• Fwd: Letter to Leyb by Tova Benjamin, talking about relationships in the digital age:“Sometimes I think, I will never forget that I felt this way. And then I do. It seems horribly scary to invest so much time and energy and emotion into something that will eventually wind down to the end of its life, be it 44 days or two years and nine months. And then what?”• The Most Exciting Moment of Alma’s Life by Etgar Keret. A quick story on life after experiencing your highest high.“Though for Alma, it’s not really just a question. Sometimes she actually dreams about what happened at the Biblical Zoo. She with her braids and the lion standing so close to her that she could feel his warm breath on her face. In some of the dreams, the lion rubs up against her in a friendly way, in others, he opens his mouth and roars, and then she usually wakes up terrified. So one can say that as long as she keeps dreaming, that moment hasn’t completely passed. But dreaming, with all due respect, is not exactly living.” • Beyond Self-Respect by Jenny Zhang. One of the most important pieces, talking about how love and respect need to go hand in hand, which I also heard a lecture on a few months back and it completely changed my viewpoint.“The way we talk about respect and teenage girls needs to change. I want girls to learn how to disrespect the men in their lives who cause them harm and violence, I want them to learn how to disrespect patriarchal values that bind and demean. Looking back on my past relationships, I can pinpoint the very moment when I lost respect for the person I was dating. Often, it happened early on—a casually offensive remark that betrayed deeper levels of racism, an unfunny joke that revealed how much he feared and hated women, or even just a delusional comment that showed zero self-awareness—but always, when I was younger, I would continue to date that person, doubling down on my commitment, all the while losing respect for him. That’s the most disturbing part, that I thought I could love someone I didn’t even respect.”• Super Into a Person’s Person-ness a conversation between Rainbow Rowell and John Green, “YA powerhouses on writing epic—yet real—teen love.” I can listen to Rainbow Rowell for eternity, as you can tell by my extensive review of my all-time favorite book of hers, Fangirl.“RAINBOW When I’m writing love stories (which I can’t help but do, it’s always a love story for me), I really don’t want to be writing a story that makes it worse for the people reading it. That perpetuates all the lies about love and attraction.JOHN Right.RAINBOW But also, if I’m writing about teenagers, I don’t want them to be somehow magically above this bullshit. They can’t be wizened 40-year-olds who know from experience that it’s garbage.JOHN Well, but also, I don’t think you ever get magically above this bullshit. We’re talking like this is all in our past, but of course inherited ideas about beauty and attractiveness affect adult life, too.RAINBOW Yes.JOHN Hopefully over time you develop an awareness that, e.g., your obsession with the perfect nose is completely ludicrous, but it’s not like it all goes away.RAINBOW You’re still a nose man?JOHN God, no. I am a PERSON MAN. I am super into a person’s person-ness.”• Before I Started Writing These Things Directly to You by Tavi Gevinson, on trying to capture the feelings as they occur.“I just don’t trust words a whole lot, and wonder if writing this, too, takes the air out of the whole thing, like in the Chekhov story “The Kiss,” where the sad loner shares the story of an improbable romantic encounter with his male colleagues and, upon hearing it out loud, experiences the whole thing as woefully insignificant.”I wholeheartedly enjoyed this piece by Tavi, wherein she managed to create a solid grip on her relationship with this goofy grinning guy in just one page. Overall, I'd say I came to appreciate most of all the pieces that exposed my innermost feelings so successfully that it made me reflect a lot. So even though the collection as a whole was mainly a hit or miss with its forty-something stories, I still came to cherish a handful of pieces. Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Rookie on Love, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! This review and more can be found on my blog.
    more
  • Pip
    January 1, 1970
    Really, really enjoyed this. As expected, I got a lot more out of some essays than others. But this is a perfect collection of stories and essays for teenagers and twenty-somethings. I'll be re-reading it again for sure! Some of the essays were incredibly beautifully written, inspiring, concise and made me reflect on THINGS, MANY THINGS.
    more
  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Rookie books and make a point of collecting every single one. Each Rookie Yearbook promised different stories, poems, and comics about various parts of growing up, and the formatting made for an aesthetically-pleasing read. Although I was somewhat excited to see that Rookie was continuing to branch off and make new books, the format of this new book, for me, was entirely different--and kind of paling in comparison to the Rookie Yearbook's glory.Instead of a wide, colorful book filled I love the Rookie books and make a point of collecting every single one. Each Rookie Yearbook promised different stories, poems, and comics about various parts of growing up, and the formatting made for an aesthetically-pleasing read. Although I was somewhat excited to see that Rookie was continuing to branch off and make new books, the format of this new book, for me, was entirely different--and kind of paling in comparison to the Rookie Yearbook's glory.Instead of a wide, colorful book filled with pictures and a lot of different diverse articles, we have a small, paperback-sized anthology all on the same subject-- this one being "Love". At first, I was excited. After all, it was another Rookie book! The format itself seemed interesting, but the issue with it was that with a format such as this one, you were putting a lot of pressure on the essays and poems themselves rather than just the surrounding aesthetics, unlike previous Rookie books, and this book appears to look like one you'd read cover-to-cover, unlike preview Rookie books which felt more like a magazine where you would read the articles that stood out to you and pick and choose. The problem with this is that the essays and stories had to be subpar in order to gain and keep a reader's attention--and for this book, 75% of them were not very interesting.Although I can usually connect with Rookie books, this one offered only a few works which actually resonated with me. The personal essays about the individual's struggles with love, etc., were ones that I especially could not bring myself to enjoy. The prose itself was beautiful but at times too poetical, taking away from the actual story the person was telling. At other times I felt like I was slogging through a swamp of foreign references and angsty analogies. I don't mean to sound rude, as I admire any writers and contributors who got their work published in here, but there was just a LOT of essays with this kind of flowery writing I couldn't connect to.The parts I did enjoy were the informative "advice"-type essays which were straightforward and thoughtful, e.g. "Under Pressure" by Victoria Chiu or "How to Confess Your Crush" by Krista Burton. A few of the poems were good as well--"Postcards from Apollo 6" by Lena Blackmon being my favourite. However, these were few and far between, and the personal essays took up a good three-fourths of the book.It wasn't my favourite read and I am missing the old Rookie Yearbooks already. Still, it is worth at least three stars for its creativity, uniqueness and the fact it's another Rookie book.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I had this book as a teenager! It’s perfect for when you’re feeling confused or overwhelmed about the meaning of platonic and romantic relationships. Through poems, illustrations, & heartfelt pieces by women of all ages “Rookie on Love” gives the reader courage & confidence to get them through the end of adolescence.
    more
  • Emma Banbury
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, probably.Rookie is known for being age appropriate without pulling its punches and this anthology doesn't fall short. It's wonderfully diverse in form and in contributors. I had a really mixed experience with it, loving some pieces and disliking others, enjoying some for how they would have helped me as a teen. I particularly hated the conversation between Rainbow Rowell and John Green, as it kind of felt like an attempt on his part to address criticisms of his older books, prove he h 3.5 stars, probably.Rookie is known for being age appropriate without pulling its punches and this anthology doesn't fall short. It's wonderfully diverse in form and in contributors. I had a really mixed experience with it, loving some pieces and disliking others, enjoying some for how they would have helped me as a teen. I particularly hated the conversation between Rainbow Rowell and John Green, as it kind of felt like an attempt on his part to address criticisms of his older books, prove he had good intentions that failed, and prove that he is in fact Like Totally Woke. However if you're fans of those authors you'll probably enjoy seeing their conversation.There were typos in my copy of the book which really irritated me because Tavi is supposed to be some kind of wunderkind editor or something. But it wasn't so bad as to stop me from reading.The contributors of this book occasionally missed the mark for me but overall I think at the very least young readers of this book will get some interesting works to look into from the various references to other authors, journalists, musicians, films/film makers, etc. I have seen criticism that says this anthology didn't align with what was expected based on previous Rookie publications, which I think was the point. There is some beautiful prose and poetry, and some more informal pieces, and some comics (which honestly were quite hard to read because of the small handwritten print) in here and I think just about everybody would be able to find one or two works to enjoy.
    more
  • Cassidy
    January 1, 1970
    wowza. i know rookie is marketed toward teenage girls, but many of the authors were my age (21) and older and there was definitely a ton of wisdom applicable to any age. it's been YEARS since i've absolutely devoured a 250+ book in a number of days and i'm so happy to have done that with this one. the essays are short, though sometimes i wish they were longer. some were cute and funny, while others hit home harder than i anticipated. either way, i took tons of advice from the pages and felt way wowza. i know rookie is marketed toward teenage girls, but many of the authors were my age (21) and older and there was definitely a ton of wisdom applicable to any age. it's been YEARS since i've absolutely devoured a 250+ book in a number of days and i'm so happy to have done that with this one. the essays are short, though sometimes i wish they were longer. some were cute and funny, while others hit home harder than i anticipated. either way, i took tons of advice from the pages and felt way less alone, because this book arrived at a time i felt pretty alienated if i'm being honest. and that's what i miss most about reading regularly: being able to get lost in the pages, to find myself in them sometimes, and to finish the book with my thoughts on certain situations/life reoriented. i will say that it was annoying most of the book revolved around heterosexual romance, but these entries were written with such charm that i can see why they were included. anyway, first entry for 2018! i can only hope i continue this enthusiasm for setting aside ~time to read~ that i did with this book. onward!
    more
  • Sonaksha
    January 1, 1970
    I'm guessing this is marketed towards younger women/girls, typically in their teens. But I definitely had to pick this one up because of some of the writers featured in it, and of course general Rookie love too. This is surely a lovely compilation of everything love. It features a heady mix of different kinds of love that we understand and don't as we grow, from crushes to first love to self love and sibling love. There were particular essays that I resonated with deeply and those essays I will I'm guessing this is marketed towards younger women/girls, typically in their teens. But I definitely had to pick this one up because of some of the writers featured in it, and of course general Rookie love too. This is surely a lovely compilation of everything love. It features a heady mix of different kinds of love that we understand and don't as we grow, from crushes to first love to self love and sibling love. There were particular essays that I resonated with deeply and those essays I will hold close to my heart and art for a long time. But, there were also a few pieces that left me feeling 'meh' or uninterested, but I guess that is bound to happen with a collection so vast like this. I particularly loved the illustrated stories/comics and wish there were more, perhaps, next time? There's definitely something giddying about reading about love.
    more
  • Maya Man
    January 1, 1970
    Knew I would love this because I love Rookie, but was even better than I expected! Each essay was super different and covered a wide range of topics related in some way to love, sometimes romantic, but often not as well. Dog eared some pieces that I really enjoyed and pulled some quotes that made me really think in the best way. So many dope people’s voices in this collection! This was also great to read in chunks because all of the pieces were pretty short so it was easy to just sit down and re Knew I would love this because I love Rookie, but was even better than I expected! Each essay was super different and covered a wide range of topics related in some way to love, sometimes romantic, but often not as well. Dog eared some pieces that I really enjoyed and pulled some quotes that made me really think in the best way. So many dope people’s voices in this collection! This was also great to read in chunks because all of the pieces were pretty short so it was easy to just sit down and read one if I didn’t have much time. Shoutout to LAUREN for gifting me this for xmas luv u.
    more
  • Amyleigh
    January 1, 1970
    RookieMag did it again with this lovely collection on love and all its unintelligible forms. The little doodles throughout gave the book a naive and tender feel yet the writings were sophisticated and tugged at the big questions about how to be in love with your self, an other, an idea, a world.
    more
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    A killer first book in what I hope will be a series?! Tavi?! I love the collection of voices featured in this book and the sweet but simple layout that makes it easy for readers to engage (the pink illustrations throughout are irresistible). I was hoping for more queer voices, but maybe next time!
    more
  • Tom
    January 1, 1970
    Goodreads giveaway winner...Thank you!
  • LouLou
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon!!
Write a review